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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 802 journals)
Psychologie & gezondheid     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Psychology & Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Psychology & Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology in Russia: State of the Art     Free   (Followers: 2)
Psychology in Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Psychology of Language and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychology of Well-Being : Theory, Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychology Research and Behavior Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology, Community & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology, Health & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
PsychologyOpen     Open Access  
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Psychopathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
PsychoPraktijk     Hybrid Journal  
psychopraxis. neuropraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychosomatic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Psychotherapy in Australia     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psyecology - Bilingual Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psyke & Logos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psykhe (Santiago)     Open Access  
Pszichológia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Quaderni di Gestalt     Full-text available via subscription  
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Recherches en psychanalyse     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Religion, Brain & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences     Open Access  
Research in Psychotherapy : Psychopathology, Process and Outcome     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research on Emotion in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Reverso     Open Access  
Review in Psychology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Review of Behavioral Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of General Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Review of Philosophy and Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Revista Argentina de Ciencias del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Revista Argentina de Clínica Psicológica     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Crescimento e Desenvolvimento Humano     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Psicodrama     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Terapia Comportamental e Cognitiva     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Terapias Cognitivas     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Neuropsicologia     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista da Abordagem Gestáltica     Open Access  
Revista da SBPH     Open Access  
Revista da SPAGESP     Open Access  
Revista de Etologia     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Psicologia da IMED     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Deporte     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Departamento de Psicologia. UFF     Open Access  
Revista do NUFEN     Open Access  
Revista Electrónica de Metodología Aplicada     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Psicología del Ejercicio y el Deporte     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Psicologia y Salud     Open Access  
Revista Intercontinental de Psicologia y Educacion     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, SOCIOTAM     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     [SJR: 0.892]   [H-I: 47]
   [10 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0735-7028 - ISSN (Online) 1939-1323
   Published by American Psychological Association (APA) Homepage  [68 journals]
  • Introduction to the special section: Research on psychological issues and
           interventions for military personnel, veterans, and their families.
    • Authors: Chan; Connie S.
      Abstract: Provides an introduction to this special issue which presents some of the most recent research addressing the unique psychological issues, challenges, and variety of interventions for assessment and treatment of military personnel, veterans, and their families and friends. The articles in this section are divided into four categories. The first section addresses the provision of care to military veterans and the challenges that communities and the criminal justice system face in providing that care. The second section explores the dynamics of working with gender-sensitive issues and sexual–gender minority veterans. The third section focuses on the effects of deployment and the challenges faced by children, mothers, and spouses during deployment and reintegration. The fourth section addresses the experiences and treatment needs of partners, children, and adolescents in military families. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0038496
       
  • Are communities ready' Assessing providers’ practices,
           attitudes, and knowledge about military personnel.
    • Authors: Miller; Katherine E.; Finn, Jacob A.; Newman, Elana
      Abstract: One potential barrier to helping returning military personnel and their families is a lack of community providers skilled to help these groups. Although capacity and competence have expanded within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), it is unknown if community agencies have the interest, capacity, and competence to help service members, veterans, and their families postdeployment. This study used an online survey to examine the knowledge, common practices, attitudes, and training needs of community mental health providers, in order to determine if needs are adequately addressed. Assessment and treatment practices with veterans and service members varied greatly in community practices. Additional training opportunities are needed, particularly for helping military personnel with traumatic brain injuries and providing evidence-based practice. Furthermore, clinicians in the community need to systematically assess new clients for military service. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0036774
       
  • Post-deployment difficulties and help seeking barriers among military
           veterans: Insights and intervention strategies.
    • Authors: Cornish; Marilyn A.; Thys, Amanda; Vogel, David L.; Wade, Nathaniel G.
      Abstract: Given the dramatic rates of mental health concerns among military veterans, more needs to be done to connect wounded warriors to the resources available to them. Through focus groups with veterans of the Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and/or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) conflicts (N = 30) we sought to understand the current post-deployment difficulties, barriers to seeking mental health care, and possible intervention methods for reducing those barriers. Post-deployment difficulties involved troubles relating to others, psychological difficulties, and behavioral or physical problems. Help-seeking barriers included stigma and concerns about the therapy process. Participants’ perspectives on ways to reduce those barriers to seeking help have implications for clinicians’ approach to therapy and outreach with veterans and can inform the development of larger-scale intervention efforts that could be tested through future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0037986
       
