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Journal Cover Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0161-4754
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3123 journals]
  • Repeatability of Cervical Joint Flexion and Extension Within and Between
           Days
    • Authors: Xu Wang; René Lindstroem; Maciej Plocharski; Lasse Riis Østergaard; Thomas Graven-Nielsen
      Pages: 10 - 18
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Xu Wang, René Lindstroem, Maciej Plocharski, Lasse Riis Østergaard, Thomas Graven-Nielsen
      Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate within- and between-day repeatability of free and unrestricted healthy cervical flexion and extension motion when assessing dynamic cervical spine motion. Methods Fluoroscopy videos of 2 repeated cervical flexion and 2 repeated extension motions were examined for within-day repeatability (20-second interval) for 18 participants (6 females) and between-day repeatability (1-week interval) for 15 participants (6 females). The dynamic cervical motions were free and unrestricted from neutral to end range. The flexion videos and extension videos were evenly divided into 10% epochs of the C0-to-C7 range of motion. Within-day and between-day repeatability of joint motion angles (all 7 joints and epochs, respectively) was tested in a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Joint motion angle differences between repetitions were calculated for each epoch and joint (7 joints), and these joint motion angle differences between within-day and between-day repetitions were tested in mixed-model analysis of variance. Results For all joints and epochs, respectively, no significant differences were found in joint motion angle between within-day or between-day repetitions. There were no significant effects of joint motion angle differences between within-day and between-day repetitions. The average within-day joint motion angle differences across all joints and epochs were 0.00° ± 2.98° and 0.00° ± 3.05° for flexion and extension, respectively. The average between-day joint motion angle differences were 0.02° ± 2.56° and 0.05° ± 2.40° for flexion and extension, respectively. Conclusions This is the first study to report the within-day and between-day joint motion angle differences of repeated cervical flexion and extension. This study supports the idea that cervical joints repeat their motion accurately.

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T17:58:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.08.005
       
  • Glucocorticoid-Induced Changes in Rat Skeletal Muscle Biomechanical and
           Viscoelastic Properties: Aspects of Aging
    • Authors: Karin Alev; Arved Vain; Maire Aru; Ando Pehme; Priit Purge; Priit Kaasik; Teet Seene
      Pages: 19 - 24
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Karin Alev, Arved Vain, Maire Aru, Ando Pehme, Priit Purge, Priit Kaasik, Teet Seene
      Objectives The purpose of this study was to estimate the state of tension (tone) and the biomechanical and viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle in aging rats during the administration of different doses of dexamethasone and to find the relationships among the state of muscle atrophy, muscle strength, and the abovementioned muscle properties. Methods Muscle state of tension, biomechanical (elasticity, dynamic stiffness) and viscoelastic (mechanical stress relaxation time, Deborah number) properties (using MyotonPRO, Myoton Ltd, Tallinn, Estonia), lean body mass (BM), and hind limb grip strength were measured before and after the administration of a 10-day treatment with dexamethasone 100 μg/100 g BM (young and old group) and 50 μg/100 g BM (old group). Results Muscle elasticity (logarithmic decrement) was lower in old animals (1.86 ± 0.03) in comparison with young adult rats (1.38 ± 0.04) (P < .01). After the 10-day treatment with dexamethasone 100 μg/100 g BM, young adult rats had 10% lower muscle elasticity (P < .01). The same dose of dexamethasone in old rats increased tone (frequency of natural oscillation) from 29.13 ± 0.51 Hz to 38.50 ± 0.95 Hz (P < .001). There were dose-dependent differences in dynamic stiffness and tone of muscle; changes in elasticity were independent of the dose in old animals. In old rats, the muscle’s viscoelastic properties decreased after dexamethasone administration. Significant correlation was found between changes in muscle logarithmic decrement and stiffness (rs = 0.90; P < .05) in old animals. Conclusions Biomechanical and viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle indicate changes in the main function of muscle during glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy and are in agreement with changes in hind limb strength. The myometric measurements indicate the direction and magnitude of change in muscle tissue after different doses of dexamethasone administration easily and quickly.

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T17:58:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.06.009
       
  • Concordance and Reliability of Photogrammetric Protocols for Measuring the
           Cervical Lordosis Angle: A Systematic Review of the Literature
    • Authors: Priscila Maria Nascimento Martins de Albuquerque; Geisa Guimarães de Alencar; Daniela Araújo de Oliveira; Gisela Rocha de Siqueira
      Pages: 71 - 80
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Priscila Maria Nascimento Martins de Albuquerque, Geisa Guimarães de Alencar, Daniela Araújo de Oliveira, Gisela Rocha de Siqueira
      Objective The aim of this study was to examine and interpret the concordance, accuracy, and reliability of photogrammetric protocols available in the literature for evaluating cervical lordosis in an adult population aged 18 to 59 years. Methods A systematic search of 6 electronic databases (MEDLINE via PubMed, LILACS, CINAHL, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science) located studies that assessed the reliability and/or concordance and/or accuracy of photogrammetric protocols for evaluating cervical lordosis, compared with radiography. Articles published through April 2016 were selected. Two independent reviewers used a critical appraisal tool (QUADAS and QAREL) to assess the quality of the selected studies. Results Two studies were included in the review and had high levels of reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.974-0.98). Only 1 study assessed the concordance between the methods, which was calculated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. To date, the accuracy of photogrammetry has not been investigated thoroughly. Conclusion We encountered no study in the literature that investigated the accuracy of photogrammetry in diagnosing hyperlordosis of cervical spine. However, both current studies report high levels of intra- and interrater reliability. To increase the level of evidence of photogrammetry in the evaluation of cervical lordosis, it is necessary to conduct further studies using a larger sample to increase the external validity of the findings.

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T17:58:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.08.004
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 41, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T17:58:29Z
       
  • Cervical Proprioception in a Young Population Who Spend Long Periods on
           Mobile Devices: A 2-Group Comparative Observational Study
    • Authors: Andrew Portelli; Susan A. Reid
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Andrew Portelli, Susan A. Reid
      Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate if young people with insidious-onset neck pain who spend long periods on mobile electronic devices (known as “text neck") have impaired cervical proprioception and if this is related to time on devices. Methods A 2-group comparative observational study was conducted at an Australian university. Twenty-two participants with text neck and 22 asymptomatic controls, all of whom were 18 to 35 years old and spent ≥4 hours per day on unsupported electronic devices, were assessed using the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test. Differences between groups were calculated using independent sample t-tests, and correlations between neck pain intensity, time on devices, and HRA test were performed using Pearson’s bivariate analysis. Results During cervical flexion, those with text neck (n = 22, mean age ± standard deviation [SD]: 21 ± 4 years, 59% female) had a 3.9° (SD: 1.4°) repositioning error, and the control group (n = 22, 20 ± 1 years, 68% female) had a 2.9° (SD: 1.2°) error. The mean difference was 1° (95% confidence interval: 0–2, P = .02). For other cervical movements, there was no difference between groups. There was a moderately significant correlation (P ≤ .05) between time spent on electronic devices and cervical pain intensity and between cervical pain intensity and HRA during flexion. Conclusion The participants with text neck had a greater proprioceptive error during cervical flexion compared with controls. This could be related to neck pain and time spent on electronic devices.

      PubDate: 2018-01-25T16:32:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.10.004
       
  • Criteria to Screen for Traumatic Cervical Spine Instability: A Consensus
           of Chiropractic Radiologists
    • Authors: Sarah Dion; Maja Stupar; Pierre Côté; Julie-Marthe Grenier; John A. Taylor
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Sarah Dion, Maja Stupar, Pierre Côté, Julie-Marthe Grenier, John A. Taylor
      Objective The purpose of this study was to establish consensus on a radiographic definition for cervical instability for routine use in chiropractic patients who sustain trauma to the cervical spine. Method We conducted a modified Delphi study with a panel of chiropractic radiologists. Panelists were asked to rate potential screening criteria for traumatic cervical spine instability when assessing cervical spine radiographs. Items rated as important for inclusion by at least 60% of participants in round 1 were submitted for a second round of voting in round 2. Items rated for inclusion by at least 75% of the participants in round 2 were used to create the consensus-based list of screening criteria. Participants were asked to vote and reach agreement on the final screening criteria list in round 3. Results Twenty-nine chiropractic radiologists participated in round 1. After 3 rounds of survey, 85% of participants approved the final consensus-based list of criteria for traumatic cervical spine instability screening, including 6 clinical signs and symptoms and 5 radiographic criteria. Participants agreed that the presence of 1 or more of these clinical signs and symptoms and/or 1 or more of the 5 radiographic criteria on routine static radiographic studies suggests cervical instability. Conclusion The consensus-based radiographic definition of traumatic cervical spine instability includes 6 clinical signs and symptoms and 5 radiographic criteria that doctors of chiropractic should apply to their patients who sustain trauma to the cervical spine.

