for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
  Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 2714 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (67 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (231 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1068 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (22 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (1 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (120 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS AND THEORIES, ECONOMIC HISTORY (115 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (10 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (90 journals)
    - INSURANCE (29 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (113 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ASSISTANCE (60 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (15 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (30 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (14 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (470 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (60 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (25 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (141 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (32 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (1 journals)

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1068 journals)            First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last

Journal of Economic Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Economic Policy Reform     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Economic Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Economic Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Economic Surveys     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Economics & Management Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Economics and Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Economics and Political Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Education and Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Education for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Electronic Commerce in Organizations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Empirical Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Engineering and Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Engineering Entrepreneurship, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Enterprising Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation     Open Access  
Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Environment & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Environmental Planning and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Ergonomics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of European Integration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Evolutionary Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Family and Economic Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Financial Econometrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Financial Intermediation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Financial Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Financial Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Financial Services Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gambling Business and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Global Business Administration     Open Access  
Journal of Global Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Hazardous Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Housing Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hydrodynamics, Ser. B     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Indian Business Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Industrial Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Institutional Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Intellectual Capital     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Intergenerational Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Academic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of International Business Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of International Business Studies     Partially Free   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International Education in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Internet Commerce     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa     Open Access  
Journal of Law and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Legal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Manufacturing Processes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Mathematical Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Media Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Medical Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Monetary Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Money Laundering Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Money, Credit and Banking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of MultiDisciplinary Evaluation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Multinational Financial Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Organizational Behavior Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Organizational Computing and Electronic Commerce     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Payments Strategy & Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Peasant Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Pension Economics and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Policy Modeling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Population Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Post Keynesian Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Poverty     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Productivity Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Property Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy     Open Access  
Journal of Regulatory Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Retailing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Revenue and Pricing Management     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Risk and Uncertainty     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Securities Compliance     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Securities Operations & Custody     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Social and Economic Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Social Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of South Asian Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Systems and Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

  First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last

Journal Cover   CESifo Economic Studies
  [SJR: 0.414]   [H-I: 12]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1610-241X - ISSN (Online) 1612-7501
   Published by Oxford University Press (OUP) Homepage  [315 journals]
  • Introduction to the Special Issue 'The Determinants of Gender Gaps'
    • Authors: Casarico, A; Profeta, P.
      Pages: 1 - 6
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:54-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu036
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Can Risk-taking Preferences be Modified? Some Experimental Evidence
    • Authors: Booth, A. L; Nolen, P.
      Pages: 7 - 32
      Abstract: We summarize our two sets of controlled experiments designed to see whether single-sex classes within co-educational environments modify students' risk-taking attitudes. In Booth and Nolen (2012b), subjects are in school years 10 and 11, while in Booth et al. (2014), they are first-year university students randomly assigned to single-sex and co-educational classes. Both studies show that while on average females are significantly less likely than men to make risky choices, on exposure to single-sex environments they behave the same as the males. Thus, part of the observed gender difference in behaviour under uncertainty found in previous studies might reflect social learning rather than inherent gender traits. (JEL codes: C9, C91, C92, J16, D01, D80, J16, J24)
      Keywords: C91 - Laboratory, Individual Behavior, C92 - Laboratory, Group Behavior, J16 - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination, D01 - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles, D80 - General, J24 - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:54-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu018
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • The Role of Women in Society: from Preindustrial to Modern Times
    • Authors: Giuliano; P.
      Pages: 33 - 52
      Abstract: The participation of women in agriculture and the role of women in society in the preindustrial period were remarkably different across ethnicities and strongly related to the type of agricultural technology adopted historically. The sexual division of labor was broadly associated to two technological regimes: shifting cultivation, where the majority of agricultural work was done by women, and plough cultivation, a system mostly dominated by men. In this article, we review the literature on the persistent effect of the impact of historical plough use on female labor force participation and fertility today. We also provide additional evidence showing that differences regarding the role of women across the two agricultural regimes were more general and persisted over time in other societal aspects, including the form of marital arrangements, the presence of polygamy and the freedom of movement enjoyed by women. (JEL codes: D03, J16, N30)
      Keywords: D03 - Behavioral Economics; Underlying Principles, J16 - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination, N30 - General, International, or Comparative
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:54-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu019
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Gender of Siblings and Choice of College Major
    • Authors: Anelli, M; Peri, G.
      Pages: 53 - 71
      Abstract: In this study, we analyze whether the gender of a student’s siblings affects the choice of college major. A family with same-gender siblings may encourage academic choices that are less gender stereotyped. We use a unique dataset covering 30,000 Italian students who graduated from high school between 1985 and 2005 that allows us to identify siblings. We follow their academic careers from high school to college graduation. We find that mixed-gender siblings tend to choose college majors following a stronger gender-stereotypical specialization: males have higher probability of choosing ‘male dominated’ majors such as Engineering and Economics. Same-gender siblings, on the other hand, have higher probability of making non-gender-stereotypical choices. This college major choice is not driven by the choice of high school academic curriculum, which appears to be mainly function of geographical proximity to schools. (JEL codes: I21, J12, J16, Z18).
