for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 2589 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26     

The end of the list has been reached. Please navigate to previous pages.

  First | 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26     

Journal Cover   Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
  [SJR: 0.965]   [H-I: 45]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0161-4754
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2589 journals]
  • Inclusion of Trigger Point Dry Needling in a Multimodal Physical Therapy
           Program for Postoperative Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): José L. Arias-Buría , Raquel Valero-Alcaide , Joshua Aland Cleland , Jaime Salom-Moreno , Ricardo Ortega-Santiago , María A. Atín-Arratibel , César Fernández-de-las-Peñas
      Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of including 1 session of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) into a multimodal physiotherapy treatment on pain and function in postoperative shoulder pain. Methods Twenty patients (5 male; 15 female; age, 58 ± 12 years) with postoperative shoulder pain after either open reduction and internal fixation with Proximal Humeral Internal Locking System plate plate or rotator cuff tear repair were randomly divided into 2 groups: physiotherapy group (n = 10) who received best evidence physical therapy interventions and a physical therapy plus TrP-DN group (n = 10) who received the same intervention plus a single session of TrP-DN targeted at active TrPs. The Constant-Murley score was used to determine pain, activities of daily living, range of motion, and strength, which was captured at baseline and 1 week after by an assessor blinded to group assignment Results Analysis of variance showed that subjects receiving TrP-DN plus physical therapy exhibited greater improvement in the Constant-Murley total score (P < .001) and also activities of daily living (P < .001) and strength (P = .019) subscales than those receiving physical therapy alone. Between-group effect sizes were large in favor of the TrP-DN group (0.97 < SMD < 1.45). Both groups experienced similar improvements in pain (P < .001) and range of motion (P < .001). Conclusions Our results suggest that including a single session of TrP-DN in the first week of a multimodal physical therapy approach may assist with faster increases in function in individuals with postoperative shoulder pain.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Passive Range of Movement of the Shoulder: A Standardized Method for
           Measurement and Assessment of Intrarater Reliability
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Justin Dougherty , Sarah Walmsley , Peter G. Osmotherly
      Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the intrarater reliability and reproducibility of a standardized procedure for measuring passive shoulder movement in asymptomatic individuals. Methods A single assessor used a digital inclinometer and standardized protocol to measure the passive range of motion of 7 shoulder movements in 168 asymptomatic shoulders. Following a warm-up maneuver, 3 measurements were taken for each movement on 2 occasions. Both shoulders were measured using a standardized order of movement. Selection of measurement beginning with left or right shoulder was randomly determined. The entire process was repeated 7 days later to assess reproducibility. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) with 95% confidence intervals and standard errors of measurement (SEMs) were calculated to assess the intrarater reliability of the methods. Results The intrarater reliability of our methods was substantial for total shoulder flexion (ICC = 0.82, SEM = 12.3°), whereas all other movements demonstrated moderate reliability (ICC range = 0.64-0.75) except external rotation in neutral abduction, for which reliability was classed as slight (ICC = 0.28, SEM = 31°). Moderate reliability was evident for all movements on follow-up at 7 days (ICC range = 0.60-0.77). Conclusions These methods of measurement have moderate to substantial reliability for the majority of tested passive shoulder movements, with moderate reliability sustained after 1 week, in a large sample of asymptomatic individuals.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Prevalence of Radiographic Findings in Individuals With Chronic Low Back
           Pain Screened for a Randomized Controlled Trial: Secondary Analysis and
           Clinical Implications
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Robert D. Vining , Eric Potocki , Ian McLean , Michael Seidman , A. Paige Morgenthal , James Boysen , Christine Goertz
      Objective The purpose of this study is to measure the prevalence of graded disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis, transitional segmentation, and the distribution of sacral slope in patients 21 to 65 years of age with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Methods This retrospective study analyzed 247 digital lumbar radiographic series obtained during a randomized controlled trial of chiropractic patients with CLBP. Chronic low back pain was defined as pain in the low back lasting 12 weeks or longer. Radiographic findings of disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis, and lumbosacral transitional segmentation were graded by 2 authors using established classification criteria. Sacral slope was measured with a digital tool contained within imaging software. Results Lumbosacral transitional segments graded I to IV (Castellvi classification) were present in 14% of cases. Lumbar disc degeneration was most prevalent at L3-4 (49%), followed by L4-5 (42%), L2-3 (41%), L5-S1 (37%), and L1-2 (29%). Isthmic spondylolisthesis was present in 5% of cases, with L5 the most common location. Degenerative spondylolisthesis demonstrated a prevalence of 18%, most commonly occurring at L4. The prevalence of degenerative spondylolisthesis was 51% for women aged 50 to 59 years and 24% for men in the same age range. Conclusions Moderate-severe disc degeneration, multilevel disc narrowing, and degenerative spondylolisthesis were common in individuals with CLBP with age more than 40 years. Isthmic spondylolisthesis was not more prevalent than what has been reported in other populations. Transitional segmentation was identified in a minority of participants, with some of these exhibiting accessory joints or fusion. Mean sacral slope in individuals with CLBP was not substantially different from mean slopes reported in other populations.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Comparison of Parameters Characterizing Lumbar Lordosis in Radiograph and
           Photogrammetric Examination of Adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Justyna Drzał-Grabiec , Aleksandra Truszczyńska , Adam Tarnowski , Maciej Płaszewski
      Objective The purpose of this study was to test validity of photogrammetry compared with radiography as a method of measuring the Cobb angle and the size of anterior-posterior spine curvatures in adults. Methods The study included 50 volunteers, 23 men and 27 women whose mean age was 52.6 years. The average weight of the subjects was 81.3 kg, average body height was 172.0 cm, and the average body mass index was 27.4. Based on radiologic examination, the length and depth of lumbar lordosis were determined and the size of the Cobb angle of lumbar scoliosis. After the radiologic examination, a photogrammetric test was performed for each subject with the projection moire phenomenon. Results The Pearson correlation found statistically significant associations concerning the length of lordosis (P < .001) and the Cobb angle (P < .001). Correlation of the depth of lordosis indicated a strong trend (P = .063). Conclusions This study found that the moire method of photogrammetric measurement produced similar findings to radiographic measurements in determining size of the Cobb angle and the length of lumbar lordosis.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 8