      PubDate: 2018-01-14T16:01:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.10.002
       
  • Relationship Between Proprioception and Endurance Functionality of the
           Cervical Flexor Muscles in Chronic Neck Pain and Asymptomatic Participants
           
    • Authors: Leila Ghamkhar; Amir H. Kahlaee; Mohammad R. Nourbakhsh; Amena Ahmadi; Amir M. Arab
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Leila Ghamkhar, Amir H. Kahlaee, Mohammad R. Nourbakhsh, Amena Ahmadi, Amir M. Arab
      Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the relationship between flexion endurance capacity and joint position error in participants with or without chronic neck pain (CNP). Methods Sixty-one CNP and 60 asymptomatic volunteers participated in this cross-sectional, case-control, and correlational analysis study. The measured variables included absolute and constant joint repositioning errors in the sagittal and horizontal directions, clinical flexor endurance test score, pain intensity, and neck disability index. Results The groups did not statistically differ in flexion endurance (P > .05). The CNP group had a smaller absolute error on the right (P < .01) and left (P = .01) rotation and an overshooting error pattern in the flexion direction (P < .05). But the asymptomatic group did not exhibit any over-/undershooting pattern tendency (P > .05). Although flexion endurance was not correlated with any of the joint repositioning error components in either group, pain and disability scores were significantly correlated with left rotation absolute error (r = –0.34 and ρ = –0.37, respectively). Conclusion The clinical cervical flexor endurance test, ignoring the relative contribution of the deep and superficial groups of muscles, may not efficiently characterize CNP patients.

      PubDate: 2018-01-14T16:01:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.08.006
       
  • Association Between Symptoms of Central Sensitization and Cognitive
           Behavioral Factors in People With Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A
           Cross-sectional Study
    • Authors: Eva Huysmans; Kelly Ickmans; Dries Van Dyck; Jo Nijs; Yori Gidron; Nathalie Roussel; Andrea Polli; Maarten Moens; Lisa Goudman; Margot De Kooning
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Eva Huysmans, Kelly Ickmans, Dries Van Dyck, Jo Nijs, Yori Gidron, Nathalie Roussel, Andrea Polli, Maarten Moens, Lisa Goudman, Margot De Kooning
      Objective The objective of this cross-sectional study was to analyze the relationship between symptoms of central sensitization (CS) and important cognitive behavioral and psychosocial factors in a sample of patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Methods Participants with chronic nonspecific low back pain for at least 3 months were included in the study. They completed several questionnaires and a functional test. Pearson’s correlation was used to analyze associations between symptoms of CS and pain behavior, functioning, pain, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and illness perceptions. Additionally, a between-group analysis was performed to compare patients with and without clinically relevant symptoms of CS. Results Data from 38 participants were analyzed. Significant associations were found between symptoms of CS and all other outcomes, especially current pain (r = 0.510, P = .001), mean pain during the past 7 days (r = 0.505, P = .001), and pain catastrophizing (r = 0.518, P = .001). Patients with clinically relevant symptoms of CS scored significantly worse on all outcomes compared with persons without relevant symptoms of CS, except on functioning (P = .128). Conclusions Symptoms of CS were significantly associated with psychosocial and cognitive behavioral factors. Patients exhibiting a clinically relevant degree of symptoms of CS scored significantly worse on most outcomes, compared with the subgroup of the sample with fewer symptoms of CS.

      PubDate: 2018-01-14T16:01:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.08.007
       
  • Erratum to “Changes in Lower Limb Strength and Function Following Lumbar
           Spinal Mobilization” [J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2017;40(8):587-596]
    • Authors: Tsoi Sze Yuen; Joseph Ng; Pui Yu Lam; Mei Yan Lau; Wai Lam Siu; Ka Man Yu; Chi Ngai Lo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Tsoi Sze Yuen, Joseph Ng, Pui Yu Lam, Mei Yan Lau, Wai Lam Siu, Ka Man Yu, Chi Ngai Lo


      PubDate: 2018-01-14T16:01:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.12.001
       
  • Integration of Doctors of Chiropractic Into Private Sector Health Care
           Facilities in the United States: A Descriptive Survey
    • Authors: Stacie A. Salsbury; Christine M. Goertz; Elissa J. Twist; Anthony J. Lisi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Stacie A. Salsbury, Christine M. Goertz, Elissa J. Twist, Anthony J. Lisi
      Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic, facility, and practice characteristics of doctors of chiropractic (DCs) working in private sector health care settings in the United States. Methods We conducted an online, cross-sectional survey using a purposive sample of DCs (n = 50) working in integrated health care facilities. The 36-item survey collected demographic, facility, chiropractic, and interdisciplinary practice characteristics, which were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results The response rate was 76% (n = 38). Most respondents were men and mid-career professionals with a mean 21 years of experience in chiropractic. Doctors of chiropractic reported working in hospitals (40%), multispecialty offices (21%), ambulatory clinics (16%), or other (21%) health care settings. Most (68%) were employees and received salary compensation (59%). The median number of DCs per setting was 2 (range 1-8). Most DCs used the same health record as medical staff and worked in the same clinical setting. More than 60% reported co-management of patients with medical professionals. Integrated DCs most often received and made referrals to primary care, physical medicine, pain medicine, orthopedics, and physical or occupational therapy. Although in many facilities the DCs were exclusive providers of spinal manipulation (43%), in most, manipulative therapies also were delivered by physical therapists and osteopathic or medical physicians. Informal face-to-face consultations and shared health records were the most common communication methods. Conclusions Doctors of chiropractic are working in diverse medical settings within the private sector, in close proximity and collaboration with many provider types, suggesting a diverse role for chiropractors within conventional health care facilities.

      PubDate: 2018-01-14T16:01:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.10.003
       
  • A Qualitative Study of Doctors of Chiropractic in a Nova Scotian
           Practice-Based Research Network: Barriers and Facilitators to the
           Screening and Management of Psychosocial Factors for Patients With Low
           Back Pain
    • Authors: Peter Stilwell; Jill A. Hayden; Piaf Des Rosiers; Katherine Harman; Simon D. French; Janet A. Curran; Warren Hefford
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Peter Stilwell, Jill A. Hayden, Piaf Des Rosiers, Katherine Harman, Simon D. French, Janet A. Curran, Warren Hefford
      Objectives This study aimed to assess chiropractors’ awareness of clinical practice guidelines for low back pain and to identify barriers and facilitators to the screening and management of psychosocial factors in patients with low back pain. Methods This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews informed by the Theoretical Domains Framework with 10 Nova Scotian chiropractors who were members of a practice-based research network. Results The participants correctly identified what the guidelines generally recommend and described the value of psychosocial factors; however, none of the participants could name specific clinical practice guidelines for low back pain. We identified 6 themes related to barriers and facilitators for chiropractors screening and managing psychosocial factors. The themes revolved around the participants’ desire to fulfill patients’ anatomy-focused treatment expectations and a perceived lack of training for managing psychosocial factors. Participants had concerns about going beyond the chiropractic scope of practice, and they perceived a lack of practical psychosocial screening and management resources. Social factors, such as the influence of other health care practitioners, were reported as both barriers and facilitators to screening and managing psychosocial factors. Conclusions The participants in this study reported that they mostly treated with an anatomical and biomechanical focus and that they did not always address psychosocial factors identified in their patients with low back pain. Although these findings are limited to Nova Scotian chiropractors, the barriers identified appeared to be potentially modifiable and could be considered in other groups. Low-cost interventions, such as continuing education using evidence-informed behavior change techniques, could be considered to address these barriers.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T18:46:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.014
       
  • Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses to
           Pain Following Thoracic Thrust Manipulation in Individuals With Neck Pain:
           A Randomized Trial
    • Authors: Cheryl L. Sparks; Wen C. Liu; Joshua A. Cleland; Joseph P. Kelly; Sarah J. Dyer; Kathryn M. Szetela; James M. Elliott
      Pages: 625 - 634
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Cheryl L. Sparks, Wen C. Liu, Joshua A. Cleland, Joseph P. Kelly, Sarah J. Dyer, Kathryn M. Szetela, James M. Elliott
      Objective The purpose of this study was to examine whether cerebral activation in response to noxious mechanical stimuli varies with thrust manipulation (TM) when compared with sham manipulation (SM) as measured by blood oxygenation level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods Twenty-four volunteers (67% female) with complaints of acute or subacute mechanical (nontraumatic) neck pain satisfied eligibility requirements and agreed to participate. Participants were randomized to receive TM to the thoracic spine or SM, and then underwent functional magnetic resonance scanning while receiving noxious stimuli before and after TM or SM. An 11-point numeric pain rating scale was administered pre- and postmanipulation for neck pain and to determine perceptions of pain intensity with respect to neck pain and mechanical stimuli. Blood oxygenation level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging recorded the cerebral hemodynamic response to the mechanical stimuli. Results Imaging revealed significant group differences, with those individuals in the manipulation group exhibiting increased areas of activation (postmanipulation) in the insular and somatosensory cortices and individuals in the sham group exhibiting greater areas of activation in the precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area, and cingulate cortices (P < .05). However, between-group differences on the numeric pain rating scale for mechanical stimuli and for self-reported neck pain were not statistically significant. Conclusions This study provides preliminary level 2b evidence suggesting cortical responses in patients with nontraumatic neck pain may vary between thoracic TM and a sham comparator.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.010
       
  • Management of Back Pain-related Disorders in a Community With Limited
           Access to Health Care Services: A Description of Integration of
           Chiropractors as Service Providers
    • Authors: Peter C. Emary; Amy L. Brown; Douglas F. Cameron; Alexander F. Pessoa; Jennifer E. Bolton
      Pages: 635 - 642
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Peter C. Emary, Amy L. Brown, Douglas F. Cameron, Alexander F. Pessoa, Jennifer E. Bolton
      Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate a chiropractic service for back pain patients integrated within a publicly funded, multidisciplinary, primary care community health center in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada. Methods Patients consulting for back pain of any duration were referred by their medical doctor or nurse practitioner for chiropractic treatment at the community health center. Patients completed questionnaires at baseline and at discharge from the service. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive patients between January 2014 and January 2016. Results Questionnaire data were obtained from 93 patients. The mean age of the sample was 49.0 ± 16.27 years, and 66% were unemployed. More than three-quarters (77%) had had their back pain for more than a month, and 68% described it as constant. According to the Bournemouth Questionnaire, Bothersomeness, and global improvement scales, a majority (63%, 74%, and 93%, respectively) reported improvement at discharge, and most (82%) reported a significant reduction in pain medication. More than three-quarters (77%) did not visit their primary care provider while under chiropractic care, and almost all (93%) were satisfied with the service. According to the EuroQol 5 Domain questionnaire, more than one-third of patients (39%) also reported improvement in their general health state at discharge. Conclusion Implementation of an integrated chiropractic service was associated with high levels of improvement and patient satisfaction in a sample of patients of low socioeconomic status with subacute and chronic back pain.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.011
       
  • Relationship Between Subjective Experience of Individuals, Practitioner
           Seniority, Cavitation Occurrence, and 3-Dimensional Kinematics During
           Cervical Spine Manipulation
    • Authors: Bernard Van Geyt; Pierre-Michel A. Dugailly; Louis De Page; Veronique Feipel
      Pages: 643 - 648
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Bernard Van Geyt, Pierre-Michel A. Dugailly, Louis De Page, Veronique Feipel
      Objective The purpose of this study was to assess individual subjective experience (ISE) of the recipients of a cervical manipulation and to analyze the influence of kinematics, cavitation occurrence, and practitioner seniority on individual experience. Methods Practitioners with different seniority (years of experience) manipulated 20 asymptomatic volunteers at C3 and C5 on both sides. Kinematics were recorded using a 3-dimensional electrogoniometer, and ISE data were gathered through a questionnaire to explore the subjects’ experiences of manipulation in terms of tactile sensations, relaxation, perception of the task, and therapist handling. Kinematics, occurrence of cavitation, practitioner’s seniority, and ISE data were analyzed concurrently. Results Motion parameters obtained during manipulation were found to be influenced by cavitation occurrence and differences between practitioners. Data analysis indicated that ISE could be grouped into 2 factors. The first revolved around grip firmness and range and speed of practitioner’s gesture. The second factor represented patient’s relaxation and the precision of handling. Also, most ISE data correlated with kinematics, although a subjective measurement did not always correlate the highest with its objective counterpart. When cavitation occurred, ISE ratings were higher, suggesting that participants may associate cavitation with the success of manipulations. Higher practitioner seniority (more years of experience) induced feelings of higher speed, amplitude, firmness, and precision. Conclusions Recipients of cervical manipulation experienced different subjective feelings that can be expressed in 2 dimensions. These feelings are influenced by cavitation occurrence and practitioner’s seniority. A better understanding of an individual’s subjective experience related to cervical manipulation could increase confidence and improve the patient-therapist relationship, and it may provide further therapeutic perspectives for the practitioners.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.09.002
       
  • Immediate Effects of Upper Cervical Translatoric Mobilization on Cervical
           Mobility and Pressure Pain Threshold in Patients With Cervicogenic
           Headache: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Authors: Miguel Malo-Urriés; José Miguel Tricás-Moreno; Elena Estébanez-de-Miguel; César Hidalgo-García; Andoni Carrasco-Uribarren; Sara Cabanillas-Barea
      Pages: 649 - 658
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Miguel Malo-Urriés, José Miguel Tricás-Moreno, Elena Estébanez-de-Miguel, César Hidalgo-García, Andoni Carrasco-Uribarren, Sara Cabanillas-Barea
      Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effects of upper cervical translatoric spinal mobilization (UC-TSM) on cervical mobility and pressure pain threshold in subjects with cervicogenic headache (CEH). Methods Eighty-two volunteers (41.54 ± 15.29 years, 20 male and 62 female) with CEH participated in the study and were randomly divided into the control and treatment groups. The treatment group received UC-TSM and the control group remained in the same position for the same time as the UC-TSM group, but received no treatment. Cervical mobility (active cervical mobility and flexion-rotation test), pressure pain thresholds over upper trapezius muscles, C2-3 zygapophyseal joints and suboccipital muscles, and current headache intensity (visual analog scale) were measured before and immediately after the intervention by 2 blinded investigators. Results After the intervention, UC-TSM group exhibited significant increases in total cervical mobility (P = .002, d = 0.16) and the flexion–rotation test (P < .001, d = 0.81-0.85). No significant difference in cervical pressure pain thresholds were observed between groups (P > .05). Nevertheless, there was a significantly lower intensity of headache in the UC-TSM group (P = .039, d = 0.57). Conclusions Upper cervical translatoric spinal mobilization intervention increased upper, and exhibited a tendency to improve general, cervical range of motion and induce immediate headache relief in subjects with CEH.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.007
       
  • Determining Predictive Outcome Factors for a Multimodal Treatment Program
           in Low Back Pain Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study
    • Authors: Rahmat Adnan; Jessica Van Oosterwijck; Barbara Cagnie; Evy Dhondt; Stijn Schouppe; Jens Van Akeleyen; Tine Logghe; Lieven Danneels
      Pages: 659 - 667
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Rahmat Adnan, Jessica Van Oosterwijck, Barbara Cagnie, Evy Dhondt, Stijn Schouppe, Jens Van Akeleyen, Tine Logghe, Lieven Danneels
      Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the factors predictive of outcomes in a multifaceted rehabilitation program for acute and chronic low back pain (LBP) patients. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed on 565 LBP patients (153 acute and 412 chronic) who participated in a multimodal treatment program at an outpatient clinic in Belgium between 2007 and 2010. The predictive value of several factors, including age, sex, body mass index, fat percentage, Oswestry Disability Index score, Beck Depression Index score, Numeric Pain Rating Scale score for back and leg pain intensity, and Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia score on favorable treatment outcomes was examined using logistic regression analysis. Results The results from the multivariate regression indicated that a higher score on the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (odds ratio [OR] = 0.92) decreases the odds of a favorable outcome following a multimodal treatment program in acute LBP. Older age (OR = 0.97), low LBP intensity (OR = 1.191), and higher scores on the Beck Depression Index (OR = 0.96) and the Oswestry LBP Disability Index (OR = 0.93) decreased the odds of a favorable treatment outcome in chronic LBP. Conclusions The findings of this study indicate that factors predictive of a (un)favorable treatment outcome differ between acute and chronic LBP. Specifically, kinesiophobia is predictive of poor treatment outcome in acute LBP. In chronic LBP, older age, low LBP intensity, and higher degrees of depression and LBP-related disability are predictive of poor treatment outcome. Therapists should consider assessing these predictive factors at intake to tailor the content of the multimodal treatment program to individual patient needs.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.09.001
       
