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Journal Cover Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2563 journals]   [SJR: 0.458]   [H-I: 18]
  • Effectiveness of neural mobilization in patients with spinal
           radiculopathy: A critical review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 August 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Michalis A. Efstathiou , Manos Stefanakis , Christos Savva , Giannis Giakas
      Spinal radiculopathy (SR) is a multifactorial nerve root injury that can result in significant pain, psychological stress and disability. It can occur at any level of the spinal column with the highest percentage in the lumbar spine. Amongst the various interventions that have been suggested, neural mobilization (NM) has been advocated as an effective treatment option. The purpose of this review is to (1) examine pathophysiological aspects of spinal roots and peripheral nerves, (2) analyze the proposed mechanisms of NM as treatment of injured nerve tissues and (3) critically review the existing research evidence for the efficacy of NM in patients with lumbar or cervical radiculopathy.


      PubDate: 2014-08-19T02:26:17Z
       
  • The effect of chronic shoulder pain on maximal force of shoulder abduction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 August 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): François Naef , Sandra Grace , Zachary Crowley-McHattan , Dean Hardy , Andrew McLeod
      The aim of this study was to determine if chronic shoulder pain had an effect on arm abduction strength and recruitment strategies of the serratus anterior, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius. Method The maximal isometric force at 30° arm abduction and the electromyographic activity of the serratus anterior, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius were recorded for 14 subjects with unilateral chronic shoulder pain and 11 healthy subjects. Results Relative to the group without pain, the group with chronic shoulder pain showed no significant difference in maximal force production during isometric arm abduction. The Mann-Whitney tests showed no differences in the activation of the serratus anterior, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius between the two groups. Discussion and conclusion Subjects with chronic shoulder pain of mild to moderate intensity showed no difference from healthy subjects in arm abduction maximal strength, and recruitment patterns of serratus anterior, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius.


      PubDate: 2014-08-19T02:26:17Z
       
  • Effectiveness of conventional physical therapy and Pilates' method in
           functionality, respiratory muscle strength and ability to exercise in
           hospitalized chronic renal patients: A study protocol of a randomized
           controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 August 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Juliana Santi Sagin Torres Pinto , Laís Azevedo Sarmento , Ana Paula Pereira da Silva , Cristina Maria Nunes Cabral , Luciana Dias Chiavegato
      Background Patients with chronic kidney disease can present compromised functional abilities, and hospitalization may further contribute to their health deterioration and loss of functional independence. Objectives To compare the effectiveness between Pilates Method and Conventional Physical Therapy in functionality, exercise capacity and respiratory muscle strength in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods 56 patients will be randomized into Control (usual care) or Pilates groups. Functionality (Barthel Index), exercise capacity (Step Test) and respiratory muscle strength (Manovacuometry) will be evaluated during pre-intervention, after the 5th and 10th sessions or at discharge in both groups. The statistical analysis will be calculated using linear mixed models and based on intention-to-treat. The level of significance will be set at α= 5%. This study is the first to develop a Pilates protocol for hospitalized chronic renal failure patients and the results will provide additional treatment options for these patients and for physiotherapists.


      PubDate: 2014-08-15T02:14:17Z
       
  • Conservative treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome: Comparison between laser
           therapy and fascial manipulation®
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Elena Pratelli , Marco Pintucci , Pina Cultrera , Enrico Baldini , Antonio Stecco , Antonio Petroncelli , Pietro Pasquetti
      The etiopathogenesis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is multifactorial and most cases are classified as idiopathic (Thurston 2013). A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effectiveness of Fascial Manipulation® (FM) and Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for CTS. This prospective trial included 42 patients (70 hands with symptoms) with clinical and electroneuromyographic diagnosis of CTS. The patients were randomly assigned to receive multiple sessions of FM or multiple session of LLLT. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) were performed at baseline, end of treatment and after three months. The group that received FM showed a significant reduction in subjective pain perception and an increased function assessed by BCTQ at the end of the treatment and follow-up. The group that received LLLT showed an improvement in the BCTQ at the end of the treatment but the improvement level was not sustained at the three month follow-up. FM is a valid alternative treatment for CTS.


      PubDate: 2014-08-15T02:14:17Z
       
  • Accuracy of the Fonseca anamnestic index in the identification of
           myogenous temporomandibular disorder in female community cases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Kelly Cristina dos Santos Berni , Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Delaine Rodrigues-Bigaton
      The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) in the identification of myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Two hundred and three female volunteers participated in this study, 117 with myogenous TMD and 86 without TMD. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were first applied as the gold standard for the diagnosis. The volunteers then answered the 10 items on the FAI, which furnished a score ranging from 0 to 100 points. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was used to determine the accuracy of the diagnosis (area under the curve) and the best cutoff point of the tool. Thus, FAI demonstrated a high degree of accuracy for the diagnosis of myogenous TMD (area under the ROC curve of 0.940). The best cutoff point was a score of 47.50. Thus, a score ranging from 0 to 45 points corresponds to the absence of myogenous TMD and scores ranging from 50 to 100 points identifies individuals with the disorder. In conclusion, the high degree of diagnostic accuracy demonstrates that the FAI can be employed for the identification of myogenous TMD in female community cases.


