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Journal Cover Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3041 journals]
  • Pilates increases isokinetic muscular strength of the elbow flexor and
           extensor muscles of older women: A randomized controlled clinical trial
    • Authors: Laís Campos de Oliveira; Deise Aparecida de Almeida Pires-Oliveira; Amanda Coutinho Abucarub; Letícia Siqueira Oliveira; Raphael Gonçalves de Oliveira
      Pages: 2 - 10
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Laís Campos de Oliveira, Deise Aparecida de Almeida Pires-Oliveira, Amanda Coutinho Abucarub, Letícia Siqueira Oliveira, Raphael Gonçalves de Oliveira
      Introduction The number of elderly people is growing and the practice of physical exercise, such as Pilates, contributes to increased muscular strength and functional autonomy in this population. Objective: To verify the influence of Pilates on the isokinetic muscular strength of the elbow flexors and extensors, and on the functionality of the upper limbs, of older women. Method Thirty volunteers were randomized into two groups-Pilates group (PG) and Control Group (CG). The PG exercises were performed twice weekly for 12 weeks. Evaluations were performed pre and post-intervention, for isokinetic muscular strength of the elbow flexors and extensors and functionality of the upper limbs. Results In the intra-group comparison, the PG improved strength of the elbow extensors and the functionality of the upper limbs (p < 0.05). When comparing the post-intervention moment, the PG was superior to the CG in all variables (p < 0.05), with a large effect size (d > 0.80). Conclusion Pilates increases the isokinetic muscular strength of the elbow flexors and extensors, in addition to the functionality of the upper limbs, in older women.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.03.002
       
  • Effect of exams period on prevalence of Myofascial Trigger points and head
           posture in undergraduate students: Repeated measurements study
    • Authors: Leonid Kalichman; Natalie Bulanov; Aryeh Friedman
      Pages: 11 - 18
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Leonid Kalichman, Natalie Bulanov, Aryeh Friedman
      Background Myofascial Trigger points (MTrPs) may be caused or aggravated by many factors, such as mental stress associated with exams and impaired posture. Aim To compare the prevalence and sensitivity of MTrPs, and forward head position (FHP) during exam period vs. mid-semester among physical therapy students. Methods 39 physical therapy students were palpated for MTrPs in neck and shoulder muscles and were photographed laterally for FHP measurement during the academic semester and during the academic examination period. Results The subjects showed higher prevalence of active MTrPs in the right Trapezius and Levator Scapula muscles, and higher prevalence of latent MTrPs in the left Sternocleidomastoideus and Levator Scapula muscles during exams, as well as a higher rate of tenderness in suboccipital musculature. Conclusions Physical therapy students show greater prevalence of MTrPs during exams. The authors recommend implementing preventative programs towards the examination period.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.04.003
       
  • The use of CranioSacral therapy for Autism Spectrum Disorders: Benefits
           from the viewpoints of parents, clients, and therapists
    • Authors: Susan Vaughan Kratz; Jane Kerr; Lorraine Porter
      Pages: 19 - 29
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Susan Vaughan Kratz, Jane Kerr, Lorraine Porter
      Objectives The objectives of this preliminary study were to explore: the use of CranioSacral Therapy for persons with Autism Spectrum Disorder, the demographics of participants, and the retrospective interpretation of reported changes related to the intervention. Participants included therapists, parents, and clients. Methods Recruitment of participants was conducted through electronic social and professional networks. Online questionnaire surveys were provided. Demographic questions were posed to understand both the extent of clinical use and the rationales for such treatment, and surveys were unique to each subject groups. All participants were given a 20-item functional behavior checklist as a means to measure their perception of change attributed to this intervention. Open-ended comments were also encouraged to explore perspectives from their experiential treatments. The Qualitative data collected was analyzed via Inductive Content Analysis. The data was stored on excel and analyzed manually and independently by all 3 authors. Results A total of 405 people responded to the recruitments and of the participants who completed surveys, 264 were therapists and 124 parents. Only a small sampling of clients responded. The demographics of professionals using CST for ASD, their level of CST training, and their qualifications to work with ASD were reflected. Demographics and referral sources of parents, and other details of their experiences, were surveyed. Perceived changes to the use of CST were explored through analysis of responses to both the Likert scale as well as the open comments. Conclusions This preliminary study introduces the concept of CranioSacral Therapy as a treatment option for symptoms associated with ASD. Its clinical use has been available for three decades but few empirical studies exist. The results of the survey suggest that CST is already being professionally recommended as a treatment. This study found that there were positive responses observed by all 3 targeted groups leading to the authors concluding that there is worthy cause to further investigate how CST benefits Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.06.006
       
