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Journal Cover Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2575 journals]   [SJR: 0.458]   [H-I: 18]
  • Lumbopelvic muscle activation patterns in three stances under graded
           loading conditions: Proposing a tensegrity model for load transfer through
           the sacroiliac joints
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Hamed Pardehshenas , Nader Maroufi , Mohammad Ali Sanjari , Mohamad Parnianpour , Stephen M. Levin
      Purpose According to the conventional arch model of the pelvis, stability of the sacroiliac joints may require a predominance of form and force closure mechanisms: the greater the vertical shear force at the sacroiliac joints, the greater the reliance on self-bracing by horizontally or obliquely oriented muscles (such as the internal oblique). But what happens to the arch model when a person stands on one leg' In such cases, the pelvis no longer has imposts, leaving both the arch, and the arch model theory, without support. Do lumbopelvic muscle activation patterns in one-legged stances under load suggest compatibility with a different model' This study compares lumbopelvic muscle activation patterns in two-legged and one-legged stances in response to four levels of graded trunk loading in order to further our understanding the stabilization of the sacroiliac joints. Methods Thirty male subjects experienced four levels of trunk loading (0%, 5%, 10% and 15% of body weight) by holding a bucket at one side, at three conditions: 1) two-legged standing with the bucket in the dominant hand, 2) ipsilateral loading: one-legged standing with the bucket in the dominant hand while using the same-side leg, and 3) contralateral loading: one-legged standing using the same leg used in condition 2, but with the bucket in the non-dominant hand. During these tasks, EMG signals from eight lumbopelvic muscles were collected. ANOVA with repeated design was performed on normalized EMG's to test the main effect of load and condition, and interaction effects of load by condition. Results Latissimus dorsi and erector spinae muscles showed an antagonistic pattern of activity toward the direction of load which may suggest these muscles as lateral trunk stabilizers. Internal oblique muscles showed a co-activation pattern with increasing task demand, which may function to increase lumbopelvic stability (P < 0.05). No unilateral pattern of the internal obliques was observed during all trials. Conclusions Our results suggest that the lumbopelvic region uses a similar strategy for load transfer in both double and single leg support positions which is not compatible with the arch analogy. Our findings are more consistent with a suspensory system (wire-spoke wheel model). If our proposed model holds true, the pelvic ring can only be integrated by adjusting tension in the spokes and by preserving rim integrity or continuity. Thus, we propose that in order to restore tension integrity throughout the pelvic ring, efforts to unlock restrictions, muscular correction of positional faults and lumbopelvic or even respiratory exercises following sacroiliac joint dysfunctions must be taken into consideration. Our hypothetical model may initiate thinking and act as a guide to future work based on a biomechanical approach to the problem of sacroiliac joint dysfunction.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Immediate improvements in activation amplitude levels of the deep
           abdominal muscle following a sacroiliac joint manipulation during rapid
           upper limb movement
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Alexandre Wesley Carvalho Barbosa , Adriana Maria Silva , Angélica Fátima Silva , Fábio Luiz Mendonça Martins , Michelle Cristina Sales Almeida Barbosa
      Objective To assess the immediate effects on the electrical activity of the transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrA/IO) muscle during rapid voluntary upper limb movements before and after a sacroiliac joint (SIJ) manipulation. Methods Twenty healthy subjects who had innominate fixation, assessed by standing flexion test, were recruited. All subjects were submitted to SIJ manipulation and the TrA/IO muscles were evaluated bilaterally, before and after the procedure, through surface electromyography while ten random rapid upper limb flexions or abductions were performed. Normality was accepted, and the paired t-test was used to determine data differences (p < 0.05). The correlations were calculated using Pearson correlation coefficient. Results All subjects presented an increase of SIJ mobility after manipulation (negative standing flexion test). Significant differences in muscle activation were noted to ipsi- and contralateral TrA/IO recruitment, prior to (A1) and after (A2) the manipulation. The A2 data were statistically greater than those in the A1. The Pearson coefficient revealed a strong correlation between the TrA/IO side and the increase in muscle activation amplitude level. Also, the data showed a moderate to strong correlation between this last variable and the moments of evaluation. Conclusion The SIJ manipulation immediately improved the electrical activity of the TrA/IO muscle during rapid voluntary upper limb movements, suggesting improved segment stability and an increment to the afferent stimuli in order to affect the motor response.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Fascial Manipulation® method applied to pubescent postural
           hyperkyphosis: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Vilma Ćosić , Julie Ann Day , Pietro Iogna , Antonio Stecco
      Background Treatment of pubescent postural hyperkyphosis commonly includes postural exercises and auto-elongation. Myofascial imbalances can be involved in functional, sagittal plane deviations of spinal curves. This pilot-study assesses the effects of one manual therapy approach that addresses fascial dysfunctions (Fascial Manipulation®) in pubescent subjects with postural hyperkyphosis. Methods 17 subjects (mean age 11.8 DS 0.8; 9 males, 8 females) were evaluated for familiarity; psychological aspects; sport; pain; anteposition of shoulders, head, and pelvis; distance C7 and L3 from plumb-line; distance fingers to floor on forward bend. Each subject received 2–4 weekly sessions of Fascial Manipulation®. Parameters were evaluated before and after manual treatment, with a follow-up at 7 months. Results A statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) was present in all the parameters analysed before and after treatment and at a 7 month follow-up. Conclusions Results suggest that Fascial Manipulation® could represent an approach to integrate into treatment of postural hyperkyphosis in pubescent subjects.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Treatment of tension-type headache with articulatory and suboccipital soft
           tissue therapy: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical
           trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Gemma V. Espí-López , Antonia Gómez-Conesa , Anna Arnal Gómez , Josep Benítez Martínez , Ángel Oliva Pascual-Vaca , Cleofás Rodríguez Blanco
      This study researches the effectiveness of two manual therapy treatments focused on the suboccipital region for tension-type headache. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted over a period of four weeks with a follow-up at one month. Eighty-four patients with a mean age of 39.7 years (SD 11.4) with tension-type headache were assigned to 4 groups which included the following manual therapy treatment: suboccipital soft tissue inhibition; occiput-atlas-axis global manipulation; combination of both techniques; and a control group. The primary assessment consisted of collecting socio-demographic data and headache characteristics in a one-month base period, data such as age, gender, severity of pain, intensity and frequency of headache, among other. Outcome secondary assessment were: impact of headache, disability, ranges of motion of the craniocervical junction, frequency and intensity of headache, and pericranial tenderness. In the month prior to the study, average pain intensity, was rated at 6.49 (SD 1.69), and 66.7% subjects suffered headaches of moderate intensity. After 8 weeks, statistically significant improvements were noted. OAA manipulative treatment and combined therapy treatments proved to be more effective than suboccipital soft tissue inhibition for tension-type headache. The treatment with suboccipital soft tissue inhibition, despite producing less significant results, also has positive effects on different aspects of headache.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Kumka's response to Stecco's fascial nomenclature editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Myroslava Kumka



