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Journal Cover Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2970 journals]
  • Transcranial direct current stimulation combined with integrative speech
           therapy in a child with cerebral palsy: A case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Vania L.C. Carvalho Lima, Luanda A. Collange Grecco, Valéria C. Marques, Felipe Fregni, Clara R. Brandão de Ávila
      The aim of this study was to describe the results of the first case combining integrative speech therapy with anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over Broca's area in a child with cerebral palsy. The ABFW phonology test was used to analyze speech based on the Percentage of Correct Consonants (PCC) and Percentage of Correct Consonants – Revised (PCC-R). After treatment, increases were found in both PCC (Imitation: 53.63%–78.10%; Nomination: 53.19%–70.21%) and PPC-R (Imitation: 64.54%–83.63%; Nomination: 61.70%–77.65%). Moreover, reductions occurred in distortions, substitutions and improvement was found in oral performance, especially tongue mobility (AMIOFE-mobility before = 4 after = 7). The child demonstrated a clinically important improvement in speech fluency as shown in results of imitation number of correct consonants and phonemes acquire. Based on these promising findings, continuing research in this field should be conducted with controlled clinical trials.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • The Pilates Method increases respiratory muscle strength and performance
           as well as abdominal muscle thickness
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Mateus Beltrame Giacomini, Antônio Marcos Vargas da Silva, Laura Menezes Weber, Mariane Borba Monteiro
      The aim of this study was to verify the effects of the Pilates Method (PM) training program on the thickness of the abdominal wall muscles, respiratory muscle strength and performance, and lung function. This uncontrolled clinical trial involved 16 sedentary women who were assessed before and after eight weeks of PM training. The thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles was assessed. The respiratory muscle strength was assessed by measuring the maximum inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressure. The lung function and respiratory muscle performance were assessed by spirometry. An increase was found in MIP (p = 0.001), MEP (p = 0.031), maximum voluntary ventilation (p = 0.020) and the TrA (p < 0.001), IO (p = 0.002) and EO (p < 0.001) thickness after the PM program. No alterations in lung function were found. These findings suggest that the PM program promotes abdominal wall muscle hypertrophy and an increase in respiratory muscle strength and performance, preventing weakness in abdominal muscles and dysfunction in ventilatory mechanics, which could favor the appearance of illnesses.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Effect of spinal stabilization exercise on dynamic postural control and
           visual dependency in subjects with chronic non-specific low back pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Mahyar Salavati, Behnam Akhbari, Ismail Ebrahimi Takamjani, Hossein Bagheri, Kamran Ezzati, Amir Hossein Kahlaee
      Background Motor control approach towards chronic non-specific low back pain (CNLBP) has gained increasing attention. CNLBP patients have shown to be more visually dependent for the postural control process than control subjects but no study has yet investigated the treatment programs effect on this disorder. Methods Forty CNLBP patients volunteered to participate in this experimental study. The subjects were randomly assigned into either stabilization exercise (SE) or control group both receiving 12 sessions of routine physiotherapy for four weeks. The SE group also received intensive stabilization exercise. Balance (in terms of overall (OSI), anteroposterior (APSI) and mediolateral stability indices (MLSI)) and functional disability were assessed by Biodex Balance System® (BBS) and Oswestry Low Back Disability Questionnaire, respectively prior and after the interventions. The balance tests were performed with open and closed eyes. Results Both interventions significantly decreased all stability indices but the SE group showed a more pronounced improvement in OSI and APSI. In the SE group, vision deprivation had smaller destabilizing effects on OSI and APSI as compared with the control group. The groups were not statistically different prior and after the interventions on all dependent variables. Oswestry index reduction in the SE group was more pronounced but the interaction of time and group variables were not significant on pain intensity. Conclusion Both interventions effectively enhanced stability indices and functional capabilities and reduced pain intensity in CNLBP patients. The SE protocol made the patients less visual dependent perhaps via better stability. Since pain reduction was not different between the groups, more functional improvement in SE group cannot simply be interpreted via the pain interference and might be related to postural control capabilities of the patients.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • The effects of dorso-lumbar motion restriction on the ground reaction
           force components during running
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Joseph J. Morley, Edward Traum
      Purpose The effects of restricting dorso-lumbar spine mobility on ground reaction forces in runners was measured and assessed. Methods A semi-rigid cast was used to restrict spinal motion during running. Subjects ran across a force platform at 3.6 m/s, planting the right foot on the platform. Data was collected from ten running trials with the cast and ten without the cast and analysed. Results Casted running showed that the initial vertical heel strike maximum was increased (p < .02) and that the anterior–posterior deceleration impulse was increased (p < .01). The maximum vertical ground reaction force was decreased in casted running (p < .01), as was the anterior–posterior acceleration impulse (p < .02). There was a trend for increased medial–lateral impulse in the uncasted state, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusions Spinal mobility and fascia contribute to load transfer between joints and body segments. Experimentally restricting spinal motion during running results in measurable and repeatable alterations in ground reaction force components. Alterations in load transfer due to decreased spinal motion may be a factor contributing to selected injuries in runners.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • The contribution of postural balance analysis in older adult fallers: A
           narrative review
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): L. Pizzigalli, M. Micheletti Cremasco, A. Mulasso, A. Rainoldi
      Objective Falls are a serious health problem for older adults. Several studies have identified the decline of postural balance as one of the main risk factors for falls. Contrary to what may be believed, the capability of force platform measurements to predict falls remains uncertain. The focus of this narrative review is the identification of postural characteristics of older adults at risk of falling using both static and dynamic postural balance assessments. Methods The literature analysis was conducted on Medline/PubMed. The search ended in May 2015. Results Centre of pressure (CoP) path length, CoP velocity and sway in medial lateral and anterior-posterior are the variables that distinguish older adult fallers from non-fallers. Discussion Recommendations to medical personnel on how to provide efficient balance training for older adults are offered, discussing the relevance and limitations of postural stability on static and dynamic board in falling risk prevention.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Toe-tal recall – What on Earth are our toes actually for'
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Matt Wallden



