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Journal Cover International Journal of Stress Management
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     ISSN (Print) 1072-5245
     Published by American Psychological Association (APA) Homepage  [68 journals]   [SJR: 0.554]   [H-I: 28]
  • Exposure to extraorganizational stressors: Impact on mental health and
           organizational perceptions for police officers.
    • Authors: Biggs; Amanda; Brough, Paula; Barbour, Jennifer P.
      Abstract: Disasters, whether natural or human-initiated, occur beyond organizational boundaries and affect organizational functioning. This research investigated the impact of a natural disaster on the health and work attitudes of police officers. Structural equation modeling was employed to test whether exposure to a natural disaster intensified job demands and diminished job resources, which, in turn, negatively influenced work outcomes. The research sample consisted of 1,623 police officers who completed electronic surveys collected approximately 10 months prior to, and 1 month after, a natural disaster. Exposure to certain aspects of a natural disaster was significantly associated with work culture support, which, in turn, was associated with job satisfaction, work engagement, psychological strain, and turnover intentions (χ²[1094] = 2484.03; p < .001; standardized root mean square residual = .04; Tucker-Lewis index = .97; comparative fit index = .98; parsimony-adjusted comparative fit index = .87; root mean square error of approximation = .03). Job resources in particular had a significant impact upon the outcome variables, supporting theoretical models that emphasize their critical role in the stressor–strain process (e.g., Hobfoll, 1989). This research suggests that positive work-related outcomes for organizations directly involved with major disasters may be attained through (a) the provision of a supportive work culture, (b) targeted supportive organizational responses to employees personally affected by disasters, and (c) adequate recognition for the work performed by employees involved in disaster relief efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-06-30
      DOI: 10.1037/a0037297
       
  • The Concise Physical Activity Questionnaire (CPAQ): Its development,
           validation, and application to firefighter occupational health.
    • Authors: Sliter; Katherine A.; Sliter, Michael T.
      Abstract: Physical activity is related to many important benefits in occupational health, but existing measures tend to be too long and involved for organizational application. The aim of this research was to create and construct validate the Concise Physical Activity Questionnaire (CPAQ), a very brief measure of physical activity for use in cross-sectional research. Four items were generated based on past research, Center for Disease Control guidelines, and input from health professionals. Across 2 studies, this scale was examined in both a laboratory and applied setting. In Study 1, 238 students completed the CPAQ, plus physiological and self-report measures relating to health. Results supported construct validity: the CPAQ related negatively to resting heart rate, health problems, BMI, and stress, and positively to gym attendance. In Study 2, 305 firefighters completed survey questionnaires. CPAQ scores related negatively to self-report burnout, and health problems and objective absenteeism measures, providing initial evidence of the CPAQ’s usefulness in occupational health research. Suggestions for future research to apply and understand the CPAQ in the workplace are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-02-03
      DOI: 10.1037/a0035638
       
  • Are workaholics born or made' Relations of workaholism with person
           characteristics and overwork climate.
    • Authors: Mazzetti; Greta; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Guglielmi, Dina
      Abstract: While the academic literature acknowledges that workaholism may result from individual characteristics as well as from environmental factors, little is known about the joint impact of these two kinds of antecedents. The present study explores whether the interaction between the perception of an overwork climate in the workplace and person characteristics (i.e., achievement motivation, perfectionism, conscientiousness, self-efficacy) may foster workaholism. Data were collected on a sample of 333 Dutch employees. The results of moderated regression analyses fully supported our hypotheses and showed that the interaction between an overwork climate and person characteristics is related to workaholism. More specifically, our results revealed a significant increase in workaholism when employees both possessed person characteristics that predispose them toward workaholism and perceived an overwork climate in their workplaces. In addition, conscientiousness and self-efficacy were related to workaholism, but only in interaction with the presence of an overwork climate. These results contribute to the ongoing conceptualization of workaholism by demonstrating empirically that a work environment characterized by an overwork climate may foster workaholism, especially for those high in achievement motivation, perfectionism, conscientiousness, and self-efficacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-02-03
      DOI: 10.1037/a0035700
       
 
 
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