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Journal Cover Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3042 journals]
  • Telocytes: Connective tissue repair and communication cells
    • Authors: Leon Chaitow
      Pages: 231 - 233
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 2
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow


      PubDate: 2017-05-25T00:08:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.011
       
  • Can inhibitory and facilitatory kinesiotaping techniques affect motor
           neuron excitability? A randomized cross-over trial
    • Authors: Amin Kordi Yoosefinejad; Alireza Motealleh; Shekoofeh Abbasalipur; Mahan Shahroei; Sobhan Sobhani
      Pages: 234 - 239
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 2
      Author(s): Amin Kordi Yoosefinejad, Alireza Motealleh, Shekoofeh Abbasalipur, Mahan Shahroei, Sobhan Sobhani
      Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of facilitatory and inhibitory kinesiotaping on motor neuron excitability. Design Randomized cross-over trial. Method Twenty healthy people received inhibitory and facilitatory kinesiotaping on two testing days. The H- and M-waves of the lateral gasterocnemius were recorded before and immediately after applying the two modes of taping. The Hmax/Mmax ratio (a measure of motor neuron excitability) was determined and analyzed. Results The mean Hmax/Mmax ratios were −0.013 (95% CI: −0.033 to 0.007) for inhibitory taping and 0.007 (95% CI: −0.013 to 0.027) for facilitatory taping. The mean difference between groups was −0.020 (95% CI: −0.048 to 0.008). The statistical model revealed no significant differences between the two interventions (P = 0.160). Furthermore, there were no within-group differences in Hmax/Mmax ratio for either group. Conclusions Our findings did not disclose signs of immediate change in motor neuron excitability in the lateral gasterocnemius.

      PubDate: 2017-05-25T00:08:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.06.011
       
  • Association between composites of selected motion palpation and pain
           provocation tests for sacroiliac joint disorders
    • Authors: Manijeh Soleimanifar; Noureddin Karimi; Amir Massoud Arab
      Pages: 240 - 245
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 2
      Author(s): Manijeh Soleimanifar, Noureddin Karimi, Amir Massoud Arab
      Background The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) has been implicated as a potential source of low back and buttock pain. Several types of motion palpation and pain provocation tests are used to evaluate SIJ dysfunction. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between motion palpation and pain provocation tests in assessment of SIJ problems. Design This study is Descriptive Correlation. Methods 50 patients between the ages of 20 and 65 participated. Four motion palpation tests (Sitting flexion, Standing flexion, Prone knee flexion, Gillet test) and three pain provocation tests (FABER, Posterior shear, Resisted abduction test) were examined. Chi-square analysis was used to assess the relationship between results of the individuals and composites of these two groups of tests. Results No significant relationship was found between these two groups of tests. Conclusions It seems that motion palpation tests assess SIJ dysfunction and provocative tests assessed SIJ pain which do not appear to be related.

      PubDate: 2017-05-25T00:08:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.06.003
       
  • Hamstring muscle length and pelvic tilt range among individuals with and
           without low back pain
    • Authors: Francis Oluwafunsho Fasuyi; Ayodele A. Fabunmi; Babatunde O.A. Adegoke
      Pages: 246 - 250
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 2
      Author(s): Francis Oluwafunsho Fasuyi, Ayodele A. Fabunmi, Babatunde O.A. Adegoke
      Hamstring tightness has been documented not to be related to the pelvic tilt position during static standing posture, but there is limited data on the relationship between hamstring muscle length (HML) and pelvic tilt range (PTR) during the dynamic movement of forward bending. This ex-post facto study was designed to compare each of HML and PTR in individuals with low back pain (LBP) and counterparts without LBP, and the relationship between HML and PTR in individuals with and without LBP. The study involved 30 purposively recruited individuals with LBP and 30 height and weight-matched individuals without LBP. Participants' PTR and HML were assessed using digital inclinometer and active knee extension test respectively. Data were analyzed using t-test and Pearson Correlation (r) at α = 0.05. Participants without LBP had significantly longer (p = 0.01) HML than those with LBP but the PTR of both groups were not significantly different. HML and PTR had indirect but not significant correlations in participants with and without LBP. Hamstring muscle length is significantly reduced in individuals with LBP but it has no significant correlation with pelvic tilt range. Pelvic tilt range reduces as hamstring muscle length increases.

      PubDate: 2017-05-25T00:08:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.06.002
       
  • The effects of 12 weeks Pilates-inspired exercise training on functional
           performance in older women: A randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Natália Donzeli Vieira; Daniela Testa; Paula Cristine Ruas; Tânia de Fátima Salvini; Aparecida Maria Catai; Ruth Caldeira Melo
      Pages: 251 - 258
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 2
      Author(s): Natália Donzeli Vieira, Daniela Testa, Paula Cristine Ruas, Tânia de Fátima Salvini, Aparecida Maria Catai, Ruth Caldeira Melo
      Background Recent scientific evidence supports the benefits of Pilates exercises on postural balance and muscle strength of older persons. However, their effects on other aspects of physical fitness, which are also important for independent living in older age, are still unknown. Objective To investigate the effects of a 12-week Pilates-inspired exercise program on the functional performance of community-dwelling older women. Methods Forty community-dwelling older women were randomly enrolled in a Pilates-inspired exercise training (2 times/week, 60 min/session) (PG, n = 21, 66.0 ± 1.4yrs) or kept in the control group (CG; n = 19, 63.3 ± 0.9yrs). The Pilates exercises were conducted in small groups and performed on mats (using accessories such as exercise rubber bands, swiss and exercise balls). The functional performance on one-leg stance (OLS), timed up and go (TUG), five-times-sit-to-stand (STS) and 6-min walk (6 MW) tests was evaluated before and after the 12-week Pilates training or control follow-up period. Results After 12 weeks, time effects were observed for STS (p = 0.03) and 6 MW tests (p < 0.01). Only among PG subjects did the time spent to rise from a chair and return to a seated position decrease significantly (2.0 s faster, p = 0.02) and the distance walked in 6 min increase (∼30 m, p < 0.01). OLS and TUG performance remained unaltered in both groups. Conclusion Pilates-inspired exercises improved dynamic balance, lower-extremity strength and aerobic resistance in community-dwelling older women. Therefore, it may be a potentially effective exercise regimen to maintain physical fitness in old age.

      PubDate: 2017-05-25T00:08:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.06.010
       
  • Responsiveness of postural performance measures following balance
           rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis patients
    • Authors: Hossein Negahban; Saeideh Monjezi; Mohammad Mehravar; Neda Mostafaee; Ali Shoeibi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hossein Negahban, Saeideh Monjezi, Mohammad Mehravar, Neda Mostafaee, Ali Shoeibi
      Introduction Evaluating responsiveness has an important role in design and interpretation of the interventional studies. The aim was to estimate the responsiveness and minimally important difference (MID) of postural performance measures following balance rehabilitation in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS, n=38). Methods Postural measures were evaluated at baseline and after 4 weeks intervention. Laboratory-based measures were center of pressure parameters. Clinically-based measures were Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Functional Gait Assessment (FGA); and walking measures 2 Minute Walk (2MW), 10 Meter Timed Walk (10MTW) and Timed Up and Go (TUG) performed under single and dual-task conditions. To evaluate responsiveness, we calculated the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) and the Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC). The optimal values for the MID were the cutoffs corresponding to the upper left corner of the ROC. Results The AUCs for mean and standard deviation of sway velocity were above the cutoff of 0.50 in most conditions. For the clinically-based measures, the highest AUCs were found for the ABC, and cognitive-2MW, followed by the BBS and 10MTW. Conclusions In this preliminary study, the most appropriate postural performance measures and the MID values for detecting meaningful changes in MS undergoing balance rehabilitation have been provided.

