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International Journal of Stress Management    [10 followers]  Follow    
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1072-5245
     Published by American Psychological Association (APA) Homepage  [54 journals]   [SJR: 0.554]   [H-I: 28]
  • Evaluation of a participatory risk management work stress intervention.
    • Authors: Dollard; Maureen F.; Gordon, Jacqueline A.
      Abstract: This study evaluated the effects of a participatory risk management intervention in an Australian public sector organization. In this quasi-experimental cohort study, intervention workgroups attended capacity-building workshops and developed and implemented action plans to reduce work and organizational stress risk factors (e.g., job design, performance management, work quality, and organizational change) and stress outcomes (e.g., work stress, morale, and sickness absence duration). There were 5 intervention and 17 control workgroups. An existing organizational development survey of work conditions and well-being was administered as a risk assessment and evaluation tool. Data were collected before the intervention (Time 1 [T1], Intervention n = 94, Control n = 511) and 12 months after (Time 2 [T2], Intervention, n = 123, Control n = 556). Multivariate analysis of variance showed a Group (Intervention vs. Control) × Time (T1 vs. T2) interaction effect with significant improvements for job design, training and development, and morale; and marginal effects for quality and positive performance management. Positive organizational change was not significant. Organizational sickness absence duration decreased, which is consistent with an intervention effect. Results were quite robust against competing explanations (i.e., changing cohorts), although regression to the mean could explain improvements in morale. Top management commitment and support, worker participation, and action plan implementation appeared important for positive change. We discuss the challenges associated with organizational stress interventions that for sustainability reasons try to capitalize on organizational processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-02-17
      DOI: 10.1037/a0035795
       
  • Theory and methods to prevent and manage occupational stress: Innovations
           from around the globe.
    • Authors: Brough; Paula; Dollard, Maureen F.; Tuckey, Michelle R.
      Abstract: This special issue of the International Journal of Stress Management responds to recent discussions concerning the limited quantity of published scholarly research on occupational stress-management interventions (SMI). First, we showcase research discussing recent innovations in stress management and how best to provide evidence that these innovations are actually having an impact. Second, we highlight the “global” quality of occupational stress-management research by encouraging submissions from both developed and developing countries. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-02-17
      DOI: 10.1037/a0035903
       
  • Correction to Biggs, Brough, and Barbour (2013).
    • Authors: No authorship indicated
      Abstract: Reports an error in "Enhancing Work-Related Attitudes and Work Engagement: A Quasi-Experimental Study of the Impact of an Organizational Intervention" by Amanda Biggs, Paula Brough and Jennifer P. Barbour (International Journal of Stress Management, Advanced Online Publication, Nov 4, 2013, np). In the article, the following Editor’s note was missing: Sheena Johnson served as the action editor for this article. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2013-38204-001.) Drawing on the job demands-resources model, this research presents a quasi-experimental evaluation of an organizational intervention aiming to enhance upstream organizational resources via a leadership-development program. Repeated-measures data for perceptions of work-related characteristics, attitudes, and outcomes were collected four months before (Time 1/baseline) and seven months after (Time 2) the leadership-development intervention. Results indicated a positive effect of the leadership-development intervention on perceptions of work characteristics and well-being for the immediate subordinates of the leadership-development intervention participants, compared with a control group. Analysis of mediated effects indicated that the leadership-development intervention had a positive effect on subordinates’ perceptions of work-culture support and strategic alignment, which in turn had a positive effect on their job satisfaction and work engagement. This research successfully demonstrated that organizational interventions aiming to enhance upstream organizational resources (via leadership development) can effectively improve the psychosocial working environment for employees. Furthermore, this research addressed commonly cited limitations of intervention research, including the dearth of organizational-level interventions, lack of research focusing on positive outcomes, and failure to address mediating effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2014-02-17
      DOI: 10.1037/a0035865
       
  • Tackling psychosocial risks and work-related stress in developing
           countries: The need for a multilevel intervention framework.
    • Authors: Kortum; Evelyn; Leka, Stavroula
      Abstract: This exploratory study aimed to provide a framework for raising awareness and tackling emerging psychosocial risks in developing countries. We considered regulation, working conditions, hazardous sectors, health impact, vulnerable workers, and multilevel interventions while recognizing existing challenges and barriers. We used a triangulated methodological approach where each stage provided the basis for the development of the next. Semi-structured expert interviews informed the development of a two-round Delphi survey to build consensus, followed by a series of focus groups to explore findings in-depth. A total of 121 experts participated across all research stages. This article concentrates on the last stage of the research, the focus groups, while making reference to the findings of the first two research stages. Results for developing countries indicate that occupational health and safety priorities have changed during the last decade and point to the need for a comprehensive framework for action, for monitoring psychosocial risks and addressing work-related stress, violence, harassment, and unhealthy behaviors. Attention to socioeconomic conditions and processes of globalization, and an extended research and action paradigm, different from that applied in industrialized countries, are required. There is lack of research, infrastructure, information, and motivation by policymakers to act and a pressing need for capacity building, stakeholder mobilization, and international exchange and collaboration. Developing countries are not spared from the health, economic, and societal impact of psychosocial risks and work-related stress and this article outlines a framework for concerted action at different levels. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2013-12-09
      DOI: 10.1037/a0035033
       