      PubDate: 2014-08-10T01:44:51Z
       
  • British Fascia Symposium: Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Susan Findlay



      PubDate: 2014-08-10T01:44:51Z
       
  • The relationship between isokinetic muscle strength and spasticity in the
           lower limbs of stroke patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): I. Abdollahi , A. Taghizadeh , H. Shakeri , M. Eivazi , S. Jaberzadeh
      Objective In this study the relationship between degree of spasticity and strength of knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscles of post stroke hemiparetic patients has been investigated. Materials & Methods The participants of this study were 40 stroke patients whose elapsed time of stroke onset was at least 3 months. Their age averaged 59 years. Spasticity was measured with the Modified Ashworth Scale. Isokinetic muscle strength was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer. Two methods of torque normalization – subtractive and weight based normalization – were used for comparing torques among participants. Results Kendall's tau-b coefficient was calculated for investigating this relationship. This coefficient was not significant for the relationship between weight based normalized data and modified Ashworth scale (MAS) in any of each muscle groups (α=0.05). This coefficient was significant for the relationship between the subtractive normalization method and MAS in knee extensors (P=0.005,α=0.01) and ankle plantar flexors (P=0.002,α=0.01). Conclusion This study suggests a negative relationship between spasticity and muscle strength and provided evidence that spastic muscles are weaker.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T01:13:22Z
       
  • Myroslava Kumka response to editorial by Carla Stecco MD: Why are there so
           many discussions about the nomenclature of fasciae?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Myroslava Kumka