      PubDate: 2017-06-18T17:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.06.008
       
  • Short-term effects of mobilisation with movement in patients with
           post-traumatic stiffness of the knee joint
    • Authors: Arun Prasad Balasundaram; Sreedevi Sreerama Rajan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Arun Prasad Balasundaram, Sreedevi Sreerama Rajan
      Background Mobilisation with movement treatment techniques have been used to increase the range of motion following pathologies associated with shoulder, elbow and ankle joints. Lack of posterior tibial glide and reflex muscle inhibition are common physical impairments in individuals with post-traumatic stiffness of the knee joint. Current evidence is lacking for the benefits of mobilisation with movement treatment techniques for the knee joint disorders. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of mobilisation with movement following post-traumatic stiffness of the knee joint. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with post-traumatic stiffness of the knee joint with a minimum available 80° knee flexion range of motion were included. One group pre-to-post-test study design was employed, in which the active knee flexion range of motion was used as an outcome measure. The mobilisation with movement treatment techniques was implemented with three sets of ten repetitions on each treatment occasion for a period of 3 days. Results The mobilisation with movement treatment techniques significantly improved the active knee flexion range of motion (p=.000) from pre-treatment to post-treatment. Conclusions The findings from this study demonstrated immediate benefits in outcomes following mobilisation with movement treatment techniques in a cohort of patients with post-traumatic stiffness of the knee joint.

      PubDate: 2017-06-18T17:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.06.007
       
  • Differences in pressure pain threshold among men and women after foam
           rolling
    • Authors: Scott W. Cheatham; Russell Baker
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Scott W. Cheatham, Russell Baker
      Background Rehabilitation professionals often prescribe foam rolling as an intervention to augment other manual therapies or as a warm-up or recovery after athletic activity. Currently, there is a gap in the literature regarding how foam rolling effects the pressure pain threshold (PPT) among men and women. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of a foam rolling intervention on the ipsilateral agonist, antagonist, and contralateral muscle group PPT among men and women. Setting University kinesiology laboratory. Participants Twenty healthy adults (M=10, F=10; mean age= 27.4 ± 8.5 years). Research Design Pre-test, post-test observational study. Intervention Video-guided foam roll intervention on the left quadriceps group. Main Outcome Measures Ipsilateral quadriceps, ipsilateral hamstring, and contralateral quadriceps muscle PPT. Results Within group comparison for men, revealed a statistically significant effect of time on PPT for the left quadriceps (p=<.001), left hamstring (p=.001), and right quadriceps (p=<.001). For women, there was a statistically significant effect of time on PPT for the left quadriceps (p=.001), left hamstring (p=.007), and right quadriceps (p=<.001). No significant difference in PPT between men and women were found for the left quadriceps (p=.31), left hamstring (p=.13), and right quadriceps (p=.070) muscle groups. Conclusions These finding suggest that foam rolling can immediately reduce PPT in the ipsilateral agonist, antagonist, and contralateral muscle groups among men and women. Future investigations are needed to determine the long-term effects of foam rolling on PPT among sexes.

      PubDate: 2017-06-18T17:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.06.006
       
  • Effects of patellar taping on knee pain, functional disability, and
           patellar alignments in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome: A
           randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Arsalan Ghoubanpour; Ghadam Ali Talebi; Somayeh Hosseinzadeh; Naser Janmohammadi; Mohammad Taghipour
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Arsalan Ghoubanpour, Ghadam Ali Talebi, Somayeh Hosseinzadeh, Naser Janmohammadi, Mohammad Taghipour
      Question What are the effects of patellar taping on pain, functional disability and patellar alignments in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS)' Design Double-blind randomized clinical trial. Participants Thirty PFPS Patients were randomly divided into two groups, intervention and control. Intervention: Patients in control group received only the routine physiotherapy. In addition to routine physiotherapy, patellar taping was used in the intervention group. Each patient was treated for 12 sessions over a period of 4 weeks. Outcome measures The KOOS and VAS questionnaires were used to assess the quality of life (QOL) and pain intensity, respectively. Three components of patellar alignment including Patellofemoral Congruence Angle (PFCA), Lateral Patellofemoral Angle (LPFA) and Lateral Patellar Displacement (LPD) were evaluated using the skyline radiography method. Results The results indicated that there was no significant difference between the control and intervention groups for LPD (P=0.586), PFCA (P=0.704) and LPFA (P=0.176) variables. No significant difference was found between the two groups in all items of the KOOS questionnaire. The knee pain intensity was significantly reduced in both the intervention (P<0.001) and control (P=0.001) groups at the end of the 4th week. Conclusion The results of the present study indicated that patellar taping compared to routine physiotherapy treatments had no beneficial effects on pain reduction, QOL improvement and correction of patellar alignment in PSPS patients. Trial registration IRCT201111012851N2.

      PubDate: 2017-06-18T17:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.06.005
       
  • The use of Neuro-Ultrasound to identify and treat nerve pathology
    • Authors: Dimitrios Kostopoulos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Dimitrios Kostopoulos


      PubDate: 2017-06-18T17:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.06.002
       
  • Aquatic myofascial release applied after high intensity exercise increases
           flexibility and decreases pain
    • Authors: Viviane Ramos Costa Lêdo; Ana Paula Xavier; Cesar Augustus Zocoler de Souza; Susi Mary de Souza Fernandes; Étria Rodrigues; Érico Chagas Caperuto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Viviane Ramos Costa Lêdo, Ana Paula Xavier, Cesar Augustus Zocoler de Souza, Susi Mary de Souza Fernandes, Étria Rodrigues, Érico Chagas Caperuto
      Objectives investigate aquatic myofascial release (AMR) effects on flexibility and delayed onset muscle soreness, after high intensity exercises. Study Design: 15 participants, control (CON) and intervention (INT), 3 moments, pre (Pre), after (Post) and 50 minutes after (Post 50/Post AMR). 6 exercises, 5 sets, 15 reps at 85% of 1 maximum repetition, followed, or not, by 50 minutes of AMR. Variables: Heart rate, lactate, rate of perceived exertion, pain and flexibility. Results: Pain perception decreased in all moments (CON4.47±2.36; INT1.13±1.46, p=0.0002). Flexibility only increased for the fingertip to floor test in both phases in the Post50/Post AMR compared to Post (CON14.33±9.19Pre, 15.07±9.37Post (p=0.7) and 12.8±4.69Post50 (p=0.4); INT14.53±9.06Pre, 13.87±9.88Post (p=0.2) and 11.03±8.96Post AMR (p=0.001)). The Well’s bench improved only for the Post AMR compared to Pre in the INT phase (INT24.79±9.91Pre; 27.67±9.46Post AMR p=0.0000023). Conclusion: We concluded that AMR is effective to reduce pain perception and to improve flexibility of the studied population submitted to a high intense exercise session.