  • Enhancing work-related attitudes and work engagement: A quasi-experimental
           study of the impact of an organizational intervention.
    • Authors: Biggs; Amanda; Brough, Paula; Barbour, Jennifer P.
      Abstract: [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 21(1) of International Journal of Stress Management (see record 2014-05163-003). In the article, the following Editor’s note was missing: Sheena Johnson served as the action editor for this article.] Drawing on the job demands-resources model, this research presents a quasi-experimental evaluation of an organizational intervention aiming to enhance upstream organizational resources via a leadership-development program. Repeated-measures data for perceptions of work-related characteristics, attitudes, and outcomes were collected four months before (Time 1/baseline) and seven months after (Time 2) the leadership-development intervention. Results indicated a positive effect of the leadership-development intervention on perceptions of work characteristics and well-being for the immediate subordinates of the leadership-development intervention participants, compared with a control group. Analysis of mediated effects indicated that the leadership-development intervention had a positive effect on subordinates’ perceptions of work-culture support and strategic alignment, which in turn had a positive effect on their job satisfaction and work engagement. This research successfully demonstrated that organizational interventions aiming to enhance upstream organizational resources (via leadership development) can effectively improve the psychosocial working environment for employees. Furthermore, this research addressed commonly cited limitations of intervention research, including the dearth of organizational-level interventions, lack of research focusing on positive outcomes, and failure to address mediating effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2013-11-04
      DOI: 10.1037/a0034508
       
  • Process evaluation for organizational stress and well-being interventions:
           Implications for theory, method, and practice.
    • Authors: Biron; Caroline; Karanika-Murray, Maria
      Abstract: Although the body of evidence showing the effects of psychosocial risks on employees’ health and well-being is substantial, effective and sustainable stress prevention remains a thorny and complex issue. Most studies have focused on evaluating the effects of organizational interventions and the results are mixed. Researchers find the evaluation of such actions methodologically challenging, whereas practitioners often find the development and implementation of such actions a complicated matter. One of the reasons for this mixed impact is the lack of attention to contextual and process issues, namely how, when, and why interventions have their effects on outcomes such as mental health, well-being, and organizational performance. This article aims to help researchers and practitioners to improve the development, implementation, and evaluation of organizational initiatives designed to reduce exposure to stress, and to promote well-being and healthy organizations. The authors review recent developments in the literature on process evaluation and propose examples of broader theoretical frameworks that could be used to improve this area. They articulate the essential elements for developing and bridging gaps between theory, methods, and practice. Throughout, the authors provide recommendations for the content, process, and reporting of research on intervention process evaluation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2013-08-12
      DOI: 10.1037/a0033227
       
  • Advancing occupational stress and health research and interventions using
           latent difference score modeling.
    • Authors: Eschleman; Kevin J.; LaHuis, David
      Abstract: Occupational stress theories are rooted in the dynamic nature of the stress process, but few researchers examine intraindividual changes in the stress and well-being process. Analyses of intraindividual change over time enable researchers to evaluate theoretical propositions and build models that may be misspecified by cross-sectional data. We introduce a longitudinal data analysis method that can be used to advance stress theories and more accurately evaluate current organizational interventions. Specifically, latent difference score (LDS; J. J. McArdle, 2001, A latent difference score approach to longitudinal dynamic structural analysis. In R. Cudek, S. DuToit, & D. Sörbom, Eds., Structural equation modeling: Present and future, pp. 342–380, Lincolnwood, IL: Scientific Software International) modeling has recently emerged as a versatile tool for investigating intraindividual change in measured variables in clinical and developmental research (C. D. Kouros & E. M. Cummings, 2010, Longitudinal associations between husbands’ and wives’ depressive symptoms, Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 72, pp. 135–147; I. Schindler, U. M. Staudinger, & J. R. Nesselroade, 2006, Development and structural dynamics of personal life investment in old age, Psychology and Aging, Vol. 21, pp. 737–753). Organizational or occupational health researchers, however, have yet to take advantage of the LDS approach. We discuss potential implications for the LDS approach in evaluating organizational interventions and stress theories and provide a didactic illustration of LDS modeling using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2013-07-01
      DOI: 10.1037/a0033099
       
  • Intervention studies on enhancing work well-being, reducing burnout, and
           improving recovery experiences among Hong Kong health care workers and
           teachers.
    • Authors: Siu; Oi Ling; Cooper, Cary L.; Phillips, David R.
      Abstract: This article reports two secondary intervention studies on stress management in Hong Kong adopting a positive psychology approach. The first intervention study was conducted among health care workers to reduce burnout and enhance work well-being (job satisfaction, physical/psychological symptoms) and positive emotions. A one-group pretest-posttest design was adopted. One thousand thirty-four health care employees were recruited from hospitals to participate in a 2-day training course held in 17 separate classes. The results obtained from paired t tests consistently demonstrated an improvement in work-related well-being and a reduction in burnout after the training. To investigate whether the improvements were specifically caused by the intervention, the second intervention study adopted a quasi-experimental method with a control group, also using a pretest-posttest design, and with an additional aim of improving the recovery experiences. Fifty teachers were recruited for the experimental group, and 48 for the control group. The results show that teachers in the experimental group scored significantly higher in recovery experiences (particularly mastery) compared to those in the control group. Implications of the findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: 2013-07-01
      DOI: 10.1037/a0033291
       
 
 
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