  • The effect of Bikram yoga on endothelial function in young and middle-aged
           and older adults
    • Authors: Stacy D. Hunter; Mandeep S. Dhindsa; Emily Cunningham; Takashi Tarumi; Mohammed Alkatan; Nantinee Nualnim; Ahmed Elmenshawy; Hirofumi Tanaka
      Pages: 30 - 34
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Stacy D. Hunter, Mandeep S. Dhindsa, Emily Cunningham, Takashi Tarumi, Mohammed Alkatan, Nantinee Nualnim, Ahmed Elmenshawy, Hirofumi Tanaka
      The purpose of this investigation was to determine if Bikram yoga, a style of heated hatha yoga, would improve endothelial function in young and middle-aged and older, healthy adults. This trial was performed in 36 young (n = 17) and middle-aged and older adults (n = 19) who completed 3 weekly Bikram yoga classes for 8 weeks. Height, body weight and body composition were determined and endothelial function was measured noninvasively using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) before and after the intervention. No changes in body weight, BMI or body fat percentage occurred as a result of the intervention in either group. Brachial artery FMD was significantly increased in middle-aged and older (P < 0.05) but not in young adults as a result of the intervention. The results demonstrate that a relatively short-term Bikram yoga practice might significantly improve vascular endothelial function in middle-aged and older adults. While apparently healthy individuals in this study experienced no adverse events, those with preexisting conditions should take caution and consult with a physician prior to engaging in this style of yoga.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.06.004
       
  • Reliability of assessment of upper trapezius morphology, its mechanical
           properties and blood flow in female patients with myofascial pain syndrome
           using ultrasonography
    • Authors: Hakimeh Adigozali; Azadeh Shadmehr; Esmail Ebrahimi; Asghar Rezasoltani; Farrokh Naderi
      Pages: 35 - 40
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Hakimeh Adigozali, Azadeh Shadmehr, Esmail Ebrahimi, Asghar Rezasoltani, Farrokh Naderi
      Objective In the present study, the intra-rater reliability of upper trapezius morphology, its mechanical properties and intramuscular blood circulation in females with myofascial pain syndrome were assessed using ultrasonography. Design A total of 37 patients (31.05 ± 10 years old) participated in this study. Ultrasonography producer was set up in three stages: a) Gray-scale: to measure muscle thickness, size and area of trigger points; b) Ultrasound elastography: to measure muscle stiffness; and c) Doppler imaging: to assess blood flow indices. Results According to data analysis, all variables, except End Diastolic Velocity (EDV), had excellent reliability (>0.806). Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for EDV was 0.738, which was considered a poor to good reliability. Conclusion The results of this study introduced a reliable method for developing details of upper trapezius features using muscular ultrasonography in female patients. These variables could be used for objective examination and provide guidelines for treatment plans in clinical settings.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.04.010
       