      PubDate: 2017-06-18T17:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.013
       
  • The effect of Kinesio Taping on postural control in subjects with
           non-specific chronic low back pain
    • Authors: Soheila Abbasi; Zahra Rojhani-Shirazi; Esmaeil Shokri; Francisco García-Muro San José
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Soheila Abbasi, Zahra Rojhani-Shirazi, Esmaeil Shokri, Francisco García-Muro San José
      Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the possible alterations in postural control during upright standing in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain and the effect of Kinesio taping on the postural control. Methods Twenty subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain and twenty healthy subjects participated in this study. The center of pressure excursion was evaluated before the intervention for both groups, and immediately after intervention for the low back pain group. Independent sample t-test, Mann-Whitney test and repeated measure ANOVA were used for the statistical analysis of the data. Results There were significant differences in the center of pressure excursion between the low back pain group versus the healthy group. The results of the ANOVA demonstrated a statistically significant difference in the mean COP displacement and velocity before Kinesio Taping, immediately after, and 24 hours after in the low back pain group. Conclusions There are poor postural control mechanisms in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain. Kinesio taping seems to change postural control immediately and have lasting effects until the day after.

      PubDate: 2017-06-18T17:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.06.003
       
  • Long-term effect of direction-movement control training on female patients
           with chronic neck pain
    • Authors: Zohreh Khosrokiani; Amir Letafatkar; Yahya Sokhangoie
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Zohreh Khosrokiani, Amir Letafatkar, Yahya Sokhangoie
      Background Treatment of movement faults in the neck is known as an important factor in treatment of chronic neck pain. Along with the identification of site and direction of the faults, direction-movement control intervention retrains the control of the movement faults. Purpose This study was designed to investigate long-term effects of a direction-movement control training on pain, disability, head repositioning accuracy, function, cervical flexor endurance, and range of motion in female patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Material and Methods Thirty women (36.5 ± 5.7 years) with chronic nonspecific neck pain were randomly allocated into two groups, i.e., an experimental group (n = 15) and a control group (n = 15). The experimental group performed the direction-movement control training for 30 min/day, three days per week for six months. All subjects were evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS), range of motion (TOM), progressive iso-inertial lifting evaluation (PILE), neck disability Index (NDI), helmet attached with laser pointer using for head repositioning accuracy (HRA), and Trott's test (deep neck flexor endurance), in pre- and six-months post-treatment intervention. Results Significant differences were observed for the pain, neck disability Index, function endurance, head repositioning accuracy, range of motion, and cervical flexor endurance in the experimental group compared to that of control group. Conclusion Direction-movement control training is likely to be an effective training program to enhance body functionality through improvement of pain, function, endurance, head repositioning accuracy, range of motion, and cervical flexor endurance. Due to the high reported effect size for direction-movement control exercises, the application of the training is suggested as a supplementary method to improve chronic nonspecific neck pain in females.

      PubDate: 2017-06-18T17:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.06.004
       
  • JBMTs most cited topic: Papers on myofascial pain
    • Authors: Leon Chaitow
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow


      PubDate: 2017-06-08T16:14:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.06.001
       
  • The Kettlebell Arm Bar
    • Authors: Lance Coffel; D.C. Craig Liebenson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Lance Coffel, D.C. Craig Liebenson


      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.023
       
  • Musculoskeletal pain associated with recreational yoga participation: A
           prospective cohort study with 1-year follow-up
    • Authors: Marc Campo; Mariya P. Shiyko; Mary Beth Kean; Lynne Roberts; Evangelos Pappas
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Marc Campo, Mariya P. Shiyko, Mary Beth Kean, Lynne Roberts, Evangelos Pappas
      Background Yoga is a popular complementary therapy for musculoskeletal pain. There are few studies however, that have examined the risks of recreational participation for causing musculoskeletal pain. Objectives To examine the relationship between musculoskeletal pain and recreational yoga participation. Methods This was a prospective cohort study with one-year follow-up. Data were collected via electronic questionnaires, one year apart. Outcomes included incidence and impact of pain caused by yoga and prevalence of pain caused, exacerbated, unaffected, and improved by yoga. Predictors included age, experience, hours of participation, and intensity of participation. Results The final sample included 354 participants from two suburban yoga studios. The incidence rate of pain caused by yoga was 10.7%. More than one-third of incident cases resulted in lost yoga participation time and/or symptoms lasting more than 3 months. None of the risk factors at baseline increased the risk for subsequent incident cases of pain caused by yoga. Conclusions Yoga can cause musculoskeletal pain. Participants may benefit from disclosure of practice to their healthcare professionals and by informing teachers of injuries they may have prior to participation. Yoga teachers should also discuss the risks for injury with their students.

      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.022
       
  • The effect of upper trapezius muscle dry needling treatment on sleep
           quality: A case report
    • Authors: Zahra Yaghoubi; Hamed Pardehshenas; Ismail Ebrahimi Takamjani
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Zahra Yaghoubi, Hamed Pardehshenas, Ismail Ebrahimi Takamjani
      Myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by trigger points in muscles, resulting in pain, limitation of motion, muscle weakness and also referral pain. Upper part of trapezius muscle is one the most common sites in upper quadrant affected by this condition. Among various manual and non-manual techniques, dry needling is one of the most effective treatment methods, and is widely used recently by physiotherapists. A 34 year old, female hairstylist with chronic shoulder pain was admitted to a physiotherapy clinic and was treated with dry needling approach, after which she found improvement of shoulder symptoms and sleep quality. Results from this case report can create an interesting and clear precedent for considering dry needling treatment in future clinical trials.

      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.020
       
  • Conservative management of temporomandibular dysfunction: A literature
           review with implications for clinical practice guidelines
    • Authors: Raymond Butts; James Dunning; Ron Pavkovich; Jersey Mettille; Firas Mourad
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Raymond Butts, James Dunning, Ron Pavkovich, Jersey Mettille, Firas Mourad
      The effective management of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) requires a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomic factors that drive the underlying condition. After reviewing the etiology associated with TMD in Part 1 of this narrative review, the temporomandibular joint capsule, articular disc and muscles of mastication emerged as key players. Part 2 focuses on conservative treatment strategies best able to reduce the pain and disability associated with TMD. A review of the literature revealed limited support of strengthening exercises targeting the muscles of mastication. There was also limited evidence for manual soft tissue work targeting muscles of mastication, which may be specifically related to the limited accessibility of the pterygoid muscles to palpation. For the reduction of pain, there was little to no evidence supporting splint therapy and electrophysical modalities, including laser therapy, ultrasound, TENs and iontophoresis. However, for the reduction of pain and disability, non-thrust mobilization and high-velocity, low amplitude thrust manipulation techniques to the TMJ and/or upper cervical articulations that directly and indirectly target the TMJ joint capsule were generally supported in the literature. Studies that used dry needling or acupuncture of the lateral pterygoid and posterior peri-articular connective tissue also led to significant improvements in pain and disability in patients with TMD. Thus, the most effective conservative management of TMD seems to be techniques best able to impact anatomic structures directly related to the etiology of TMD, to include the joint capsule, articular disc and muscles of mastication, specifically the superior and inferior head of the lateral pterygoid.