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Influence of instrument assisted soft tissue treatment techniques on
           myofascial trigger points
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Dawn T. Gulick
      Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of instrument assisted soft tissue techniques (IASTT) on myofascial trigger points (MTrP). Design Randomized, controlled study with the researcher assessing the MTrP sensitivity blinded to the treatment rendered. Participants Phase 1 = 27; Phase 2 = 22. Intervention MTrPs were identified in the upper back. In phase 1, two MTrPs (right & left) were identified. One was treated with IASTT, the other was a control. In phase 2, one MTrP was identified in a treatment and a control group. In each phase, the treatment groups received six treatments of IASTT. Outcome measures Sensitivity threshold of the MTrP was assessed with a dolorimeter. Results There was a significant improvement in both groups over time but there was no difference between the treatment and control groups. Conclusions The use of a pressure dolorimeter may have served as a form of ischemic compression treatment. This assessment tool may have been a mitigating factor in the over-shadowing any potential influence of the IASTT on the MTrP. Thus, another assessment tool needs to be identified for MTrP assessment. Until that technique is identified, the effect of IASTT on MTrPs in inconclusive.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Inadvertent recovery in communication deficits following the upper limb
           mirror therapy in stroke: A case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Kamal Narayan Arya , Shanta Pandian
      Broca's aphasia is the most challenging communication deficit in stroke. Left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a key region of the mirror-neuron system, gets lesioned in Broca's aphasia. Mirror therapy (MT), a form of action-observation, may trigger the mirror neurons. The aim of this study was to report a case of poststroke subject with Broca's aphasia, who exhibited an inadvertent and significant improvement in speech after MT for the paretic upper limb. The 20-month old stroke patient underwent MT through goal-directed tasks. He received a total absence of spontaneous speech, writing, and naming. After 45 sessions of task-based MT for the upper limb, he showed tremendous recovery in expressive communication. He had fluent and comprehensive communication; however, with a low pitch and minor pronunciation errors. He showed a substantial change (from 18/100 to 79/100) on the Communicative Effective Index, particularly, on items such as expressing emotions, one-to-one conversation, naming, and spontaneous conversation.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Upper cervical mobility, posture and myofascial trigger points in subjects
           with episodic migraine: Case-control study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Danit Tali , Itay Menahem , Elisha Vered , Leonid Kalichman
      Objectives To evaluate the association between episodic migraines and the prevalence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the sternocleidomastoid and upper trapezius, forward head posture (FHP), neck range of motion (ROM) and cervical facet joint stiffness. Methods 20 physiotherapy students with episodic migraines and 20 age- and sex matched healthy controls were included in this observational case-control study. Demographics and headache status were evaluated through questionnaires. Active neck ROM, presence of MTrPs, and cervical facet joint mobility were assessed by physical examination. FHP was measured using a lateral digital photograph taken in a sitting position. Results No significant differences were found in neck ROM measurements and FHP between the migraine and control groups. Significant differences were found in the prevalence of cervical facet joints stiffness in Occiput-C1 (χ 2 = 4.444, p = 0.035) and C1–C2 (χ 2 = 10.157, p = 0.001), but not in other segments. Significant differences were found in the prevalence of active and latent MTrPs between the migraine and control subjects in the right trapezius (χ 2 = 11.649, p = 0.003) and right sternocleidomastoid (χ 2 = 8.485, p = 0.014). Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that the prevalence of MTrPs in neck muscles and hypomobility in the upper cervical facet joints are associated with migraines.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Effects of yoga on arm volume among women with breast cancer related
           lymphedema: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Mary Insana Fisher , Betsy Donahoe-Fillmore , Laura Leach , Colleen O'Malley , Cheryl Paeplow , Tess Prescott , Harold Merriman
      Lymphedema affects 3–58% of survivors of breast cancer and can result in upper extremity impairments. Exercise can be beneficial in managing lymphedema. Yoga practice has been minimally studied for its effects on breast cancer related lymphedema (BCRL). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of yoga on arm volume, quality of life (QOL), self-reported arm function, and hand grip strength in women with BCRL. Six women with BCRL participated in modified Hatha yoga 3×/week for 8 weeks. Compression sleeves were worn during yoga sessions. Arm volume, QOL, self-reported arm function, and hand grip strength were measured at baseline, half-way, and at the conclusion of yoga practice. Arm volume significantly decreased from baseline (2423.3 ml ± 597.2) to final measures (2370.8 ml ± 577.2) (p = .02). No significant changes in QOL (p = .12), self-reported arm function (p = .34), or hand grip strength (p = .26) were found. Yoga may be beneficial in the management of lymphedema.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • The Happy Antics programme: Holistic exercise for people with dementia
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Yvonne J-Lyn Khoo , Paul van Schaik , Jackie McKenna
      Background Holistic exercise for people with dementia could have psychological and physical benefits, but there is a lack of research on the experience of this type of exercise. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptance of holistic exercise among people with dementia. Method A holistic exercise programme for people with dementia was designed and implemented. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken to explore participants' experience of holistic exercise, transcribed verbatim and analyzed. Results Seven themes were generated from the data. They were enjoyment, relaxation, keeping active, social interaction, pain relief, learning something new and intention to continue, respectively. Conclusion The results of the current small-scale study provide evidence for the feasibility and acceptance of holistic exercise for people with dementia. In addition, participants appeared to benefit in terms of psychological and physical wellbeing.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Lower thoracic syndrome – A differential screen for back pain