  • Functional Limitations in Adults Who Utilize Chiropractic or Osteopathic
           Manipulation in the United States: Analysis of the 2012 National Health
           Interview Survey
    • Authors: Mary L. Forte; Michele Maiers
      Pages: 668 - 675
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Mary L. Forte, Michele Maiers
      Objectives The goals of this study were to identify self-reported differences in function, comorbidities, and medical service utilization among adults who reported using chiropractic and/or osteopathic manipulation in the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, and to compare these between older and younger adults. Methods We conducted a descriptive study of adults aged 18 or older who were included in the 2012 National Health Interview Survey and the Alternative Medicine Questionnaire. We included those who reported using chiropractic and/or osteopathic manipulation in the past 12 months. Responses were analyzed using SAS software. Weighted estimates were reported as percentages of chiropractic/osteopathic users overall and by age group (<65 years vs ≥65 years). Results Among the 8.5% of US adults who reported receiving manipulation, 97.6% saw chiropractors. Most adults were under age 65 (83.7%), female (56.6%), and white (85.1%). Except for sitting tolerance, functional limitations were significantly higher among older manipulation users compared with younger manipulation users (all P < .001). Older (vs younger) chiropractic/osteopathic users more often reported functional limitations (65.7% vs 37.2%), had difficulty walking without equipment (14.7% vs 2.8%), found it very difficult or were unable to walk one-quarter mile (15.7% vs 3.8%) or climb 10 steps (11.4% vs 2.5%), and needed help with instrumental activities of daily living (6.9% vs 2.0%). Comorbidities differed by age: cardiovascular events/conditions, cancer, diabetes, and arthritis were more common among older adults, and headaches, neck pain, and depression were more frequent in younger adults. Similar proportions of older and younger adults had emergency room visits (23.0% vs 21.7%); older adults reported more surgeries (26.1% vs 15.4%). Conclusions Notable differences exist in functional limitations and comorbidities between older and younger chiropractic and osteopathic manipulation users. This information could inform clinical practice, education, and policy.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.015
       
  • Expectations of Qigong and Exercise Therapy in Patients With Long-term
           Neck Pain: An Analysis of a Prospective Randomized Study
    • Authors: Liselott C.G. Persson; Birgitta Lansinger; Jane Carlsson; Gunvor Gard
      Pages: 676 - 684
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Liselott C.G. Persson, Birgitta Lansinger, Jane Carlsson, Gunvor Gard
      Objective The aim of the present study was to study differences in treatment expectations after participating in qigong and exercise therapy among participants with long-term neck pain, the impact of total group expectations on treatment outcomes, and the relationship between these treatment expectations and pain and disability. Method Reliable questionnaires were used. Differences between qigong and exercise was studied in a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial (n = 122). The impact of total group expectations on treatment outcomes and the association between these treatment expectations and pain and disability were studied with nonparametric statistical analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficient. Results The exercise group had higher expectations than the qigong group before the intervention on how logical treatment seemed to be and after the intervention on treatment credibility (ie, that the treatment would reduce/eliminate neck pain). The exercise group was also more confident that the treatment could reduce neck pain and significantly increased their expectations of reduced neck pain over the 3-month intervention period. Both treatment groups had high expectations of the assigned treatment. Those with high expectations had better treatment outcomes in pain and disability. The relationship between treatment expectations and credibility, pain, and disability was weak. Conclusions The current findings support the role of assessment of expectation/credibility for positive treatment results. An understanding of each patient’s treatment expectations may be helpful in guiding patients with respect to appropriate interventions and as an indication of risk of poor outcome.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.009
       
  • The Reliability of Standing Sagittal Measurements of Spinal Curvature and
           Range of Motion in Older Women With and Without Hyperkyphosis Using a
           Skin-Surface Device
    • Authors: Tayebeh Roghani; Minoo Khalkhali Zavieh; Abbas Rahimi; Saeed Talebian; Farideh Dehghan Manshadi; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban; Nicole King; Wendy Katzman
      Pages: 685 - 691
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Tayebeh Roghani, Minoo Khalkhali Zavieh, Abbas Rahimi, Saeed Talebian, Farideh Dehghan Manshadi, Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban, Nicole King, Wendy Katzman
      Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the intrarater reliability of a skin-surface instrument (Spinal Mouse, Idiag, Voletswil, Switzerland) in measuring standing sagittal curvature and global mobility of the spine in older women with and without hyperkyphosis. Methods Measurements were made in 19 women with hyperkyphosis (thoracic kyphosis angle ≥50°), mean age 67 ± 5 years, and 14 women without hyperkyphosis (thoracic kyphosis angle <50°), mean age 63 ± 6 years. Sagittal thoracic and lumbar curvature and mobility of the spine were assessed with the Spinal Mouse during neutral standing, full spinal flexion, and full spinal extension. Tests were performed by the same examiner on 2 days with a 72-hour interval. The intrarater reliability of the measurements was analyzed using the intraclass correlation coefficient, standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change. Results Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.89 to 0.99 in both groups. The standard errors of measurement ranged from 1.02° to 2.06° in the hyperkyphosis group and from 1.15° to 2.22° in the normal group. The minimal detectable change ranged from 2.85° to 5.73° in the hyperkyphosis group and from 3.20° to 6.17° in the normal group. Conclusions Our results indicated that the Spinal Mouse has excellent intrarater reliability for the measurement of sagittal thoracic and lumbar curvature and mobility of the spine in older women.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.008
       
  • Development and Validation of Prediction Equations for Spinal Curve Angles
           Based on Skin Surface Measurements
    • Authors: Tássia S. Furlanetto; Eduardo B.C. de Oliveira; Cláudia T. Candotti; Adriane Vieira; Paula V. de Mesquita; Isis J.R.L. Navarro; Jefferson F. Loss
      Pages: 692 - 699
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Tássia S. Furlanetto, Eduardo B.C. de Oliveira, Cláudia T. Candotti, Adriane Vieira, Paula V. de Mesquita, Isis J.R.L. Navarro, Jefferson F. Loss
      Objective The purpose of this study was to develop, assess the reliability of, and validate prediction equations that estimate the sagittal curves of the spine from the skin surface. Methods Forty digital panoramic radiographs were used to develop the prediction equation, and 59 radiographs were used to assess reliability and validate the equations. For evaluation of the thoracic and lumbar curves, anatomical reference points were marked on the vertebral body, spinous process, and skin surface at the C6, C7, T2, T4, T6, T8, T10, T12, L2, L4, and S2 vertebrae. Three third-degree polynomials were obtained, estimated with the least squares method: inner curves from the centroid of the vertebral bodies and from the apex of the spinous processes and external curve from the skin surface. The magnitude of the curves of each region was estimated based on the angle between tangent lines at several vertebral levels. Prediction equations were obtained (simple linear regression) for the vertebral levels that had the best correlation between the inner and surface curves. The validation of the prediction equations was confirmed using Pearson’s correlation (r), Student t test, and root mean square error. The reliability of the method was confirmed using the intraclass correlation coefficient, standard error of measurement, and minimal detectable change (α = 0.05). Results The best correlations were obtained between the T4-T12 (thoracic) and T10-S2 (lumbar) levels (r > 0.85). For the intrarater and interrater reliability, the correlation was higher than 0.965 and higher than 0.896, respectively. There was a significant and strong correlation between estimated and actual values for the thoracic and lumbar curves, which was confirmed by the t-test results and by the root mean square error inferior to 1°. Conclusion Prediction equations can precisely and accurately estimate the angles of the internal sagittal curves of the spine from the skin surface.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.06.015
       