  • The effect of kinesio taping versus stretching techniques on muscle
           soreness, and flexibility during recovery from nordic hamstring exercise
    • Authors: Tarik Ozmen; Gokce Yagmur Gunes; Hanife Dogan; Ilyas Ucar; Mark Willems
      Pages: 41 - 47
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tarik Ozmen, Gokce Yagmur Gunes, Hanife Dogan, Ilyas Ucar, Mark Willems
      The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching, or kinesio taping (KT) on muscle soreness and flexibility during recovery from exercise. Sixty-five females were randomly assigned to four groups: PNF stretching (n = 15), static stretching (n = 16), KT (n = 17), and control (n = 17). All participants performed nordic hamstring exercise (5 sets of 8 repetitions). In all groups, hamstring flexibility at 24 h and 48 h was not changed from baseline (p > .05). The muscle soreness was measured higher at 48 h post-exercise compared with baseline in the control group (p = .04) and at 24 h post-exercise compared with baseline in the PNF group (p < .01). No significant differences were found for intervention groups compared with control group in all measurements (p > .05). The KT application and pre-exercise stretching have no contribute to flexibility at 24 h and 48 h after exercise, but may attenuate muscle soreness.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.04.001
       
  • Neurophysiological and clinical effects of dry needling in patients with
           upper trapezius myofascial trigger points
    • Authors: Maryam Abbaszadeh-Amirdehi; Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari; Soofia Naghdi; Gholamreza Olyaei; Mohammad Reza Nourbakhsh
      Pages: 48 - 52
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Maryam Abbaszadeh-Amirdehi, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Soofia Naghdi, Gholamreza Olyaei, Mohammad Reza Nourbakhsh
      Introduction Dry needling (DN) is a widely used in treatment of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). The purpose of this pretest-posttest clinical trial was to investigate the neurophysiological and clinical effects of DN in patients with MTrPs. Methods A sample of 20 patients (3 man, 17 women; mean age 31.7 ± 10.8) with upper trapezius MTrPs received one session of deep DN. The outcomes of neuromuscular junction response (NMJR), sympathetic skin response (SSR), pain intensity (PI) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were measured at baseline and immediately after DN. Results There were significant improvements in SSR latency and amplitude, pain, and PPT after DN. The NMJR decreased and returned to normal after DN. Conclusions A single session of DN to the active upper trapezius MTrP was effective in improving pain, PPT, NMJR, and SSR in patients with myofascial trigger points. Further studies are needed.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.04.014
       
  • Change of pectoralis minor length, and acromial distance, during scapular
           retraction at 60° shoulder elevation
    • Authors: Nitaya Viriyatharakij; Chatchada Chinkulprasert; Navarat Rakthim; Jetjaree Patumrat; Butsarin Ketruang
      Pages: 53 - 57
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Nitaya Viriyatharakij, Chatchada Chinkulprasert, Navarat Rakthim, Jetjaree Patumrat, Butsarin Ketruang
      As the pectoralis minor muscle is inserted into the coracoid process, an improper length of this muscle would affect scapular and shoulder motions. Therefore, this study is proposed to assess the effects on pectoralis minor's length and acromial distance after active scapular retraction in scaption at 60° elevation. Sixty right-hand-dominant participants (11 males, 49 females) were randomized into an intervention group and a control group. The intervention group performed pectoralis minor muscle stretching by active scapular retraction, while the control group were asked to sit in an upright position. The result shows that, the mean lengths of pectoralis minor in the intervention group were significantly increased when compared with those of the control group (p = 0.004 and p = 0.014 respectively). Simultaneously, the reduction in acromial distance of this intervention group was substantially greater than the control group's (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001 respectively). However, it should be noted that the results reported only relate to the period immediately following muscle stretching.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.04.015
       
  • Effect of cognitive task on postural control of the patients with chronic
           ankle instability during single and double leg standing
    • Authors: Zeinab Shiravi; Saeed Talebian Moghadam; Mohammad Reza Hadian; Gholamreza Olyaei
      Pages: 58 - 62
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Zeinab Shiravi, Saeed Talebian Moghadam, Mohammad Reza Hadian, Gholamreza Olyaei
      Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a cognitive task on standing postural control of the injured and non-injured leg of athletes with chronic ankle instability. Methods Postural stability was measured by center of pressure parameters while chronic ankle instability patients (n = 8) randomly performed single and double leg standing in isolation or concurrently with a digit-backward cognitive task. Results After performing a concurrent cognitive task, anteroposterior sway significantly decreased in injured leg (P < 0.05) and area significantly decreased in both injured and non-injured legs (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in all center of pressure parameters between injured and non-injured legs. Conclusion The findings confirm the effect of a concurrent digit-backwards memory task on single leg standing balance in chronic ankle instability patients but the response to cognitive loading was not significantly different between the injured and non-injured legs.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.05.001
       