      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.021
       
  • “Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of a movement control test
           in shoulder”
    • Authors: S. Rajasekar; Rakshith K. Bangera; Padmanaban Sekaran
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 June 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): S. Rajasekar, Rakshith K. Bangera, Padmanaban Sekaran
      Background Movement faults are commonly observed in patients with musculoskeletal pain. The Kinetic Medial Rotation Test (KMRT) is a movement control test used to identify movement faults of the scapula and gleno-humeral joints during arm movement. Objective tests such as the KMRT need to be reliable and valid for the results to be applied across different clinical settings and patient populations. The primary objective of the present study was to determine the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of KMRT in subjects with and without shoulder pain. Methods Sixty subjects were included in this study based on specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two musculoskeletal physiotherapists with different levels of clinical experience performed the tests. The intra-rater reliability was tested in twenty asymptomatic subjects by a single assessor at two week intervals. An equal number of subjects with and without shoulder pain were tested by both the assessors to determine the inter-rater reliability. Both components of the KMRT, the Gleno- Humeral Anterior Translation (GHAT) and the Scapular Forward Tilt (SCFT) were tested. Results The Kappa values for inter-rater reliability of the GHAT and SCFT were K=0.68 & K=0.65 respectively in subjects with shoulder pain. In asymptomatic subjects, the inter-rater reliability of GHAT was K=0.61 and SCFT was K=0.85. Intra-rater reliability ranged from K=0.66 for GHAT to K=0.87 for SCFT. Conclusion Our study found substantial agreement in inter-rater reliability of KMRT in subjects with shoulder pain, whereas substantial to near perfect agreement was found in intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of KMRT in subjects without shoulder pain.

      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.019
       
  • Osteopathic manipulative treatment for low back and pelvic girdle pain
           during and after pregnancy: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Helge Franke; Jan-David Franke; Sebastian Belz; Gary Fryer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Helge Franke, Jan-David Franke, Sebastian Belz, Gary Fryer
      Background To examine the effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) for low back pain (LBP) in pregnant or postpartum women. Methods Randomized controlled trials unrestricted by language were reviewed. Outcomes were pain and functional status. Mean difference (MD) or standard mean difference (SMD) and overall effect size were calculated. Results Of 102 studies, 5 examined OMT for LBP in pregnancy and 3 for postpartum LBP. Moderate-quality evidence suggested OMT had a significant medium-sized effect on decreasing pain (MD, −16.65) and increasing functional status (SMD, −0.50) in pregnant women with LBP. Low-quality evidence suggested OMT had a significant moderate-sized effect on decreasing pain (MD, −38.00) and increasing functional status (SMD, −2.12) in postpartum women with LBP. Conclusions This review suggests OMT produces clinically relevant benefits for pregnant or postpartum women with LBP. Further research may change estimates of effect, and larger, high-quality randomized controlled trials with robust comparison groups are recommended.

      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.014
       
  • A patellar bandage improves mobility but not static balance in elderly
           female fallers
    • Authors: Marcos Eduardo Scheicher; Ligia Cristiane Santos Fonseca; Tiago Buso Bortolloto; Isabela Feitosa de Carvalho
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Marcos Eduardo Scheicher, Ligia Cristiane Santos Fonseca, Tiago Buso Bortolloto, Isabela Feitosa de Carvalho
      Background The deterioration in the somatosensory and motor systems observed with increasing age can cause balance problems. Studies have shown that the use of infrapatellar bandages can enhance proprioception and improve postural balance. Aims To evaluate the effect of an infrapatellar bandage on static balance and mobility in elderly female fallers and non-fallers. Methods Forty older women (20 fallers and 20 non-fallers) were evaluated. Mobility (Timed Up and Go test) and balance (force platform) were measured in the presence and absence of additional sensory information (elastic infrapatellar bandage). Results Mobility differed in fallers (p=0.0001), but not in non-fallers (p=0.27), when the patellar bandage was applied. Additional sensory information did not improve static balance in either group (p>0.05), but a trend towards improvement was observed in fallers. Conclusion Additional sensory input from an infrapatellar bandage improves mobility but not bipedal stance in elderly fallers.

      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.012
       
  • An Electromyographic Analysis of Selected Asana in Experienced Yogic
           Practitioners
    • Authors: Kathleen Kelley; Katherine Slattery; Kaitlyn Apollo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Kathleen Kelley, Katherine Slattery, Kaitlyn Apollo
      The purpose of this study was to assess electromyographic (EMG) output of the anterior tibialis (TA), medial head of the gastrocnemius (GA), rectus femoris (RF), bicep femoris (BF), and gluteus medius (GM) in experienced yogic practitioners during selected yoga asana. A secondary purpose was to examine the differences in EMG output in unilateral V. bilateral standing yoga asana. The study was a single occasion descriptive design. Thirteen healthy yoga practitioners (1 male, 12 females, average age of 37.5) with more than five years of experience were recruited. EMG activity was recorded during maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) of the TA, GA, RF, and BF using the Biodex Multijoint System®, and GM using manual muscle testing position. Subjects then performed the following yoga asana while EMG activity was recorded: downward facing dog, half-moon, tree, chair, and warrior three pose. Each asana was held for fifteen seconds and performed three times. EMG data were band pass filtered and the root mean square was obtained. Asana data were then amplitude normalized with the subjects’ MVIC data. Integrated EMG was calculated for TA, GA, RF, BF and GM, in each asana. A multilevel regression analysis was performed, and peak EMG data was compared. Analysis between muscles showed that during CH and DD EMG activity was greatest in the TA muscle compared to the other muscles, while during HM and WR the GA muscle showed the greatest activity. Analysis within muscles showed low GA, BF, and GM activity during chair pose and downward facing dog compared to half moon, tree, and warrior three, and high RF activity during chair compared to the other poses. In conclusion, there were differences in frontal and sagittal plane muscle activation between single limb and double limb poses in experienced yogic practitioners.

      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.018
       
  • Multifidus muscle size in adolescents with and without back pain using
           ultrasonography
    • Authors: Nahid Rahmani; Ali Kiani; Mohammad Ali Mohseni-Bandpei; Iraj Abdollahi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Nahid Rahmani, Ali Kiani, Mohammad Ali Mohseni-Bandpei, Iraj Abdollahi
      Objective The purposes of this study were; a) to compare multifidus muscle cross sectional area (CSA) in male adolescents suffering from low back pain (LBP) with healthy male adolescents using ultrasonography (US), and b) to assess the correlation between multifidus muscle size and demographic variables. Methods A random sample of 40 healthy boys (as a control group) and 40 boys with LBP (as an experimental) at the age range of 15-18 years was recruited in the present cohort study. Multifidus muscle dimensions including CSA, antero-posterior and medio-lateral dimensions were measured at level of L5 in both groups using US. Results The results of an independent t-test to compare multifidus muscle size between experimental and control groups showed a significant difference between the two groups in terms of CSA, antro-posterior and medio-lateral dimensions so that the experimental group had smaller muscle size than the control group. A significant correlation was found between height, weight and body mass index (BMI) and multifidus muscle size, but no significant correlation was observed between age and muscle size. Pain intensity and functional disability index was significantly correlated with muscle size in the experimental group. Conclusions According to the results, multifidus muscle size was decreased in 15 to 18 years old male adolescents suffering from LBP compared with their healthy counterparts. Further studies are needed to support the findings of the present study.