  • Accuracy of a Radiological Evaluation Method for Thoracic and Lumbar
           Spinal Curvatures Using Spinous Processes
    • Authors: Bárbara V. Marchetti; Cláudia T. Candotti; Eduardo G. Raupp; Eduardo B.C. Oliveira; Tássia S. Furlanetto; Jefferson F. Loss
      Pages: 700 - 707
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9
      Author(s): Bárbara V. Marchetti, Cláudia T. Candotti, Eduardo G. Raupp, Eduardo B.C. Oliveira, Tássia S. Furlanetto, Jefferson F. Loss
      Objective The purpose of this study was to assess a radiographic method for spinal curvature evaluation in children, based on spinous processes, and identify its normality limits. Methods The sample consisted of 90 radiographic examinations of the spines of children in the sagittal plane. Thoracic and lumbar curvatures were evaluated using angular (apex angle [AA]) and linear (sagittal arrow [SA]) measurements based on the spinous processes. The same curvatures were also evaluated using the Cobb angle (CA) method, which is considered the gold standard. For concurrent validity (AA vs CA), Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient, root-mean-square error, Pitman- Morgan test, and Bland-Altman analysis were used. For reproducibility (AA, SA, and CA), the intraclass correlation coefficient, standard error of measurement, and minimal detectable change measurements were used. Results A significant correlation was found between CA and AA measurements, as was a low root-mean-square error. The mean difference between the measurements was 0° for thoracic and lumbar curvatures, and the mean standard deviations of the differences were ±5.9° and 6.9°, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients of AA and SA were similar to or higher than the gold standard (CA). The standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change of the AA were always lower than the CA. Conclusion This study determined the concurrent validity, as well as intra- and interrater reproducibility, of the radiographic measurements of kyphosis and lordosis in children.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.013
       
  • Contribution of Load Expectations to Neuromechanical Adaptations During a
           Freestyle Lifting Task: A Pilot Study
    • Authors: Anne Courbalay; Charles Tétreau; Arnaud Lardon; Thomas Deroche; Vincent Cantin; Martin Descarreaux
      Pages: 547 - 557
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 8
      Author(s): Anne Courbalay, Charles Tétreau, Arnaud Lardon, Thomas Deroche, Vincent Cantin, Martin Descarreaux
      Objectives The main goal of this study was to determine to what extent load expectations modulate neuromechanical adaptations in individuals with and without chronic low back pain (cLBP) when lifting and lowering various loads. The second goal was to assess the feasibility of a simple lifting protocol during which expectations about loads were manipulated. Methods Seventeen participants with cLBP and 18 participants without low back pain were asked to lift and lower boxes of mild to moderate loads. Two kinds of expectations (lighter and heavier) were respectively associated to each experimental block. Self-reported exertion was assessed to control for expectations modulation. Erector spinae and vastus lateralis electromyography (EMG) activity were recorded and kinematics angle calculated. Results The results showed a main effect of expectations, with loads introduced as heavier being associated to a higher exertion compared with loads introduced as lighter. EMG activity analyses revealed significant interaction involving expectations, movement phase, and loads, as well as significant differences between groups. Kinematic angles did not reveal any significant effect of expectations nor group during the lifting phase. Conclusions Psychological factors may contribute to neuromechanical adaptations to low back pain. Our preliminary findings show that expectations about loads may result in neuromechanical differences between individuals with cLBP and those without cLBP. This pilot study showed that testing the manipulation of expectations and EMG records was feasible but highlighted the need to go beyond single infrared markers to assess kinematics.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.004
       
  • Evaluation of Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Measurement Properties of
           STarT Back Screening Tool: A Systematic Review
    • Authors: Fadi M. Al Zoubi; Owis Eilayyan; Nancy E. Mayo; André E. Bussières
      Pages: 558 - 572
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 8
      Author(s): Fadi M. Al Zoubi, Owis Eilayyan, Nancy E. Mayo, André E. Bussières
      Objective The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the extent to which the STarT Back Screening Tool (SBST) has been evaluated for (1) the quality of translation of evidence for cross-cultural adaptation and (2) the measurement properties in languages other than English. Methods A systematic search of 8 databases, including Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, AMED, Scopus, PubMed, and Web of Science, was performed. Electronic databases were searched for the period between 2008 and December 27, 2016. We included studies related to cross-cultural adaptation, including translation and assessment of the measurement properties of SBST. Study selection, translation, methodologic and quality assessments, and data extraction were performed independently by 2 reviewers. Results Of the 1566 citations retrieved, 17 studies were admissible, representing 11 different SBST versions in 10 languages. The quadratic weighted κ statistics of the 2 reviewers, for the translation, methodologic assessment, and quality assessment were 0.85, 0.76, and 0.83, respectively. For translation, only 2 versions (Belgian-French and Mandarin) fulfilled all requirements. None of the versions had tested all the measurement properties, and when performed, these were found to have been conducted inadequately. With regard to quality assessment, overall, the included versions had a “Poor” total summary score except 2 (Persian and Swiss-German), which were rated as “Fair.” Conclusions Few versions fully met the standard criteria for valid translation, and none of the versions tested all the measurement properties. There is a clear need for more accurate cross-cultural adaptation of SBST and greater attention to the quality of psychometric evaluation of the adapted versions of SBST. At this time, caution is recommended when using SBST in languages other than English.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.005
       
  • Chiropractic Management for US Female Veterans With Low Back Pain: A
           Retrospective Study of Clinical Outcomes
    • Authors: Kelsey L. Corcoran; Andrew S. Dunn; Lance R. Formolo; Gregory P. Beehler
      Pages: 573 - 579
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 8
      Author(s): Kelsey L. Corcoran, Andrew S. Dunn, Lance R. Formolo, Gregory P. Beehler
      Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if female US veterans had clinically significant improvement in low back pain after chiropractic management. Methods This is a retrospective chart review of 70 courses of care for female veterans with a chief complaint of low back pain who received chiropractic management through the VA Western New York Healthcare System in Buffalo, New York. A paired t test was used to compare baseline and discharge outcomes for the Back Bournemouth Questionnaire. The minimum clinically important difference was set as a 30% improvement in the outcome measure from baseline to discharge. Results The average patient was 44.8 years old, overweight (body mass index 29.1 kg/m2), and white (86%). The mean number of chiropractic treatments was 7.9. Statistical significance was found for the Back Bournemouth Questionnaire outcomes. The mean raw score improvement was 12.4 points (P < .001), representing a 27.3% change from baseline with 47% of courses of care meeting or exceeding the minimum clinically important difference. Conclusion For our sample of female veterans with low back pain, clinical outcomes from baseline to discharge improved under chiropractic care. Although further research is warranted, chiropractic care may be of value in contributing to the pain management needs of this unique patient population.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.001
       
  • A Finite Element Analysis of Stress Distribution and Disk Displacement in
           Response to Lumbar Rotation Manipulation in the Sitting and Side-Lying
           Positions
    • Authors: Li Li; Tong Shen; Yi-Kai Li
      Pages: 580 - 586
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 8
      Author(s): Li Li, Tong Shen, Yi-Kai Li
      Objective This study aimed to investigate stress distribution and disk displacement in healthy and degenerated intervertebral disks during simulated lumbar rotation manipulation (LRM) in the sitting and side-lying positions. Methods Three-dimensional (3D) finite element models of healthy, mildly degenerated and moderately degenerated L4/5 spinal units were reconstructed. Lumbar rotation manipulation in the sitting and side-lying positions were simulated, and alterations in stress distribution and disk displacement in the lumbar disks were observed. Results The application of LRM in the sitting or side-lying position resulted in a similar stress distribution in healthy, mildly degenerated, and moderately degenerated disks. Stress was concentrated at the anterior right side of the annulus. In all disks, intradiskal pressure (IDP) and maximum von Mises stress were higher during LRM in the sitting position than during LRM in the side-lying position. During these manipulations, Intradiskal pressure and stress in the annulus of moderately degenerated disks were higher than in mildly degenerated disks. Displacement was most obvious in healthy disks. Conclusions Mildly and moderately degenerated lumbar disks were subject to higher stress during LRM in the sitting position than during LRM in the side-lying position. Intradiskal pressure and the maximum von Mises stress in the annulus of moderately degenerated disks increased, suggesting the need for caution when treating patients with moderately compromised disks. Although our results are in accordance with previously published data, they are simulated and preliminary and do not necessarily replicate the clinical condition.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.006
       