  • Stress biomarker responses to different protocols of forced exercise in
           chronically stressed rats
    • Authors: Maryam Radahmadi; Hojjatallah Alaei; Mohammad Reza Sharifi; Nasrin Hosseini
      Pages: 63 - 68
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Maryam Radahmadi, Hojjatallah Alaei, Mohammad Reza Sharifi, Nasrin Hosseini
      Stress is one of the most significant causes of major health problems on a global scale. The beneficial effects of exercise on combating stress, however, are well-established. The present study investigated the stress biomarker responses, such as serum corticosterone, interlukin-1β, and glucose levels, to different (preventive, therapeutic, protective, and continuous) protocols of forced exercise under stress. Male rats were randomly allocated to the following five groups: stressed, preventive, therapeutic, protective, and continuous (and/or pre-stress, post-stress, stress-accompanied, and both pre-stress and stress-accompanied exercise respectively) exercise groups. Stress was applied 6 h/day for 21 days and the treadmill running was employed at a speed of 20–21 m/min for 21 and 42 days. The findings showed that the therapeutic, protective, and continuous exercises led to reduced corticosterone and glucose levels. Whereas, the preventive exercise did not reverse the stress responses, and that the therapeutic exercise led to a significant decline in serum interlukin-1β. It is concluded that protective, therapeutic, and, particularly, continuous exercises lead to significant reductions in serum corticosterone and the associated stress-induced hyperglycemia. Moreover, it appears that the timing and duration of exercise are the two factors contributing to changes in stress biomarker responses.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.05.002
       
  • The scapula backward tipping test: An inter-rater reliability study
    • Authors: Deepak Sebastian; Raghu Chovvath; Ramesh Malladi
      Pages: 69 - 73
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Deepak Sebastian, Raghu Chovvath, Ramesh Malladi
      Background & Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the scapula backward tipping test (SBTT) in detecting the presence of pectoralis minor (PM) tightness and subsequently scapula forward tipping, in a symptomatic population. PM tightness with scapula forward tipping has been described to cause pain and dysfunction in the shoulder region. Methods 30 patients with a diagnosis of shoulder pain were randomly assigned and examined by 2 musculoskeletal physical therapists at a time. The procedure consisted of having the individual lay on the stomach in a neutral head position with palms in the anatomical position. The examiner firmly stabilized the inferior angle of the scapula with one hand and the fingers of the other hand hooked the under surface of the coracoid process. A gentle yet firm pull was imparted in an upward direction to sense tightness and to observe movement of the acromion up to the tragus of the ear. A comparison was made with the other side to sense restriction. Inter-rater reliability was determined using the kappa statistic. Results The SBTT was found to be reproducible between examiners (Kappa = 0.735, SE of kappa = 0.123, 95% confidence interval), with a percentage agreement of 86.67%. Conclusion The SBTT may be incorporated as a simple yet effective test to determine the presence of PM tightness and subsequently scapula forward tipping.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.05.003
       
  • Increased strength of the scapular stabilizer and lumbar muscles after
           twelve weeks of Pilates training using the Reformer machine: A pilot study
           