      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.016
       
  • Pilates program design and health benefits for pregnant women: A
           practitioners' survey
    • Authors: Melissa Mazzarino; Debra Kerr; Meg E. Morris
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Melissa Mazzarino, Debra Kerr, Meg E. Morris
      Background Little is known about recommendations for safe and appropriate instruction of Pilates exercises to women during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to examine Pilates practitioners’ perspectives regarding Pilates program design for pregnant women. We also sought to elucidate their views on the potential benefits, restrictions and contraindications on Pilates in pregnancy. Methods A cross-sectional survey was performed. Pilates practitioners were invited to participate via email. Participants were surveyed about their experience and views on: screening processes in alignment with The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) (2002) guidelines; (ii) optimal exercise program features and (iii) physical and mental health benefits of Pilates for pregnant women. Results The survey was completed by 192 Pilates practitioners from a range of settings. Practitioners reported conducting formal screening (84%) for safety in pregnant women prior to commencing Pilates classes. Most did not routinely seek medical approval from the woman’s general practitioner. Divergent views emerged regarding the safety and benefits of Pilates exercises in the supine position. Mixed opinions were also generated regarding the effects of spinal flexion exercises, single-leg stance exercises and breathing manoeuvres. There was little agreement on the optimal frequency or dosage of exercises. Views regarding absolute contraindications to exercise differed from The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) (2002) guidelines which cautioned about the dangers of persistent bleeding, premature labour, pre-eclampsia, placental praevia and incompetent cervix. The most frequent reported physical and psychological benefit of Pilates was improving pelvic floor strength (12%) and improved social wellbeing (23%). Conclusions The study highlighted wide variations in practice for Pilates exercises with pregnant woman as well as low adherence to clinical practice guidelines. Further evidence is required to advise on appropriate screening and individualised Pilates programming, particularly for women with medical conditions during pregnancy.

      PubDate: 2017-06-03T15:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.015
       
  • The test retest reliability of gait outcomes in subjects with anterior
           knee pain
    • Authors: Dominique Claire Leibbrandt; Quinette Louw
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Dominique Claire Leibbrandt, Quinette Louw
      Introduction Anterior knee pain (AKP) is a common condition frequently causing young, athletic patient to attend sports rehabilitation centres. Abnormal biomechanics are thought to contribute towards the development and chronicity of the condition. Gait analysis is commonly used to identify abnormal biomechanics in subjects with AKP, however the reliability of these measurements are unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the test retest reliability of hip, knee and ankle kinematics during gait in an AKP population so the true effects of an intervention can be established. Methods Thirty-one subjects with AKP attended the 3D Motion Analysis Laboratory at Tygerberg Medical Campus of Stellenbosch University in Cape Town, South Africa, for gait analysis. Participants returned seven days later at approximately the same time to repeat the gait analysis assessment from day one. The same assessor tested all subjects on both occasions. The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM) were calculated for hip, knee and ankle kinematic outcomes on the affected side and used for analysis. Results All outcomes obtained were acceptable to excellent test retest reliability scores for both measures of relative reliability (ICC=0.78-0.9) and measures of absolute reliability (SEM= 0.94 - 4.2 degrees). Hip frontal plane and ankle sagittal plane outcomes were the most reliable and had the lowest measurement error. Hip transverse plane outcomes were least reliable and demonstrated the highest measurement error. Conclusion Hip, knee and ankle kinematic factors that are commonly associated with AKP can be measured reliably using gait analysis. Daily and weekly variation in symptoms in an AKP population may influence the reliability of knee sagittal plane outcomes. Therefore, it is important to document factors that could influence the kinematics such as pain, activity levels and the use of pain medication.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T23:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.011
       
  • The immediate effect of osteopathic cervical spine mobilization on median
           nerve mechanosensitivity: A triple-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled
           trial
    • Authors: Gary Whelana; Ross Johnston; Charles Millward; Darren J. Edwards
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gary Whelana, Ross Johnston, Charles Millward, Darren J. Edwards
      Background Neurodynamics is a clinical medium for testing the mechanical sensitivity of peripheral nerves which innervate the tissues of both the upper and lower limb. Currently, there is paucity in the literature of neurodynamic testing in osteopathic research, and where there is research, these are often methodologically flawed, without the appropriate comparators, blinding and reliability testing. Aims This study aimed to assess the physiological effects (measured through Range of Motion; ROM), of a commonly utilized cervical mobilization treatment during a neurodynamic test, with the appropriate methodology, i.e., compared against a control and sham. Specifically, this was to test whether cervical mobilization could reduce upper limb neural mechanical sensitivity. Methodology Thirty asymptomatic participants were assessed and randomly allocated to either a control, sham or mobilization group, where they were all given a neurodynamic test and ROM was assessed. Results The results showed that the mobilization group had the greatest and most significant increase in ROM with Change-Left p < 0.05 and Change-Right p < 0.05 compared against the control group, and Change-Left p <0.01 and Change-Right p< 0.05 compared against the sham group. Conclusions This study has highlighted that, as expected, cervical mobilization has an effect at reducing upper limb neural mechanical sensitivity. However, there may be other factors interacting with neural mechanosensitivity outside of somatic influences such as psychological expectation bias. Further research could utilize the methodology employed here, but with other treatment areas to help develop neural tissue research. In addition to this, further exploration of psychological factors should be made such as utilizing complex top-down cognitive processing theories such as the neuromatrix or categorization theories to help further understand cognitive biases such as the placebo effect, which is commonly ignored in osteopathic research, as well as other areas of science, and which would further complete a holistic perspective.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T23:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.009
       
  • Pilates instruction affects stability and muscle recruitment during the
           long stretch exercise
    • Authors: Alessandra Fayh Paulitsch; Guilherme Auler Brodt; Catiane Souza; Jefferson Fagundes Loss
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Alessandra Fayh Paulitsch, Guilherme Auler Brodt, Catiane Souza, Jefferson Fagundes Loss
      Purpose To examine pelvic stability with and without instruction regarding the voluntary recruitment of the ‘powerhouse’ muscles during a long stretch exercise on the Pilates Reformer. Scope Evaluation of the muscle activity and pelvic stability during a Pilates exercise of 12 physically active volunteers. Volunteers performed five repetitions of the long stretch in sets of two, one with and one without instruction regarding the voluntary recruitment of the powerhouse muscles. Electromyography of the external oblique (EO), multifidus (MU), gluteus maximus (GM) and adductor longus (AL) muscles and pelvic angle stability were recorded. Conclusion When asked to perform the exercise with instruction regarding the voluntary recruitment of the powerhouse muscles, all muscles were more activated, with the exception of the EO. In the voluntary recruitment situation, lumbopelvic stability, as measured by the coefficient of variation of the pelvic angle, was higher than in instances without instruction. Lumbopelvic stability undergoes changes with and without instruction regarding the voluntary recruitment of the powerhouse muscles when the long stretch exercise is performed on a Reformer.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T23:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.010
       
  • Patients with motor conversion disorder use early developmental motor
           patterns
    • Authors: Iftah Biran; Yona Shahar Levy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Iftah Biran, Yona Shahar Levy
      Objective – To assess psychological factors of individuals suffering from conversion disorder/Functional Neurological Disorder (CD/FND) as observed through their motor behavior. Methods – We analyzed the psychomotor behavior of 6 patients (all male, average age – 52.8 years) with CD/FND in a specialized clinic using a binary motor - psychological developmental paradigm (Emotorics - Emotive Body Movement Mind Paradigm [Emotorics-EBMMP]). Results All patients showed dominance of an early developmental prototype (P0) characterized by flexed postures resembling the infant held by his caregivers and relative paucity of a more developed prototype (P1) characterized by erect position typical for a face to face interaction. Conclusions The P0 preponderance suggests impingement on the core self and regression to/or fixation in an early developmental stage.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T23:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.008
       