      Keywords: I21 - Analysis of Education, J12 - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure; Domestic Abuse, J16 - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination, Z18 - Public Policy
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:54-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu028
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • The Sources of the Gender Gap in Economics Enrolment
    • Authors: Tonin, M; Wahba, J.
      Pages: 72 - 94
      Abstract: In many countries there is a considerable gender gap in enrolment for a bachelor’s degree in Economics, arguably an important stepping stone towards positions of influence in policymaking and occupations paying relatively high wages. We investigate the sources of this gap by looking in detail at the university admission process in the UK. We use a 50% random sample of administrative data covering all university applications in 2008 and find no evidence of universities discriminating against female applicants. What we find is that girls are less likely to apply for a bachelor’s degree in Economics to start with, even if once they apply their likelihood of enrolling is the same as for boys. Girls are less likely to study Maths in high school and this may deter them from applying to study Economics at the university level. However, even among those who have studied Maths, females are less likely to apply than males, suggesting that differences in the choice of A level subjects cannot explain the whole gap. (JEL codes: I21, I23, I28, J24.)
      Keywords: I21 - Analysis of Education, I23 - Higher Education Research Institutions, I28 - Government Policy, J24 - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:54-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu033
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Fighting Lone Mothers' Poverty Through In-Work Benefits: Methodological
           Issues and Policy Suggestions
    • Authors: Pronzato; C. D.
      Pages: 95 - 122
      Abstract: Lone mothers are overrepresented among the poor in many European countries, with detrimental consequences for them and their children. Even in Norway, which is known for its successful economic and welfare development, lone mothers were at least three times more likely to be poor than married mothers. To redress this issue, the Norwegian government instituted a welfare reform in 1998, increasing lone-parent benefit levels and introducing working requirements. Using a quasi-experimental model, Mogstad and Pronzato (2008) found that the reform had a positive effect on lone mothers’ labor supply and slightly reduced poverty. Yet given the extent of public resources invested, was this the most that policy makers could expect in terms of reducing poverty? To answer this question, I estimate a discrete choice model of work and welfare participation decisions, and use the behavioral estimates to derive the policy parameters that would have minimized poverty among lone mothers. To produce more robust results, a prerequisite for developing policy recommendations, the discrete choice model is validated by comparing its predictions with the estimated effects of the reform obtained from a quasi-experiment (Mogstad and Pronzato 2008). (JEL codes: I38, J22, C25)
      Keywords: I38 - Government Policy; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs, J22 - Time Allocation and Labor Supply, C25 - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:54-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu021
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Working Women and Fertility: the Role of Grandmothers' Labor Force
           Participation
    • Authors: Aparicio-Fenoll, A; Vidal-Fernandez, M.
      Pages: 123 - 147
      Abstract: Grandmothers’ availability for childcare has been shown to increase the labor force participation (LFP) and fertility of daughters. However, grandmothers’ childcare availability depends highly on their LFP. When grandmothers work, intergenerational income transfers to their daughters may increase at the expense of time transfers (through childcare). Using a Two-stage Two-steps Least Squares estimation, we exploit changes in legal retirement ages in Italy to explore the relationship between mothers’ LFP and daughters’ LFP and fertility choices. We show that even though grandmothers who participate in the labor force provide less childcare, their daughters are more likely to have children and less likely to participate in the labor force. This can be explained by the increase in family income as a result of mothers’ LFP offsetting the influence of the reduction in childcare. (JEL codes: J41, J24, M51, C41, C33, C35, J6, L1).
      Keywords: J41 - Labor Contracts, J24 - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity, M51 - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions, C41 - Duration Analysis, C33 - Models with Panel Data, C35 - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:54-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu030
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Affirmative Action and the Power of the Elderly
    • Authors: Baltrunaite, A; Casarico, A, Profeta, P.
      Pages: 148 - 164
      Abstract: There is evidence that age matters in politics. In this article we study whether implementation of affirmative action policies on gender can generate additional effects on an alternative dimension of representation, namely, the age of politicians. We consider an Italian law which introduced gender quotas in candidate lists for local elections in 1993, and was abolished in 1995. As not all municipalities went through elections during this period, we can identify two groups of municipalities and use a difference in differences estimation to analyze the effect of gender quotas on the age of elected politicians. We find that gender quotas are associated with election of politicians that are younger by more than 1 year. The effect occurs mainly due to the reduction in age of elected male politicians and is consistent with the optimizing behavior of parties or of voters. (JEL codes: D72, J45)
      Keywords: D72 - Models of Political Processes: Rent-Seeking, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior, J45 - Public Sector Labor Markets
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:55-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu032
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Small Firms' Credit Access in the Euro Area: Does Gender Matter?