    • Authors: Núbia Tomain Otoni dos Santos; Karoline Cipriano Raimundo; Sheila Aparecida da Silva; Lara Andrade Souza; Karoline Carregal Ferreira; Zuleika Ferreira Borges Santo Urbano; Andréa Licre Pessina Gasparini; Dernival Bertoncello
      Pages: 74 - 80
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Núbia Tomain Otoni dos Santos, Karoline Cipriano Raimundo, Sheila Aparecida da Silva, Lara Andrade Souza, Karoline Carregal Ferreira, Zuleika Ferreira Borges Santo Urbano, Andréa Licre Pessina Gasparini, Dernival Bertoncello
      Objective The aim of this work was to analyze muscle strength in Pilates novices who used the Reformer equipment during twelve training sessions. Methods Twenty-four healthy young female volunteers, who were non-smokers and did not exercise regularly, were split into a control group (mean age 28 ± 4 years and BMI 24.55 ± 3.21 kg/m2) and a training group (mean age 29 ± 4 years and BMI 22.69 ± 2.87 kgm2). The data were checked for normality using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, and were then analyzed using the t-test (p < 0.05). Results After the training sessions, there were statistically significant differences between the groups for the scapular stabilizer muscles (p = 0.0263) and the lumbar muscles (p = 0.0001). For the scapular stabilizers, the initial/final values were 14.69 ± 2.80/14.79 ± 2.89 (control group) and 15.99 ± 3.54/17.44 ± 2.88 (Pilates group). The corresponding values for the lumbar muscles were 53.83 ± 11.66/53.28 ± 11.14 (control group) and 54.75 ± 10.27/64.80 ± 10.20 (Pilates group). Conclusion After twelve sessions of Pilates with the Reformer equipment, there were improvements in lumbar extensor and scapular stabilizer strength. Several benefits are reported by practitioners of Pilates, but until now, there has been limited scientific evidence of the improvement of strength in the trunk and limbs after application of the technique.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.05.005
       
  • Lumbar scoliosis: Reducing lower back pain and improving function in
           adulthood. A case report with a 2-year follow-up
    • Authors: Massimiliano Polastri; Michele Romano
      Pages: 81 - 85
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Massimiliano Polastri, Michele Romano
      Background Lower back pain (LBP) can persist into adulthood as a sequelae of adolescent lumbar scoliosis, particularly under certain conditions influenced by aspects of bodily biomechanics and/or other factors. Here we describe the use of tailored bracing used in an adult with pre-existing lumbar scoliosis suffering from LBP. Case description A 40-year-old female presented with acute LBP. The subject complained of acute lumbar pain exacerbated when she was upright, and when she was engaged in the normal activities of daily life. At the time of the first observation, the patient was wearing a brace that was readily available commercially. We modified the non-individualized elastic brace that the patient had already purchased. Major improvements were observed in either or both of the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale and Numerical Pain Rating Scale scores. Conclusion We speculate that the tailored bracing described in the present case may be a viable option in carefully selected cases.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.05.004
       
  • Effects of Pilates exercise on general health of hemodialysis patients
    • Authors: Zahra Rahimimoghadam; Zahra Rahemi; Neda Mirbagher Ajorpaz; Zohre Sadat
      Pages: 86 - 92
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Zahra Rahimimoghadam, Zahra Rahemi, Neda Mirbagher Ajorpaz, Zohre Sadat
      Pilates is a type of exercise which has recently drawn exercise and health experts' attention. They have noticed that it can improve hemodialysis patients' general health. A clinical trial study was performed. Fifty hemodialysis patients were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. A demographic information questionnaire and a general health questionnaire (GHQ-28) were completed by the two groups at the beginning of the study. Then, modified Pilates exercises were carried out in the intervention group three times a week over a period of eight weeks. At the end of the study, the GHQ-28 questionnaire was completed by the two groups. In the intervention group, the difference between the mean scores of general health before (45.24 ± 9.9) and after (31.2 ± 6.9) the intervention was significant (p ≤ 0.002). After the intervention, the difference between the mean scores of the control (1.6 ± 1.3) and intervention (14 ± 0.78) groups was also significant (p ≤ 0.001).