      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Fascial hierarchies and the relevance of crossed-helical arrangements of
           collagen to changes in the shape of muscles
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Graham Scarr
      Muscles are composite structures consisting of contractile myofibres surrounded by complex hierarchies of collagen-reinforced fascial sheaths. They are essentially flexible cylinders that change in shape, with the particular alignment of collagen fibres within their myofascial walls reflecting the most efficient distribution of mechanical stresses and coordinating these changes. However, while the functional significance of this crossed-helical fibre arrangement is well established in other species and in different parts of the body, relatively little attention has been given to this within the fascia of humans; and the relevance of this geometric configuration to muscles and surrounding fascial tissues is described.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Stiffness of resting lumbar myofascia in healthy young subjects quantified
           using a handheld myotonometer and concurrently with surface
           electromyography monitoring
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Kalyani Nair, Alfonse T. Masi, Brian J. Andonian, Alexander J. Barry, Brandon A. Coates, John Dougherty, Emily Schaefer, Jacqueline Henderson, Joseph Kelly
      This study aimed to non-invasively quantify passive stiffness of superficial myofascia at a lower lumbar (L3-L4) anatomical level in young healthy male and female subjects and investigate its possible morphological variation. Resting prone lumbar myofascial measurements were quantified using MyotonPro® and statistically analyzed in 20 young healthy individuals over 3-weekly intervals, concurrently with surface electromyography (sEMG). Averaged mean ± SE stiffness (Newton/meter) over three weeks was significantly (p < 0.001) greater in males (247.8 ± 11.3) than females (208.4 ± 11.3), on the right (237.7 ± 12.8) than left sides (218.5 ± 12.3), at 10-min (231.4 ± 9.1) than initial baseline (224.8 ± 9.1) values. A polymorphism of stiffness values in 10 male and 10 female subjects was suggested by box plot analyses of the 3 weekly measurements and greater inter-individual than intra-individual variances. Greater knowledge of lumbar myofascial stiffness can improve understanding of their contributions in health and chronic low back disorders.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Anma massage (Japanese massage) therapy for patients with Parkinson's
           disease in geriatric health services facilities: Effectiveness on limited
           range of motion of the shoulder joint
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sachie Suoh, Nozomi Donoyama, Norio Ohkoshi
      Objective To determine the efficacy of Anma massage therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in geriatric health services facilities. Methods (1) Immediate treatment effects: 10 PD patients, in the intervention period with Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) scale at stage 5, received 30–40 min sessions of Anma massage therapy. In the non-intervention period, six PD patients did not undergo this therapy. The shoulder joint range of motion (ROM) was measured before and after each session. (2) Continuous treatment effects: Six PD patients in the intervention period received the same massage sessions once a week continuously for seven weeks. One week after the completion of the treatment, the ROM of the shoulder joints was measured. Results (1) Shoulder abduction on the more affected side showed immediate significant improvements. (2) Shoulder abduction on the more affected side and less affected side showed notable effects of continuous treatment procedure leading to significant improvement. Conclusion The above results suggested the efficacy of successive Anma massage therapy.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Effects of manual percussion during postural drainage on lung volumes and
           metabolic status in healthy subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Jirakrit Leelarungrayub, Wichai Eungpinichpong, Jakkrit Klaphajone, Mujalin Prasannarong, Kritsana Boontha
      Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of manual percussion during three different positions of postural drainage (PD) on lung volumes and metabolic status. Methods Twenty six healthy volunteers (13 women and 13 men), with a mean age of 20.15 ± 1.17 years, participated. They were randomized into three standard positions of PD (upper, middle, or lower lobes) and given manual percussion at a frequency of 240 times per minute for 5 min. Lung volumes, including tidal volume (TV), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), expiratory reserve volume (ERV) and vital capacity (VC); and metabolic status, such as oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide (VCO2), respiratory rate (RR), and minute ventilation (VE) were evaluated. Results The lung volumes showed no statistical difference in VC or IRV from percussion during PD in all positions, except for the lower lobe, where increased TV and decreased ERV were found when compared to PD alone. Furthermore, percussion during PD of the upper and middle lobes did not affect RR or VE, when compared to PD alone. In addition, percussion during PD of the middle and lower lobes increased VO2 and VCO2 significantly, when compared to PD alone, but it did not influence PD of the upper lobe. Conclusion This study indicated that up to 5 min of manual percussion on PD of the upper and middle lobes is safe mostly for lung volumes, RR, and VE, but it should be given with care in PD conditions of the lower lobe.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • The clinical presentation of individuals with femoral acetabular
           impingement and labral tears: A narrative review of the evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Scott W. Cheatham, Keelan R. Enseki, Morey J. Kolber
      Femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) has emerged as one of the more commonly recognized intraarticular hip pathologies and is often accompanied with a labral tear. The understanding of the clinical characteristics of individuals with symptomatic FAI has evolved over the past several years due to emerging research. As research progresses, there is often a gap in translating the current evidence to clinical practice. This manuscript presents the latest evidence underpinning the clinical presentation of FAI and labral tears. Evidence is presented within the context of bridging the latest research and clinical practice.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Refugee experiences of individual basic body awareness therapy and the
           level of transference into daily life. An interview study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Trine Stårup Madsen, Jessica Carlsson, Maja Nordbrandt, Jonna Anne Jensen
      Purpose The aim of the study was to investigate refugee experiences of individual Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) and the level of transference into daily life. Method Qualitative research using semi-structured interviews. Malterud's version of Giorgi's 4-step analysis was used to analyse the data. Participants Three traumatised refugees with PTSD who had completed 14–20 individual BBAT sessions. Results The participants experienced the movements in BBAT as small and simple with big effects. BBAT was found to relieve pain and tension, bring peace of mind and body, and make it easier to sleep. Regular practice was necessary, as were instructions from a physiotherapist, to get the effect from BBAT. Positive changes in the contact to oneself and others were experienced and new coping strategies were developed. Conclusion Traumatised refugees experienced positive effects from BBAT and transference into daily life was experienced to a great extent.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • A reliability study of the new sensors for movement analysis
           (SHARIF–HMIS)
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Mohen Abedi, Farideh Dehghan Manshadi, Minoo Khalkhali Zavieh, Sajad Ashouri, Hadi Azimi, Mohamad Parnanpour
      Aim SHARIF–HMIS is a new inertial sensor designed for movement analysis. The aim of the present study was to assess the inter-tester and intra-tester reliability of some kinematic parameters in different lumbar motions making use of this sensor. Materials and methods 24 healthy persons and 28 patients with low back pain participated in the current reliability study. The test was performed in five different lumbar motions consisting of lumbar flexion in 0, 15, and 30° in the right and left directions. For measuring inter-tester reliability, all the tests were carried out twice on the same day separately by two physiotherapists. Intra-tester reliability was assessed by reproducing the tests after 3 days by the same physiotherapist. Findings The present study revealed satisfactory inter- and intra-tester reliability indices in different positions. ICCs for intra-tester reliability ranged from 0.65 to 0.98 and 0.59 to 0.81 for healthy and patient participants, respectively. Also, ICCs for inter-tester reliability ranged from 0.65 to 0.92 for the healthy and 0.65 to 0.87 for patient participants. Conclusion In general, it can be inferred from the results that measuring the kinematic parameters in lumbar movements using inertial sensors enjoys acceptable reliability.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • The effect of adding whole body vibration training to strengthening
           training in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: A randomized clinical
           trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Hamid Reza Bokaeian, Amir Hoshang Bakhtiary, Majid Mirmohammadkhani, Jamile Moghimi