  • Changes in Lower Limb Strength and Function Following Lumbar Spinal
           Mobilization
    • Authors: Tsoi Sze Yuen; Pui Yu Lam; Mei Yan Lau; Wai Lam Siu; Ka Man Yu; Chi Ngai Lo; Joseph Ng
      Pages: 587 - 596
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 8
      Author(s): Tsoi Sze Yuen, Pui Yu Lam, Mei Yan Lau, Wai Lam Siu, Ka Man Yu, Chi Ngai Lo, Joseph Ng
      Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate whether grade III passive lumbar rotational mobilization on L2-3 can improve hip flexor strength and performance in the single-leg triple-hop test in asymptomatic young adults. Methods Twenty-four participants (12 men, 12 women) aged from 19 to 26 years who were positive in the hip flexor “break” test were recruited in this study. They were randomly allocated to the treatment group or sham group. Isometric hip flexor torque (N·m) and single-leg triple-hop distance (cm) were measured before and after a passive lumbar rotational mobilization or a sham intervention. Results After the intervention, both the treatment and sham groups exhibited a significant increase in longest hop distance (P = .040 and .044, respectively). The treatment group had a significantly higher (3.41 ± 5.44%) positive percentage change in torque than the sham group (–2.36 ± 5.81%) (P = .02). Conclusion The study results indicated a potential effect of grade III passive lumbar rotational mobilization in improving hip flexor strength. However, whether the improvement in hopping performance was the result of a treatment effect or a learning effect could not be determined.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.003
       
  • Intrarater and Inter-rater Reliability of Active Cervical Range of Motion
           in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain Measured With Technological and
           Common Use Devices: A Systematic Review With Meta-regression
    • Authors: Angie Rondoni; Giacomo Rossettini; Diego Ristori; Fabio Gallo; Marco Strobe; Federico Giaretta; Andrea Battistin; Marco Testa
      Pages: 597 - 608
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 8
      Author(s): Angie Rondoni, Giacomo Rossettini, Diego Ristori, Fabio Gallo, Marco Strobe, Federico Giaretta, Andrea Battistin, Marco Testa
      Objectives The purpose of this systematic review was to compare intrarater and inter-rater reliability of active cervical range of motion (ACROM) measures obtained with technological devices to those assessed with low-cost devices in patients with nonspecific neck pain. As a secondary outcome, we investigated if ACROM reliability is influenced by the plane of the assessed movement. Methods Medline, Scopus, Embase, the Cochrane Library, CINHAL, PEDro, and gray literature were searched until August 2016. Inclusion criteria were reliability design, population of adults with nonspecific neck pain, examiners of any level of experience, measures repeated at least twice, and statistical indexes on reliability. A device was considered inexpensive if it cost less than €500. The risk of bias of included studies was assessed by Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies. Results The search yielded 35 151 records. Nine studies met all eligibility criteria. Their Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies mean score was 3.7 of 11. No significant effect of the type of device (inexpensive vs expensive) on intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was identified for intrarater (ICC = 0.93 vs 0.91; P > .99) and inter-rater reliability (ICC = 0.80 vs 0.87; P > .99). The plane of movement did not affect inter-rater reliability (P = .11). Significant influences were identified with intrarater reliability (P = .0001) of inexpensive devices, where intrarater reliability decreased (P = .01) in side bending, compared with flexion-extension. Conclusions The use of expensive devices to measure ACROM in adults with nonspecific neck pain does not seem to improve the reliability of the assessment. Side bending had a lower level of intrarater reliability.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.002
       
  • Comparison of Pressure Pain Thresholds in Upper Trapezius and Temporalis
           Muscles Trigger Points Between Tension Type Headache and Healthy
           Participants: A Case–Control Study
    • Authors: Carlos Romero-Morales; Gonzalo Jaén-Crespo; David Rodríguez-Sanz; Irene Sanz-Corbalán; Daniel López-López; César Calvo-Lobo
      Pages: 609 - 614
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 8
      Author(s): Carlos Romero-Morales, Gonzalo Jaén-Crespo, David Rodríguez-Sanz, Irene Sanz-Corbalán, Daniel López-López, César Calvo-Lobo
      Objective To date, the minimum clinical differences (MCDs) in the pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of the upper trapezius and temporalis muscles have not yet been established in participants with tension-type headache (TTH). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the MCDs of the PPTs of the upper trapezius and temporalis in participants with TTH and those without TTH. Methods The sample comprised 120 participants with TTH (n = 60; mean [standard deviation] years = 38.30 [10.05]) and without TTH (n = 60; 34 [8.20]). The participants were recruited from an outpatient clinic in Spain from 2014 to 2016. The PPTs of the most hyperalgesic trigger points of the upper trapezius and temporalis were assessed. Results There were statistically significant differences, mean (standard deviation) kg/cm2, for the right upper trapezius PPT (P < .001; 1.52 [0.35] vs 2.37 [0.49]), the left upper trapezius PPT (P < .001; 1.53 [0.36] vs 2.29 [0.49]), the right temporalis PPT (P = .008; 1.56 [0.31] vs 1.72 [0.33]), and the left temporalis PPT (P = .001; 1.57 [0.27] vs 1.74 [0.30]) between participants with and without TTH, respectively. Conclusions The PPT MCDs for the right and left upper trapezius and the right and left temporalis were 0.85, 0.76, 0.16, and 0.17 kg/cm2, respectively, for the clinical management of trigger points in participants with TTH.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.06.014
       
  • Immediate Changes in Resting and Contracted Thickness of Transversus
           Abdominis After Dry Needling of Lumbar Multifidus in Healthy Participants:
           A Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial
    • Authors: Emilio J. Puentedura; Sarah J. Buckingham; Daniella Morton; Crystal Montoya; Cesar Fernandez de las Penas
      Pages: 615 - 623
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 8
      Author(s): Emilio J. Puentedura, Sarah J. Buckingham, Daniella Morton, Crystal Montoya, Cesar Fernandez de las Penas
      Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in resting and/or contraction thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA) muscle after dry needling (DN) of the lumbar multifidus (LM) in asymptomatic participants. Methods A randomized controlled laboratory trial with crossover design was performed. Forty-seven healthy individuals who had not experienced low back pain in the previous 6 months were randomly assigned to receive DN to the LM or a sham-DN intervention. Participants received both interventions separated at least 7 days apart. They were instructed on how to perform a concentric contraction of TrA. Resting and contraction thicknesses of the TrA were obtained through real-time ultrasound measurements before and immediately after each intervention by an assessor blinded to the intervention received. Data from 4 individuals had to be excluded because of poor image quality. Results Two-way analysis of variance revealed a significant contraction with treatment interaction (F [1,42] = 11.489; P = .002). Simple main effects using paired-samples t tests and a Bonferroni post hoc analysis revealed differences in contracted states of the TrA for DN vs sham-DN (P = .009) and between contracted and resting states for the DN group (P = .001): after DN, TrA thickness at rest exhibited a mean decrease of 0.03 cm and a mean increase of 0.05 cm during contraction. Conclusion This study suggests that application of DN to LM was accompanied by a decreased resting thickness and an increased contraction thickness of the TrA in asymptomatic participants.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.06.013
       
  • Pediatric Patients in Swiss Chiropractic Clinics: A Questionnaire Survey
    • Authors: Mette Hobaek Siegenthaler
      Pages: 477 - 485
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 7
      Author(s): Mette Hobaek Siegenthaler
      Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate practice characteristics of chiropractors who treat pediatric patients in Swiss chiropractic clinics. Methods An online survey questionnaire was created and tested for face and content validity. Participation by Swiss chiropractors was voluntary and anonymous and completed November to December 2015. The data were analyzed using SPSS. The analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results The sample consisted of 144 chiropractors, which represented a 53% response rate, and 98% of the responding practitioners treated patients younger than age 18. The proportion of pediatric patients treated was 8.7%. The most common pediatric age groups were schoolchildren and adolescents, with infants younger than 6 months being the third most common. Musculoskeletal complaints were the most common conditions treated in all age groups. In children younger than 2 years old, nonmusculoskeletal conditions were well represented. Prophylactic examination was common among children 6 years and younger. A total of 61% of responding chiropractors received direct referrals from medical doctors and 56% received direct referrals from pediatricians. The most common age groups for referrals from pediatricians were schoolchildren and adolescents. Only 15% of the chiropractors wrote reports about their pediatric patients to their pediatrician often or regularly; 90% of the responding chiropractors stated they rarely or never refer to a pediatric specialist, and 80% of the chiropractors have never or have rarely been invited to attend medical congresses or to teach the pediatric health care community about chiropractic care for children. Conclusion The majority of chiropractors in Switzerland treat pediatric patients, most commonly schoolchildren and adolescents for musculoskeletal disorders.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.03.007
       