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • The Effect of Adding Forward Head Posture Corrective Exercises in the
           Management of Lumbosacral Radiculopathy: A Randomized Controlled Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Ibrahim M. Moustafa , Aliaa A. Diab
      Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate and long-term effects of a multimodal program, with the addition of forward head posture correction, in patients with chronic discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy. Methods This randomized clinical study included 154 adult patients (54 females) who experienced chronic discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy and had forward head posture. One group received a functional restoration program, and the experimental group received forward head posture corrective exercises. Primary outcomes were the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcomes included the anterior head translation, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, trunk inclination, lateral deviation, trunk imbalance, surface rotation, pelvic inclination, leg and back pain scores, and H-reflex latency and amplitude. Patients were assessed at 3 intervals (pretreatment, 10-week posttreatment, and 2-year follow-up). Results A general linear model with repeated measures indicated a significant group × time effect in favor of the experimental group on the measures of ODI (F = 89.7; P < .0005), anterior head translation (F = 23.6; P < .0005), H-reflex amplitude (F = 151.4; P < .0005), H-reflex latency (F = 99.2; P < .0005), back pain (F = 140.8; P < .0005), and leg pain (F = 72; P < .0005). After 10 weeks, the results revealed an insignificant difference between the groups for ODI (P = .08), back pain (P = .29), leg pain (P = .019), H-reflex amplitude (P = .09), and H-reflex latency (P = .098). At the 2-year follow-up, there were significant differences between the groups for all variables adopted for this study (P < .05). Conclusions The addition of forward head posture correction to a functional restoration program seemed to positively affect disability, 3-dimensional spinal posture parameters, back and leg pain, and S1 nerve root function of patients with chronic discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Adverse Events Due to Chiropractic and Other Manual Therapies for Infants
           and Children: A Review of the Literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 October 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Angela J. Todd , Matthew T. Carroll , Anske Robinson , Eleanor K.L. Mitchell
      Objective The purpose of this study was to review the literature for cases of adverse events in infants and children treated by chiropractors or other manual therapists, identifying treatment type and if a preexisting pathology was present. Method English language, peer-reviewed journals and non–peer-reviewed case reports discussing adverse events (ranging from minor to serious) were systematically searched from inception of the relevant searchable bibliographic databases through March 2014. Articles not referring to infants or children were excluded. Results Thirty-one articles met the selection criteria. A total of 12 articles reporting 15 serious adverse events were found. Three deaths occurred under the care of various providers (1 physical therapist, 1 unknown practitioner, and 1 craniosacral therapist) and 12 serious injuries were reported (7 chiropractors/doctors of chiropractic, 1 medical practitioner, 1 osteopath, 2 physical therapists, and 1 unknown practitioner). High-velocity, extension, and rotational spinal manipulation was reported in most cases, with 1 case involving forcibly applied craniosacral dural tension and another involving use of an adjusting instrument. Underlying preexisting pathology was identified in a majority of the cases. Conclusion Published cases of serious adverse events in infants and children receiving chiropractic, osteopathic, physiotherapy, or manual medical therapy are rare. The 3 deaths that have been reported were associated with various manual therapists; however, no deaths associated with chiropractic care were found in the literature to date. Because underlying preexisting pathology was associated in a majority of reported cases, performing a thorough history and examination to exclude anatomical or neurologic anomalies before applying any manual therapy may further reduce adverse events across all manual therapy professions.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Assessment of Scoliotic Deformity Using Spinous Processes: Comparison of
           Different Analysis Methods of an Ultrasonographic System
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Terry K. Koo , Jing-Yi Guo , Christina Ippolito , Jamie C. Bedle
      Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of 5 analysis methods in quantifying scoliotic deformity, using the spatial positions of SP tips acquired by a custom-developed ultrasound-based system, with different curve fitting methods and angle metrics in terms of their correlation with Cobb angle, test-retest reliability, vulnerability to digitization errors, and accuracy of identifying end vertebrae and convexity direction. Methods Three spinal column dry bone specimens were randomly configured to 30 different scoliotic deformities. Raw spatial data of the SP tips were processed by the following 3 methods: (1) fifth-order polynomial fitting, (2) locally weighted polynomial regression (LOESS) with smoothing parameter (α) = .25, and (3) LOESS with α = .4. Angle between the 2 tangents along the spinal curve with the most positive and negative slopes (ie, posterior deformity angle) and summation of the angles formed by every 2 lines joining 3 neighboring SPs between the end vertebrae (ie, accumulating angle) were computed to quantify scoliotic deformity. Their performances were compared in terms of their correlation with Cobb angle, test-retest reliability, vulnerability to digitization errors, and accuracy of identifying end vertebrae. Results Posterior deformity angle calculated from the spinal curve constructed by LOESS with α = .4 excelled in every aspect of the comparison (ie, Cobb angle, test-retest reliability, vulnerability to digitization errors, and accuracy of identifying end vertebrae and convexity direction), making it the method of choice of those tested for processing the spatial data of the SP tips in this ultrasonography study using dry bone specimens. Conclusions The ultrasound-based system and the LOESS (0.4)–posterior deformity angle method developed for this study offer a viable technology for quantifying scoliotic deformity in a reliable and radiation-free manner. However, further validation using scoliosis subjects is needed before they can be used to quantify spinal deformity in the clinical setting.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Immediate Effects of Active Versus Passive Scapular Correction on Pain and
           Pressure Pain Threshold in Patients With Chronic Neck Pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Enrique Lluch , Maria Dolores Arguisuelas , Otilia Calvente Quesada , Estibaliz Martínez Noguera , Marta Peiró Puchades , José A. Pérez Rodríguez , Deborah Falla
      Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of active vs passive scapular correction on pain and pressure pain threshold at the most symptomatic cervical segment in patients with chronic neck pain. Methods Twenty-three volunteers with chronic, idiopathic neck pain were recruited (age, 38.9 ± 14.4 years; sex [man/woman], 3/20; Neck Disability Index, 28.1% ± 9.9%). Subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups: active scapular correction or passive scapular correction. Pressure pain threshold and pain intensity rated on a numerical rating scale during a posteroanterior glide over the most symptomatic cervical segment were measured before and immediately after the active or passive scapular intervention. Results Only the active scapular correction produced a reduction in pain (pre, 6.3 ± 1.2; post, 3.7 ± 2.4; P < .05) and increase in pressure pain threshold (pre, 8.7 ± 4.2 kg/cm2; post, 10.1 ± 3.8 kg/cm2; P < .05) at the most painful cervical segment. Conclusions An active scapular correction exercise resulted in an immediate reduction of pain and pressure pain sensitivity in patients with chronic neck pain and scapular dysfunction.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Pain, Disability, and Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Instability and
           Endurance Tests in Subjects With Lumbar Spondylolisthesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Silvano Ferrari , Carla Vanti , Raffaella Piccarreta , Marco Monticone
      Objective The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the relationship between the main clinical tests to detect spinal instability, the perceived pain and disability, and symptomatic spondylolisthesis (SPL) characteristics, (2) to investigate the relationship between endurance and instability tests, and (3) to measure the diagnostic accuracy of these tests in unstable SPL diagnosed against dynamic radiographs. Methods Four instability tests were evaluated on 119 subjects: aberrant movements, active straight leg raising (ASLR), prone instability test, and passive lumbar extension test (PLE); and 2 endurance tests, prone bridge test and supine bridge test (SBT). The results were compared with the numeric rating scale for pain and the Oswestry Disability Index for disability. These tests were used as index tests and compared with dynamic radiographs as reference standard on 64 subjects. Results A significant relationship between disability and all the clinical tests but ASLR was observed. The relation between tests and pain was weaker, not significant for prone instability test and aberrant movement and critical for ASLR (P = .05). There was a low relationship between endurance tests and instability tests. Only PLE showed a significant association with dynamic radiographs (P = .017). Conclusion Endurance and instability tests appear to be weakly related to the amount of pain but significantly related to the disability in symptomatic SPL. Of the tests evaluated, PLE exhibited the best ability to predict positive dynamic radiographs.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Thank You to JMPT Peer Reviewers for 2013
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Claire Johnson
      This article recognizes editorial board members and peer reviewers who completed manuscript reviews for the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics in the year 2013 and provides a summary of international representation of the peer reviewers.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Comparison Between Neck Pain Disability and Cervical Range of Motion in
           Patients With Episodic and Chronic Migraine: A Cross-Sectional Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Gabriela F. Carvalho , Thais C. Chaves , Maria C. Gonçalves , Lidiane L. Florencio , Carolina A. Braz , Fabíola Dach , Cesar Fernández de Las Peñas , Débora Bevilaqua-Grossi
      Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck pain–related disability and cervical range of motion (CROM) in patients with episodic migraine (EM) and chronic migraine (CM) and to examine the correlation of both outcomes. Methods This cross-sectional study consisted of 91 patients with EM and 34 with CM. Cervical range of motion was measured with the CROM device, and pain during the cervical movement was recorded. Self-reported disability related to neck pain was assessed with the Neck Disability Index. Results Patients with CM showed higher Neck Disability Index scores and more moderate and severe disability (P = .01). Severe disability as a result of neck pain was associated with 7.6-fold risk of developing CM (P = .003). No significant differences in CROM were identified between groups. Moderate negative correlations between CROM and disability were found for 4 motions within the CM group (−0.60 < r < −0.39) and with 3 in the EM group (−0.48 < −0.45). Disability was positively and moderately correlated to pain evoked during CROM in both groups (0.34 < r <0.51). Conclusion This study found that neck pain was highly prevalent in patients with migraine. Neck pain–related disability increased with increased frequency of the migraine attacks and was associated with the risk of migraine chronicity. The correlation between CROM and neck pain disability was more evident in patients with CM and in patients with pain during cervical movement.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Use of High-Resolution Ultrasound to Measure Changes in Plantar Fascia
           Thickness Resulting From Tissue Creep in Runners and Walkers
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Aaron B. Welk , Daniel W. Haun , Thomas B. Clark , Norman W. Kettner
      Objective This study sought to use high-resolution ultrasound to measure changes in plantar fascia thickness as a result of tissue creep generated by walking and running. Methods Independent samples of participants were obtained. Thirty-six walkers and 25 runners walked on a treadmill for 10 minutes or ran for 30 minutes, respectively. Standardized measures of the thickness of the plantar fascia were obtained in both groups using high-resolution ultrasound. Results The mean thickness of the plantar fascia was measured immediately before and after participation. The mean plantar fascia thickness was decreased by 0.06 ± 0.33 mm SD after running and 0.03 ± 0.22 mm SD after walking. The difference between groups was not significant. Conclusion Although the parameters of this study did not produce significant changes in the plantar fascia thickness, a slightly higher change in the mean thickness of the plantar fascia in the running group deserves further investigation.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Evaluation of Myofascial Trigger Points Using Infrared Thermography: A
           Critical Review of the Literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus Guirro
      Objective The aim of this study was to review recent studies published on the use of infrared thermography for the assessment of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Methods A search of the MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro, and SciELO databases was carried out between November 2012 and January 2013 for articles published in English, Portuguese, or Spanish from the year 2000 to 2012. Because of the nature of the included studies and the purpose of this review, the analysis of methodological quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool. Results The search retrieved 11 articles, 2 of which were excluded based on language (German and Chinese). Three were duplicated in different databases, 1 did not use infrared thermography for diagnostic purposes, and the other did not use infrared thermography to measure the skin temperature. Thus, the final sample was made up of 4 observational investigations: 3 comparative studies and 1 accuracy study. Conclusion At present, there are few studies evaluating the accuracy and reliability of infrared thermography for the diagnosis and assessment of MTrPs. Of the few studies present, there is no agreement on skin temperature patterns in the presence of MTrPs.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Intrarater and Interrater Reliability of Photographic Measurement of
           Upper-Body Standing Posture of Adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Rodrigo Miguel Ruivo , Pedro Pezarat-Correia , Ana Isabel Carita
      Objective The purposes of this study were to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of a photographic measurement of the sagittal postures of the cervical spine and shoulder, quantitatively characterize the postural alignment of the head and shoulders in the sagittal plane of Portuguese adolescents 15 to 17 years old in natural erect standing, and analyze differences in postural angles between sexes. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2 secondary schools in Portugal where 275 adolescent students (146 females and 129 males) aged 15 to 17 years were evaluated. Sagittal head, cervical, and shoulder angles were measured with photogrammetry and the Postural Assessment Software. Results For interrater reliability, all of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values for the 3 angles were higher than 0.85. For intrarater reliability, the ICC values for the sagittal head angle, shoulder angle, and cervical angle were 0.83, 0.78, and 0.66, respectively. Mean values of sagittal head, cervical, and shoulder angles were 17.2° ± 5.7°, 47.4° ± 5.2°, and 51.4° ± 8.5°, respectively. Anterior head carriage was demonstrated by 68% of the adolescents, whereas 58% had protraction of the shoulder(s). Males had significantly higher mean cervical and sagittal head angles. Conclusions Forward head posture and protracted shoulders were common postural disorders in adolescents 15 to 17 years old, with females revealing a lower mean cervical angle. The intrarater and interrater evaluation of standing sagittal posture of the cervical spine and shoulders by photogrammetry was reliable.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • The Effect of Cervical Spine Manipulation on Postural Sway in Patients
           With Nonspecific Neck Pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alison R. Fisher , Catherine J. Bacon , Jamie V.H. Mannion
      Objective This crossover study aimed to determine whether a single high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation of the cervical spine would affect postural sway in adults with nonspecific neck pain. Methods Ten participants received, in random order, 7 days apart, a high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation applied to a dysfunctional spinal segment and a passive head-movement control. Four parameters of postural sway were measured before, immediately after, and at 5 and 10 minutes after each procedure. Results Results showed no differences between interventions in change in any of the parameters. When changes before and immediately after each procedure were analyzed separately, only the control showed a significant change in the length of center of pressure path (an increase from median, 118 mm; interquartlie range, 93-137 mm to an increase to 132 mm; 112-147; P = .02). Conclusion This study failed to show evidence that single manipulation of the cervical spine influenced postural sway. Given the ability of the postural control system to reweight the hierarchy of sensory information to compensate for inadequacies in any 1 component, it is possible that any improvements in the mechanisms controlling postural sway elicited by the manipulative intervention may have been concealed.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • The Effect of Body Position on Pulmonary Function, Chest Wall Motion, and
           Discomfort in Young Healthy Participants
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Satoko Naitoh , Katsuyuki Tomita , Keita Sakai , Akira Yamasaki , Yuji Kawasaki , Eiji Shimizu
      Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different recumbent positions on pulmonary function, chest wall motion, and feelings of discomfort in young nonobese healthy volunteers. Methods Twenty healthy volunteers (age, 28.0±1.4years; height, 167.5±10.1cm; weight, 62.3±10.2kg) were studied in the sitting position and in the following 6 recumbent positions: supine, left retroversion at a 45° tilt, left anteversion at a 45° tilt, right retroversion at a 45° tilt, right anteversion at a 45° tilt, and prone. After 5minutes of a selected position, pulmonary functions, including vital capacity (VC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second, maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures (MIP and MEP, respectively), and breathing pattern components at the chest wall were assessed. Discomfort was assessed using a modified Borg scale. Results When participants changed position from sitting to each of the 6 recumbent positions, forced expiratory volume in 1 second values decreased significantly (P < .05). None of the participants showed changes in the MIP or MEP in any of the 6 recumbent positions. Rib cage motion was restricted in all recumbent positions except supine, left anteversion at a 45° tilt, and prone. In all 6 recumbent positions, discomfort was experienced during the pulmonary tests. However, in the left retroversion at a 45° tilt position, no discomfort was experienced during the MIP and MEP assessments. Conclusion In young, nonobese, healthy volunteers, recumbent positions caused diminished pulmonary functions and induced feelings of discomfort.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Relationship Between Chiropractic Teaching Institutions and Practice
           Characteristics Among Canadian Doctors of Chiropractic: A Random Sample
           Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Aaron A. Puhl , Christine J. Reinhart , Jon B. Doan , Marion McGregor , H. Stephen Injeyan
      Objective The objectives of this study were to determine if faction membership among Canadian doctors of chiropractic (DCs) is associated with differences in educational program characteristics among English-speaking Canadian and United States chiropractic colleges and to determine if those differences are expressed in terms of surveyed attitudes and behaviors regarding treatment efficacy, radiographic imaging, vaccinations, and interprofessional referrals. This study also aims to identify if educational programs may be a potential source of multiple professional identities. Methods A randomly selected sample of Canadian DCs, stratified across the English-speaking provinces, was surveyed by mail. Survey items included school of graduation, self-categorization by chiropractic subgroup, perceptions of condition-specific treatment efficacy, use of plain film radiographic imaging, vaccination attitudes/behaviors, and patient referral patterns. Self-categorization by chiropractic subgroup included: the unorthodox faction (associates the chiropractic subluxation as an encumbrance to the expression of health) and the orthodox perspective (associates with musculoskeletal joint dysfunction, public health, and lifestyle concerns). For data analysis, chiropractic schools were divided into 2 groups according to location: English-speaking Canada and the US. The US was further clustered into liberal (“interested in mixing elements of modern and alternative therapies into the practice of chiropractic") and conservative categories (“chiropractors who believe in continuing the traditions of chiropractic"). Results Of 740 deliverable questionnaires, 503 were returned for a response rate of 68%. χ 2 Testing revealed significant differences in self-categorized faction membership associated with the clustering of colleges based on ideological viewpoints (χ 2 = 27.06; P = .000). Descriptive results revealed a relationship between school of origin and perceived treatment efficacy, use of radiographic imaging, and vaccination attitudes. No significant differences were found relative to interprofessional referral patterns. Conclusion Chiropractic program attended is a significant predictor of orthodox vs unorthodox faction membership and professional practice characteristics for Canadian DCs. This suggests that the current chiropractic education system may contribute to multiple professional identities.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Occupational Low Back Pain in Primary and High School Teachers: Prevalence
           and Associated Factors
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Mohammad A. Mohseni Bandpei , Fatemeh Ehsani , Hamid Behtash , Marziyeh Ghanipour
      Objective The purposes of this study were to investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for low back pain (LBP) in teachers and to evaluate the association of individual and occupational characteristics with the prevalence of LBP. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 586 asymptomatic teachers were randomly selected from 22 primary and high schools in Semnan city of Iran. Data on the personal, occupational characteristics, pain intensity, and functional disability as well as the prevalence and risk factors of LBP were collected using different questionnaires. Results Point, last month, last 6 months, annual, and lifetime prevalence rates of LBP were 21.8%, 26.3%, 29.6%, 31.1%, and 36.5%, respectively. The highest prevalence was obtained for the high school teachers. The prevalence of LBP was significantly associated with age, body mass index, job satisfaction, and length of employment (P < .05 in all instances). Prolonged sitting and standing, working hours with computer, and correcting examination papers were the most aggravating factors, respectively. Rest and participation in physical activity were found to be the most relieving factors. Conclusion The prevalence of LBP in teachers appears to be high. High school teachers were more likely to experience LBP than primary school teachers. Factors such as age, body mass index, length of employment, job satisfaction, and work-related activities were significant factors associated with LBP in this teacher population.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • A Comparative Analysis of Static Balance Between Patients With Lumbar
           Spinal Canal Stenosis and Asymptomatic Participants
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Aleksandra Truszczyńska , Justyna Drzał-Grabiec , Zbigniew Trzaskoma , Kazimierz Rąpała , Adam Tarnowski , Krystyna Górniak
      Objective The aim of this study was to assess static balance in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis who qualified for surgical decompression of associated neural structures and compare them with asymptomatic participants. Methods This case-controlled study evaluated a sample of 50 patients with spinal canal stenosis (stenosis group) and 48 participants with no history of clinical symptoms of back pain. Static balance was assessed by conducting quantitative analysis of balance reaction parameters in quiet standing with the eyes closed. Results Higher values were observed in total length of center of pressure (COP) path, length of COP path in the anterior-posterior plane, mean amplitude of COP projection in the anterior-posterior plane, maximal amplitude between the 2 most distant points in the anterior-posterior plane, mean COP velocity, and sway area marked by the moving COP in the stenosis group compared with the asymptomatic group. Conclusions This study showed statistically significant differences in static balance parameters between patients with spinal canal stenosis compared with the asymptomatic group.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Comparison of 2 Methods of Measuring Spine Angular Kinematics During