      Strengthening training (ST) and whole body vibration training (WBV) alone may improve symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee. In this study, we investigated the effect of adding WBV training to quadriceps and hamstring muscles strengthening training on functional activity, pain, quality of life and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis. 28 volunteers were randomly allocated to two groups; 1) quadriceps and hamstring muscles strengthening training (ST group, 13 patients) and 2) quadriceps and hamstring muscles strengthening training along with WBV training (ST + WBV group, 15 patients). The treatment protocol for both groups involved 3 sessions per week for 8 weeks. All measurements were performed before and after intervention. The measurements included: pain by means of a visual analogue scale (VAS), quality of life by means of the WOMAC scale, functional activity by the 2 min walking test (2MWT), time up & go test (TUGT) and 50-foot walking test (50FWT) and the muscle peak torque (MPT), total work (TW) and muscle power (MP) as muscle performance of quadriceps and hamstring muscles by an Isokinetic Biodex machine. After intervention, the comparison of mean changes between two groups showed improvement in the WBV + ST group in terms of 2MWT, MPT, TW and MP variables (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference was found between the experimental groups in term of pain, quality of life, TUGT and 50FWT. These results suggest that adding whole body vibration training to strengthening training may provide better treatment effects for patients with knee osteoarthritis.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Onset and maximum values of electromyographic amplitude during prone hip
           extension after neurodynamic technique in patients with lumbosciatic pain:
           A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Giselle Horment-Lara, Carlos Cruz-Montecinos, Rodrigo Núñez-Cortés, Pablo Letelier-Horta, Luis Henriquez-Fuentes
      Objective The mechanisms underlying the effects of neurodynamic techniques are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide a starting point for future research on explaining why neurodynamic techniques affect muscular activities in patients with sciatic pain. Methods A double-blind trial was conducted in 12 patients with lumbosciatica. Surface electromyography activity was assessed for different muscles during prone hip extension. Pre- and post-intervention values for muscle activity onset and maximal amplitude signals were determined. Results There was a significant reduction in the surface electromyography activity of maximal amplitude in the erector spinae and contralateral erector spinae (p < 0.05). Additionally, gluteus maximus (p < 0.05) activity onset was delayed post-intervention. Conclusions Self-neurodynamic sliding techniques modify muscular activity and onset during prone hip extension, possibly reducing unnecessary adaptations for protecting injured components. Future work will analyze the effects of self-neurodynamic sliding techniques during other physical tasks.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Sagittal evaluation of usual standing and sitting spinal posture
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Kurt Claeys, Simon Brumagne, Jan Deklerck, Jacques Vanderhaeghen, Wim Dankaerts
      Postural rehabilitation often plays an important role in the management of non-specific low back pain. While cervical and lumbar correlations have been demonstrated previously, the different role of the pelvis and the thoracic spine for postural control in sitting and standing remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate postural correlations between all spinal regions in standing and sitting. Based on digital photographs eight postural angles were analyzed in 99 young healthy persons. Pearson correlations between different postural angles were calculated. In sitting pelvic tilt demonstrated mostly medium correlations with five out of seven other postural angles, compared to three in standing. In standing trunk angle showed five out of seven mostly medium correlations with other regions compared to four out of seven in usual sitting. The low and different correlations suggest a large between-subject variability in sagittal spinal posture, without the existence of any optimal sagittal posture.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • The Functional Movement Screen as a predictor of police recruit
           occupational task performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Claire Bock, Michael Stierli, Benjamin Hinton, Robin Orr
      Aim The aim of this study was to determine whether poor movement patterns impact on police recruit task performance. Methods Fifty-three volunteers were randomly selected from a pool of 173 police recruits attending basic recruit training. Relationships between movement performance, as measured by the Functional Movement Screen, and four occupational tasks were investigated. Results Eleven percent failed the marksmanship and baton strike assessments, 21% failed defensive tactics and 36% failed the tactical options assessment. Mean Functional Movement Screen score was 13.96 points (±1.99 points). Only the tactical options assessment approached a significant difference (p = 0.077) between pass/fail recruits. When Functional Movement Screen scores when graded as pass (14+) or fail (<14) again only the tactical options assessment approached significance (p = 0.057). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that a relationship between an officer's movement patterns and occupational performance, most notably choice of tactical options, may exist.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Application of neuroplasticity theory through the use of the Feldenkrais
           Method® with a runner with scoliosis and hip and lumbar pain: A case
           report
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Lori K. Myers
      Neuroplasticity theory has gained considerable attention in recent years in the professions of medicine, psychology and neuroscience. Most research on neuroplasticity has been in neurology focusing on stroke and other central nervous system disease and injury. Further research is necessary to advance the connection of neuroplasticity theory to musculoskeletal conditions and rehabilitation. The theory of neuroplasticity as it applies to the acquisition of new skills and modification of maladaptive, pain-perpetuating and inefficient movement patterns is fundamental to the Feldenkrais Method. This case report demonstrates the application of neuroplasticity theory with the Feldenkrais Method as the primary intervention for a 42-year-old female runner with a history of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who presented with hip and lumbar pain. The client had clinically meaningful improvements in pain intensity and the Global Rating of Change scale while meeting her goals to resume pain free running, repetitive stair climbing at work, and other leisure activities.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Acute effects of traditional Thai massage on cortisol levels, arterial
           blood pressure and stress perception in academic stress condition: A
           single blind randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Surussawadi Bennett, Michael John Bennett, Uraiwon Chatchawan, Patcharaporn Jenjaiwit, Rungthip Pantumethakul, Soontorn Kunhasura, Wichai Eungpinichpong
      Traditional Thai massage (TTM) has been applied widely to promote relaxation. However, there is little evidence to support its efficacy on academic stress. A randomised controlled trial was performed to examine the acute effects of TTM on cortisol level, blood pressure, heart rate and stress perception in academic stress. This prospective trial included 36 physiotherapy students with a self perceived stress score of between 3 and 5. They were randomly allocated into the TTM (18 people) group or the control group (18 people). Saliva cortisol level, blood pressure, heart rate and stress perception rating were measured before and after the intervention. Both groups showed a significant reduction in cortisol level and heart rate when compared with baseline (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in cortisol level between the two groups. The results suggest the need for further study into other possible physiological effects on stress of TTM.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Understanding and working with the psychodynamics of
           practitioner–patient relationships in the manual therapies
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Danny Sher, Mannie Sher
      In this paper, we argue that practitioner–patient relationships in the manual therapies would be strengthened by a deeper understanding of the psychodynamics and emotions of those relationships. We suggest that in many cases, a purely bio-mechanical approach may neglect underlying psychological and emotional reasons of the patient's presenting condition, and consequently, lead to a less than adequate outcome for the patient. We offer easily adopted suggestions that could enhance the practice of practitioners of manual therapies as well as other professions that rely on the application of physical methods of diagnosis and treatment. These suggestions could lead to improved prognosis and increased professional satisfaction for practitioners. This paper describes five key dynamics that characterize practitioner–patient relationships: (i) pain as a form of communication; (ii) the ‘heart-sink’ patient; (iii) dependency; (iv) the erotic transference; (v) endings and loss.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Effect of Butler's neural tissue mobilization and Mulligan's bent leg
           raise on pain and straight leg raise in patients of low back ache
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Neha Tambekar, Shaila Sabnis, Apoorva Phadke, Nilima Bedekar