  • Providing coordinated care to veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan wars with
           complex psychological and social issues in a department of veterans
           affairs medical center: Formation of seamless transition committee.
    • Authors: Mallen; Michael J.; Schumacher, Marianne M.; Leskela, Jennie; Thuras, Paul; Frenzel, Mark
      Abstract: Veterans returning from combat and reintegrating to civilian life after one or more deployments are at risk for a multitude of physical and mental health problems. The current article reviews the relevant literature related to the most common struggles of veterans adjusting to their return home and the transition from military to civilian culture. The reintegration process can be a challenging time for the veterans and those professionals who are attempting to serve them. A template for how one Midwestern Veterans Affairs Medical Center provides coordinated care to high-risk veterans returning home is presented. The Seamless Transition Committee (STC) is composed of leaders in mental health and other disciplines to provide expert consultation and coordination of care for high-risk, postdeployment veterans. A case vignette is presented to illustrate common issues and challenges faced by postdeployment veterans and how the STC functions together to design and implement treatment recommendations. Data is presented on the composition of 149 veterans served through the committee during the first 3 years including changes in their utilization of services at the medical center. Finally, outcome data from staff members utilizing the committee indicate the STC enhanced care and saved time during treatment planning and implementation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0037755
       
  • Moving forward: A problem-solving training program to foster veteran
           resilience.
    • Authors: Tenhula; Wendy N.; Nezu, Arthur M.; Nezu, Christine Maguth; Stewart, Michael O.; Miller, Sarah A.; Steele, Jennifer; Karlin, Bradley E.
      Abstract: It is vital for mental health professionals serving veterans to be able to address the full range of needs presented by returning veterans, including those that affect a veterans’ daily life (e.g., relationships, employment, and community functioning) but may not rise to the level of requiring specialty mental health care. This article describes the development and evaluation of an innovative Veterans Affairs program, Moving Forward, which focuses on building resilience and reducing emotional distress. Moving Forward is based on the principles of problem-solving therapy that have been adapted for use in a four-session, classroom-based training program for veterans. The program evaluation results indicate that Moving Forward is feasible, well-received by veterans, and yields improvements in social problem solving, resilience, and overall distress levels. Although there is a strong evidence base for problem-solving therapy in a range of clinical settings and with a variety of patient populations (Nezu et al., 2013), this represents the first effort to apply these principles in a program focusing on the readjustment and resilience of our nation’s veterans. We include several recommendations for building on these results, including the use of Internet-based training, inclusion of family members in training, and recommendations for research in this important area. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0037150
       
  • Trauma among justice-involved veterans.
    • Authors: Hartwell; Stephanie W.; James, Amy; Chen, Jie; Pinals, Debra A.; Marin, Martha C.; Smelson, David
      Abstract: This report examines the challenges faced by justice-involved veterans and their experience of trauma. Using 153 consecutive admissions to veteran-specific jail diversion programs in 2 states (Connecticut and Massachusetts), we present demographic, military history, behavioral health, and criminal history data on veterans in relationship to self-reports of trauma. Our results reveal a sample of veterans with a history of contact with the criminal justice system that have high reported rates of trauma, in particular, before the age of 18. Understanding the complex trauma history of justice-involved veterans is essential for providing appropriate and holistic treatment and informed policy responses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0037725
       