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.05.012
       
  • Influence of treadmill gait training with additional load on motor
           function, postural instability and history of falls for individuals with
           Parkinson's disease: A randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Larissa Coutinho de Lucena Trigueiro; Gabriela Lopes Gama; Tatiana Souza Ribeiro; Louise Gabriella Lopes de Macedo Ferreira; Élida Rayanne Viana Pinheiro Galvão; Emília Márcia Gomes de Souza e Silva; Clécio de Oliveira Godeiro Júnior; Ana Raquel Rodrigues Lindquist
      Pages: 93 - 100
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Larissa Coutinho de Lucena Trigueiro, Gabriela Lopes Gama, Tatiana Souza Ribeiro, Louise Gabriella Lopes de Macedo Ferreira, Élida Rayanne Viana Pinheiro Galvão, Emília Márcia Gomes de Souza e Silva, Clécio de Oliveira Godeiro Júnior, Ana Raquel Rodrigues Lindquist
      Background Evaluate the effects of additional load (5% and 10% of body weight) with treadmill gait training on the motor aspects in Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods Randomized controlled single-blind trial with 30 individuals with PD. The volunteers were divided into three groups (treadmill with 0%, 5% or 10% load), where Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was applied. Treadmill gait training was conducted over 4 consecutive weeks, with three weekly sessions of 30 min each. Results There was a significant reduction in all groups in the time factor for motor function (F = 12.92; P = 0.001) and postural instability (F = 11.23; P = 0.002). No significant difference was observed in group × time interaction (F < 1.76; P > 0.19). Conclusion The treadmill comprises an effective therapy for people with PD, for important motor aspects such as motor function and postural instability. Additional load had no influence on results.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.05.009
       
  • Experiences of intervertebral motion palpation in osteopathic practice –
           A qualitative interview study among Swedish osteopaths
    • Authors: Niklas S. Sposato; Kristofer Bjerså
      Pages: 101 - 108
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 1
      Author(s): Niklas S. Sposato, Kristofer Bjerså
      Background Assessment in manual therapy includes quantitative and qualitative procedures, and intervertebral motion palpation (IMP) is one of the core assessment methods in osteopathic practice. The aim of this study was to explore osteopathic practitioners' experiences of clinical decision-making and IMP as a diagnostic tool for planning and evaluation of osteopathic interventions. Method The study was conducted with semi-structured interviews that included eight informants. Content analysis was used as the analytical procedure. Result In total, three categories emerged from the analysis: strategic decision-making, diagnostic usability of IMP, and treatment applicability of IMP. Conclusion The study indicated that IMP was considered relevant and was given particular importance in cases where IMP findings confirmed clinical information attained from other stages in the diagnostic process as a whole. However, IMP findings were experienced as less important if they were not correlated to other findings.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.05.008
       
  • Realizing the benefits, makes the benefits real
    • Authors: Matt Wallden
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matt Wallden


      PubDate: 2017-03-24T10:07:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.014
       
  • Cognitive Functional Therapy (CFT) for chronic non-specific neck pain
    • Authors: Ney Meziat-Filho; Maicom Lima; Jessica Fernandez; Felipe J.J. Reis
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Ney Meziat-Filho, Maicom Lima, Jessica Fernandez, Felipe J.J. Reis
      This case report presents the effect of Cognitive Functional Therapy (CFT) in a patient with chronic non-specific neck pain. The patient believed that pain signified tissue damage, and demonstrated pain catastrophizing, hypervigilance, stress sensitivity, and movement impairment of the neck, during extension and rotation. The CFT intervention integrated a cognitive approach with manual therapy and active exercises to encourage the patient to trust her neck again. One month after the first appointment, the patient had recovered confidence, and the pain and disability had disappeared almost entirely.

      PubDate: 2017-03-24T10:07:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.010
       
  • The significance of closed kinematic chains to biological movement and
           dynamic stability
    • Authors: Stephen Levin; Susan Lowell de Solórzano; Graham Scarr
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Stephen Levin, Susan Lowell de Solórzano, Graham Scarr
      Closed kinematic chains (CKCs) are widely used in mechanical engineering because they provide a simple and efficient mechanism with multiple applications, but they are much less appreciated in living tissues. Biomechanical research has been dominated by the use of lever models and their kinematic analysis, which has largely ignored the geometric organization of these ubiquitous and evolutionary-conserved systems, yet CKCs contribute substantially to our understanding of biological motion. Closed-chain kinematics couple multiple parts into continuous mechanical loops that allow the structure itself to regulate complex movements, and are described in a wide variety of different organisms, including humans. In a biological context, CKCs are modular units nested within others at multiple size scales as part of an integrated movement system that extends throughout the organism and can act in synergy with the nervous system, where present. They provide an energy-efficient mechanism that enables multiple mechanical functions to be optimized during embryological development and increases evolutionary diversity.