      Low back ache (LBA) is a common musculoskeletal disorder sometimes associated with a positive limited Straight leg raise (SLR) test. Mulligan's bent leg raise (BLR) and Butler's neural tissue mobilization (NTM) are commonly used techniques for the treatment of low back ache where SLR is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of both the techniques on pain and limited SLR in patients with LBA. Thirty one patients with LBA with radiculopathy were randomly allocated into 2 groups; BLR [n = 16] NTM [n = 15]. The outcome measures i.e. visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and universal goniometer for measuring SLR range of motion (SROM) were assessed at the baseline, post intervention and after 24 h (follow up). Within group analysis using paired t-test revealed a significant difference between pre-treatment and post-treatment VAS and SROM score(p < 0.05). However no difference was seen between pre-treatment and follow up (p > 0.05). The study showed that both techniques produce immediate improvement in pain and SLR range but this effect was not maintained during the follow up period.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Practitioners' perceptions of yoga's positive and negative effects:
           Results of a National United States survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Crystal L. Park, Kristen E. Riley, Tosca D. Braun
      Objectives Yoga is becoming increasingly popular, yet little information is available regarding practitioners' perceptions of effects of their practice. This study aimed to characterize perceptions of both positive and negative changes practitioners reported in physical and psychosocial domains. Design Cross-sectional internet-based survey. Participants Yoga practitioners (N = 542, including 162 teachers) recruited via email and flyers sent to yoga studios across the United States (US). Participants ranged in age from 18 to 85 years (M = 44). Measures Participants rated the extent to which they experienced positive or negative change in physical health and psychosocial dimensions and then listed up to three positive and three negative effects of their practice. Results Both students and teachers reported moderately high levels of positive physical changes and psychosocial changes, although teachers generally reported more positive changes. Few negative changes were reported. In open-ended responses, the most commonly reported positive effects were general health and fitness and relaxation. Most commonly reported negative effects were injuries, soreness, emotional triggers/irritability, and expense. Conclusions Findings suggest that yoga practitioners generally perceive high levels of positive changes, but some also experience adverse effects. Future research should assess subjective experiences of change alongside more objective measures of improvement.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Effect of static neck flexion in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon in
           healthy males and females
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Roghayeh Mousavi-Khatir, Saeed Talebian, Nader Maroufi, Gholam Reza Olyaei
      Introduction Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, especially among skilled workers who must keep their necks in a flexed position frequently during the day. The present study investigated changes in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon parameters after sustained neck flexion. Methods The participants were 40 healthy subjects grouped by gender (20 females, 20 males). They were exposed to static neck flexion at the full angle of cervical flexion for 10 min. Each subject underwent three trials of cervical flexion and re-extension before and after this period. Differences in onset and cessation angle of flexion-relaxation phenomenon, maximum neck flexion angle, amplitude of neck muscle activation and flexion-relaxation ratio were evaluated. Results The maximum neck flexion angle significantly increased after sustained flexion. The onset of flexion-relaxation was significantly delayed during flexion, but cessation angle remained unchanged. Myoelectric activity of the cervical erector spinae muscles increased significantly after maintaining flexion, especially in female subjects. The flexion-relaxation ratio also decreased significantly. Conclusion It was concluded that 10 min of static flexion results in a delay in flexion-relaxation phenomenon and a shortened silence period. Also the cervical erector spinae muscles are required to be active longer and generate more activity. These neuromuscular changes may be a risk factor for neck pain.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Reproducibility of the low back clinical postural grouping in adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Ney Meziat-Filho, Roberta Mendonça, Adriano Pezolato, Felipe J.J. Reis, Leandro Alberto Calazans Nogueira
      Objective The purpose of this study was to analyze the intra- and inter-rater reliability of the Low Back Clinical Postural Grouping (LBCPG). Methods Fifty-eight school adolescents were evaluated by lateral photography. The examiners classified the posture of the participants as: hyperlordotic, sway back, flat back or neutral. The intra- and inter-rater reliability were quantified by the percentage agreement between clinicians and the kappa coefficient with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results The intra-rater percentage agreement was 91.4%, k = 0.87 (95% IC 0.77–0.98, p < 0.001) for the more experienced rater, and 86.2% k = 0.79 (IC 95% 0.62–0.96, p < 0.001) for the less experienced rater. The percentage agreement between clinicians was 55.17% k = 0.39 (95% CI: 0.23–0.55, p < 0.001). The agreement rose to 70.69%, k = 0.58 (95% CI 0.41–0.74, p < 0.001) when an optional second opinion of the raters was also considered. Conclusion: The LBCPG was reliable when used by the same clinician. The strategy of a second opinion could be used to improve the inter-rater reliability in epidemiological studies with large samples.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Aquaticity: A discussion of the term and of how it applies to humans
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Danae Varveri, Christina Karatzaferi, Elizana Pollatou, Giorgos K. Sakkas
      The relationship between humans and water and the effects on aspects related to human performance has never been studied scientifically. The aim of the current systematic review is to attempt to define the term “aquaticity”, present the factors that describe it and reveal the form in which it presents itself in today's society, in order to become a distinct scientific field of study. A systematic review of the literature has been conducted using anecdotal reports from the internet and forums as well as scientific articles and books from databases on issues related to aquatic sports. To the best of our knowledge there are no scientific articles dealing with human's aquaticity. In the current systematic review, four factors have been recognized that are closely related to human aquaticity. Those are related to physical condition in the water, to apnea and ability to immerse, to mental health and to parameters related to body composition. According to our findings, “Aquaticity is the capacity of a terrestrial mammalian organism to function and habitualise in the aquatic environment. The level of aquaticity depends on mental and physical characteristics and can be improved by frequent exposure to the water element”. The ideal state of aquaticity is achieved through the activation of the diving reflex, when the human body is totally immersed in water. The development of knowledge regarding the aquatic environment leads humans to an improved state of aquaticity.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Cross friction algometry (CFA): Comparison of pressure pain thresholds
           between patients with chronic non-specific low back pain and healthy
           subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 2
      Author(s): Andre Farasyn, Bert Lassat
      Palpation is widely used to assess muscular sensitivity in clinical settings but still remains a subjective evaluation. This cross-sectional study assessed a newly developed cross-friction algometry making palpation measurable. The objective was to investigate the reliability of pressure pain thresholds obtained using Cross-Friction Algometry (CFA-PPTs) measured at the level of Erector spinae and Gluteus maximus central muscle parts, and to compare the CFA-PPTs between patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (nCLBP) and matching healthy subjects. Participants Patients presenting nCLBP to GP's and send into a Pain Center and healthy subjects recruited via university ad valvas & flyers distribution. Outcome measures 30 patients with nCLBP were measured for cross-friction algometry. Other evaluations consisted of the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results The inter- and intra-reliability were tested and found to be sufficient. The mean CFA-PPT values of the Erector spinae at levels T8, T10, L1 & L3 and the Gluteus maximus of the nCLBP group were significantly lower (p ≤ 0.001) when compared to the CFA-PPT values of the healthy group. The greatest difference (−58%) was found at L1 Erector spinae level and at the superior part of the Gluteus maximus measuring point (−59%). Within the group of patients with nCLBP it was surprising to notice that there was no significant correlation between all the reference points measured using CFA-PPTs and the outcomes of the VAS and ODI scores. Conclusions With the aid of CFA, the importance of local muscular disorder in the lumbar part of the Erector spinae and Gluteus maximus in patients with nCLBP is obviously demonstrated, but also reveals the very large inter-individual differences in muscular fibrosis sensitivity and/or pain behavior in daily life. This possibly re-opens the debate on which influences can be put forward as the most important: the central or the peripheral sensitization system.