           Dynamic Flexion Movements: Skin-Mounted Markers Compared With Markers
           Affixed to Rigid Bodies
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 37, Issue 9
      Author(s): Samuel J. Howarth
      Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the spine flexion angle time histories computed with the 2 described techniques (dot product [DP] and a modified joint coordinate system [JCS] approaches) that used vector algebra and used skin-mounted markers to the spine flexion angles derived using local coordinate systems constructed from rigid bodies affixed to the pelvis and thorax during spine flexion movements. Methods Discrepancies between the simplified marker setup and a criterion standard (CS) method for measuring spine kinematics were quantified. Sixteen participants performed full forward spine flexion. Three-dimensional kinematic data were obtained from markers affixed bilaterally over the greater trochanters, iliac crests, and 10th ribs. Time varying spine flexion angles were derived from the 3-, and 2-dimensional marker data using a DP and a modified JCS approach. Criterion standard spine kinematics were obtained from clusters of markers adhered to 2 rigid fins that were affixed over the pelvis and trunk. The DP and JCS methods were compared with the CS by computing root mean squared differences and correlations during the spine flexion trials. Descriptive measurements of missing kinematic data were also obtained. Results On average, root mean squared differences were 30.1% lower for the JCS method of deriving spine flexion angles. Correlations were also higher for the JCS method by 2.5%, compared with the DP method. Conclusion The findings suggest that the adapted JCS method is superior to the DP method for deriving spine flexion angles. This is especially true when only 2-dimensional coordinate data are available.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • An Exploratory, Descriptive Study of Consumer Opinions and Behaviors
           Regarding Health Products Sales at 4 Chiropractic Practices in a Large,
           Western Canadian Urban Center
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Stacey A. Page , Chinyere Mbadiwe , D. Gordon McMorland , Jaroslaw P. Grod
      Objective This study describes the opinions and behaviors of chiropractic patients in a large, western Canadian urban center regarding the sale of health products by doctors of chiropractic. Methods A brief, descriptive survey consisting of both fixed-choice and open-ended questions was distributed by clinic reception staff at 4 chiropractic offices in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Each practice sold a range of health products, including those relating to musculoskeletal care and nutrition, and served between 275 and 320 clients per week. Results After a 10-week recruitment interval between January and March 2013, a convenience sample of 103 chiropractic patients was obtained. Most patients supported the sale of health products by doctors of chiropractic (n = 101; 98.1%), and most had made health product purchases from a doctor of chiropractic at some point (n = 73; 70.9%). Products relating to muscular care, exercise/rehabilitation products, and pillows were purchased most often (>40%). Consumers were most supportive of doctors of chiropractic selling products they perceived to be directly related to musculoskeletal care. Some participants believed that there should be limits placed on the range of products sold including the products had to be consistent with the practitioner’s area of expertise and had to have some demonstrated level of effectiveness. Primary reasons for health product purchase included the doctor’s recommendations, convenience, and perception that the product would improve well-being (>50%). Conclusions This study found that chiropractic patients were supportive of health product sales by doctors of chiropractic, assuming certain conditions were met. Consumers believed that product sales should be undertaken with integrity and should be consistent with the doctor’s area of expertise. Consumer beliefs appeared to impact their purchasing behaviors.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Reproducibility of the Kinematics in Rotational High-Velocity,
           Low-Amplitude Thrust of the Upper Cervical Spine: A Cadaveric Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Silvia Gianola , Erik Cattrysse , Steven Provyn , Peter Van Roy
      Objective This study aimed to investigate the reproducibility of the kinematics in rotational high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust of the upper cervical spine. Methods Twenty fresh human cervical specimens were studied in a test-retest situation with 2 manual therapists. Kinematics of C1-C2 and C0-C1 were examined during segmental rotational HVLA manipulation through an ultrasound-based tracking system. The thrust moment was analyzed by 3-dimensional aspects: the range of motion of axial rotation, flexion-extension, lateral banding, and the cross-correlation between the axial rotation and the coupled lateral banding components. Results During rotational HVLA thrust on C1-C2, the main axial rotation demonstrates an intraexaminer relationship varying from almost perfect to fair (intraclass correlation coefficient =0.71; intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.35) and a substantial interexaminer correlation of 0.73. Conclusions This study showed substantial levels of reliability for the main axial rotation component of segmental manual rotational HVLA thrust on C1-C2. Intra- and interrater reliability for flexion-extension, lateral bending, and cross-correlation was low.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Evaluation of the Lumbar Kinematic Measures That Most Consistently
           Characterize Lumbar Muscle Activation Patterns During Trunk Flexion: A
           Cross-Sectional Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Sebastian Lühring , Alison Schinkel-Ivy , Janessa DM Drake
      Objective The purpose of this study was to determine which kinematic measure most consistently determined onset and cessation of the flexion-relaxation response. Methods The study was a cross-sectional design in a laboratory setting in which 20 asymptomatic university-aged (19.8-33.3 years old) participants were tested. Muscle activation was measured for the lumbar erector spinae, and 3-dimensional motion was recorded. Flexion-relaxation onset and cessation occurrences were determined for 10 standing maximum voluntary flexion trials. The lumbar and trunk angles at both events were expressed as unnormalized (°) and normalized (%Max: percentage of maximum voluntary flexion) measures. Intraclass correlation coefficients and coefficients of variation were calculated to determine within- and between-participant reliability, respectively. Results Mean (SD) unnormalized flexion-relaxation angles ranged from 46.28° (11.63) (lumbar onset) to 108.10° (12.26) (trunk cessation), whereas normalized angles ranged from 71.31%Max (16.44) (trunk onset) to 94.83%Max (lumbar cessation). Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.905 (normalized lumbar, left side, onset) to 0.995 (unnormalized lumbar, both sides, cessation). Coefficients of variation ranged from 3.56% (normalized lumbar, right side, cessation) to 26.02% (unnormalized trunk, left side, onset). Conclusions The data suggest that, for asymptomatic individuals, unnormalized and normalized lumbar kinematics most consistently characterized flexion-relaxation angles within and between participants, respectively. Lumbar measures may be preferential when the flexion-relaxation response is investigated in future clinical and biomechanical studies.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Sensorimotor Control During Peripheral Muscle Vibration: An Experimental
           Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jean-Alexandre Boucher , Martin C. Normand , Éric Boisseau , Martin Descarreaux
      Objective The aims of this study were to determine whether the application of vibration on a postural lower limb muscle altered the sensorimotor control of its joint as measured by isometric force production parameters and to compare present findings with previous work conducted on trunk muscle. Methods Twenty healthy adults were asked to reproduce submaximal isometric plantar flexion under 3 different conditions: no vibration and vibration frequencies of 30 and 80 Hz on the soleus muscle. Time to peak torque, variable error, as well as constant error and absolute error in peak torque were calculated and compared across conditions. Results Under vibration, participants were significantly less accurate in the force reproduction task, as they mainly undershot the target torque. Applying an 80-Hz vibration resulted in a significantly higher negative constant error than lower-frequency vibration (30 Hz) or no-vibration condition. Decreases in isometric force production accuracy under vibration influence were also observed in a previous study conducted on trunk muscle. However, no difference in constant error was found between 30- and 80-Hz vibration conditions. Conclusion The results suggest that acute soleus muscle vibration interferes with plantar flexion torque generation by distorting proprioceptive information, leading to decreases in accuracy of a force reproduction task. Similar results in an isometric trunk extension force reproduction task were found with vibration applied on erector spinae muscle. However, high-frequency vibration applied on soleus muscle elicited higher force reproduction errors than low-frequency stimulation.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Manipulative Therapy and Rehabilitation for Recurrent Ankle Sprain With
           Functional Instability: A Short-Term, Assessor-Blind, Parallel-Group
           Randomized Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Danella Lubbe , Ekta Lakhani , James W. Brantingham , Gregory F. Parkin-Smith , Tammy K. Cassa , Gary A. Globe , Charmaine Korporaal
      Objective The purpose of this study was to compare manipulative therapy (MT) plus rehabilitation to rehabilitation alone for recurrent ankle sprain with functional instability (RASFI) to determine short-term outcomes. Methods This was an assessor-blind, parallel-group randomized comparative trial. Thirty-three eligible participants with RASFI were randomly allocated to receive rehabilitation alone or chiropractic MT plus rehabilitation. All participants undertook a daily rehabilitation program over the course of the 4-week treatment period. The participants receiving MT had 6 treatments over the same treatment period. The primary outcome measures were the Foot and Ankle Disability Index and the visual analogue pain scale, with the secondary outcome measure being joint motion palpation. Data were collected at baseline and during week 5. Missing scores were replaced using a multiple imputation method. Statistical analysis of the data composed of repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Between-group analysis demonstrated a difference in scores at the final consultation for the visual analogue scale and frequency of joint motion restrictions (P ≤ .006) but not for the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (P = .26). Conclusions This study showed that the patients with RASFI who received chiropractic MT plus rehabilitation showed significant short-term reduction in pain and the number of joint restrictions in the short-term but not disability when compared with rehabilitation alone.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Manual and Manipulative Therapy in Addition to Rehabilitation for
           Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Assessor-Blind Randomized Pilot Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Lauren Dwyer , Gregory F. Parkin-Smith , James W. Brantingham , Charmaine Korporaal , Tammy K. Cassa , Gary Globe , Debra Bonnefin , Victor Tong
      Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the methodological integrity, sample size requirements, and short-term preliminary clinical outcomes of manual and manipulative therapy (MMT) in addition to a rehabilitation program for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods This was a pilot study of an assessor-blinded, randomized, parallel-group trial in 2 independent university-based outpatient clinics. Participants with knee OA were randomized to 3 groups: 6 MMT sessions alone, training in rehabilitation followed by a home rehabilitation program alone, or MMT plus the same rehabilitation program, respectively. Six MMT treatment sessions (provided by a chiropractic intern under supervision or by an experienced chiropractor) were provided to participants over the 4-week treatment period. The primary outcome was a description of the research methodology and sample size estimation for a confirmatory study. The secondary outcome was the short-term preliminary clinical outcomes. Data were collected at baseline and 5weeks using the Western Ontario and McMasters Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire, goniometry for knee flexion/extension, and the McMaster Overall Therapy Effectiveness inventory. Analysis of variance was used to compare differences between groups. Results Eighty-three patients were randomly allocated to 1 of the 3 groups (27, 28, and 28, respectively). Despite 5 dropouts, the data from 78 participants were available for analysis with 10% of scores missing. A minimum of 462 patients is required for a confirmatory 3-arm trial including the respective interventions, accounting for cluster effects and a 20% dropout rate. Statistically significant and clinically meaningful changes in scores from baseline to week 5 were found for all groups for the Western Ontario and McMasters Osteoarthritis Index (P ≤ .008), with a greater change in scores for MMT and MMT plus rehabilitation. Between-group comparison did not reveal statistically significant differences between group scores at week 5 for any of the outcome measures (P ≥ .46). Conclusions This pilot trial suggests that a confirmatory trial is feasible. There were significant changes in scores from baseline to week 5 across all groups, suggesting that all 3 treatment approaches may be of benefit to patients with mild-to-moderate knee OA, justifying a confirmatory trial to compare these interventions.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Evaluation of Palpation, Pressure Algometry, and Electromyography for
           Monitoring Trigger Points in Young Participants
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Marcin Wytrążek , Juliusz Huber , Joanna Lipiec , Aleksandra Kulczyk
      Objective The aims of this study were to assess trigger points (TrPs), their pain threshold, and the activity of motor units in the neck and shoulder girdle muscles of young volunteers and to assess palpation, algometry, and surface electromyography (EMG) for their detection. Methods Seventy participants aged from 19 to 26 years (20.6 ± 1.4 years [mean ± SD]) were examined to identify TrPs through palpation, an algometer test for pressure pain threshold (PPT), a test for the activity of muscle motor units at rest (rEMG) and at maximal contraction (mcEMG) with surface EMG recordings. Results Palpation studies revealed numerous symmetrical nonreferring latent TrPs (379/560 performed tests), referring latent TrPs (91/560), and few active TrPs (4/560). Algometry confirmed the lowest PPT in active TrPs and the highest PPT in participants with no TrPs (86/560). Pressure pain thresholds were lower in nonpregnant women than in men, especially in the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles with nonreferring and referring latent TrPs. Trigger points evoked a moderate increase of rEMG amplitude but with no evident changes in mcEMG. Conclusions This study showed that the preliminary algometry and rEMG recordings monitored a decrease in PPT and an increase in muscle tension in all cases of TrPs in each of the 3 types detected in people younger than 30 years.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Immediate Effects of Electrical Stimulation, Diathermy, and Physical
           Exercise on Lower Limb Arterial Blood Flow in Diabetic Women With
           Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Randomized Crossover Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro , Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus Guirro , Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Siane Cristina Santarosa Pascote , Delaine Rodrigues-Bigaton
      Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of high-voltage electrical stimulation (HVES), continuous short wave diathermy, and physical exercise on arterial blood flow in the lower limbs of diabetic women with peripheral arterial disease. Methods A crossover study was carried out involving 15 diabetic women (mean age of 77.87 ± 6.20 years) with a diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease. One session of each therapeutic resource was held, with a 7-day washout period between protocols. Blood flow velocity was evaluated before each session and 0, 20, 40 and 60 minutes after the administration of each protocol. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc test was used for the intragroup and intergroup comparisons. Results In the intragroup analysis, a significant reduction (P < .05) was found in blood flow velocity in the femoral and popliteal arteries over time with HVES and physical exercise and in the posterior tibial artery with the physical exercise protocol. However, no significant differences were found in the intergroup analysis (P > .05). Conclusion Proximal blood circulation in the lower limb of diabetic women with peripheral arterial disease was increased by a single session of HVES and physical exercise, whereas distal circulation was only increased with physical exercise.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Influence of Clinician Characteristics and Operational Factors on
           Recruitment of Participants With Low Back Pain: An Observational Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Daniel Steffens , Chris G. Maher , Manuela L. Ferreira , Mark J. Hancock , Leani S.M. Pereira , Christopher M. Williams , Jane Latimer
      Objective The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence recruitment of patients to an observational study of low back pain (LBP). Methods From 1147 primary care (first health contact) clinicians initially contacted, 138 (physiotherapists and chiropractors) agreed to participate in a large observational study of LBP and were the focus of the current study. Data were collected pertaining to clinicians' characteristics, operational factors, and the number of patients recruited. The association of a variety of clinician characteristics and operational factors with recruitment rate was determined using a multivariate negative binomial regression analysis. Results From October 2011 to November 2012, 1585 patients were screened by 138 study clinicians with 951 eligible patients entering the observational study. Clinicians who were members of their professional association had a recruitment rate less than half that of those who were nonmembers (P < .0001). Clinicians who were trained by telephone had a recruitment rate 4.01 times higher than those trained face to face (P < .0001). Similarly, clinicians who referred a larger number of ineligible participants had a slightly higher recruitment rate with an incident rate ratio of 1.04 per ineligible patient (P < .0001). Other clinicians' characteristics and operational factors were not associated with recruitment. Conclusion This study provides evidence that it is feasible to recruit participants from primary care practices to a simple observational study of LBP. Factors identified as influencing recruitment were professional association (negative association), training by telephone, and referring a higher number of ineligible participants.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Cadaveric Validation of Dry Needle Placement in the Lateral Pterygoid
           Muscle
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Juan A. Mesa-Jiménez , Jesús Sánchez-Gutiérrez , José L. de-la-Hoz-Aizpurua , César Fernández-de-las-Peñas
      Objective The aim of this anatomical study was to determine if a needle is able to reach the lateral pterygoid muscle during the application of dry needling technique. Methods A dry needling approach using 2 needles of 50 to 60 mm in length, one inserted over the zygomatic process posterior at the obituary arch (for the superior head) and other inserted below the zygomatic process between the mandibular condyle and the coronoid process (for the inferior head), was proposed. A progressive dissection into 3 stages was conducted into 2 heads of fresh male cadavers. First, dry needling of the lateral pterygoid muscle was applied on the cadaver. Second, a block dissection containing the lateral pterygoid was harvested. Finally, the ramus of the mandible was sectioned by osteotomy to visualize the lateral pterygoid muscle with the needle placements. Results With the needles inserted into the cadaver, the block dissection revealed that the superior needle reached the superior (sphenoid) head of the lateral pterygoid muscle and the inferior needle reached the inferior (pterygoid) head of the muscle. At the final stage of the dissection, when the ramus of the mandible was sectioned by osteotomy, it was revealed that the superior needle entered into the belly of the superior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle. Conclusions This anatomical study supports that dry needling technique for the lateral pterygoid muscle can be properly conducted with the proposed approach.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • A Comparison of Lumbopelvic Motion Patterns and Erector Spinae Behavior
           Between Asymptomatic Subjects and Patients With Recurrent Low Back Pain
           During Pain-Free Periods
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Daniel Sánchez-Zuriaga , Juan López-Pascual , David Garrido-Jaén , Maria Amparo García-Mas
      Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the patterns of lumbopelvic motion and erector spinae (ES) activity during trunk flexion-extension movements and to compare these patterns between patients with recurrent low back pain (LBP) in their pain-free periods and matched asymptomatic subjects. Methods Thirty subjects participated (15 patients with disc herniation and recurrent LBP in their pain-free periods and 15 asymptomatic control subjects). A 3-dimensional videophotogrammetric system and surface electromyography (EMG) were used to record the angular displacements of the lumbar spine and hip in the sagittal plane and the EMG activity of the ES during standardized trunk flexion-extension cycles. Variables were maximum ranges of spine and hip flexion; percentages of maximum lumbar and hip flexion at the start and end of ES relaxation; average percentages of EMG activity during flexion, relaxation, and extension; and flexion-extension ratio of myoelectrical activity. Results Recurrent LBP patients during their pain-free period showed significantly greater ES activation both in flexion and extension, with a higher flexion-extension ratio than controls. Maximum ranges of lumbar and hip flexion showed no differences between controls and patients, although patients spent less time with their lumbar spine maximally flexed. Conclusions This study showed that reduced maximum ranges of motion and absence of ES flexion-relaxation phenomenon were not useful to identify LBP patients in the absence of acute pain. However, these patients showed subtle alterations of their lumbopelvic motion and ES activity patterns, which may have important clinical implications.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Electromyographic Analysis of Training to Selectively Strengthen the
           Lumbar Multifidus Muscle: Effects of Different Lifting Directions and
           Weight Loading of the Extremities During Quadruped Upper and Lower
           Extremity Lifts
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Mitsuhiro Masaki , Hiroshige Tateuchi , Rui Tsukagoshi , Satoko Ibuki , Noriaki Ichihashi
      Objective The lumbar multifidus muscle (LMF) is a lower back muscle that contributes to spinal stability. Several electromyographic analyses have evaluated LMF activity during various types of training. The present study examined the activity of the back muscles during quadruped upper and lower extremity lifts (QULELs) with different lifting direction and weight loading of extremities. Methods Seventeen healthy men were included as subjects. The exercise conditions comprised raising the upper extremity of one side and the lower extremity of the opposite side in a quadruped position with different lifting direction and weight loading. The various combinations of lifts were modifications of conventional QULEL, in which the upper extremity is raised to 180° shoulder flexion and the lower extremity to 0° hip extension. The effects of different lifting directions and weight loading on LMF and lumbar erector spinae (LES) muscle activities were measured using surface electromyography. Results The LMF activity and the LMF/LES activity ratio on the side of lower extremity lifting were higher during QULEL with the upper and lower extremities in abduction than during conventional QULEL. The LMF/LES activity ratio was lower during QULEL with weight loading on the upper and lower extremities than during conventional QULEL. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that QULEL with shoulder and hip abduction is more effective to selectively strengthen LMF on the side, where the lower extremity is lifted. Loading weight onto both the lifted upper and lower extremities during QULEL is disadvantageous as a selective LMF training method because the LMF/LES activity ratio is low.