  • Barriers to seeking mental health services among adolescents in military
           families.
    • Authors: Becker; Sara J.; Swenson, Rebecca R.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Cataldo, Andrea M.; Spirito, Anthony
      Abstract: Military families with adolescents experience high levels of stress associated with parental deployment, but many of these families do not seek or utilize mental health services. The current qualitative study was designed to better understand barriers to mental health treatment experienced by adolescents in military families. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with military adolescents (n = 13), military (nonenlisted) parents (n = 12), and mental health service providers who treat adolescents in military families (n = 20). Discussions primarily explored barriers to seeking treatment, with supplemental questions assessing the ideal elements of mental health services for this population. Seven barriers to engaging in mental health services were identified: 4 internal (confidentiality concerns, stigma, ethic of self-reliance, lack of perceived relevance) and 3 external (time and effort concerns, logistical concerns, financial concerns). Challenges engaging military adolescents in mental health services are discussed and several recommendations are offered for service providers attempting to work with this population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0036120
       
  • Parent–child attachment during the deployment cycle: Impact on
           reintegration parenting stress.
    • Authors: Louie; Ashley D.; Cromer, Lisa DeMarni
      Abstract: Military families with young children face unique psychological and relational challenges during reintegration because of attachment disruption. This can increase psychological stress for service members. We examined three phases of the deployment cycle: predeployment, deployment, and reintegration to reveal risk and resilience factors that may impede or promote attachment relationships. We also explored the impact of predeployment preparation and deployment communication on service members’ parenting stress at reintegration. We conducted (N = 30) semistructured interviews with fathers who were deployed within 2 years of the study, and whose youngest child was 6 years old or younger during the deployment. We found that military fathers whose families did not have preparation strategies for maintaining father–child relationship during the deployment experienced more parenting stress after the deployment than did fathers whose families did use preparation strategies. All participants reportedly communicated with their children during deployment, although number of communication methods did not predict later parenting stress. The most common reintegration experiences were described as an adjustment period, parental stress, and time off of work. Strategies for building attachment as a means of promoting resilience throughout the deployment cycle are identified and discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0036603
       
  • One day at a time: The experiences of partners of veterans with
           posttraumatic stress disorder.
    • Authors: Mansfield; Alyssa J.; Schaper, Kim M.; Yanagida, Alana M.; Rosen, Craig S.
      Abstract: The intimate partners of veterans living with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often have few opportunities to articulate in their own words how the disorder affects them and their families. Besides relationship challenges and stress associated with assuming a caregiver role, partners may endure their own psychological distress. These occurrences may be overlooked when treating PTSD, as the focus is usually on the veteran and from the veteran’s perspective. Engaging significant others and understanding their perspective is paramount to both the veteran’s recovery and the well-being of the couple. We mailed surveys to partners of veterans with PTSD as part of a larger study that assessed PTSD-related knowledge, beliefs, treatment involvement, and quality of life. At the end of the survey was an optional free-text section inviting partners to share any other information related to their circumstances. Of all survey respondents, over half (n = 252) provided comments. We used this opportunity to explore these partners’ experiences of living with a veteran diagnosed with PTSD. Using a thematic analysis framework, independent raters coded comments relating to relationships, partner/family reactions, protective factors, mental health services, reactions to study participation, and general remarks. Findings highlighted the myriad ways in which PTSD impacts both partners and families, strategies partners use to cope, and specific mental health services they believe would be most beneficial. Responses suggested a continued need to include partner perspectives in future work, and to provide mental health services targeted to partners of veterans with PTSD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0038422
       