           following vertical compression injury: A case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Deepak Sebastian
      A 36-year-old male experienced left sided back and radiating flank pain, following a fall on his buttock. A detailed medical evaluation ruled out the presence of red flags. Initial examination revealed positive findings of comparable local tenderness over the left T11, T12 and left paraspinal area, and a 2 cm shortening of the left leg. 8 treatment visits for a period of 4 weeks addressed mechanical dysfunction at the T11, T12, lumbar and pelvic region, comprising manual therapy, therapeutic exercise and pain relieving modalities. Reduction of local tenderness, back and radiating flank pain was observed. Additionally, resolution of the persistent apparent shortening of his left leg was observed, following a high velocity thrust (HVT) manipulation of the T11, T12 segments. The vertebral motion segment of T11, T12, the thoracoabdominal nerves, the 12th rib, the quadratus lumborum and the serratus posterior inferior are speculated to be potential symptom mediators. The findings in the case report suggest the lower thoracic region to be included during the evaluation process of back pain, especially when the mechanism of injury is a vertical compression.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Differences and similarities in postural alterations caused by sadness and
           depression
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Jose Luis Rosario , Maria Suely Bezerra Diógenes , Rita Mattei , José Roberto Leite
      The present study investigated the existence of a relationship between depression and body posture in 40 women, aged between 20 and 30 years, who had normal body mass indices (or were underweight) and absence of neurological, psychiatric, or musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of a relationship between sadness, depression and the posture represented by the angle of Tales, head inclination, shoulder inclination, and forward head and shoulder protrusion. The degree of depression was rated on analogue scales representing current and usual depression and current and usual sadness and by the Beck Depression Inventory. The results indicated that a relationship exists between: Beck depression and the angle of Tales (p = 0.01), current depression and inclination of the head (p = 0.05) and inclination of the shoulders (p = 0.006), and usual depression and protrusion of the shoulder (p = 0.02). Inclination of the shoulders is associated with current sadness (p = 0.03; r = 0.443) and usual sadness (p = 0.04; r = 0.401). Usual sadness is also associated with protrusion of the shoulder (p = 0.05; r = 0.492). No associations were found with protrusion of the head and the emotional variables assessed. The conclusion was that depression and sadness might possibly change posture. Consequently, postural assessment and treatment may assist in diagnosing and treating depression.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Effects of non-surgical joint distraction in the treatment of severe knee
           osteoarthritis
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Khosro Khademi-Kalantari , Somayeh Mahmoodi Aghdam , Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban , Mehdi Rezayi , Abbas Rahimi , Sedighesadat Naimee
      Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of non surgical knee distraction in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. Method forty female patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were randomly divided in two groups. A standard physiotherapy treatment was applied to both groups and in one group it was accompanied with 20 min knee joint distraction. The patients were treated for 10 sessions. Clinical examination consisted of functional examination, completion of a quality of life questionnaire, pain scale, and assessment of joint mobility and joint edema. Result The standard physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction resulted in significantly higher improvement in pain (P = 0.004), functional ability (P = 0.02), quality of life (P = 0.002) and knee flexion range of motion (p = 0.02) compared to the standard physiotherapy treatment alone post treatment and after 1 month follow up. Conclusion Adding knee distraction to standard physiotherapy treatment can result in further improvement in pain relief, increased functional ability and better quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Effects of a training program based on the Proprioceptive Neuromuscular
           Facilitation method on post-stroke motor recovery: A preliminary study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Tatiana Souza Ribeiro , Emília Márcia Gomes de Sousa e Silva , Wagner Henrique Sousa Silva , Vescia Vieira de Alencar Caldas , Diana Lídice Araújo Silva , Fabrícia Azevedo Costa Cavalcanti , Ana Raquel Rodrigues Lindquist
      This preliminary study sought to analyze the effects of a training program based on the Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) method on motor recovery of individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis. Eleven individuals with chronic hemiparesis (mean lesion time of 19.64 months) after unilateral and non-recurrent stroke underwent training based on PNF method for twelve sessions, being evaluated for motor function - using the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM) instrument; functionality, by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM); and gait kinematic (using the Qualisys Motion Capture System), at baseline and post-training. Significant changes in FIM (from median 67 to median 68; P = .043) and STREAM scores (from median 47 to median 55; P = .003) were observed. Data showed significant changes in motor function and functionality after training, suggesting that this program can be useful for rehabilitation of chronic stroke survivors.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Whether lidocaine or dry needling should be the favored treatment after
           meta analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lin Liu , Qiang-Min Huang , Long-Bing Wang