      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Effectiveness of myofascial release: systematic review of randomized
           controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): M.S. Ajimsha , Noora R. Al-Mudahka , J.A. Al-Madzhar
      Introduction Myofascial release (MFR) is a form of manual therapy that involves the application of a low load, long duration stretch to the myofascial complex, intended to restore optimal length, decrease pain, and improve function. Anecdotal evidence shows great promise for MFR as a treatment for various conditions. However, research to support the anecdotal evidence is lacking. Objective To critically analyze published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the effectiveness of MFR as a treatment option for different conditions Data sources Electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane library, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), with key words myofascial release and myofascial release therapy. No date limitations were applied to the searches Study selection Articles were selected based upon the use of the term myofascial release in the abstract or key words. The final selection was made by applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the full text. Studies were included if they were English-language, peer-reviewed RCTs on MFR for various conditions and pain Data extraction Data collected were number of participants, condition being treated, treatment used, control group, outcome measures and results. Studies were analyzed using the PEDro scale and the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine's Levels of Evidence scale. Conclusions The literature regarding the effectiveness of MFR was mixed in both quality and results. Although the quality of the RCT studies varied greatly, the result of the studies was encouraging, particularly with the recently published studies. MFR is emerging as a strategy with a solid evidence base and tremendous potential. The studies in this review may help as a respectable base for the future trials.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Case study: Could ultrasound and elastography visualized densified areas
           inside the deep fascia?
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Tuulia Luomala , Mika Pihlman , Jouko Heiskanen , Carla Stecco
      Many manual techniques describe palpable changes in the subcutaneous tissue. Many manual therapists have perceived palpable tissue stiffness and how it changes after treatment. No clear demonstration exists of the presence of specific alterations in the subcutaneous tissue and even less a visualization of their changes following manual therapy. This case study visualizes by ultrasound and elastography an alteration of the deep fascia in a 40-year-old male with subacute pain in the calf area. Ultrasound and elastography permits visualization of gliding, echogenicity and elasticity of deep fascia and their changes, after manual therapy (Fascial Manipulation©). This study suggests the possible use of the ultrasound and elastography to furnish a more objective picture of the “sensations” that are commonly reported by manual therapists, and which supports clinicians in the diagnosis of the myofascial pain.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Comparison of group motor control training versus individual training for
           people suffering from back pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Heike Streicher , Franz Mätzold , Christine Hamilton , Petra Wagner
      This study investigated the effects of “motor-control training” (MCT) using the model of deficits in the activation of transversus abdominis (TrA) in people with recurrent back pain. The purpose of this investigation was to establish whether MCT – implemented within a new group intervention (experimental group) – is able to produce results similar to those of a conventional intervention applied individually (control group) to people suffering from back pain. Using the form of an experimental pre-post-test design, the study consisted of an experimental group (N = 18, mean age M = 45.2; SD = 18.4; 9 ♂, 9 ♀) and a comparison group (N = 13; age = 56.6; SD = 18.5; 6 ♂, 7 ♀). The training covered a period of six weeks, with two training sessions per week. The amount of training was the same in both groups. Aside from the same extent of training, the participants in the experimental group completed training content in the group interventions identical to that completed by the comparison group in the individual treatments. To clarify: The difference between the two groups was that the participants in the individual-therapy control group received individual feedback on their exercise performance and correction notes from the instructor. This degree of individual attention was not given within the group therapy. The selective activation of the M. transversus abdominis (TrA) was the main focus of the intervention, with the intent of improving its stabilising corset function, especially within the lumbar region, via increased tension of the thoracolumbar fascia. To record the progress of both groups, the anterolateral abdominal muscle recruitment of the M. transversus abdominis (TrA) was measured as a main influencing factor for anterolateral stabilisation of the spine. For measurements of muscle recruitment, rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (M-Turbo™ SonoSite® Erlangen in B-Mode) according to Whittaker (2007) was used. Furthermore, the relationship between pain relief and the development of muscle recruitment was evaluated. Finally, the possible pain relief and the improvement of daily routine disruptions were assessed via the visual analogous scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODI) (Mannion et al., 2006a,b). Both forms of intervention produced significant improvements in abdominal muscle control and pain (p < 0.003; p < 0.007). However, according to Cohen (1988), the effect sizes could be classified as a low to medium effect advantage on the part of the individual treatment (d < 0.5). Nevertheless, there were no statistically significant differences between individual and group interventions for the measured parameters, indicating that the group interventions can be considered more efficient because more patients were helped at the same time with similar effort. This result provides new and valuable insights for doctors, sports medicine specialists and physiotherapists, as well as for the sponsors of prescribed treatments, and it confirms the usefulness of integrating the new form of intervention into existing multimodal back therapy training concepts.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Surface electromyographic recordings after passive and active motion along
           the posterior myofascial kinematic chain in healthy male subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Martin H.S. Weisman , May Haddad , Noga Lavi , Simon Vulfsons
      Objective To map the association of muscle activations along the superficial back line (SBL) using separate conditions of active range of motion with and without resistance and passive range of motion. Method Using surface electromyography, electrodes were placed at specific points along the SBL. Twenty healthy adult males (aged 25.35 ± 1.24 years and body mass index 23.78 ± 2.12) underwent five test conditions. Conditions 1–3 involved passive movement, active movement and active movement against maximum isometric resistance (IR) of the right gastrocnemius and conditions 4 and 5 involved neck extension without and with isometric resistance from prone position. Results Passive and active motion without resistance found no significant (p > 0.05) correlations at any electrodes. Maximum IR yielded significant (p < 0.05) correlations with medium to very strong correlations at almost all electrodes. Neck extension without and with resistance showed significant medium to very strong correlations though the posterior superior iliac spine and right hamstring, respectively. Conclusion Results demonstrated significant associations between the test condition muscle activations and muscle activations along the contiguous SBL. Thus, showing a need for a complete evaluation of the SBL in patients suffering from myofascial pain at all locations along it.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • The chronicity of myogenous temporomandibular disorder changes the skin
           temperature over the anterior temporalis muscle
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Amanda Carine Packer , Ana Cláudia de Souza Costa , Delaine Rodrigues-Bigaton
      The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the chronicity of myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and skin temperature over the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. A blind, cross-sectional study was carried out involving 30 women with myogenous TMD, aged 18–40 years (mean of 23.60 ± 5.12 years). The volunteers were recruited from the university community. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) was used for the diagnosis of TMD and the determination of chronicity. The volunteers were also submitted to infrared thermography to measure absolute skin temperature over the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles and determine their temperature asymmetries. A significant association was found between duration of TMD and temperature asymmetry of the anterior temporalis muscle (rs = 0.224, p = 0.034). The present findings demonstrate that chronicity of myogenous TMD changes the skin temperature over the anterior temporalis muscle.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Assessment of type of bite and vertical dimension of occlusion in children
           and adolescents with temporomandibular disorder
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Analúcia Ferreira Marangoni , Camila Haddad Leal de Godoy , Daniela Aparecida Biasotto-Gonzalez , Thays Almeida Alfaya , Kristianne Porta Santos Fernandes , Raquel Agnelli Mesquita-Ferrari , Sandra Kalil Bussadori
      The aim of the present study was determine the type of bite and abnormalities in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) among children and adolescents with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The Helkimo index was employed for the diagnostic investigation of TMD. A clinical examination was performed for the determination of occlusion. The VDO was measured using a digital caliper. Fisher's exact text was used to determine associations between type of bite, gender and TMD. The Student's t-test was used to compare age and VDO by gender. The significance level was set to 5% or corresponding p-value. Children and adolescents with anterior open bite were 1.2-fold more likely to develop TMD in comparison to those without any type of malocclusion. The same was found for those with posterior crossbite and mixed malocclusion. A statistically significant association was found between the VDO and age in both genders. TMD affected 68.85% of the sample. No correlation was found between malocclusion, VDO and TMD in the sample. The present findings suggest that individuals with malocclusion are more prone to TMD. Therefore, it is important to evaluate all variables capable of influencing the harmony of the stomatognathic system for an effective diagnosis of TMD and malocclusion.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • A comparison of two formulas of topical menthol on vascular responses and
           perceived intensity prior to and follow a bout of maximum voluntary
           muscular contractions (MVMCs)
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Robert Topp , Alex Ng , Alyson Cybulski , Katalin Skelton , Paula Papanek
      The purpose of this study was to compare the vascular responses in the brachial artery and perceived intensity of two different formulas of topical menthol gels prior to and following a bout of maximum voluntary muscular contractions (MVMCs). 18 adults completed the same protocol on different days using blinded topical menthol gels (Old Formula and New Formula). Heart rate, brachial artery blood flow (ml/min), vessel diameter and reported intensity of sensation were measured at baseline (T1), at 5 min after application of the gel to the upper arm (T2), and immediately following five MVMCs hand grips (T3). The New Formula exhibited a significant decline in blood flow (−22.6%) between T1 and T2 which was not different than the nonsignificant declines under the Old Formula 1 (−21.8%). Both formulas resulted in a significant increase in perceived intensity of sensation between T1 and T2. Blood flow increased significantly with the New Formula (488%) between T2 and T3 and nonsignificantly with the Old Formula (355%).