  • Interexaminer Reliability Study of a Standardized Myofascial Diagnostic
           Technique of the Superior Thoracic Inlet
    • Authors: Daniel Hutchinson; Scott Hines; Nevin Vijayaraghavan; Andrew Sammond; Kristen Metzler-Wilson; Michael L. Kuchera
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Daniel Hutchinson, Scott Hines, Nevin Vijayaraghavan, Andrew Sammond, Kristen Metzler-Wilson, Michael L. Kuchera
      Regional fascial motion palpation is often incorporated by osteopathic practitioners to enable them to identify superior thoracic inlet (STI) myofascial somatic dysfunction motion patterns; however without standardized instruction, diagnostic outcomes may vary between examiners. This study proposes a protocol for diagnosing the STI motion pattern that standardizes examiner hand placement, palpatory discrimination, posture, and relative body positioning. The study design incorporated useful infrastructure recommended by the Fédération Internationale de Médecine Manuelle (FIMM) including protocol agreement steps prior to conducting the formal interexaminer reliability study with the goals of attaining >80% interexaminer agreement and kappa values >0.6 for each cardinal plane. The agreement phase comprised of testing 52 participants acquired agreements of 92.3% (rotation), 88.9% (translation), and 94.2% (sagittal). Kappa value testing involving an additional 82 participants obtained values of 0.65 (rotation), 0.59 (translation), and 0.70 (sagittal). Such kappa values endorse fair-to-excellent positive interexaminer correlations, demonstrating utility of this standardized palpatory protocol for STI myofascial dysfunctional diagnosis.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T23:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.004
       
  • Deep tissue massage: What are we talking about?
    • Authors: Yogev Koren; Leonid Kalichman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Yogev Koren, Leonid Kalichman
      Background Massage is a common treatment in complementary and integrative medicine. Deep tissue massage, a form of therapeutic massage, has become more and more popular in recent years. Hence, the use of massage generally and deep tissue massage specifically, should be evaluated as any other modality of therapy to establish its efficacy and safety. Aim To determine the definitions used for deep tissue massage in the scientific literature and to review the current scientific evidence for its efficacy and safety. Methods Narrative review. Results There is no commonly accepted definition of deep tissue massage in the literature. The definition most frequently used is the intention of the therapist. We suggest separating the definitions of deep massage and deep tissue massage as follows: deep massage should be used to describe the intention of the therapist to treat deep tissue by using any form of massage and deep tissue massage should be used to describe a specific and independent method of massage therapy, utilizing the specific set of principles and techniques as defined by Riggs: “The understanding of the layers of the body, and the ability to work with tissue in these layers to relax, lengthen, and release holding patterns in the most effective and energy efficient way possible within the client's parameters of comfort”. Heterogeneity of techniques and protocols used in published studies have made it difficult to draw any clear conclusions. Favorable outcomes may result from deep tissue massage in pain populations and patients with decreased range of motion. In addition, several rare serious adverse events were found related to deep tissue massage, probably as a result of the forceful application of massage therapy. Conclusions Future research of deep tissue massage should be based on a common definition, classification system and the use of common comparators as controls.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T23:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.006
       
  • Impact of age and obstacle negotiation on timing measures of gait
           initiation
    • Authors: Maryam Hayati; Saeed Talebian; Catherine Sherrington; Hassan Ashayeri; Behrouz Attarbashi Moghadam
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Maryam Hayati, Saeed Talebian, Catherine Sherrington, Hassan Ashayeri, Behrouz Attarbashi Moghadam
      Introduction The separate and combined impacts of age and walkway obstruction on the reaction time, anticipatory postural adjustment phases of gait initiation and cognitive dual task performance are not well understood. This study aimed to a) examine the impact of age and task complexity on reaction and anticipatory postural adjustment phases separately b) examine the impact of age and walkway obstruction on cognitive task performance while walking. Method Nineteen older adults (mean age± SD: 66.73 ± 3.38 years) and twelve younger adults (mean age± SD: 26.5 ± 4.37 years), participated in this study. The tests were performed in four conditions: a smooth walkway; a smooth walkway with concurrent cognitive task; an obstructed walkway; and an obstructed walkway with a concurrent cognitive task. Reaction and anticipatory postural adjustment phases were measured from the recorded center of pressure trajectory data. Results Reaction time phase was significantly longer in the older group (P = 0.04), but there was no significant impact of task complexity (P = 0.95). Conversely, there was a significant impact of task complexity on anticipatory postural adjustment phase (P = 0.04), but there was no significant difference between the age groups (P = 0.38). Cognitive task response time was not significantly different between age groups or with walkway obstruction (P = 0.19 and P = 0.90 respectively).There were no significant interactions between age group and task complexity. Conclusion Reaction time phase but not anticipatory postural adjustment phase was longer in healthy older than younger adults. Anticipatory postural adjustment phase but not reaction time phase was slower for more complex gait initiation tasks. Cognitive task performance was similar across age groups and conditions.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T23:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.007
       
  • A critical overview of the current myofascial pain literature – June
           2017
    • Authors: Jan Dommerholt; Li-Wei Chou; Michelle Finnegan; Todd Hooks
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt, Li-Wei Chou, Michelle Finnegan, Todd Hooks
      We would like to welcome Dr. Li-Wei Chou, MD, PhD as our newly appointed contributing author. Dr. Chou is Assistant Professor at China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan and he has an impressive publication record with many research studies and book chapters. The current overview includes several articles comparing dry needling (DN) to acupuncture with sharply contrasting points of view. Several basic studies shed further light on the nature of myofascial pain, myalgia, fascia and examination techniques, such as sonoelastography. Neuroimaging studies demonstrated microstructural abnormalities in brain gray matter of chronic myofascial pain patients, which is an important new finding. As usual, many manual TrP papers and DN papers were published in the past several months.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T23:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.003
       
  • A clinical single blind study to investigate the immediate effects of
           plantar vibration on balance in patients after stroke
    • Authors: Azam Karimi-AhmadAbadi; Soofia Naghdi; Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari; Zahra Fakhari; Maede Khalifeloo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Azam Karimi-AhmadAbadi, Soofia Naghdi, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Zahra Fakhari, Maede Khalifeloo
      Summary Balance disorder is a very common cause of disability in patients after a stroke. Vibration therapy is one of the physiotherapeutic modalities used to improve balance. Objective To investigate the immediate effects of plantar vibration on balance in patients with stroke. Methods In this single blind comparative study, 22 patients with stroke (8 females, 14 males; age 55.82 ± 11.87 years old) participated. Patients underwent treatment, first with the placebo vibration and 1 week later with active vibration (frequency 100 HZ, 5 min). Mini-BESTest score, Modified Modified Ashworth Scale for plantar flexor spasticity, and ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (PROM) were evaluated before and immediately after the placebo or active vibration. Results A significant clinical improvement in balance, ankle plantar flexor spasticity, and the ankle dorsiflexion PROM was observed following either placebo or active vibration. The improvements after active vibration were significantly greater for all outcome measures compared with placebo vibration. There was a large effect size (Cohen's d = 0.85) for balance after active vibration. Conclusion The vibration applied to the sole of the affected foot of patients after stroke was effective for improving balance, reducing ankle plantar flexor spasticity, and increasing ankle dorsiflexion PROM.