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • The effect of trunk coordination exercise on dynamic postural control
           using a Core Noodle
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Yuki Miyake , Shinichiro Nakamura , Masaaki Nakajima
      Objective To investigate the influence of trunk coordination exercise on dynamic postural control relative to postural sway. Method The effects of trunk coordination exercises were examined using a Core Noodle for the postural sway in healthy students who were assigned to an exercise or control group. The independent variable was the extent of exposure to Core Noodle exercise, and the dependent variable was dynamic postural control. A stabilometer, which measures dynamic postural control, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the exercises. In addition, center of gravity movements were assessed using a Gravicorder G-620 stabilometer in which the subject was asked to shift their center of gravity between 2 circles on a computer monitor. Pre- and post-intervention dynamic postural control was statistically evaluated between the exercise group and control group using the Mann–Whitney test. Finally, we investigated the application of these exercises for a stroke patient. Results and conclusion For post-intervention, the envelop area, mean length of the pathways between 2 circles, and the number of circles were significantly higher in the exercise group. Trunk coordination exercise performed Core Noodle may be used to enhance the dynamic postural balance of healthy young adults, and it can also be adapted for stroke patients.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Idiopathic scoliosis: The tethered spine II: post-surgical pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lucy Whyte Ferguson
      The treatment of severe chronic pain in young people following surgery for the correction of curvatures of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is presented through two case histories. Effective treatment involved release of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) known to refer pain into the spine, and treatment of related fascia and joint dysfunction. The TrPs found to be contributing to spinal area pain were located in muscles at some distance from the spine rather than in the paraspinal muscles. Referred pain from these TrPs apparently accounted for pain throughout the base of the neck and thoracolumbar spine. Exploratory surgery was considered for one patient to address pain following rod placement but the second surgery became unnecessary when the pain was controlled with treatment of the myofascial pain and joint dysfunction. The other individual had both scoliosis and hyperkyphosis, had undergone primary scoliosis surgery, and subsequently underwent a second surgery to remove hardware in an attempt to address her persistent pain following the initial surgery (and because of dislodged screws). The second surgery did not, however, reduce her pain. In both cases these individuals, with severe chronic pain following scoliosis corrective surgery, experienced a marked decrease of pain after myofascial treatment. As will be discussed below, despite the fact that a significant minority of individuals who have scoliosis corrective surgery are thought to require a second surgery, and despite the fact that pain is the most common reason leading to such revision surgery, myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) had apparently not previously been considered as a possible factor in their pain.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • A pilot study on the effects of low frequency repetitive transcranial
           magnetic stimulation on lower extremity spasticity and motor neuron
           excitability in patients after stroke
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Soofia Naghdi , Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari , Maryam Rastgoo , Bijan Forogh , Shohreh Jalaie , Gholamreza Olyaei
      Purpose To evaluate the effect of low frequency, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the lower extremity spasticity and motor neuron excitability in patients after stroke. Methods Seven patients after stroke aged 42–78 years were included in this pretest-posttest clinical trial. The rTMS at 1 Hz and duration of 20 min was applied to the intact leg motor cortex for five consecutive sessions. Primary outcome measures were the Modified Modified Ashwoth Scale (MMAS) and the H max/M max ratio. Measurements were taken at baseline (T0), after the last treatment (5th) session (T1), and at 1 week follow up (T2). Results Clinically assessed ankle plantar flexor spasticity (p = 0.05) improved significantly after treatment at T1. Knee extensor spasticity scored 0 after treatment at T1 and T2. The H max/M max ratio showed no statistically significant improvement after treatment. Conclusion The pilot data indicate that the inhibitory rTMS of the intact leg motor cortex in patients after stroke may improve the lower extremity spasticity.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Effects of Baduanjin on mental health: A comprehensive review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fung Kei Cheng
      Mental disorders affect not only individual well-being but also community health, which pushes mental care professionals to investigate various solutions to accommodate different needs. The exercise of Baduanjin, a form of Qigong, facilitates improvements in psychological health, potentially serving as an alternative choice for interventions. This comprehensive review analyses 28 publications, among which three are in English and 25 in Chinese, these indicating enhancement in quality of life and mental health for a variety of participants, including college students, middle-aged individuals, the elderly, and patients who suffer from different mental problems or chronic physical illnesses. The outcomes suggest that this cost-effective, learner-friendly and self-pacing exercise should be promoted in individual and group settings for both curative and preventive measures, and for which further investigations are also recommended.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Dr Karel Lewit – Thoughts of an associate, assistant, friend
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Giancarlo Russo