      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 38, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-02-27T16:13:23Z
       
  • Development of the Headache Activities of Daily Living Index: Initial
           Validity Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Howard Vernon , Gordon Lawson
      Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a novel instrument for assessing headache-related disability focussing solely on important activities of daily living. Methods Part 1: A literature search was conducted in PubMed and Google Scholar, supplemented by hand searches in bibliographies to retrieve the original article for any instrument for the assessment of headache-related disability. Each instrument was evaluated for item categories, specific item content, measurement scale format for each item, and instructions to users. Together, these features constituted the construct validity of these instruments. Qualitative evaluations of these results were summarized with respect to the adequacy of each component. Psychometric features such as reliability and validity were not assessed. Part 2: An existing instrument for assessing self-rated disability, the Neck Disability Index, was modified for content and format and subjected to 2 rounds of clinician and patient review. Item contents and formats received final consensus, resulting in a 9-item instrument: the Headache Activities of Daily Living Index (HADLI). This instrument was tested in a sample of headache patients. Cronbach α and individual item correlations were obtained. Principal Components Analysis was performed. Results Part 1: The search identified 6 reports on 5 preexisting instruments for self-rating of headache-related disability. Problems in content were found in all instruments, especially relating to the lack of items for specific activities of daily living. Problems were noted in most of the instruments for scaling and instructions with respect to the effect of headache on activities of daily living. Part 2: The authors first identified suitable items from an existing instrument for self-rating of disability. These were supplemented by items drawn from the literature. A panel of 3 clinicians and 2 laypersons evaluated these items. Two more focus groups of 7 headache sufferers each reviewed the new instrument. After this, a 9-item instrument for assessing activities of daily living in headache sufferers, the HADLI, was finalized. After this, 53 participants were recruited to study the face validity of the instrument. The sample consisted of 41 women and 12 men with a mean age of 37.3 (12) years; mean duration of headaches was 7.4 (8.3) years; mean frequency of headaches per week was 3.4 (2.4); and the intensity was 6 (2.4). The mean HADLI score was 26.2 (13.4), or 52%. There were no floor or ceiling effects for total score. The total Index Cronbach α was 0.96. The Principal Components Analysis identified one component which accounted for 75% of the variance. Conclusions The HADLI was created using theory and empirical-based methods. Face validity was assessed by focus group input and by first-level psychometrics. The HADLI has good face validity and is suitable for further reliability and validity testing.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T15:15:45Z
       