      PubDate: 2017-05-09T22:56:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.013
       
  • Pilates experience vs. muscle activation during abdominal drawing-in
           maneuver
    • Authors: Alexandre Carvalho Barbosa; Edgar Ramos Vieira; Angelica Fátima Silva; Ana Carolina Coelho; Fábio Mendonça Martins; Diogo Simões Fonseca; Michelle Almeida Barbosa; Diego Bordachar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Alexandre Carvalho Barbosa, Edgar Ramos Vieira, Angelica Fátima Silva, Ana Carolina Coelho, Fábio Mendonça Martins, Diogo Simões Fonseca, Michelle Almeida Barbosa, Diego Bordachar
      The purpose of this study was to compare the activation of deep abdominal and spine stabilizer muscles of subjects with and without Pilates experience. Twenty-three subjects were divided into a no-experience group (n=13) and an experienced group (n=10). The subjects performed three 12-second drawing-in maneuver trials at 50% TrA/IO maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The experienced group presented greater activation of both muscles than the no-experience group (62% vs. 32% MVC for the TrA/IO, and 52% vs. 12% MVC for the LD, p<0.001). The no-experience group had higher variability among trials and did not reach 50% MVC for the TrA/IO, while the experienced group was able to reach and keep the TrA/IO activation at or above 50% MVC. Pilates experience and muscle activation were strongly associated. Pilates trained subjects were able to sustain concomitant abdominal and low back muscle contraction during the drawing-in maneuver, while subjects with no Pilates experience were not able to reach the same levels of abdominal activation and did not present significant low back muscle co-activation.

      PubDate: 2017-05-04T21:58:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.002
       
  • Pelvic Musculoskeletal dysfunctions in women with and without chronic
           pelvic pain
    • Authors: Najmeh Sedighimehr; Farideh Dehghan Manshadi; Nasim Shokoohi; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 May 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Najmeh Sedighimehr, Farideh Dehghan Manshadi, Nasim Shokoohi, Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban
      Aim This study aimed to compare the prevalence of pelvic musculoskeletal dysfunctions in women with and without Chronic Pelvic Pain (CPP). Materials &Methods A total of 84 women with and without CPP (42 in each group), participated in this cross-sectional analytical study. After collecting demographic information, clinical examinations were carried out to compare pelvic musculoskeletal dysfunctions between two groups. Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) goodness-of-fit, Independent t, X2 and Pearson correlation tests were used for data analysis. Values of p<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Findings Significant differences were found in the asymmetric iliac crest and pubic symphysis height (45.2% vs 9.5%), positive sacroiliac provocation and positive Carnett’s tests (50% vs 4.8%), (p<0. 05). CPP Patients exhibited more tenderness at Levator ani, Piriformis, and Obturator Internus muscles, also higher degrees of pelvic inclination (p<0. 05). Conclusion Higher frequency of pelvic musculoskeletal dysfunctions in women with CPP suggests the value of routine musculoskeletal examinations for earlier diagnosis of musculoskeletal originated CPP and effective management of these patients.

      PubDate: 2017-05-04T21:58:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.001
       
  • Analysis of chronic myofascial pain in the upper trapezius muscle of
           breast cancer survivors and women with neck pain
    • Authors: Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho; Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus Guirro; Vânia Tie Koga Ferreira; Alessandra Kelly de Oliveira; Ana Maria de Almeida; Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus Guirro, Vânia Tie Koga Ferreira, Alessandra Kelly de Oliveira, Ana Maria de Almeida, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro
      Myofascial trigger points are present in dysfunctioning muscles and are associated with several diseases. However, the scientific literature has not established whether myofascial trigger points from different underlying diseases have the same clinical characteristics. Thus, the objective of the present study was to compare the intensity of myofascial pain, catastrophizing, and the pressure pain threshold at myofascial trigger points among breast cancer survivors and women with neck pain. This was a cross-sectional study that included women over 18 years old complaining of myofascial pain in the upper trapezius muscle region for more than 90 days, equally divided into breast cancer survivors (n = 30) and those with neck pain (n = 30). For inclusion, the presence of a bilateral, active, and centrally located mean distance from C7 to acromion in the upper trapezius was mandatory. The measures of assessment were: pain intensity, catastrophizing, and the pressure pain threshold at the myofascial trigger points. A significant difference was observed only when comparing pain intensity (p < 0.001) between the breast cancer survivors (median score: 8.00 points, first quartile: 7.00 points, third quartile: 8.75 points) and women with neck pain (median score: 2.50 points, first quartile: 2.00 points, third quartile: 4.00 points). No significant difference was found between groups in catastrophizing and pressure pain threshold. The conclusion of this study was that breast cancer survivors have a higher intensity of myofascial pain in the upper trapezius muscle when compared to patients with neck pain, which indicates the need for evaluation and a specific intervention for the myofascial dysfunction of these women.

      PubDate: 2017-05-04T21:58:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.012
       
  • Acute electromyographic responses of deep thoracic paraspinal muscles to
           spinal manual therapy interventions. An experimental, randomized
           cross-over study
    • Authors: Gary Fryer; Michael Bird; Barry Robbins; Jane C. Johnson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gary Fryer, Michael Bird, Barry Robbins, Jane C. Johnson
      This single group, randomized, cross-over study explored whether manual therapy alters motor tone of deep thoracic back muscles by examining resting electromyographic activity (EMG) after 2 types of manual therapy and a sham control intervention. Twenty-two participants with thoracic spinal pain (15 females, 7 males, mean age 28.1±6.4 years) had dual fine-wire, intramuscular electrodes inserted into deep transversospinalis muscles at a thoracic level where tissues appeared abnormal to palpation (AbP) and at 2 sites above and below normal and non-tender to palpation (NT). A surface electrode was on the contralateral paraspinal mass at the level of AbP. EMG signals were recorded for resting prone, two 3-second free neck extension efforts, two 3-second resisted maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC), and resting prone before the intervention. Randomized spinal manipulation, counterstrain, or sham manipulation was delivered and EMG re-measured. Participants returned 1 and 2 weeks later for the remaining 2 treatments. Reductions in resting EMG followed counterstrain in AbP (median decrease 3.3%, P=.01) and NT sites (median decrease 1.0%, P=.05) and for the surface electrode site (median decrease 2.0%, P=.009). Reduction in EMG following counterstrain during free neck extension was found for the surface electrode site (median decrease 2.7%, P<.01). Spinal manipulation produced no change in EMG, whereas counterstrain technique produced small significant reductions in paraspinal muscle activity during prone resting and free neck extension conditions. The clinical relevance of these changes is unclear.

      PubDate: 2017-05-04T21:58:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.011
       
  • Concurrent Validity of Pain Scales in Individuals with Myofascial Pain and
           Fibromyalgia
    • Authors: Scott Cheatham; Morey J. Kolber; Monique Mokha; William J. Hanney
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Scott Cheatham, Morey J. Kolber, Monique Mokha, William J. Hanney
      Objective Clinicians and researchers often use the numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) and visual analog scale (VAS) to measure and track pain in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and fibromyalgia (FM). The VAS is often used as a reference standard in chronic pain research. To date, no studies have specifically measured the concurrent validity of the NPRS and VAS in these individuals. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the concurrent validity of the NPRS when compared to the reference standard VAS in patients with MPS and FM. Methods This investigation explored the concurrent validity of the NPRS and VAS in sixty participants with MPS (N=30) and FM (N=30). All participants underwent one day of testing using the American College of Rheumatology criteria for classifying FM. For each tender point (18-total), participants graded tenderness using the NPRS and VAS. Results An excellent relationship was found between the NPRS and VAS for the MPS group (rho≥.81, 95% CI .79-.85, p<.001) and the FM group (rho ≥.96, 95% CI .92-.97, p<.001). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the NPRS has good concurrent validity with the referenced standard VAS among individuals with MPS and FM.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27T22:01:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.009
       
  • The effect of foot orthoses on joint moment asymmetry in male children
           with flexible flat feet
    • Authors: AmirAli Jafarnezhadgero; Morteza Madadi Shad; Reed Ferber
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): AmirAli Jafarnezhadgero, Morteza Madadi Shad, Reed Ferber
      Introduction It has been widely postulated that structural and functional misalignments of the foot, such as flat foot, may cause mechanical deviations of the lower limb during walking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of foot orthoses on lower extremity joint moment asymmetry during the stance phase of walking in children with asymptomatic flexible flat feet. Methods Fourteen volunteer male children, clinically diagnosed with flexible flat feet, participated in this study. Subjects completed 12 walking trials at a self-selected walking speed while 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected for two conditions: shod with no orthoses, and shod with orthoses. The gait asymmetry index for each variable for each subject was defined as: (1-(lesser moment/greater moment)) × 100. Results Results reveal no significant differences in ankle or knee joint moment asymmetry. However, the use of foot orthoses decreased asymmetry for the hip abduction moment (P = 0.04) compared to walking without orthoses and also resulted in subtle, non-significant increases in frontal plane subtalar and sagittal plane knee and hip joints moment asymmetry. Conclusion We conclude that foot orthoses decrease frontal plane hip joint moment asymmetry, but have little effect on ankle and knee joint asymmetry.