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Kinesiologic taping and muscular activity: A myofascial hypothesis and a
           randomised, blinded trial on healthy individuals
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Alberto Gusella , Marcello Bettuolo , Francesco Contiero , Giovanni Volpe
      Background During recent years scientific research has demonstrated a growing interest in elastic and anaelastics adhesive taping techniques. However, only a few studies investigating the principles behind the effects of taping. At present, the action mechanisms of kinesiology taping remain speculative. Objectives To investigate the effects of taping application on the tone of the pectoralis major muscle at rest, in absence of any relevant pathologies. Methods and measures The study involved a prospective, randomised and blinded clinical trial on healthy individuals and a repeated measures study design. Two different taping techniques (facilitatory and inhibitory) were applied over the pectoralis major of 24 healthy volunteers. The outcome measure was passive range of motion of external rotation of the glenohumeral joint. Results Facilitatory taping significatively enhanced the activity of the underlying muscle. Results showed a negative correlation between facilitatory taping application and the contralateral pectoralis major length, indicating a possible effect on the muscle tone of areas outside the site of direct application. The inhibitory taping application did not produce significant results. Conclusions effects on ipsilateral and contralateral muscle physiology could be interpreted through the initial hypothesis of taping inducing changes in fascial stiffness. These could be transmitted along the continuing system. Further studies are needed to inform the possible uses of taping in clinical practice.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Stroke-related motor outcome measures: Do they quantify the
           neurophysiological aspects of upper extremity recovery?
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Shanta Pandian , Kamal Narayan Arya
      Various stroke rehabilitation outcome measures are used in clinical and research practice. Severe upper extremity paresis serves as a challenge for the selection of an appropriate outcome measure. No single measure is universally acceptable and sufficient to record the minute clinically important changes. The objectives of the present review were to explore the stroke-specific upper extremity motor outcome measures and to better understand those measures' ability to quantify upper extremity motor recovery. Seven outcome measures were selected for this review. The criteria used to select outcome measures for this review included performance-based tools that assessed the upper extremity's voluntary motor control and outcome measures which had been used for the past 10 years. A critical review that referred to motor recovery stages and volitional control was performed. The upper extremity components of each measure were compared with the neurophysiological aspects of recovery (Brunnstrom Recovery Stages) and analyzed for their clinical relevance. The concepts of minimal detectable change and minimal clinically important difference were also considered while examining the outcome measures. The findings of this review reveal that there were very few measures available to precisely assess the upper extremity motor components and volitional control. Most of the measures are functional and performance-based. Only Fugl–Meyer Assessment was found to explore the individual joint motor control as per the sequential recovery stages. Further, there is a need to develop stroke-specific upper extremity outcome measures. Scoring criteria of the acceptable measures may be modified to discern precise and progressive, but clinically significant motor changes.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • The effects of selected asanas in Iyengar yoga on flexibility: Pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Daniel James Amin , Maureen Goodman
      In recent years the practice of yoga has gained popularity as a form of physical fitness and exercise, and has been said to improve strength and flexibility. The main objective of this research project was to evaluate the effects of a six week Iyengar yoga intervention on flexibility. N = 16 low to moderately active females (52.37 ± 7.79 years) attended Iyengar yoga practice for a total of 6 weeks, consisting of one 90 min session per week. Lumbar and hamstring flexibility were assessed pre and post-intervention using a standard sit and reach test. The results show a significant increase in flexibility, indicating 6 weeks of single session yoga training may be effective in increasing erector spinae and hamstring flexibility. This is important when considering that much of the population find it difficult to attend more than one session a week into their training schedule.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • The effect of dry needling for myofascial trigger points in the neck and
           shoulders: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Joshua Ong , Leica S. Claydon
      Background and purpose: The aim of this systematic review with meta-analysis is to determine the effect of dry needling in the treatment of MTrPs. Methods Searches were performed using the electronic databases AMED, EBM reviews, Embase, and Ovid MEDLINE (all from database inception-February 2012). Study selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they compared dry needling with another form of treatment or placebo and included pain intensity as an outcome. Data extraction Two blinded reviewers independently screened the articles, scored their methodological quality and extracted data. Quality assessment Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) quality scale and the Cochrane risk of bias tool were used. Results Four RCTs compared dry needling to lidocaine and one RCT compared dry needling to placebo. Meta-analyses of dry needling revealed no significant difference between dry needling and lidocaine immediately after treatment standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.41 (95%CI −0.15 to 0.97), at one month (SMD −1.46; 95% CI −2.04 to 4.96) and three to six months (SMD −0.28; 95% CI −0.63 to 0.07). Discussion Although not significant in the meta-analyses, there were interesting patterns favoring lidocaine immediately after treatment and dry needling at three to six months.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • A 12-week medical exercise therapy program leads to significant
           improvement in knee function after degenerative meniscectomy: A
           randomized controlled trial with one year follow-up
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Håvard Østerås
      There is no consensus in the postoperative rehabilitation regimen for patients who have undergone surgery for medial meniscus damage. The aim of this study was to examine whether it is necessary to undergo postoperative physiotherapy treatment these patients. A prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. 42 participants (26 males, 16 women) were randomly assigned into an exercise group (EG) (n = 22) or a control group (CG) (n = 20). Prognostic variables were similar between the groups at baseline. The EG achieved significantly better outcome effects than the CG at pain (VAS reduced 1.9 in TG and 0.6 in CG, p < 0.01) and function (KOOS decreased 18.0 in TG and only 6.5 in CG, p < 0.01) during the 12 week intervention period. The results after a 12-month follow-up indicated the same results as at posttest 3 months postoperatively. In patients with surgery for degenerative meniscus damage, postoperative medical exercise therapy – as a model of physiotherapy – is an efficient treatment alternative compared to no systematic rehabilitation.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • The effects of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles on cervical
           multifidus muscle dimensions in healthy office workers
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Leila Rahnama , Asghar Rezasoltani , Minoo Khalkhali Zavieh , Farhang Noori Kochi , Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban
      It is argued that cervical multifidus muscles (CMM) are responsible for providing neck stability. However, whether they are actually activated during the tasks performed by the upper extremities to the neck is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles on the dimensions of CMM. Twenty three healthy males voluntarily participated in this study. Ultrasonography imaging of CMM was conducted at rest and at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction of shoulder muscles in 6 directions of shoulder movements. Anterior–posterior dimension (APD), lateral dimension (LD), shape ratio and multiplied linear dimension (MLD) of cervical multifidus were measured. The APD of CMM was increased while LD and shape ratio were decreased by shoulder muscles contraction (P < 0.01).