  • Clinical Outcomes for Neurogenic Claudication Using a Multimodal Program
           for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Retrospective Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Carlo Ammendolia , Ngai Chow
      Objective The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess the effectiveness of a 6-week, nonsurgical, multimodal program that addresses the multifaceted aspects of neurogenic claudication. Methods In this retrospective study, 2 researchers independently extracted data from the medical records from January 2010 to April 2013 of consecutive eligible patients who had completed the 6-week Boot Camp Program. The program consisted of manual therapy twice per week (eg, soft tissue and neural mobilization, chiropractic spinal manipulation, lumbar flexion-distraction, and muscle stretching), structured home-based exercises, and instruction of self-management strategies. A paired t test was used to compare differences in outcomes from baseline to 6-week follow-up. Outcomes included self-reported pain, disability, walking ability, and treatment satisfaction. Results A total of 49 patients were enrolled, with a mean age of 70 years. The mean difference in the Oswestry Disability Index was 15.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.39-18.92), and that for the functional and symptoms scales of the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire was 0.41 (95% CI, 0.26-0.56) and 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.93), respectively. Numeric pain scores for both leg and back showed statistically significant improvements. Improvements in all outcomes were clinically important. Conclusions This study showed preliminary evidence for improved outcomes in patients with neurogenic claudication participating in a 6-week nonsurgical multimodal Boot Camp Program.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T15:15:45Z
       