      PubDate: 2016-05-20T20:31:47Z
       
  • Effect of cognitive task on postural control of the patients with chronic
           ankle instability during single and double leg standing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 May 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Zeinab shiravi, Saeed Talebian Moghadam, Mohammad Reza Hadian, Gholamreza Olyaei
      Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a cognitive task on standing postural control of the injured and non-injured leg of athletes with chronic ankle instability. Methods Postural stability was measured by center of pressure parameters while chronic ankle instability patients (n = 8) randomly performed single and double leg standing in isolation or concurrently with a digit-backward cognitive task. Results After performing a concurrent cognitive task, anteroposterior sway significantly decreased in injured leg (P < 0.05) and area significantly decreased in both injured and non-injured legs (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in all center of pressure parameters between injured and non-injured legs. Conclusion The findings confirm the effect of a concurrent digit-backwards memory task on single leg standing balance in chronic ankle instability patients but the response to cognitive loading was not significantly different between the injured and non-injured legs.


      PubDate: 2016-05-15T20:21:16Z
       
  • Kinesio Taping for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Nicole L. Nelson
      Background Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a prevalent issue that engenders enormous social and economic burdens. Recently, kinesio taping (KT) has become of interest in the management of chronic pain. Accordingly, this is the first systematic review to explicitly report the effects of KT on CLBP. Objective The aim of this review was to summarize the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of KT on CLBP. Methods A search was performed on the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, SPORT Discus and Science Direct, up to June 17, 2015, using the following keywords: Kinesiology taping, kinesio taping, chronic low back pain. Results In total, five studies involving 306 subjects met the inclusion criteria and corresponded to the aim of this review. The methodological quality of the included RCTs was good, with a mean score of 6.6 on the 10-point PEDro Scale. Moderate evidence suggests KT, as a sole treatment or in conjunction with another treatment, is no more effective than conventional physical therapy and exercise with respect to improving pain and disability outcomes. There is insufficient evidence suggesting that KT is superior to sham taping in improving pain and disability. Limited evidence suggests that KT is more effective than sham taping in improving range of motion (ROM) and global perceived effect (GPE) in the short term. Very limited evidence indicates that KT is more effective than conventional physical therapy in improving anticipatory postural control of the transversus abdominus muscles and improved cerebral cortex potential. Conclusion Kinesio taping is not a substitute for traditional physical therapy or exercise. Rather, KT may be most effective when used as an adjunctive therapy, perhaps by improving ROM, muscular endurance and motor control. More high quality studies that consider the multiple factors that mediate CLBP, in the short, intermediate and long term, are needed to strengthen the evidence of the effectiveness of KT on CLBP.


      PubDate: 2016-05-01T13:44:34Z
       
  • Can Physical Therapy centred on cognitive and behavioural principles
           improve Pain Self-Efficacy in symptomatic lumbar isthmic
           spondylolisthesis' A case series
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Silvano Ferrari, Carla Vanti, Costa Francesco, Fornari Maurizio
      Purpose Pain-related self-efficacy is defined as “the beliefs held by people with chronic pain that were able to carry out certain activities, even when experiencing pain”, and it is considered a relevant mediator in the relationship between pain and disability in chronic low back pain. This case series describes a treatment aiming to improve pain self-efficacy in patients with symptomatic lumbar spondylolisthesis. Method Ten consecutive outpatients with lumbar spondylolisthesis and chronic LBP referred to a rehabilitative clinic participated in this study. Cognitive and behavioural principles were integrated with functional and graded approach in each individual physical therapy program. The outcome measures concerned clinical instability and endurance tests, pain, disability and self-efficacy. Results Pain self-efficacy and lumbar function improved in 7 out of 10 patients; clinical tests improved in 9 out of 10 patients. Conclusion A rehabilitation program carried out by a physical therapist, centred on cognitive and behavioural principles, appeared useful in improving pain self-efficacy and lumbar function. These results may be interesting for future controlled trials.


      PubDate: 2016-05-01T13:44:34Z
       
  • Change of Pectoralis Minor’s length and acromial distance: Effects
           from active scapular retraction in scaption at 60 degrees shoulder
           elevation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Nitaya Viriyatharakij, Chatchada Chinkulprasert, Navarat Rakthim, Jetjaree Patumrat, Butsarin Ketruang
      As the pectoralis minor muscle is inserted into the coracoid process, an improper length of this muscle would affect scapular and shoulder motions. Therefore, this study is proposed to assess the effects on pectoralis minor’s length and acromial distance after active scapular retraction in scaption at 60 degrees elevation. Sixty right-hand-dominant participants (11 males, 49 females) were randomized into an intervention group and a control group. The intervention group performed pectoralis minor muscle stretching by active scapular retraction, while the control group were asked to sit in an upright position. The result shows that, the mean lengths of pectoralis minor in the intervention group were significantly increased when compared with those of the control group (p=0.004 and p=0.014 respectively). Simultaneously, the reduction in acromial distance of this intervention group was substantially greater than the control group’s (p<0.001 and p=0.001 respectively). However, it should be noted that the results reported only relate to the period immediately following muscle stretching.