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Sirsasana (headstand) technique alters head/neck loading: Considerations
           for safety
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Rachel Hector , Jody L. Jensen
      Background This study examined the weight-bearing responsibility of the head and neck at moments of peak force during three headstand techniques. Methods Three matched groups of 15 each (18–60 years old) were formed based upon lower limb entry/exit technique: symmetrical extended, symmetrical flexed, and asymmetrical flexed. All 45 practitioners performed 3 headstands. Kinematics and kinetics were analyzed to locate peak forces acting on the head, loading rate, center of pressure (COP) and cervical alignment. Findings During entry, symmetrical extended leg position trended towards the lowest loads as compared to asymmetrical or symmetrical flexed legs (Cohen's d = 0.53 and 0.39 respectively). Also, symmetrical extended condition produced slower loading rates and more neutral cervical conditions during loading. Interpretation Subjects loaded the head with maximums of 40–48% of total body weight. The data support the conclusion that entering the posture with straight legs together may reduce the load and the rate of change of that load.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Effect of remote after-effects of resistive static contraction of the
           pelvic depressors on improvement of restricted wrist flexion range of
           motion in patients with restricted wrist flexion range of motion
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Arai Mitsuo , Shiratani Tomoko
      The objective of the study was to compare the effects of remote aftereffects of resistive static contraction of the pelvic depressors (RSCPD) with aftereffects of static contraction of upper extremity muscles (SCUE) on improvement of the maximal active range of motion (MAROM) for patients with restricted wrist flexion range of motion (ROM) due to upper limb pain and dysfunction. The participants were 10 outpatients with restricted wrist joints. The mean (SD) age was 53.7 (4.4) years (range, 34–81). The subjects performed two exercise protocols (SCUE and RSCPD) in random order. One-way repeated measures ANOVA showed significant main effects in evaluation of the change in MAROM and IEMG activities for different conditions (after rest, after SCUE, and after RSCPD). The remote aftereffects of RSCPD, but not those of SCUE, caused significant improvement in MAROM for restricted wrist flexion ROM.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Massage treatment and medial tibial stress syndrome; A commentary to
           provoke thought about the way massage therapy is used in the treatment of
           MTSS
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sarah Fogarty
      As students and practitioners we are taught about the treatment and causative factors of medial shin pain, in particular’ shin splints' or the more recent term; medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). During the years there have been many theories, conjecture and misunderstandings about the mechanisms of ‘shin splints/medial tibial stress syndrome’ however the ramifications of these mechanisms on how massage treatment is delivered have not being discussed. The evidence for the treatment of MTSS is largely clinical with little evidence of any treatment being proven to be effective in treating MTSS. The aim of this article is to present a summary of the mechanisms of MTSS and a commentary to provoke thought about the way massage therapy is used in the treatment of MTSS based on these mechanisms.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Comparison of the effects of remote after-effects of static contractions
           for different upper-extremity positions and pinch-force strengths in
           patients with restricted wrist flexion range of motion
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mitsuo Arai , Tomoko Shiratani
      The objective of the study was to examine the after-effects of static contractions of upper extremity muscles in different shoulder joint positions and at different pinch-force strengths on the maximal active range of motion (MAROM) and wrist agonist/antagonist IEMG activities for patients with restricted wrist flexion range of motion (ROM) due to upper limb pain and dysfunction. The subjects were 10 outpatients (3 males, 7 females) with restricted wrist joints. These subjects performed four static contractions of upper extremity muscles in neutral and diagonal shoulder joint positions and with weak and strong pinch-force strengths in random order. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed that the change in MAROM was significantly larger (P < 0.05) after diagonal-strong static contractions than after neutral-weak static contractions. There were no significant correlations between changes in MAROM and IEMG activities. These results indicate that shoulder joint position and pinch-force strength should be considered for effective induction of remote after-effects of static contractions for increasing MAROM for restricted wrist flexion ROM.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Dr Karel Lewit 1916–2014
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Craig Liebenson