  • Biomechanical and Histological Effects of Augmented Soft Tissue
           Mobilization Therapy on Achilles Tendinopathy in a Rabbit Model
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Kan Imai , Kazuya Ikoma , Qingshan Chen , Chunfeng Zhao , Kai-Nan An , Ralph E. Gay
      Objective Augmented soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) has been used to treat Achilles tendinopathy and is thought to promote collagen fiber realignment and hasten tendon regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical and histological effects of ASTM therapy on rabbit Achilles tendons after enzymatically induced injury. Methods This study was a non-human bench controlled research study using a rabbit model. Both Achilles tendons of 12 rabbits were injected with collagenase to produce tendon injury simulating Achilles tendinopathy. One side was then randomly allocated to receive ASTM, while the other received no treatment (control). ASTM was performed on the Achilles tendon on postoperative days 21, 24, 28, 31, 35, and 38. Tendons were harvested 10 days after treatment and examined with dynamic viscoelasticity and light microscopy. Results Cross-sectional area in the treated tendons was significantly greater than in controls. Storage modulus tended to be lower in the treated tendons but elasticity was not significantly increased. Loss modulus was significantly lower in the treated tendons. There was no significant difference found in tangent delta (loss modulus/storage modulus). Microscopy of control tendons showed that the tendon fibers were wavy and type III collagen was well stained. The tendon fibers of the augmented soft tissue mobilization treated tendons were not wavy and type III collagen was not prevalent. Conclusion Biomechanical and histological findings showed that the Achilles tendons treated with ASTM had better recovery of biomechanical function than did control tendons.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T15:15:45Z
       