  • With or without you: Preliminary evidence that attachment avoidance
           predicts nondeployed spouses’ reactions to relationship challenges
           during deployment.
    • Authors: Borelli; Jessica L.; Sbarra, David A.; Snavely, Jonathan E.; McMakin, Dana L.; Coffey, John K.; Ruiz, Sarah K.; Wang, Binghuang A.; Chung, Samuel Y.
      Abstract: Although much is written about the impact of deployment on nondeployed spouses (NDSs) and couple relationships, few empirical studies address this directly. Using attachment theory as a guiding framework, this study followed 32 NDSs across a military deployment. We examined the prospective association between NDSs’ attachment avoidance and their response to relational challenges (assessed using both correlational and experimental designs) during a deployment. Two weeks before deployment, NDSs provided self-reports of their attachment avoidance and relationship satisfaction. During the deployment, they provided stream-of-consciousness speech samples regarding (a) the deployment and (b) their anticipated reunion with their spouse: after each speech sample they reported on their subjective anxiety. Based on random assignment, NDSs then completed either an experimenter-led “personal” or “relational” memory savoring task, reporting on their emotional state before and after the task. Two weeks after the deployment, NDSs reported on their relationship satisfaction. Higher avoidance was associated with more frequent anxiety word use and higher self-reported anxiety when discussing the anticipated reunion. Avoidance moderated the association between savoring condition and postsavoring negative emotion, such that in the relational condition only, greater avoidance was related to more negative emotion. Postsavoring emotional state moderated the longitudinal association between predeployment attachment avoidance and postdeployment relationship satisfaction. Results are discussed in terms of their contribution to the literature on coping during attachment stressors as well as their implications for treatment with NDSs undergoing deployment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0037780
       
  • Correction to Creech, Hadley, and Borsari (2014).
    • Authors: No authorship indicated
      Abstract: Reports an error in "The impact of military deployment and reintegration on children and parenting: A systematic review" by Suzannah K. Creech, Wendy Hadley and Brian Borsari (Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, Advanced Online Publication, Apr 14, 2014, np). In Table 1, in the first column, under Substance Abuse, author listing 25 should read: Acion, Ramiriez, Jorge, Arndt (see also no. 13 above). No. 12 was referenced in error. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2014-12887-001.) Hundreds of thousands of children have had at least 1 parent deploy as part of military operations in Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom; OIF; Operation New Dawn; OND) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom; OEF). However, there is little knowledge of the impact of deployment on the relationship of parents and their children. This systematic review examines findings from 3 areas of relevant research: the impact of deployment separation on parenting, and children’s emotional, behavioral, and health outcomes; the impact of parental mental health symptoms during and after reintegration; and current treatment approaches in veteran and military families. Several trends emerged. First, across all age groups, deployment of a parent may be related to increased emotional and behavioral difficulties for children, including higher rates of health-care visits for psychological problems during deployment. Second, symptoms of PTSD and depression may be related to increased symptomatology in children and problems with parenting during and well after reintegration. Third, although several treatments have been developed to address the needs of military families, most are untested or in the early stages of implementation and evaluation. This body of research suggests several promising avenues for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0038142
       
  • Gender-sensitive therapy with male servicemen: An integration of recent
           research and theory.
    • Authors: Danforth; Lindsay; Wester, Stephen R.
      Abstract: It goes without saying that serving in the military is one of the most physically and psychologically stressing jobs that a man might choose. Servicemen work long hours, are often time required to use deadly force, and are constantly being put in life-threatening and high stress situations where they are required to operate at optimum performance. Given these rough working conditions, it is no wonder that they face a multitude of psychological issues. Consistent with men in the civilian population, male veterans tend to seek help less frequently than their female counterparts for the psychological problems that they are facing. With over 21 million veterans in the United States, and with many more expected to soon return, it is important that mental health professionals consider how to best work with this population. The purpose of the manuscript is to present gender-sensitive considerations to therapy when working with male members of the armed forces. By keeping masculinity in mind, mental health professionals may be able to get veterans to engage in treatment at higher rates, and might be able to prevent them from terminating prematurely. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-12-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0036759
       