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Biomechanical assessment of human posture: A literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): José Luís Pimentel do Rosário
      Introduction Postural deviations have been linked to a series of different kinds of pain and dysfunction. However, posture is not an easy subject to study, mainly because postural assessments are still scientifically inaccurate, such as photography, or expensive, such as MRI, whereas others, such as X-ray, involve radiation problems. The aim of this literature review was to search for new scientific methods for assessing posture and to discuss which among both new and old methods are best for scientific and clinical objectives. Materials and methods The Medline and Lilacs databases were searched for the period 2003 to 2013 with the use of the following keywords: “posture” and “postural.” Results A total of 452 articles that assessed posture in some way were found. Twenty-two articles were selected, and 11 relevant types of technologies were described. Discussion The relevant technologies discussed were force plate; pictures; goniometers, inclinometers, tape, and other devices; 3D analysis; 3D X-ray; sensors; electromyography; Kinect; magnetic resonance imaging; 4D computed tomography; and infrared. Conclusion There is enough technology to make a very good quantitative evaluation possible. For example, the 3D MRI or the 4D CT can register static and dynamic posture. Other cheaper solutions may use combined and synchronized equipments. However, these synchronizations still require validation.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Feasibility and outcomes of a classical Pilates program on lower extremity
           strength, posture, balance, gait, and quality of life in someone with
           impairments due to a stroke
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sarah Shea , Gabriele Moriello
      Pilates is a method that can potentially be used for stroke rehabilitation to address impairments in gait, balance, strength, and posture. The purpose of this case report was to document the feasibility of using Pilates and to describe outcomes of a 9-month program on lower extremity strength, balance, posture, gait, and quality of life in an individual with stroke. The participant was taught Pilates exercises up to two times per week for nine months in addition to traditional rehabilitation in the United States. Outcomes were assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), GAITRite System®, 5 repetition sit-to-stand test (STST), and flexicurve. Improvements were found in balance, lower extremity strength, and quality of life. Posture and gait speed remained the same. While these changes cannot be specifically attributed to the intervention, Pilates may have added to his overall rehabilitation program and with some modifications was feasible to use in someone with a stroke.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • The effect of Pilates based exercise on mobility, postural stability, and
           balance in order to decrease fall risk in older adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Rachel W. Pata , Katrina Lord , Jamie Lamb
      Falls are a common problem in older adults. Impaired balance, mobility and postural stability are risk factors for falling. Limited research has been performed on Pilates exercise and the ability to decrease fall risk. In this quasi-experimental study, 35 adults (61–87 years old) participated in an 8-week Pilates based exercise program. Blind examiners conducted the Timed Up and Go (TUG), Forward Reach Test, and Turn 180 Test before and after the intervention. Number of falls, perception of Pilates, and fear of falling was also recorded. Thirty-two (91.4%) participants completed post-test measures. Significant improvements were seen in the TUG (p <0.001) and Turn 180 Test (p = 0.002). Improvements were also demonstrated in the Forward Reach Test (p = 0.049). A positive perception of the Pilates program and decreased fear of falling was shown. Results suggest a Pilates based exercise program may be effective in improving balance, mobility and postural stability to decrease fall risk.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Massage therapy plus topical analgesic is more effective than massage
           alone for hand arthritis pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Tiffany Field , Miguel Diego , Lynda Solien-Wolfe
      Methods 20 adults were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a massage therapy plus a topical analgesic application group. Both groups received a weekly massage from a therapist and were taught self-massage (same procedure) to be done by each participant once daily over a four-week period. Results The massage plus topical analgesic group as compared to the massage group had greater improvement in hand function as measured by a digital hand exerciser following the first session and across the four-week period. That group also had a greater increase in perceived grip strength and a greater decrease in hand pain, depressed mood and sleep disturbances over the four-week period. Massage therapy has been effective for several pain syndromes including migraine headaches (Lawle and Cameron, 2006)), lower back pain (Hsieh et al., 2004), fibromyalgia (Kalichman, 2010), neck and shoulder pain (Kong et al., 2013), carpal tunnel syndrome (Elliott and Burkett, 2013), and pain related to upper limb arthritis (Field et al., 2013). The purpose of the current study was to determine whether applying a topical analgesic following massage might be more effective than massage alone in treating pain associated with hand arthritis.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Analysis of activities in the daily lives of older adults exposed to the
           Pilates Method
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 3
      Author(s): Vanessa Sanders Curi Pérez , Aline Nogueira Haas , Silvia Susana Wolff
      Objective The objective of this study was to analyse the Pilates Method (PM) to assess whether it can help to improve the performance of activities that older adults undertake in their daily lives. Method this is a pre-post experimental study with a convenience sample consisting of 22 women, aged from 65 to 74 years. Data collection was divided into three stages: 1) the Battery Test of Daily Life Activities for Physically Independent Elderly (BTDLAPIE); 2) 12 weeks of Pilates training, with 50-minute sessions twice a week; 3) Repetition of all BTDLAPIE tests. We used the Student t test for paired samples and the level of significance was considered to be ≤0.05. Conclusion After the study group had been exposed to 12 weeks of training with the PM, it took them less time to perform the activities of their daily lives. However, we suggest that other controlled studies are needed in order to understand these outcomes more fully.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Definition of fascia: A morphological perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): G. Natale , S. Condino , P. Soldani , F. Fornai , M. Mattioli Belmonte , M. Gesi
      Despite their importance in anatomy, physiology, pathology and surgery, the fasciae and the fascial spaces have been poorly described in classic textbooks. This little attention depends on the fact that these fasciae vary in thickness and composition, especially at the cervical level. Indeed, in the main literature they have been described in different forms. Furthermore, the definition itself of the fascia is not consistent in a variety of authors. As a consequence, different criteria have been used to define and classify the fascial systems. In this paper, a brief terminological history and the most common nomenclatures and classifications of the fascia have been summarized.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Towards a Rosetta Stone of manual therapeutic methodology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Paul R. Standley