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • International Myopain Society (IMS) US chapter meeting
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Stewart Wild



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • An Evidence-Informed Review of the Current Myofascial Pain Literature
           – January 2015
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt , Rob Grieve , Michelle Layton , Todd Hooks
      This article provides an up-to-date review of the most recent publications about myofascial pain, trigger points (TrPs) and other related topics. We have added some commentaries where indicated with supporting references. In the Basic Research section, we reviewed the work by Danish researchers about the influence of latent TrPs and a second study of the presence and distribution of both active and latent TrPs in whiplash-associated disorders. The section on Soft Tissue Approaches considered multiple studies and case reports of the efficacy of myofascial release (MFR), classic and deep muscle massage, fascial techniques, and connective tissue massage. TrP dry needling (DN) is becoming a common approach and we included multiple studies, reviews, and case reports, while the section on Injection Techniques features an article on TrP injections following mastectomy and several articles about the utilization of botulinum toxin. Lastly, we review several articles on modalities and other clinical approaches.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Long-term benefits of somatosensory training to improve balance of elderly
           with diabetes mellitus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Patrícia Silva , Priscila Fernanda Figueredo Borges Botelho , Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro , Maíta Mara O.L.L. Vaz , Daniela Cristina Carvalho de Abreu
      We evaluate the effects of somatosensory training on the mean amplitude of the center of pressure (COP) in the upright position and the sustained benefits after 6-month. Twelve elderly patients with type II diabetes (T2DM) participated in the study. Patients with T2DM were allocated to the somatosensory protocol, which consisted of a circuit composed of 13 stations with different textures. The rehabilitation protocol was applied twice a week during the period of 12 weeks. Upright balance, in 2 situations (fixed platform with eyes open and closed) to evaluate the mean amplitude of COP oscillation in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions and the total area of COP oscillation. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-exercise and 6-month follow-up. The somatosensory training protocol was beneficial to reduce the AP oscillation of the COP, remaining after 6 months of the end of intervention in elderly with T2DM.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Pilates versus general exercise effectiveness on pain and functionality in
           non-specific chronic low back pain subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fernanda Queiroz Ribeiro Cerci Mostagi , Josilainne Marcelino Dias , Ligia Maxwell Pereira , Karen Obara , Bruno Fles Mazuquin , Mariana Felipe Silva , Monica Angelica Cardoso Silva , Renata Rosa de Campos , Maria Simone Tavares Barreto , Jéssyca Fernandes Nogueira , Tarcísio Brandão Lima , Rodrigo Luiz Carregaro , Jefferson Rosa Cardoso
      Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common causes of disability, and the Pilates method has been associated with improvements in symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Pilates method, when compared to general exercises, on pain and functionality after eight weeks (16 sessions, 2×/week) and a follow-up of three months, in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). A randomised controlled trial composed of 22 subjects was proposed. Subjects were allocated into two groups: the Pilates group (PG) (n = 11) and the general exercise group (GEG) (n = 11). The PG protocol was based on the Pilates method and the GEG performed exercises to manage NSCLBP. There were no differences between the groups. When analysed over time, the GEG demonstrated improvements in functionality between baseline and the end of treatment (P = .02; Cohen's d ¯  = 0.34) and baseline and follow-up (P = .04; Cohen's d ¯  = 0.31). There were no differences between the Pilates and general exercises with regard to pain and functionality in NSCLBP subjects but general exercises were better than Pilates for increasing functionality and flexibility.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Application of Pilates principles increases paraspinal muscle activation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Letícia Souza Andrade , Luís Mochizuki , Flávio Oliveira Pires , Renato André Sousa da Silva , Yomara Lima Mota
      Objective To analyze the effect of Pilates principles on the EMG activity of abdominal and paraspinal muscles on stable and unstable surfaces. Methods Surface EMG data about the rectus abdominis (RA), iliocostalis (IL) and lumbar multifidus (MU) of 19 participants were collected while performing three repetitions of a crunch exercise in the following conditions: 1) with no Pilates technique and stable surface (nP + S); 2) with no Pilates technique and unstable surface (nP + U); 3) with Pilates technique and stable surface (P + S); 4) with Pilates and unstable surface (P + U). The EMG Fanalysis was conducted using a custom-made Matlab® 10. Results There was no condition effect in the RA iEMG with stable and unstable surfaces (F (1,290) = 0 p = 0.98) and with and without principles (F (1,290) = 1.2 p = 0.27). IL iEMG was higher for the stable surface condition (F (1,290) = 32.3 p < 0.001) with Pilates principles (F (1,290) = 21.9 p < 0.001). The MU iEMG was higher for the stable surface condition with and without Pilates principles (F (1,290) = 84.9 p < 0.001).


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Reflections: Reviews, reviewers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Neuroscience education in addition to trigger point dry needling for the
           management of patients with mechanical chronic low back pain: A
           preliminary clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mario Téllez-García , Ana I. de-la-Llave-Rincón , Jaime Salom-Moreno , Maria Palacios-Ceña , Ricardo Ortega-Santiago , César Fernández-de-las-Peñas
      The objective of the current study was to determine the short-term effects of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) alone or combined with neuroscience education on pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). Twelve patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive either TrP-DN (TrP-DN) or TrP-DN plus neuroscience education (TrP-DN + EDU). Pain intensity (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0–10), disability (Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMQ-, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index-ODI), kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-TSK), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the C5–C6 zygapophyseal joint, transverse process of L3 vertebra, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle were collected at baseline and 1-week after the intervention. Patients treated with TrP-DN + EDU experienced a significantly greater reduction of kinesiophobia (P = 0.008) and greater increases in PPT over the transverse process of L3 (P = 0.049) than those patients treated only with TrP-DN. Both groups experienced similar decreases in pain, ODI and RMQ, and similar increases in PPT over the C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior after the intervention (all, P > 0.05). The results suggest that TrP-DN was effective for improving pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical LBP at short-term. The inclusion of a neuroscience educational program resulted in a greater improvement in kinesiophobia.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Electromyographic activity of rectus abdominis muscles during dynamic
           Pilates abdominal exercises
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gabriela Bueno Silva , Mirele Minussi Morgan , Wellington Roberto Gomes de Carvalho , Elisangela Silva , Wagner Zeferino de Freitas , Fabiano Fernandes da Silva , Renato Aparecido de Souza
      Objective To assess the electrical behaviour of the upper rectus abdominis (URA) and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) by electromyography (EMG) during the following dynamic Pilates abdominal exercises: roll up, double leg stretch, coordination, crisscross and foot work. The results were compared with EMG findings of traditional abdominal exercises (sit up and crunch). Methods: Seventeen female subjects (with no experience of the Pilates method) were recruited. The URA and LRA were evaluated while 12 isotonic contractions were performed using the Pilates principles or traditional abdominal exercises. The data were normalised by a maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Normality was accepted, and ANOVA followed by Tukey test was used to determine data differences (P < 0.05). Results: Pilates exercises double leg stretch, coordination, crisscross and foot work promoted greater muscle activation than traditional exercises, mainly in URA. Thus, these exercises have the potential to be prescribed for muscle strengthening programmes.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Abdominal training from a yoga perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Craig Liebenson , Jason Brown