      PubDate: 2016-05-01T13:44:34Z
       
  • Low Level Light Therapy and Tattoos: A Case Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Teresa Ingenito
      Background and Purpose Physical therapists (PTs) frequently provide neuromusculoskeletal treatment for patients who incidentally may have one or more tattoos. Low level light therapy (LLLT) is one of the modalities commonly used by physical therapists to decrease pain and facilitate healing. Case Description This case report describes a 22 year old man who was given LLLT to address his complaints of musculoskeletal pain. Outcomes Blistering of the skin was documented over the LLLT application site, a black tattoo. Discussion The blisters, which formed after the LLLT treatment were most likely caused by the inadvertent and unexpected heating of the iron oxides and/or the metal salts in the tattoo’s black pigment. PTs should exercise caution when applying LLLT in the presence of dark tattoos.


      PubDate: 2016-05-01T13:44:34Z
       
  • Changes in co-contraction during stair descent after manual therapy
           protocol in knee osteoarthritis: a pilot, single-blind, randomized study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Carlos Cruz-Montecinos, Rodrigo Flores-Cartes, Agustín Montt-Rodriguez, Esteban Pozo, Alvaro Besoaín-Saldaña, Giselle Horment-Lara
      Introduction Manual therapy has shown clinical results in patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, the biomechanical aspects during functional tasks have not been explored in depth. Methods Through surface electromyography, the medial and lateral co-contractions of the knee were measured while descending stairs, prior and posterior to applying a manual therapy protocol in the knee, with emphasis on techniques of joint mobilization and soft-tissue management. Results Sixteen females with slight or moderate knee osteoarthritis were recruited (eight experimental, eight control). It was observed that the lateral co-contraction index of the experimental group, posterior to intervention, increased by 11.7% (p = 0.014). Conclusions The application of a manual therapy protocol with emphasis on techniques of joint mobilization and soft-tissue management modified lateral co-contraction, which would have a protective effect on the joint.


      PubDate: 2016-05-01T13:44:34Z
       
  • A Model for Radiating Leg Pain of Endometriosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Geoffrey M. Bove
      Endometriosis is a prevalent female health disorder that often leads to back pain and radiating leg pain. Patients with such pain often seek care from multiple health care professionals, including manual therapists. We hypothesized that endometrioma can induce nerve inflammation thus the radiating leg pain that often accompanies endometriosis. To model sciatic endometriosis in female Wistar rats, a section of uterine horn was autotransplanted to the sciatic nerve. Uterus sections with the endometrium removed and autotransplanted to the sciatic nerve served as controls. After 1, 3, and 15 months the nerves were harvested and processed for immune cell presence and for neural elements. Control nerves were harvested after 4 months. All autotransplants survived, resulting in a fusion of the uterus sections to the nerves. Macroscopically, turgid cysts apposed to the nerves characterized the complexes. Microscopically, the complexes contained recruited macrophages, indicating persistent inflammation, and were innervated by small diameter axons. Only 1 of 8 control rats developed a small cyst, presumably due to residual endometrium. The persistent immune response and innervation suggest the nerve-uterus complexes as sources of inflammation and persistent neural discharge, and thus pain. This model could shed light upon the radiating leg pain that often accompanies endometriosis. Manual therapists should be aware of the possibility of endometriosis causing symptoms and examination findings that mimic musculoskeletal etiologies.


      PubDate: 2016-04-18T15:55:14Z
       
  • The effect of kinesio taping versus stretching techniques on muscle
           soreness, and flexibility during recovery from nordic hamstring exercise
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Tarik Ozmen, Gokce Yagmur Gunes, Hanife Dogan, Ilyas Ucar, Mark Willems
      The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching, or kinesio taping (KT) on muscle soreness and flexibility during recovery from exercise. Sixty-five females were randomly assigned to four groups: PNF stretching (n=15), static stretching (n=16), KT (n=17), and control (n=17). All participants performed nordic hamstring exercise (5 sets of 8 repetitions). In all groups, hamstring flexibility at 24 h and 48 h was not changed from baseline (p>.05). The muscle soreness was measured higher at 48 h post-exercise compared with baseline in the control group (p= 0.04) and at 24 h post-exercise compared with baseline in the PNF group (p<.01). No significant differences were found for intervention groups compared with control group in all measurements (p>.05). The KT application and pre-exercise stretching have no contribute to flexibility at 24 h and 48 h after exercise, but may attenuate muscle soreness.


      PubDate: 2016-04-18T15:55:14Z
       
  • Neurophysiological and clinical effects of dry needling in patients with
           upper trapezius myofascial trigger points
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Maryam Abbaszadeh-Amirdehi, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Soofia Naghdi, Gholamreza Olyaei, Mohammad Reza Nourbakhsh
      Introduction Dry needling (DN) is a widely used treatment modality in myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). The purpose of this pretest-posttest clinical trial was to investigate the neurophysiological and clinical effects of DN in patients with MTrPs. Methods A sample of 20 patients (3 man, 17 women; mean age 31.7±10.8) with upper trapezius MTrPs received one session of deep DN. The outcomes of neuromuscular junction response (NMJR), sympathetic skin response (SSR), pain intensity (PI) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were measured at baseline and immediately after DN. Results There were significant improvements in SSR latency and amplitude, pain, and PPT after DN. The NMJR decreased and returned to normal after DN. Conclusions A single session of DN to the active upper trapezius MTrP was effective in improving pain, PPT, NMJR, and SSR in patients with myofascial trigger points. Further studies are needed.


      PubDate: 2016-04-18T15:55:14Z
       
  • Does leg predomination affect the measurement of vasti muscle activity
           during single leg squatting' A reliability study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Javid Mostamand, Dan L. Bader, Zoë Hudson
      Introduction Although measuring vasti muscle activity may reveal whether the pain relief is associated with altering this parameter during functional activities in subjects with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), it may be necessary to determine whether the inherent properties of the dominant leg influences the reliability of measuring VMO/VL amplitude. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of leg predomination on reliability testing of the VMO/VL amplitude measurement during single leg squatting in healthy subjects. Methods Using an electromyography (EMG) unit, the ratio amplitudes of VMO and VL muscles of ten healthy subjects with a right dominant leg was assessed during single leg squatting. Data was collected from two silver-silver surface electrodes placed over the muscle bellies of the VMO and VL. This procedure was performed on the both right and left legs, during three separate single leg squats from a neutral position to a depth of approximately 30° of knee flexion. Subjects were then asked to repeat the test procedure after a minimum of a week’s interval. The amplitude of VMO and VL were then calculated using root mean square (RMS). Results There was no significant difference between the VMO/VL amplitude mean values of paired test of right (mean, SD of 0.85, 0.10) and left knees (mean, SD of 0.82, 0.10) (p> 0.05). The CV (coefficient of variation) values during within and between session tests, revealed the high repeatability and reproducibility of VMO/VL amplitude measurements on both knees. The ICC (intra class correlation coefficient) values during within and between sessions tests showed the high reliability of these measurements on both knees. Conclusion The high reliability of VMO/VL amplitude measurements on both dominant and non-dominant legs of healthy subjects suggests that the VMO/VL amplitude measurement would not be influenced by the leg predomination during single leg squatting.