  • Risk of Stroke After Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation in Medicare B
           Beneficiaries Aged 66 to 99 Years With Neck Pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): James M. Whedon , Yunjie Song , Todd A. Mackenzie , Reed B. Phillips , Timothy G. Lukovits , Jon D. Lurie
      Objective The purpose of this study was to quantify risk of stroke after chiropractic spinal manipulation, as compared to evaluation by a primary care physician, for Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 to 99 years with neck pain. Methods This is a retrospective cohort analysis of a 100% sample of annualized Medicare claims data on 1 157 475 beneficiaries aged 66 to 99 years with an office visit to either a chiropractor or primary care physician for neck pain. We compared hazard of vertebrobasilar stroke and any stroke at 7 and 30 days after office visit using a Cox proportional hazards model. We used direct adjusted survival curves to estimate cumulative probability of stroke up to 30 days for the 2 cohorts. Results The proportion of subjects with stroke of any type in the chiropractic cohort was 1.2 per 1000 at 7 days and 5.1 per 1000 at 30 days. In the primary care cohort, the proportion of subjects with stroke of any type was 1.4 per 1000 at 7 days and 2.8 per 1000 at 30 days. In the chiropractic cohort, the adjusted risk of stroke was significantly lower at 7 days as compared to the primary care cohort (hazard ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.45), but at 30 days, a slight elevation in risk was observed for the chiropractic cohort (hazard ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.19). Conclusions Among Medicare B beneficiaries aged 66 to 99 years with neck pain, incidence of vertebrobasilar stroke was extremely low. Small differences in risk between patients who saw a chiropractor and those who saw a primary care physician are probably not clinically significant.