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Effect of massage on DOMS in ultramarathon runners: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Lorenzo Visconti , Gianpiero Capra , Giacomo Carta , Corrado Forni , Denise Janin
      In recent years, the popularity of ultramarathons has increased. During these competitions, musculoskeletal problems are very common. Among the more frequent of those problems is the onset of muscle pain, which is defined in the literature as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The present study aimed to collect epidemiological data regarding the onset of musculoskeletal problems during the Tor des Geants (International ultramarathon race of 330 km in length and 24,000 m in elevation difference) and to describe the effects of massage on reducing pain and overall perceived improvement in a sample of 25 athletes who complained of DOMS. Two hundred and twenty-one treatments were performed on 220 ultramarathon runners, of which 207 were males and 34 were females; the age group most represented ranged from 40 to 50 years. The most common symptom was pain, which occurred in more than 95% of cases, and the most affected area was the lower extremities (90% of subjects). In the analysed subjects, treatment with massage generated a significant (p < 0.0001) improvement. The numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) value was 3.6 points on average (SD 2.1) after massage, and there were no cases of worsening DOMS after massage as determined using the patient global impression of change (PGIC). The values of minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in DOMS management were calculated on the basis of the ROC curves and two other anchor-based methods in the PGIC and were 2.8–3.9 points on the NPRS. In the context analysed, massage was an effective treatment to reduce DOMS during the onset of symptoms.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Adherence to home exercises in non-specific low back pain. A randomised
           controlled pilot trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Anna Sabrina Hügli , Markus Josef Ernst , Jan Kool , Fabian Marcel Rast , Anne-Kathrin Rausch-Osthoff , Angelika Mannig , Sarah Oetiker , Christoph Michael Bauer
      Specific exercises for the improvement of movement control of the lumbopelvic region are well-established for patients with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) and movement control impairment (MCI). However, a lack of adherence to home exercise regimens is often observed. The aim of the study was to explore the differences in home exercise (HE) adherence between patients who perform conventional exercises and those who exercise with Augmented Feedback (AF). Twenty patients with NSLBP and MCI were randomly allocated into two groups. The physiotherapy group (PT group) completed conventional exercises, and the AF group exercised with an AF system that was designed for use in therapy settings. The main outcome measure was self-reported adherence to the home exercise regimen. There was no significant difference in HE duration between the groups (W= 64, p= 0.315). The AF group exercised for a median of 9 min and 4 s (IQR= 3’59’’), and the PT group exercised for 4 min and 19 s (IQR= 8’30’’). Exercising with AF led to HE times that were similar to those of conventional exercise, and AF might be used as an alternative therapy method for home exercise.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Results of chiropractic scoliosis rehabilitation treatment at two years
           post-skeletal maturity in identical female twins
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Brian Dovorany , Mark W. Morningstar , Clayton Stitzel , Aatif Siddiqui
      Background Scoliosis treatment guidelines for non-operative management suggest that patients should be followed for two years beyond skeletal maturity to appropriately evaluate treatment effect. This report outlines the results of identical twin girls' treatment with chiropractic rehabilitation treatment at two years post skeletal maturity. Findings The twins participated in a treatment lasting two weeks, followed by home care maintenance and periodic follow-ups for they reached skeletal maturity. Two year follow up showed reduced Cobb angles of 19° and 15°, respectively. Conclusion Identical twin girls who were evaluated two years after skeletal maturity showed clinically significant improvements in Cobb angle measurements. Controlled, prospective study design for future patients treated in this manner will provide greater insight into how the treatment may have impacted the observed changes.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Movement Health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Warrick McNeill , Lincoln Blandford