      PubDate: 2016-04-14T01:16:24Z
       
  • Hip and groin pain in a cyclist resolved after performing a pelvic floor
           fascial mobilization
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sivan Navot, Leonid Kalichman
      Pelvic floor muscle assessment in situations of hip/groin pain in both male and female patients can be a key element in treatment success. We present herein, a 32 year old male professional cyclist, exhibiting right hip and groin pain during cycling and prolonged sitting. The pain commenced after the patient suffered a right hip severe contusion in 2013 causing a tear in the tensor fascia lata and gluteus medius muscle. The patient did not complain of pelvic floor dysfunctions. After receiving several series of conventional physical therapy for the hip/groin pain, the patient experienced partial pain relief and slight improvement of hip range of motion. His pelvic floor muscles and fascia involvement were subsequently assessed. Two sessions of Pelvic Floor Fascial Mobilization (PFFM) were performed and the patient fully recovered. The authors believe that PFFM, a new fascial-oriented manual therapy of the pelvic floor approach, can be used for both hip/groin and pelvic floor pain or dysfunction.


      PubDate: 2016-04-10T01:00:52Z
       
  • The Influence of Positional Release Therapy on the Myofascial Trigger
           Points of the Upper Trapezius Muscle in Computer Users
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): M. Mohammadi Kojidi, F. Okhovatian, A. Rahimi, A.A. Baghban, H. Azimi
      Objective The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of Positional Release Therapy (PRT) in computer users via latent trigger points (LTrPs) of the upper trapezius muscle. Materials and Methods Twenty-eight women with the upper trapezius MTrPs participated in this study. Subjects were randomly classified into two groups (14 in each group): the subjects in the Group 1 received PRT in shortened position while those in the group 2 received sham control in the neutral position of the upper trapezius muscle. They received three therapy sessions every other day for one week. The local pain intensity and Pressure pain threshold (PPT) were measured via Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and algometry, respectively, before interventions and repeated 5 minutes after the first and third treatment sessions in each group. Results One-way ANOVA was used for data analysis. After treatment, between groups comparison revealed that for PPT and VAS, there were significant differences between the two groups (VAS and PPT; P< 0.05). Conclusion Both groups (PRT and sham control) showed alleviation of pain and increase in PPT during three sessions of therapy although PRT showed to be more effective in these patients.


      PubDate: 2016-04-10T01:00:52Z
       
  • Is there an association between women’s consultations with a massage
           therapist and health-related quality of life' Analyses of 1,800 women
           aged 56-61 years
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jane Frawley, Wenbo Peng, David Sibbritt, Lesley Ward, Romy Lauche, Yan Zhang, Jon Adams
      Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonplace in Australia with massage being a popular CAM modality. Methods This is a sub-study from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH). A total of 2,120 mid-age (56-61 year old) women who consulted a CAM practitioner were invited to participate in this study. The Short-Form (SF-36) questionnaire was used to measure women’s health-related quality of life. Results A total of 1,800 women returned the questionnaire generating a response rate of 85.0%. Overall, 912 (50.7%) women visited a massage therapist in the previous 12 months. Women with lower quality of life scores in terms of bodily pain (p=0.012) and/or emotional health (p=0.029) were more likely to consult a massage therapist than those with higher scores. Conclusion The implications of these associations are important for informing healthcare providers in providing effective and coordinated care for patients with pain and mood symptoms.


      PubDate: 2016-04-10T01:00:52Z
       
  • Does ‘Kinesio Tape’ alter thoracolumbar fascia movement during
           lumbar flexion' An observational laboratory study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Shihfan Jack Tu, Roger Woledge, Dylan Morrissey
      Background Changes in thoracolumbar fascial thickness, structure and shear strain are associated with lower back pain (LBP). Therapeutic taping techniques such as Kinesio-Taping (KT) are increasingly used to treat LBP, albeit with variable effects and unclear mechanisms. However, evidence for quantifying the treatment effects in vivo fascia properties is inadequate. We therefore aimed to explore taping mechanisms using an in vivo ultrasound measurement. Methods Thoracolumbar ultrasound videos of known orientations and positions were taken from 12 asymtomatic participants (8 males and 4 females, aged 22.9 ± 3.59) while performing velocity-guided lumbar flexion with and without KT applied. An automated algorithm using cross-correlation to track contiguous tissue layers across sequential frames in the sagittal plane, was developed and applied to two movements of each subject in each taping condition. Differences of inter-tissue movements and paracutaneous translation at tissue boundaries were compared. Results Significant reduction in the mean movement of subcutaneous tissue during lumbar flexion before and after taping was found. There was no difference in other observed tissue layers. Tissue paracutaneous translation at three boundaries were significantly reduced during lumbar flexion when KT was applied (skin-subcutaneous: 0.25mm, p < 0.01; subcutaneous-perimuscular tissue: 0.5mm, p = 0.02; and perimuscular-muscle: 0.46, p = 0.05). No overall reduction in lumbar flexion was found (p = 0.10). Conclusions KT reduced subcutaneous inter-tissue movement and paracutaneous translation in the superficial thoracolumbar fascia during lumbar flexion, and the relationship of such difference to symptomatic change merits exploration. Combining ultrasound data with muscle activation information may be useful to reveal potential mechanisms of therapeutic taping in patients with LBP.


      PubDate: 2016-04-10T01:00:52Z
       
  • Reliability of upper trapezius morphology, its mechanical properties and
           blood flow in female patients with myofascial pain syndrome using
           ultrasonography
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hakimeh Adigozali, Azadeh Shadmehr, Esmail Ebrahimi, Asghar Rezasoltani, Farrokh Naderi
      Objective In the present study, the intra-rater reliability of upper trapezius morphology, its mechanical properties and intramuscular blood circulation in females with myofascial pain syndrome were assessed using ultrasonography. Design A total of 37 patients (31.05±10 years old) participated in this study. Ultrasonography producer was set up in three stages: a) Gray-scale: to measure muscle thickness, size and area of trigger points; b) Ultrasound elastography: to measure muscle stiffness; and c) Doppler imaging: to assess blood flow indices. Results According to data analysis, all variables, except End Diastolic Velocity (EDV), had excellent reliability (>0.806). Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for EDV was 0.738, which was considered a poor to good reliability. Conclusion The results of this study introduced a reliable method for developing details of upper trapezius features using muscular ultrasonography in female patients. These variables could be used for objective examination and provide guidelines for treatment plans in clinical settings.