      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Fascial Consciousness
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Thomas Myers



      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • CAN osteopathic manipulative treatment modify the posture in elderly
           PEOPLE? - A single-case research –
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): F. Pellerin , P. Guihéneuc , G. Guihard
      In this work, we have studied the consequences of three consecutive osteopathic manipulative sessions (OMS) on the postural control by using a single-case research (SCR) design. The patient was a 77 years old woman complaining for altered balance and low-back pain. OMS were realized by a single practitioner. The pain level was self-quoted by using a visual Borg scale. The posture was monitored onto a force platform. Postural parameters were deduced from the analysis of the centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacement. The statistical significance of the observed differences was established by using a SCR-related effect size indicator (i.e. Taunovlap). Our results indicate that OMS decrease the patient’s pain, modify CoP mean position and decrease the length and velocity of the CoP displacement. Furthermore, modifications of the body oscillations were observed after OMS. This work indicates that OMS can improve the body balance and that SCR allows the objective evaluation of the consequences of OMS.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Reduced stimulation and pain management: General and manual
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Rethinking design parameters in the search for optimal dynamic seating
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jennifer Pynt
      Dynamic seating design purports to lessen damage incurred during sedentary occupations by increasing sitter movement while modifying muscle activity. Dynamic sitting is currently defined by O’Sullivan et al. (2013d) as relating to ‘the increased motion in sitting which is facilitated by the use of specific chairs or equipment’ (p. 628). Yet the evidence is conflicting that dynamic seating creates variation in the sitter’s lumbar posture or muscle activity with the overall consensus being that current dynamic seating design fails to fulfill its goals. Research is needed to determine if a new generation of chairs requiring active sitter involvement fulfills the goals of dynamic seating and aids cardio/metabolic health. This paper summarises the pursuit of knowledge regarding optimal seated spinal posture and seating design. Four new forms of dynamic seating encouraging active sitting are discussed. These are 1) The Core-flex with a split seatpan to facilitate a walking action while seated 2) the Duo balans requiring body action to create rocking 3) the Back App and 4) Locus pedestal stools both using the sitter’s legs to drive movement. Unsubstantiated claims made by the designers of these new forms of dynamic seating are outlined. Avenues of research are suggested to validate designer claims and investigate whether these designs fulfill the goals of dynamic seating and assist cardio/metabolic health. Should these claims be efficacious then a new definition of dynamic sitting is suggested; ‘Sitting in which the action is provided by the sitter, while the dynamic mechanism of the chair accommodates that action’.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • The Pilates breathing technique increases the electromyographic amplitude
           level of the deep abdominal muscles in untrained people
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Alexandre Wesley Carvalho Barbosa , Camila Antunes Guedes , Douglas Novaes Bonifácio , Angélica de Fátima Silva , Fábio Luiz Mendonça Martins , Michelle Cristina Sales Almeida Barbosa
      Objective To evaluate the behaviour of the upper rectus abdominis, lower rectus abdominis and transverse abdominis/internal oblique (TrA/IO) by using surface electromyography during trunk flexion with and without the Pilates breathing technique. Methods Nineteen female subjects (without experience of the Pilates method) were recruited. The muscles were evaluated while trunk flexion was performed by using the Pilates breathing technique (POW) and Step Barrel device, followed by another contraction without the technique (NORM). Normality was accepted, and the paired t-test was used to determine data differences (p<0.05). Results Significant differences were noted in the amplitude level of activation between TrA/IO-POW and TrA/IO-NORM. The activation amplitude level of TrA/IO-POW significantly increased compared with all the other muscles under the NORM condition. Conclusion The breathing technique of the Pilates method associated with trunk flexion increases TrA/IO electrical activity.