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Effects of strength and balance training on the mobility, fear of falling
           and grip strength of elderly female fallers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Melina Galleti Prata , Marcos Eduardo Scheicher
      The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of virtual reality and strength training on the balance, fear of falling and handgrip strength of older women with a history of falls. The fear of falling, mobility and grip strength were evaluated in 11 elderly fallers (72.4 ± 5.2 years). The faller group was submitted to 12 weeks of virtual reality and muscle strength training. The results showed improvement in mobility (p = 0.0004) and in the fear of falling (p = 0.002). No significant difference was observed for hand grip strength. It can be concluded that virtual reality and muscle strength interventions are beneficial for mobility and fear of falling in older women with a history of falls.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • One repetition maximum bench press performance: A new approach for its
           evaluation in inexperienced males and females: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Antonino Bianco , Davide Filingeri , Antonio Paoli , Antonio Palma
      The aim of this study was to evaluate a new method to perform the one repetition maximum (1RM) bench press test, by combining previously validated predictive and practical procedures. Eight young male and 7 females participants, with no previous experience of resistance training, performed a first set of repetitions to fatigue (RTF) with a workload corresponding to ⅓ of their body mass (BM) for a maximum of 25 repetitions. Following a 5-min recovery period, a second set of RTF was performed with a workload corresponding to ½ of participants' BM. The number of repetitions performed in this set was then used to predict the workload to be used for the 1RM bench press test using Mayhew's equation. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and blood lactate were monitored before, during and after each 1RM attempt. A significant effect of gender was found on the maximum number of repetitions achieved during the RTF set performed with ½ of participants' BM (males: 25.0 ± 6.3; females: 11.0x± 10.6; t = 6.2; p < 0.001). The 1RM attempt performed with the workload predicted by Mayhew's equation resulted in females performing 1.2 ± 0.7 repetitions, while males performed 4.8 ± 1.9 repetitions. All participants reached their 1RM performance within 3 attempts, thus resulting in a maximum of 5 sets required to successfully perform the 1RM bench press test. We conclude that, by combining previously validated predictive equations with practical procedures (i.e. using a fraction of participants' BM to determine the workload for an RTF set), the new method we tested appeared safe, accurate (particularly in females) and time-effective in the practical evaluation of 1RM performance in inexperienced individuals.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Characterization of chronic pain in breast cancer survivors using the
           McGill Pain Questionnaire
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Vânia Tie Koga Ferreira , Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro , Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Simone Mara de Araújo Ferreira , Ana Maria de Almeida
      The aim of the present study was to characterize pain in breast cancer survivors using the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted with 30 women aged 30 to 80 years who had been submitted to treatment for breast cancer (surgery and complementary treatment) at least 12 months earlier with reports of pain related to the therapeutic procedures. Pain was characterized using the full-length version of the MPQ, which is made up of 78 descriptors divided into four categories: sensory (ten items), affective (five items), evaluative (one item) and miscellaneous (four items). Two indices were also used to measure pain through the use of the descriptors: the number of words chosen (NWC) and the pain rating index (PRI). The most frequent descriptive terms were “agonizing” (n = 16; 53.3%), “tugging” (n = 15; 50%), “sore” (n = 14; 46.7%), “wretched” (n = 14; 46.7%), “troublesome” (n = 13; 43.3%) and “spreading” (n = 11; 36.7%). The sensory category had the highest PRI value based on the descriptors chosen (mean: 0.41). Women with chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer employed the “agonizing”, “tugging” and “sore” descriptors with greatest frequency and rated pain in the sensory category as having the greatest impact.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Clinical analysis and baropodometric evaluation in diagnosis of abnormal
           foot posture: A clinical TRIAL
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 October 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hugo Pasini Neto , Luanda André Collange Grecco , Luiz Alfredo Braun Ferreira , Thaluanna Calil Lourenço Christovão , Natália de Almeida Carvalho Duarte , Cláudia Santos Oliveira
      Foot posture involves the integration of sensory information from the periphery of the body. This information generates precise changes through fine adjustments that compensate for the continuous, spontaneous sway of the body in the standing position. Orthopedic insoles are one of the therapeutic resources indicated for assisting in this process. Evaluation of these podal influences, by clinical examination and/or the assistance of baropodometry becomes crucial. Thus, the aim of the present study was determine the combination of the components of orthopedic insoles using two different evaluation methods. Forty healthy female volunteers between 18 and 30 years participated in the study. The volunteers were submitted to two different evaluations: clinical analysis and baropodometry. During the exams, different insole components were tested. The statistical analysis of the two evaluations revealed differences regarding the normalization of posture following the application of the insole components and in the determination of the combination of these components. The findings suggest that the clinical analysis is a fast and accurate method for determining the immediate benefits of the postural insole components and is therefore the more indicated method for the evaluation of foot posture, but does not present a concrete foundation to differentiate it with respect to baropodometric evaluation in the assessment and diagnosis of foot posture, however, a greater difficulty was encountered in achieving posture normalization when using information obtained through baropodometry.


      PubDate: 2014-10-06T13:04:40Z
       
  • The Middle Crossed Syndrome – New Insights into Core Function
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 September 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matt Wallden



      PubDate: 2014-09-17T07:34:19Z
       
  • Assessing and Correcting the Middle Crossed Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 September 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matt Wallden



      PubDate: 2014-09-17T07:34:19Z
       
  • British Fascia Symposium: Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Susan Findlay



      PubDate: 2014-08-10T01:44:51Z
       
  • Definition of fascia: A morphological perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): G. Natale , S. Condino , P. Soldani , F. Fornai , M. Mattioli Belmonte , M. Gesi
      Despite their importance in anatomy, physiology, pathology and surgery, the fasciae and the fascial spaces have been poorly described in classic textbooks. This little attention depends on the fact that these fasciae vary in thickness and composition, especially at the cervical level. Indeed, in the main literature they have been described in different forms. Furthermore, the definition itself of the fascia is not consistent in a variety of authors. As a consequence, different criteria have been used to define and classify the fascial systems. In this paper, a brief terminological history and the most common nomenclatures and classifications of the fascia have been summarized.


      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Towards a Rosetta Stone of manual therapeutic methodology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Paul R. Standley



      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Fascial Consciousness
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Thomas Myers



      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
  • Reduced stimulation and pain management: General and manual
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2014-07-28T00:41:24Z
       
 
 
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