      PubDate: 2016-04-10T01:00:52Z
       
  • Assessment of the posture of adolescents in everyday clinical practice:
           intra-rater and inter-rater reliability and validity of a posture index
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Oliver Ludwig, Annette Hammes, Jens Kelm, Eduard Schmitt
      Objectives The assessment of the posture of children and adolescents using photometric methods has a long tradition in paediatrics, manual therapy and physiotherapy. It can be well integrated into the clinical routine and enables objective documentation. One-dimensional parameters such as angle sizes are mostly used in the diagnosis of postural defects in children and adolescents by means of photogrammetry. This study examined the posture index, a complex parameter, which evaluates the alignment of several trunk segments in the sagittal plane and is suitable for use as a screening parameter in everyday clinical practice. Methods For this postural photographs were taken in the sagittal plane of the habitual posture in a subgroup of 105 adolescents (12.9 ± 2.6 years) for analysing validity, and in a subgroup of 25 adolescents (12.1 ± 2.8 years) for analysing reliability and objectivity. Marker spheres (12 mm) were placed on five anatomical landmarks. The posture was also evaluated clinically by experienced investigators (PT, MD, DSc). The distances of the marker points to the plumb line through the malleolus lateralis were calculated and the posture index calculated from these. In order to determine the objectivity, reliability and validity of the posture index, statistical parameters were calculated. Results The posture index demonstrated very good objectivity (intraclass correlation coefficient ICC = 0.865), good reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.842) and good validity compared to the posture assessment done by the medical experts (Spearman's rho = 0.712). Conclusions The posture index reflects a doctor’s assessment of the posture of children and adolescents and is suitable as a clinical parameter for the assessment of postural defects.


      PubDate: 2016-04-10T01:00:52Z
       
  • Effect of Exams Period on Prevalence of Myofascial Trigger Points and Head
           Posture in Undergraduate Students: Repeated Measurements Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leonid Kalichman, Natalie Bulanov, Aryeh Friedman
      Background Myofascial Trigger points (MTrPs) may be caused or aggravated by many factors, such as mental stress associated with exams and impaired posture. Aim To compare the prevalence and sensitivity of MTrPs, and forward head position (FHP) during exam period vs. mid-semester among physical therapy students. Methods 39 physical therapy students were palpated for MTrPs in neck and shoulder muscles and were photographed laterally for FHP measurement during the academic semester and during the academic examination period. Results The subjects showed higher prevalence of active MTrPs in the right Trapezius and Levator Scapula muscles, and higher prevalence of latent MTrPs in the left Sternocleidomastoideus and Levator Scapula muscles during exams, as well as a higher rate of tenderness in suboccipital musculature. Conclusions Physical therapy students show greater prevalence of MTrPs during exams. The authors recommend implementing preventative programs towards the examination period.


      PubDate: 2016-04-10T01:00:52Z
       
  • Long-term impact of ankle sprains on postural control and fascial
           densification
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leonid Kalichman, Hila Lachman, Naama Freilich
      Objective To evaluate the effect of a past ankle sprain (AS) on postural control and fascial changes in the adjacent body segment. Methods 20 young, healthy subjects with a history (≥6 months) of significant (Grades 2, 3) lateral ASs and 20 controls with no history of AS were recruited to cross-sectional case-control study. All subjects performed the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). The Stecco method was used to evaluate fascial densification in the calf and upper foot areas. Results The leg with the AS in the study group vs. the right leg in the control group exhibited significant differences (lower scores of SEBT test in the AS group) for the following directions: anterior (p <0.001), antero-lateral (p <0.001), posterior (P = 0.028), postero-medial (P = 0.001), medial (P = 0.001), antero-medial (p <0.001). A comparison between the leg with an AS in the study group and the right leg in the control group showed a significantly high prevalence of fascial densification for the talus internal rotation (p= 0.014), talus retromotion (p=0.001), talus lateral (p=0.040) and pes external rotation (p=0.060) points. Conclusions There are long term effects of an AS on postural control and on the sensitivity and movability of the fascia in the calf and foot.


      PubDate: 2016-04-10T01:00:52Z
       
  • Older adult Alexander technique practitioners walk differently than
           healthy age-matched controls
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Kate A. Hamel, Christopher Ross, Brooke Schultz, Matthew O’Neill, David Anderson
      The Alexander Technique (AT) seeks to eliminate harmful patterns of tension that interfere with the control of posture and movement and in doing so, it may serve as a viable intervention method for increasing gait efficacy in older adults. The purpose of this study was to compare the comfortable pace gait kinematics of older AT practitioners with those of healthy, age-matched controls. Participants were six licensed AT practitioners and seven healthy age-matched controls between the ages of 63 and 75. During the stance phase, AT participants exhibited significantly greater ankle stance range of motion (ROM) and plantar flexion at toe off, as well as lower ROM of the trunk and head compared to controls. During the swing phase, the AT practitioners had significantly increased hip and knee flexion and a trend toward significantly increased dorsiflexion. The findings suggest that the older AT practitioners walked with gait patterns more similar to those found in the literature for younger adults. These promising results highlight the need for further research to assess the AT's potential role as an intervention method for ameliorating the deleterious changes in gait that occur with aging.


      PubDate: 2016-04-10T01:00:52Z
       
  • Viola M. Frymann, D.O., F.A.A.O., Internationaly Recongnized And
           Pioneering Osteopathic Physican, Dies At 94 In San Diego, California By
           Dr. Hollis King, D.O., PhD
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 April 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hollis H. King



      PubDate: 2016-04-06T18:57:50Z
       
  • Dosage and Manual Therapies – can we translate science into
           practice'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2016-04-02T02:12:44Z
       
  • A Critical Overview of the Current Myofascial Pain Literature –
           March 2016
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt, Todd Hooks, Michelle Finnegan, Rob Grieve
      The worldwide interest in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and trigger points (TrPs) is reflected in the increasing number of publications. In this overview of the literature, we included 26 studies, case reports and review articles by authors from 18 different countries. Several research groups are exploring the characteristic of TrPs such as Chen and colleagues, who continued their work on the quantification of the taut bands. Meng and colleagues studied the relationships between TrPs and central sensitization, while Yu and colleagues examined the electrophysiological characteristics that occur as a result of active TrPs. Several researchers used objective measurements to determine clinical outcomes, such as Koppenhaver and colleagues who measured objective changes in the function and nociceptive sensitivity of lumbar multifidus muscle subjects with low back pain. Turo and colleagues quantified muscle tissue changes after dry needling in chronic myofascial pain using elastography. Multiple studies explored various treatment options for TrPs, such as dry needling, injections with lidocaine or granisetron, traditional Thai massage, self-myofascial release, kinesiotaping, and monochromatic infrared photo energy, among others.


      PubDate: 2016-03-08T14:36:10Z
       
  • Editorial: Simulation of Abstract Models of Structural Homeostasis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Dorothea Blostein



      PubDate: 2016-01-09T18:23:28Z
       
 
 
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