  • The Effects of Forward Head Posture on Neck Extensor Muscle Thickness: An
           Ultrasonographic Study
    • Authors: Fereshte Goodarzi; Leila Rahnama; Noureddin Karimi; Raziyeh Baghi; Shapour Jaberzadeh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Fereshte Goodarzi, Leila Rahnama, Noureddin Karimi, Raziyeh Baghi, Shapour Jaberzadeh
      Objective This study aimed to compare neck extensor muscle thickness, thickness changes, and strength between participants with forward head posture (FHP) and controls with normal head posture (NHP). Methods Twenty college students with FHP (mean age 21.30 ± 2.36 years) and 20 students with NHP (mean age 21.85 ± 2.78 years) participated in this case-control study. The thickness of neck extensor muscles was measured at rest and at maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). In addition, the craniovertebral angle (CVA) was calculated. To compare thickness changes between the 2 groups and among 5 muscles, a 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance was applied. In addition, Pearson’s correlation test was performed to investigate the relationship between neck extensor MVIC and CVA. Results The FHP group demonstrated lower MVIC compared with the NHP group (P = .03). Semispinalis capitis showed the smallest thickness changes during neck extensor MVIC in FHP compared with the controls (P < .001). However, no significant difference in terms of muscle thickness was observed between the 2 groups at the state of rest (P = .16-.99). A positive association was also found between the MVIC and CVA (P = .02). Conclusions Semispinalis capitis had less thickness changes during MVIC of neck extensors in individuals with FHP compared with those with NHP. This indirectly implies lower activity of this muscle in FHP condition. This study finding may help researchers develop therapeutic exercise protocols to manage FHP.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.012
       
  • The Effectiveness of Hollowing and Bracing Strategies With Lumbar
           Stabilization Exercise in Older Adult Women With Nonspecific Low Back
           Pain: A Quasi-Experimental Study on a Community-based Rehabilitation
    • Authors: Minseock Kim; Minhee Kim; Sejun Oh; BumChul Yoon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Minseock Kim, Minhee Kim, Sejun Oh, BumChul Yoon
      Objective The purpose of this study was to explore the therapeutic effectiveness of hollowing lumbar stabilization exercise (HLSE) and bracing lumbar stabilization exercise (BLSE) for older adult women with nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) in community welfare centers. Method A total of 38 older adult women with NSLBP were allocated to either the HLSE group (n = 17, 70.4 ± 1.7 years) or the BLSE group (n = 21, 66.8 ± 4.4 years). Both groups performed intervention for 12 consecutive weeks, 3 times per week. Each group performed 5 lumbar stabilization exercises, including side plank exercise, bridge exercise, 4-kneeling exercise, prone plank exercise, and prone back extension exercise with hollowing and bracing strategy, respectively. The baseline and post-test values of trunk strength, low back disability (Korean Oswestry Disability Index [K-ODI] and Korean Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire [K-RMDQ]), and static balance (1-leg standing test) were compared by using per-protocol analysis. Results In trunk strength, the trunk flexor had significant difference (F = 11.10, P = .001) between groups and within groups of BLSE (t = –5.56, P = .001) and HLSE (t = –2.50, P = .024). Trunk back extensor of HLSE (t = –6.00, P = .001) and BLSE (t = –9.19, P = .001) only had significant within-group difference. However, in trunk side flexor, HLSE and BLSE had only significant difference between groups. In low back disability, K-ODI for HLSE (t = 4.50, P = .001) and BLSE (t = 4.60, P = .001) had significant within-group difference but no significant difference between groups (F = 0.28, P = .202). In K-RMDQ, HLSE only had significant within-group difference (t = 3.97, P = .001). In trunk muscle strength, the effect size of HLSE and BLSE groups for trunk flexor was HLSE –0.53 (medium) and BLSE –1.21 (large); trunk side flexor: HLSE 0.27 (small) and BLSE –0.24 (small); and trunk back extensor: HLSE 1.1 (large) and BLSE 2.00 (large), respectively. In low back disability, the effect size of both groups for K-ODI was HLSE 0.88 (large) and BLSE 1.05 (large), and K-RMDQ, HLSE 0.19 (small) and BLSE 0.40 (small), respectively. Conclusion Our findings suggest that HLSE and BLSE could be recommended for community settings to improve trunk strength and low back disability in older adult women with NSLBP. Especially, HLSE and BLSE could be recommended for elderly women with NSLBP who have lower back disability and weak trunk muscle strength, respectively.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.06.012
       
  • Common Manual Therapy Practices in the Netherlands for Infants With Upper
           Cervical Dysfunction: A Prospective Cohort Study
    • Authors: Eric R.I.C. Saedt; Femke Driehuis; Thomas J. Hoogeboom; Bé H. van der Woude; Rob A. de Bie; Maria W.G. Nijhuis-van der Sanden
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Eric R.I.C. Saedt, Femke Driehuis, Thomas J. Hoogeboom, Bé H. van der Woude, Rob A. de Bie, Maria W.G. Nijhuis-van der Sanden
      Objective The purpose of this study was to describe common clinical practices of manual therapists (MTs) in the Netherlands for infants with indications of upper cervical dysfunction (UCD). Methods A prospective observational cohort study was conducted to gain insight into characteristics, reasons for seeking care, and common clinical practice for infants (<27 weeks) with indications of UCD, referred to MTs. Pre- and posttreatment self-reported questionnaires were used to collect data from parents and MTs. Parents reported on infant characteristics and perceived effect of treatment. Manual therapists reported on diagnostics, therapeutic procedures, and outcomes. Results Between 2006 and 2007, data regarding 307 referred infants (mean age: 11.2 weeks) were collected by parents and 42 MTs. The most frequent reasons for seeking care were positional preference, restlessness, and/or abnormal head position. Manual therapists observed active, spontaneous, and provoked mobility and passive upper cervical mobility. Of the 307 infants, 295 were diagnosed with UCD based on positive outcomes on the flexion-rotation test and/or lateral flexion test. After treatment with mobilization techniques, positive outcomes on the flexion-rotation test decreased from 78.8% to 6.8%. For the lateral flexion test, the positive outcomes decreased from 91.5% to 6.2%. All parents perceived positive treatment effects. No serious adverse events were reported during this study. Conclusions This is the first study to describe common clinical practice for infants referred for manual therapy. Infants with UCD were treated mainly with upper cervical mobilization techniques, and the greatest perceived effect was observed after approximately 2 treatment sessions.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.08.003
       
  • Correlation Between Severity of Temporomandibular Disorder, Pain
           Intensity, and Pressure Pain Threshold
    • Authors: Carolina Marciela Herpich; Cid André Fidelis de Paula Gomes; Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho; Fabiano Politti; Cesário da Silva Souza; Daniela Aparecida Biasotto-Gonzalez
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Carolina Marciela Herpich, Cid André Fidelis de Paula Gomes, Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho, Fabiano Politti, Cesário da Silva Souza, Daniela Aparecida Biasotto-Gonzalez
      Objective The aim of the present study was to correlate the severity of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) with the pressure pain threshold over the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. Methods A blind, cross-sectional study was conducted involving 60 women ages 18 to 40 years with a diagnosis of myogenous TMD. Evaluations were performed using the Fonseca Anamnestic Index (FAI), the visual analogue scale, and algometry over the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. Spearman’s correlation coefficients (rs) were calculated to measure the association between TMD severity, pain intensity, and the pressure pain threshold. Results A moderate, significant, and negative correlation was found between TMD severity and the pressure pain threshold over the left masseter muscle (rs = –0.276; P = .034). No significant correlations were found for the other variables analyzed (P = .124-.985). Conclusions Temporomandibular disorder measured using the FAI was associated to the pressure pain threshold over the masseter muscle. The significant and negative association found between the score of the FAI and the pressure pain threshold over the masseter muscle demonstrated that patients with more severe signs and symptoms of TMD had a lower pressure pain threshold.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.08.001
       