  • Family adjustment of deployed and nondeployed mothers in families with a
           parent deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan.
    • Authors: Gewirtz; Abigail H.; McMorris, Barbara J.; Hanson, Sheila; Davis, Laurel
      Abstract: Almost nothing is known about the family and individual adjustment of military mothers who have deployed to the conflicts in Iraq or Afghanistan (Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn; OIF, OEF, OND), constituting a gap in psychologists’ knowledge about how best to help this population. We report baseline data on maternal, child, parenting, and couple adjustment for mothers in 181 families in which a parent deployed to OIF/OEF/OND. Among this sample, 34 mothers had deployed at least once, and 147 mothers had experienced the deployment of a male spouse/partner. Mothers completed self-report questionnaires assessing past-year adverse life events, war experiences (for deployed mothers only), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms, difficulties in emotion regulation, parenting, couple adjustment, and child functioning. Mothers who had deployed reported greater distress than nondeployed mothers (higher scores on measures of PTSD and depression symptoms), and slightly more past year adverse events. A moderate number of war experiences (combat and postbattle aftermath events) were reported, consistent with previous studies of women in current and prior conflicts. However, no differences were found between the two groups on measures of couple adjustment, parenting, or child functioning. Results are discussed in terms of the dearth of knowledge about deployed mothers, and implications for psychologists serving military families. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-09-22
      DOI: 10.1037/a0036235
       
  • An empirical investigation of challenges and recommendations for welcoming
           sexual and gender minority veterans into VA care.
    • Authors: Sherman; Michelle D.; Kauth, Michael R.; Ridener, Lauren; Shipherd, Jillian C.; Bratkovich, Kristi; Beaulieu, Gregory
      Abstract: Approximately 1 million gay and lesbian Americans are veterans. With the repeal of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is focusing on the unique needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans. As a result of research in the private sector documenting stigmatizing attitudes and discrimination toward LGBT individuals in health care settings, the Institute of Medicine and The Joint Commission published recommendations for responding to the needs of LGBT individuals. However, minimal research has examined the unique needs of LGBT veterans and their experiences in VA. This 2-site (Oklahoma City, OK; Houston, TX), mixed-methods study included 202 VA providers and 58 LGBT veterans. Experiences at VA, comfort in providing/receiving care, barriers LGBT veterans face in coming to VA, and recommendations for making VA more welcoming were assessed. Six focus groups and 6 individual interviews were conducted with veterans, and providers completed anonymous surveys. Less than one third of LGBT veterans and providers viewed VA as welcoming to LGBT veterans. Half of providers indicated they do not assess sexual orientation with any of their patients. Furthermore, half of providers reported that they do not alter their treatment plans even if they know the veteran is lesbian, gay, or bisexual. Many constructive suggestions regarding how VA can be more welcoming arose in the veteran inquiry and the provider survey. Based on our findings and the broader literature, recommendations for providers and administrators are described. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-08-25
      DOI: 10.1037/a0034826
       
  • The impact of military deployment and reintegration on children and
           parenting: A systematic review.
    • Authors: Creech; Suzannah K.; Hadley, Wendy; Borsari, Brian
      Abstract: [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 45(6) of Professional Psychology: Research and Practice (see record 2014-55559-008). In Table 1, in the first column, under Substance Abuse, author listing 25 should read: Acion, Ramiriez, Jorge, Arndt (see also no. 13 above). No. 12 was referenced in error.] Hundreds of thousands of children have had at least 1 parent deploy as part of military operations in Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom; OIF; Operation New Dawn; OND) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom; OEF). However, there is little knowledge of the impact of deployment on the relationship of parents and their children. This systematic review examines findings from 3 areas of relevant research: the impact of deployment separation on parenting, and children’s emotional, behavioral, and health outcomes; the impact of parental mental health symptoms during and after reintegration; and current treatment approaches in veteran and military families. Several trends emerged. First, across all age groups, deployment of a parent may be related to increased emotional and behavioral difficulties for children, including higher rates of health-care visits for psychological problems during deployment. Second, symptoms of PTSD and depression may be related to increased symptomatology in children and problems with parenting during and well after reintegration. Third, although several treatments have been developed to address the needs of military families, most are untested or in the early stages of implementation and evaluation. This body of research suggests several promising avenues for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-04-14
      DOI: 10.1037/a0035055
       
 
 
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