      PubDate: 2015-01-16T21:48:10Z
       
  • Peripheral Oxidative Stress Blood Markers in Patients With Chronic Back or
           Neck Pain Treated With High-Velocity, Low-Amplitude Manipulation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Carolina Kolberg , Andréa Horst , Maira S. Moraes , Felipe Coutinho Kullmann Duarte , Ana Paula Konzen Riffel , Taína Scheid , Angela Kolberg , Wania A. Partata
      Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate oxidative-stress parameters in individuals with chronic neck or back pain after 5 weeks of treatment with high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation. Methods Twenty-three individuals aged 38.2 ± 11.7 years with nonspecific chronic neck or back pain verified by the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Chronic Pain Grade, with a sedentary lifestyle, no comorbidities, and not in adjuvant therapy, underwent treatment with HVLA chiropractic manipulation twice weekly for 5 weeks. Therapeutic procedures were carried out by an experienced chiropractor. Blood samples were assessed before and after treatment to determine the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and the levels of nitric oxide metabolites and lipid hydroperoxides. These blood markers were analyzed by paired Student t test. Differences were considered statistically significant, when P was <.05. Results There was no change in catalase but an increase in SOD (0.35 ± 0.03 U SOD per milligram of protein vs 0.44 ± 0.04 U SOD per milligram of protein; P < .05) and GPx (7.91 ± 0.61 nmol/min per milligram of protein vs 14.07 ± 1.07 nmol/min per milligram of protein; P < .001) activities after the treatment. The nitric oxide metabolites and the lipid hydroperoxides did not change after treatment. Conclusion High-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation twice weekly for 5 weeks increases the SOD and GPx activities. Previous studies have shown a relationship between pain and oxidative and nitrosative parameters; thus, it is possible that changes in these enzymes might be related to the analgesic effect of HVLA spinal manipulation.


      PubDate: 2015-01-11T21:40:54Z
       
  • Using PubMed Search Strings for Efficient Retrieval of Manual Therapy
           Research Literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Paolo Pillastrini , Carla Vanti , Stefania Curti , Stefano Mattioli , Silvano Ferrari , Francesco Saverio Violante , Andrew Guccione
      Objective The aim of this study was to construct PubMed search strings that could efficiently retrieve studies on manual therapy (MT), especially for time-constrained clinicians. Methods Our experts chose 11 Medical Subject Heading terms describing MT along with 84 additional potential terms. For each term that was able to retrieve more than 100 abstracts, we systematically extracted a sample of abstracts from which we estimated the proportion of studies potentially relevant to MT. We then constructed 2 search strings: 1 narrow (threshold of pertinent articles ≥40%) and 1 expanded (including all terms for which a proportion had been calculated). We tested these search strings against articles on 2 conditions relevant to MT (thoracic and temporomandibular pain). We calculated the number of abstracts needed to read (NNR) to identify 1 potentially pertinent article in the context of these conditions. Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of the proposed PubMed search strings to identify relevant articles included in a systematic review on spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low back pain. Results Fifty-five search terms were able to extract more than 100 citations. The NNR to find 1 potentially pertinent article using the narrow string was 1.2 for thoracic pain and 1.3 for temporomandibular pain, and the NNR for the expanded string was 1.9 and 1.6, respectively. The narrow search strategy retrieved all the randomized controlled trials included in the systematic review selected for comparison. Conclusion The proposed PubMed search strings may help health care professionals locate potentially pertinent articles and review a large number of MT studies efficiently to better implement evidence-based practice.


      PubDate: 2014-12-12T21:18:29Z
       
  • Regional Lumbar Motion and Patient-Rated Outcomes: A Secondary Analysis of
           Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Rune M Mieritz , Gert Bronfort , Jan Hartvigsen
      Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship in change scores between regional lumbar motion and patient-rated pain of the previous week and back-related function in chronic low back pain patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial and treated with either exercise therapy or spinal manipulation using 6 different motion parameters. Methods Regional lumbar motions were sampled using a 6 degrees of freedom instrumented spatial linkage system in 199 participants at baseline and 12-week follow-up. The regional lumbar motion data were analyzed as a total cohort as well as relative to subgroup stratifications; back pain only vs back and leg pain, and treatment modality. For identifying clinically meaningful improvements in the measurements of back pain and back-related function, we used a 30% threshold. Results The relationship between change scores in patient-rated outcomes and objective measures of regional lumbar motion was found to be weak. In contrast, distribution of pain and treatment received affected associations between motion parameters and patient-rated outcomes. Thus, stronger correlation coefficients and significant differences between clinically relevant improved vs no clinical relevant change were found in some motion parameters in the subgroup with back pain only and the treatment group receiving spinal manipulation. Conclusion Overall, changes in regional lumbar motion were poorly associated with patient-rated outcomes measured by back-related function and back pain intensity scores. However, associations between regional lumbar motion vs patient-rated pain and back-related function were different in relative subgroups (back pain only vs back and leg pain and treatment).


      PubDate: 2014-11-06T13:49:49Z
       
  • Immediate Changes After Manual Therapy in Resting-State Functional
           Connectivity as Measured by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in
           Participants With Induced Low Back Pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2014
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Charles W. Gay , Michael E. Robinson , Steven Z. George , William M. Perlstein , Mark D. Bishop
      Objective The purposes of this study were to use functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the immediate changes in functional connectivity (FC) between brain regions that process and modulate the pain experience after 3 different types of manual therapies (MT) and to identify reductions in experimentally induced myalgia and changes in local and remote pressure pain sensitivity. Methods Twenty-four participants (17 men; mean age ± SD, 21.6 ± 4.2 years) who completed an exercise-injury protocol to induce low back pain were randomized into 3 groups: chiropractic spinal manipulation (n = 6), spinal mobilization (n = 8), or therapeutic touch (n = 10). The primary outcome was the immediate change in FC as measured on functional magnetic resonance imaging between the following brain regions: somatosensory cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, thalamus, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, anterior and poster insula, and periaqueductal gray. Secondary outcomes were immediate changes in pain intensity, measured with a 101-point numeric rating scale, and pain sensitivity, measured with a handheld dynamometer. Repeated-measures analysis of variance models and correlation analyses were conducted to examine treatment effects and the relationship between within-person changes across outcome measures. Results Changes in FC were found between several brain regions that were common to all 3 MT interventions. Treatment-dependent changes in FC were also observed between several brain regions. Improvement was seen in pain intensity after all interventions (P < .05) with no difference between groups (P > .05). There were no observed changes in pain sensitivity, or an association between primary and secondary outcome measures. Conclusion These results suggest that MTs (chiropractic spinal manipulation, spinal mobilization, and therapeutic touch) have an immediate effect on the FC between brain regions involved in processing and modulating the pain experience. This suggests that neurophysiologic changes after MT may be an underlying mechanism of pain relief.


      PubDate: 2014-10-06T14:52:15Z
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014