  • Association of Pain Catastrophizing With Static Balance, Mobility, or
           Functional Capacity in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Blind
           Cross-sectional Study
    • Authors: Cid André Fidelis de Paula Gomes; Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho; Daniela Aparecida Biasotto-Gonzalez; Fabiano Politti; Paulo de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Cid André Fidelis de Paula Gomes, Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho, Daniela Aparecida Biasotto-Gonzalez, Fabiano Politti, Paulo de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho
      Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether catastrophizing is associated with static balance, mobility, and functional capacity in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods A blind, cross-sectional study was conducted involving 60 volunteers (males and females), ages 40 to 80 years, with a diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis. Patients were recruited from a physical therapy clinic in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The following measures were used for the evaluations: Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale, Functional Reach Test, Timed Up and Go Test, Lower Extremity Functional Scale, and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index. In statistical analysis, histograms were created to determine distribution of data. Spearman’s correlation coefficients (rs) were then calculated to determine the strength of the associations among the variables. Results No significant correlation was found between the Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale score and the other clinical measures employed in the present study: Functional Reach Test (rs = 0.151; P = .249), Timed Up and Go Test (rs = –0.147; P =.264), Lower Extremity Functional Scale (rs = 0.023; P = .860), and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis (rs = –0.222; P = .088). Conclusions In this study, catastrophizing was not associated with static balance, mobility, or functional capacity in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

      PubDate: 2017-12-21T18:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.08.002
       
  • Quantitative Postural Analysis of Children With Congenital Visual
           Impairment
    • Authors: Michelle de Pádua; Juliana F. Sauer; Silvia M.A. João
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Michelle de Pádua, Juliana F. Sauer, Silvia M.A. João
      Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the postural alignment of children with visual impairment with that of children without visual impairment. Methods The sample studied was 74 children of both sexes ages 5 to 12 years. Of these, 34 had visual impairment and 40 were control children. Digital photos from the standing position were used to analyze posture. Postural variables, such as tilt of the head, shoulder position, scapula position, lateral deviation of the spine, ankle position in the frontal plane and head posture, angle of thoracic kyphosis, angle of lumbar lordosis, pelvis position, and knee position in the frontal and sagittal planes, were measured with the Postural Assessment Software 0.63, version 36 (SAPO, São Paulo, Brazil), with markers placed in predetermined bony landmarks. Results The main results of this study showed that children with visual impairment have increased head tilt (P < .001), shoulder deviation in frontal plane (P = .004), lateral deviation of the spine (P < .001), changes in scapula position (P = .012), higher thoracic kyphosis (P = .004), and lower lumbar lordosis (P < .001). Conclusions Visual impairment influences postural alignment. Children with visual impairment had increased head tilt, uneven shoulders, greater lateral deviation of the spine, thoracic kyphosis, lower lumbar lordosis, and more severe valgus deformities on knees.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.07.016
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 9


      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 8


      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 40, Issue 7


      PubDate: 2017-12-11T17:44:16Z
       
  • The Relationship Between Spinal Pain and Comorbidity: A Cross-sectional
           Analysis of 579 Community-Dwelling, Older Australian Women
    • Authors: Katie E. de Luca; Lynne Parkinson; Scott Haldeman; Julie E. Byles; Fiona Blyth
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Katie E. de Luca, Lynne Parkinson, Scott Haldeman, Julie E. Byles, Fiona Blyth
      Objectives The aims of this study were to (1) report the prevalence and explore the influence of spinal pain on quality of life and (2) assess the relationship between spinal pain and the type and number of comorbidities. Methods This cross-sectional study comprised 579 community-dwelling, older Australian women. Women had “spinal pain” if they marked “yes” to neck pain, upper back pain, mid-back pain, and/or lower back pain. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were performed to report the prevalence and explore the relationship between spinal pain and the type and number of comorbidities. Results A majority of women (55.8%) who returned surveys had spinal pain. Women with spinal pain had significantly lower physical and mental quality of life scores than women without spinal pain (Medical Outcomes Study: 36 Item Short Form Survey [SF-36] physical component summary: 40.1 ± 11.1 vs 49.0 ± 9.0, and SF-36 mental component summary: 50.0 ± 10.5 vs 53.9 ± 8.2, respectively). Having spinal pain was significantly associated with overweight and obesity (odds ratio 1.98 [95% confidence interval 1.3-2.96] and 2.12 [1.37-3.28]), diabetes (1.93 [1.01-3.67]), pulmonary comorbidity (1.66 [1.04-2.65]), and cardiovascular comorbidity (1.57 [1.07-2.28]). More than half of the women with spinal pain reported 2 or more comorbidities, with comorbidities significantly more common among women with spinal pain than among women without spinal pain. The odds of having spinal pain increased with an increasing number of comorbidities (2 comorbidities: 2.44 [1.47-4.04], 3 comorbidities: 3.07 [1.66-5.67], 4 comorbidities: 5.05 [1.64-15.54]). Conclusions Spinal pain is common in community-dwelling, older Australian women and is associated with greater disability and poorer quality of life. Diabetes, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, and obesity appear to have a relationship with spinal pain. There was an incremental increase in the risk of spinal pain associated with increasing comorbidity count.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T19:16:50Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.06.004
       
  • Changes in Postural Sway After a Single Global Postural Reeducation
           Session in University Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Authors: Carlos Lozano-Quijada; Emilio J. Poveda-Pagán; José V. Segura-Heras; Sergio Hernández-Sánchez; María J. Prieto-Castelló
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Carlos Lozano-Quijada, Emilio J. Poveda-Pagán, José V. Segura-Heras, Sergio Hernández-Sánchez, María J. Prieto-Castelló
      Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a single session of global postural reeducation (GPR) in postural sway in young adult university students who use data visualization screens. Methods A randomized controlled trial with 2 parallel groups was performed. Sixty-four subjects were randomized in the experimental group (12 men and 20 women) who underwent the GPR session, and a control group (13 men and 19 women) that did not receive any intervention was included. Center of pressure (COP) was assessed using a stabilometric platform, with eyes open and eyes closed before, immediately after, 48 hours after, and 7 days after intervention in both groups. Results In the interaction of time and gender, statistically significant differences were found for the area covered by COP (P = .020) and for the standard deviation (SD) in the mediolateral axis (P = .035). Considering the complete interaction time, gender, and group, statistically significant differences were found (P = .015) for the anteroposterior rate covered by COP and the SD in the anteroposterior axis (P = .033). In eyes closed condition, the intersubject analysis showed statistically significant differences for the interaction between group and gender for the variable mediolateral SD (P = .043). Considering the interaction of time with group, statistically significant differences were found for full length covered by COP (P = .017). Conclusions Changes in postural sway were observed after a single GPR session, mainly at 48 hours, with different behaviors between men and women.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T19:16:50Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.06.005
       
  • Prediction Effects of Personal, Psychosocial, and Occupational Risk
           Factors on Low Back Pain Severity Using Artificial Neural Networks
           Approach in Industrial Workers
    • Authors: Ebrahim Darvishi; Hassan Khotanlou; Jamshid Khoubi; Omid Giahi; Neda Mahdavi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2017
      Source:Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
      Author(s): Ebrahim Darvishi, Hassan Khotanlou, Jamshid Khoubi, Omid Giahi, Neda Mahdavi
      Objectives This study aimed to provide an empirical model of predicting low back pain (LBP) by considering the occupational, personal, and psychological risk factor interactions in workers population employed in industrial units using an artificial neural networks approach. Methods A total of 92 workers with LBP as the case group and 68 healthy workers as a control group were selected in various industrial units with similar occupational conditions. The demographic information and personal, occupational, and psychosocial factors of the participants were collected via interview, related questionnaires, consultation with occupational medicine, and also the Rapid Entire Body Assessment worksheet and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index software. Then, 16 risk factors for LBP were used as input variables to develop the prediction model. Networks with various multilayered structures were developed using MATLAB. Results The developed neural networks with 1 hidden layer and 26 neurons had the least error of classification in both training and testing phases. The mean of classification accuracy of the developed neural networks for the testing and training phase data were about 88% and 96%, respectively. In addition, the mean of classification accuracy of both training and testing data was 92%, indicating much better results compared with other methods. Conclusion It appears that the prediction model using the neural network approach is more accurate compared with other applied methods. Because occupational LBP is usually untreatable, the results of prediction may be suitable for developing preventive strategies and corrective interventions.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T14:09:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.03.012
       
 
 
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