      PubDate: 2017-04-20T21:17:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.007
       
  • Acute effects of self-myofascial release and stretching in overhead
           athletes with GIRD
    • Authors: Ryan R. Fairall; Lee Cabell; Richard J. Boergers; Fortunato Battaglia
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Ryan R. Fairall, Lee Cabell, Richard J. Boergers, Fortunato Battaglia
      Summary Objective To examine the acute effects of self-myofascial release (SMR), static stretching (SS), and the combination of self-myofascial release and static stretching (SMR+SS) on glenohumeral internal rotation range of motion (GH IR ROM) in overhead athletes with glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD). Participants Twelve asymptomatic adult male amateur softball position players exhibiting GIRD. Results All three methods significantly improved GH IR ROM. Post hoc testing revealed that SS alone and SMR+SS improved GH IR ROM significantly more than SMR alone. However, there were no significant differences in GH IR ROM between SS alone and SMR+SS. Conclusions If an athlete has a limited time to perform a warm-up (e.g., 3-4 minutes), SS alone is recommended to improve GH IR ROM. However, if the athlete has more time available to warm up (e.g., 7-8 minutes), combining SMR+SS may result in a greater increase in GH IR ROM.

      PubDate: 2017-04-13T16:51:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.001
       
  • Exercise on balance and function for knee osteoarthritis: A randomized
           controlled trial
    • Authors: Roberta de Matos Brunelli Braghin; Elisa Cavalheiro Libardi; Carina Junqueira; Marcello Henrique Nogueira – Barbosa; Daniela Cristina Carvalho de Abreu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Roberta de Matos Brunelli Braghin, Elisa Cavalheiro Libardi, Carina Junqueira, Marcello Henrique Nogueira – Barbosa, Daniela Cristina Carvalho de Abreu
      Objectives To assess balance and function of symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and investigate the influence of physical exercise. Design Subjects were divided into three groups: Group 1 (n = 15), symptomatic knee OA; Group 2 (n = 11), asymptomatic knee OA; and Group 3 (n = 16), knee OA and no intervention. History of falls, the WOMAC questionnaire, balance and functionality were assessed. Results After intervention, there was a significant difference in the total WOMAC score and in the pain and function domains only in Group 1. After intervention, Group 2 showed significant differences in decreased time on the Step Up/Over test and postural sway increased. Conclusion After the intervention, the symptomatic group reported improvement in pain and function on the WOMAC, while the asymptomatic group showed improvement in performance in the Step Up/Over test. There were no new episodes of falls in groups 1 and 2.

      PubDate: 2017-04-13T16:51:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.006
       
  • Neck pain in Iranian school teachers: Prevalence and risk factors
    • Authors: Fatemeh Ehsani; Mohammad Ali Mohseni-Bandpei; César Fernández-de-las-Peñas; Khodabakhsh Javanshir
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fatemeh Ehsani, Mohammad Ali Mohseni-Bandpei, César Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Khodabakhsh Javanshir
      Neck pain (NP) is a common occupational health problem associated with a number of professions. Many studies indicate that NP is common among teachers, yet no published study was found to address the prevalence and risk factors of NP in Iranian school teachers. The purpose of the current study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors for NP among school teachers in Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 586 randomly selected primary and high schools teachers from 22 schools in Tehran, Iran. Point, last month, last 6 months, annual, and lifetime prevalence rates of NP were 24%, 29%, 33%, 37%, and 43%, respectively. There was a significant association and increased prevalence of NP with a number of risk factors such as; being female, age, general health, length of employment, regular exercise and job satisfaction (P < 0.05 in all instances). Therefore, some individual and occupational factors may make conditions relevant for the development of NP among teachers.

      PubDate: 2017-04-07T11:17:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.003
       
  • Ischemic compression and kinesiotherapy on chronic myofascial pain in
           breast cancer survivors
    • Authors: Flávia Belavenuto Rangon; Vânia Tie Koga Ferreira; Monique Silva Rezende; Amanda Apolinário; Ana Paula Ferro; Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Flávia Belavenuto Rangon, Vânia Tie Koga Ferreira, Monique Silva Rezende, Amanda Apolinário, Ana Paula Ferro, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro
      Objective assess the effects of ischemic compression and kinesiotherapy on the rehabilitation of breast cancer survivors with chronic myofascial pain. Methods A randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial was performed with 20 breast cancer survivors with myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle. Patients were randomly allocated to ischemic compression + kinesiotherapy (G1, n=10) and kinesiotherapy (G2, n=10). Both groups were submitted to 10 sessions of treatment. The variables evaluated were: Numeric Rating Scale, Pain Related Self-Statement Scale, pressure pain threshold, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast and Infrared thermography. Results A significant reduction (p <0.05) was observed in pain intensity after 10 sessions in Groups 1 and 2, a significant increase (p <0.05) in pressure pain threshold in both the operated and non-operated side after 10 sessions for Group 1. Conclusion Ischemic compression associated with kinesiotherapy increases the pressure pain threshold on the myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle and reduces the intensity of pain in breast cancer survivors with myofascial pain.

      PubDate: 2017-04-07T11:17:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.005
       
  • Electromyographic changes in muscles around the ankle and the knee joints
           in women accustomed to wearing high-heeled or low-heeled shoes
    • Authors: Mona Kermani; Mehri Ghasemi; Abbas Rahimi; khosro Khademi-kalantari; Alireza Akbarzadeh-Bghban
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mona Kermani, Mehri Ghasemi, Abbas Rahimi, khosro Khademi-kalantari, Alireza Akbarzadeh-Bghban
      Objectives This study aimed to investigate muscle activities in the muscles around the ankle and knee joints in women accustomed to wearing high-heeled or low-heeled shoes. Method ology: Forty young women (age: 18-40 years) participated in this comparative clinical study. Twenty of the recruited subjects were accustomed to high-heeled shoes and the other half to low-heeled shoes. Electrical activities of the ankle and knee muscles in both groups with and without wearing their accustomed shoes were studied during walking. Results Tibialis anterior and the medial gastrocnemius muscles started contraction earlier in the high-heeled shoe group. The duration of medial gastrocnemius activity and the intensity of proneus longus activity were significantly more in the high-heeled shoe group. Conclusion Wearing high-heeled shoe for a long time could result in over work of muscles such as medial gastrocnemius and proneus longus by increase in the duration or the intensity of their contractions during walking.

      PubDate: 2017-04-07T11:17:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.04.002
       
 
 
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