      PubDate: 2014-06-10T16:40:28Z
       
  • Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles
           during clinical isometric endurance tests
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Shabnam ShahAli , Amir Massoud Arab , Saeed Talebian , Esmaeil Ebrahimi , Andia Bahmani , Noureddin Karimi , Hoda Nabavi
      The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity at supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73-0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study’s findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP.


      PubDate: 2014-06-10T16:40:28Z
       
  • Exercise Mode Heterogeneity Among Reported Studies of the Qigong Practice
           Baduanjin
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 June 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Kevin Antonishen
      There has not been a uniform method for the practice of Baduanjin, and most published research reports involving this set of traditional Chinese exercise have provided incomplete descriptions of the movements used for those studies. This paper reviews elements of past research methodologies of Baduanjin intervention studies and provides considerations for future research. Ambiguities and inconsistencies in the descriptions of the movements, along with some implications which arise from this are discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-06-10T16:40:28Z
       
  • Immediate improvements in activation amplitude levels of the deep
           abdominal muscle following a sacroiliac joint manipulation during rapid
           upper limb movement
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 June 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Alexandre Wesley Carvalho Barbosa , Adriana Maria Silva , Angélica Fátima Silva , Fábio Luiz Mendonça Martins , Michelle Cristina Sales Almeida Barbosa
      Objective To assess the immediate effects on the electrical activity of the transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrA/IO) muscle during rapid voluntary upper limb movements before and after a sacroiliac joint (SIJ) manipulation. Methods Twenty healthy subjects who had innominate fixation, assessed by standing flexion test, were recruited. All subjects were submitted to SIJ manipulation and the TrA/IO muscles were evaluated bilaterally, before and after the procedure, through surface electromyography while ten random rapid upper limb flexions or abductions were performed. Normality was accepted, and the paired t-test was used to determine data differences (p<0.05). The correlations were calculated using Pearson correlation coefficient. Results All subjects presented an increase of SIJ mobility after manipulation (negative standing flexion test). Significant differences in muscle activation were noted to ipsi- and contralateral TrA/IO recruitment, prior to (A1) and after (A2) the manipulation. The A2 data were statistically greater than those in the A1. The Pearson coefficient revealed a strong correlation between the TrA/IO side and the increase in muscle activation amplitude level. Also, the data showed a moderate to strong correlation between this last variable and the moments of evaluation. Conclusion The SIJ manipulation immediately improved the electrical activity of the TrA/IO muscle during rapid voluntary upper limb movements, suggesting improved segment stability and an increment to the afferent stimuli in order to affect the motor response.


      PubDate: 2014-06-10T16:40:28Z
       
  • Are movement screens relevant for Pilates, circus or dance'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 May 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Warrick McNeill



      PubDate: 2014-06-03T15:08:35Z
       
  • The Double Knee Swing Test - a practical example of The Movement and
           Performance Matrix movement screen
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Warrick McNeill



      PubDate: 2014-06-03T15:08:35Z
       
  • Can we describe what we do'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 June 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2014-06-03T15:08:35Z
       
  • The Teeter
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): D.C. Craig Liebenson



      PubDate: 2014-05-22T16:08:23Z
       
  • P.KolářClinical Rehabilitation2013Hardback (shipping included)
           € 109 (e-Book € 82.99). Also available: set of 2 posters
           illustrating developmental positions for DNS exercises: € 65
           (including shipping). Both available at:www.rehabps.com
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 May 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): John C. Hannon