    • Authors: Stefani, M. L; Vacca, V.
      Pages: 165 - 201
      Abstract: This article uses European Central Bank (ECB) survey data to assess whether gender matters in the small firms’ financial structure and access to credit. Firms owned or managed by women (female firms) use smaller amounts and less heterogeneous sources of external finance than their male counterparts. According to statistical evidence, female firms have difficulty in accessing bank finance: on the demand side, they apply for bank loans less frequently, as they more often anticipate a rejection; on the supply side, they experience a higher rejection rate. Econometric analysis shows that these different patterns are largely explained by the characteristics (such as business size, age, and sector of activity) that make female firms structurally different from those led by men, without leaving room for a significant gender effect. An additional contribution of this article is to compare the major euro-area countries within a homogeneous framework: weak evidence of gender discrimination appears in the supply of bank loans in Germany, Italy, and Spain, while some demand obstacles arise in France. (JEL classification: G32, G21, J16).
      Keywords: G32 - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure, G21 - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages, J16 - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:55-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu031
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • The Gender Gap in Entrepreneurship: Not just a Matter of Personality
    • Authors: Caliendo, M; Fossen, F. M, Kritikos, A, Wetter, M.
      Pages: 202 - 238
      Abstract: Why do entrepreneurship rates differ so markedly by gender? Using data from a large representative German household panel, we investigate to what extent personality traits, human capital, and the employment history influence the start-up decision and can explain the gender gap in entrepreneurship. Applying a decomposition analysis, we observe that the higher risk aversion among women explains a large share of the entrepreneurial gender gap. We also find an education effect contributing to the gender difference. In contrast, the Big Five model and the current employment state have effects in the opposite direction, meaning that the gender gap in entrepreneurial entry would be even larger if women had the same scores and the same employment status as men. (JEL codes: L26, J16, D81, J24, M13).
      Keywords: L26 - Entrepreneurship, J16 - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination, D81 - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty, J24 - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity, M13 - New Firms; Startups
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:55-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu023
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • A Study of Outcome Reporting Bias Using Gender Differences in Risk
           Attitudes
    • Authors: Crosetto, P; Filippin, A, Heider, J.
      Pages: 239 - 262
      Abstract: There is a strong consensus in the experimental literature according to which women are more risk averse than men. However, new evidence reveals that only a tiny fraction of the replications of the Holt and Laury (2002) risk elicitation task displays gender differences. This striking distance between the consensus and the data gathered with this elicitation method provides a clean test of the presence of an outcome reporting bias in the risk and gender literature. Exploiting a large data set of replications of Holt and Laury (2002), we find no evidence that the likelihood of reporting about gender differences is affected by obtaining results in line or against the consensus. Two variables significantly increase the probability of describing results along a gender dimension: the share of women among the authors and the fact that the study focuses directly on risk preferences. Both variables, however, are orthogonal to the results being in line with the consensus or not, confirming the absence of any outcome reporting bias. (JEL codes: C81; D81; J16).
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:55-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu029
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Family Structure and the Education Gender Gap: Evidence from Italian
           Provinces
    • Authors: Bertocchi, G; Bozzano, M.
      Pages: 263 - 300
      Abstract: We investigate the determinants of the education gender gap in Italy in a historical perspective with a focus on the influence of family structure. We capture the latter with two indicators: residential habits (nuclear versus complex families) and inheritance rules (partition versus primogeniture). After controlling for economic, institutional, religious, and cultural factors, we find that over the 1861–1901 period family structure is a driver of the education gender gap, with a higher female-to-male enrollment rate ratio in upper primary schools being associated with nuclear residential habits and equal partition of inheritance. We also find that only the effect of inheritance rules persists over the 1971–2001 period. (JEL codes: E02, H75, I25, J16, N33, O15).
      Keywords: E02, H75 - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare, I25 - Education and Economic Development, J16 - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination, N33 - Europe: Pre-1913, O15 - Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distributi
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:55-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu026
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Achieving Gender Equality: Development versus Historical Legacies
    • Authors: Dilli, S; Rijpma, A, Carmichael, S. G.
      Pages: 301 - 334
      Abstract: Economic development is often held to be beneficial for gender equality. However, there is good reason to believe that persistent institutions such as religion, legal traditions, and family practices, also matter. This article provides an empirical assessment of the relative importance of development and historical determinants of gender equality at the cross-national level. To capture this long-term relationship, a new index of gender equality that stretches back to 1950 is introduced. The determinants of this index are analysed using data on development and religious, legal, and family traditions. We find that variables measuring the long-lasting institutions of countries can be as important as economic development in determining gender equality outcomes. Thus, our study highlights the importance of considering the historical context of a country when analysing the determinants of gender equality gaps. (JEL codes: J160, N000, Z130, J120)
      PubDate: 2015-02-26T05:00:55-08:00
      DOI: 10.1093/cesifo/ifu027
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2015)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014