      PubDate: 2014-05-22T16:08:23Z
       
  • Lumbopelvic muscle activation patterns in three stances under graded
           loading conditions: proposing a tensegrity model for load transfer through
           the sacroiliac joints
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 May 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hamed Pardehshenas , Nader Maroufi , Mohammad Ali Sanjari , Mohamad Parnianpour , Stephen M. Levin
      Purpose According to the conventional arch model of the pelvis, stability of the sacroiliac joints may require a predominance of form and force closure mechanisms: the greater the vertical shear force at the sacroiliac joints, the greater the reliance on self-bracing by horizontally or obliquely oriented muscles (such as the internal oblique). But what happens to the arch model when a person stands on one leg' In such cases, the pelvis no longer has imposts, leaving both the arch, and the arch model theory, without support. Do lumbopelvic muscle activation patterns in one-legged stances under load suggest compatibility with a different model' This study compares lumbopelvic muscle activation patterns in two-legged and one-legged stances in response to four levels of graded trunk loading in order to further our understanding the stabilization of the sacroiliac joints. Methods Thirty male subjects experienced four levels of trunk loading (0%, 5%, 10% and 15% of body weight) by holding a bucket at one side, at three conditions: 1) two-legged standing with the bucket in the dominant hand, 2) ipsilateral loading: one-legged standing with the bucket in the dominant hand while using the same-side leg, and 3) contralateral loading: one-legged standing using the same leg used in condition 2, but with the bucket in the non-dominant hand. During these tasks, EMG signals from eight lumbopelvic muscles were collected. ANOVA with repeated design was performed on normalized EMG’s to test the main effect of load and condition, and interaction effects of load by condition. Results Latissimus dorsi and erector spinae muscles showed an antagonistic pattern of activity toward the direction of load which may suggest these muscles as lateral trunk stabilizers. Internal oblique muscles showed a co-activation pattern with increasing task demand, which may function to increase lumbopelvic stability (P < 0.05). No unilateral pattern of the internal obliques was observed during all trials. Conclusions Our results suggest that the lumbopelvic region uses a similar strategy for load transfer in both double and single leg support positions which is not compatible with the arch analogy. Our findings are more consistent with a suspensory system (wire-spoke wheel model). If our proposed model holds true, the pelvic ring can only be integrated by adjusting tension in the spokes and by preserving rim integrity or continuity. Thus, we propose that in order to restore tension integrity throughout the pelvic ring, efforts to unlock restrictions, muscular correction of positional faults and lumbopelvic or even respiratory exercises following sacroiliac joint dysfunctions must be taken into consideration. Our hypothetical model may initiate thinking and act as a guide to future work based on a biomechanical approach to the problem of sacroiliac joint dysfunction.


      PubDate: 2014-05-22T16:08:23Z
       
  • The Fascia Debate
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2014-05-01T18:17:16Z
       
  • Helene Langevin PhD responds to Editorial by Carla Stecco MD: Why are
           there so many discussions about the nomenclature of fasciae'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Helene Langevin



      PubDate: 2014-05-01T18:17:16Z
       
  • Tom Myers responds to Carla Stecco MD’s editorial: Why are there so
           many discussions about the nomenclature of fasciae'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Thomas Myers



      PubDate: 2014-05-01T18:17:16Z
       
  • Paolo Tozzi DO PT responds to editorial by Carla Stecco MD: Why are there
           so many discussions about the nomenclature of fasciae'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Paolo Tozzi



      PubDate: 2014-05-01T18:17:16Z
       
  • Robert Schleip PhD and Werner Klingler MD PhD respond to Carla Stecco MDs
           Editorial: Why are there so many discussions about the nomenclature of
           fasciae'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Robert Schleip , Werner Klingler



      PubDate: 2014-05-01T18:17:16Z
       
  • Comparison of spine motion and trunk muscle activity between abdominal
           hollowing and abdominal bracing maneuvers during prone hip extension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Tadanobu Suehiro , Masatoshi Mizutani , Susumu Watanabe , Hiroshi Ishida , Kenichi Kobara , Hiroshi Osaka
      The aim of this study was to examine the effects of lumbopelvic stabilization maneuvers on spine motion and trunk muscle activity during prone hip extension (PHE). In this study, 14 healthy male volunteers (mean age, 21.2 ± 2.6 years) were instructed to perform PHE without any maneuvers (control), with abdominal hollowing (AH), and with abdominal bracing (AB). Surface electromyography data were collected from the trunk muscles and the lumbopelvic motion was measured. Lumbar extension and anterior pelvic tilt degree were significantly lower in the AH and AB than in the control condition during PHE (p<0.001). Lumbar extension and anterior pelvic tilt degree did not differ significantly between the AH and AB (p>0.05). Global muscle group activity such as external obliques was lower in the AH than in the AB. These findings suggest that PHE with AH effectively minimizes unwanted lumbopelvic motion which does not result in global muscle activation.


      PubDate: 2014-04-22T10:04:47Z
       
  • Why are there so many discussions about the nomenclature of fasciae'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Carla Stecco



      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
 
 
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