      PubDate: 2017-03-18T06:16:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.012
       
  • The partial Get-Up
    • Authors: Carmen Bott; Craig Liebenson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Carmen Bott, Craig Liebenson


      PubDate: 2017-03-11T17:48:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.011
       
  • The local twitch response during trigger point dry needling: Is it
           necessary for successful outcomes?
    • Authors: Thomas Perreault; James Dunning; Raymond Butts
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Thomas Perreault, James Dunning, Raymond Butts
      Background Myofascial trigger point (MTrP) injection and trigger point dry needling (TrPDN) are widely accepted therapies for myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Empirical evidence suggests eliciting a local twitch response (LTR) during needling is essential. Objective This is the first review exploring the available literature, regardless of study design, on the neurophysiological effects and clinical significance of the LTR as it relates to reductions in pain and disability secondary to MTrP needling. Methods PubMed, MEDLINE, Science Direct and Google Scholar were searched up until October 2016 using terms related to trigger point needling and the LTR. Results and Discussion: Several studies show that eliciting a LTR does not correlate with changes in pain and disability, and multiple systematic reviews have failed to conclude whether the LTR is relevant to the outcome of TrPDN. Post needling soreness is consistently reported in studies using repeated in and out needling to elicit LTRs and increases in proportion to the number of needle insertions. In contrast, needle winding without LTRs to MTrPs and connective tissue is well supported in the literature, as it is linked to anti-nociception and factors related to tissue repair and remodeling. Additionally, the positive biochemical changes in the MTrP after needling may simply be a wash out effect related to local vasodilation. While the LTR during TrPDN appears unnecessary for managing myofascial pain and unrelated to many of the positive effects of TrPDN, further investigation is required.

      PubDate: 2017-03-11T17:48:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.008
       
  • Impact of osteopathic therapy on pro-prioceptive balance and quality of
           life in patients with dizziness
    • Authors: L. Papa; A. Amodio; F. Biffi; A. Mandara
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): L. Papa, A. Amodio, F. Biffi, A. Mandara
      The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) in patients with Benign-Paroxysmal-Positional Vertigo (BPPV). Thirty-one patients with BPPV were randomly assigned into two groups: 19 patients received osteopathic treatments (TG) and 12 patients received sham therapy (SG), both in four weekly sessions. Before the first and the last treatment, those patients were evaluated using Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and stabilometric platform to assess lifestyle modification and balance functions. After the treatment session, TG compared to SG showed an improvement in DHI global (p=0.02), functional (p=0.03) and physical (p=0.03) components, as well as a reduction of swinging area (p=0.02). An association between swinging area and lifestyle measures (global [r=0.53; p=0.02]; functional [r=0.50; p=0.03]; physical [r=0.60; p= 0.01]) changes were found in TG. These findings suggest that OMT could be a useful approach to reduce imbalance symptoms and to improve the quality of life in patients suffering from dizziness.

      PubDate: 2017-03-11T17:48:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.001
       
  • The Rebound Boots Change the Lower Limb Muscle Activation and Kinematics
           During Different Fitness Exercises
    • Authors: Mateus Rossato; Rodolfo André Dellagrana; Juliane Cristine Lopes dos Santos; Felipe P. Carpes; Rodrigo Ghedini Gheller; De Angelys de Ceselles Seixas da Silva; Ewertton de Souza Bezerra; João Otacílio Libardoni dos Santos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mateus Rossato, Rodolfo André Dellagrana, Juliane Cristine Lopes dos Santos, Felipe P. Carpes, Rodrigo Ghedini Gheller, De Angelys de Ceselles Seixas da Silva, Ewertton de Souza Bezerra, João Otacílio Libardoni dos Santos
      The purpose of this study was to evaluate electromyography and kinematic parameters of the lower limbs using rebound boots (RB) and barefoot during a gym workout. This information can be helpful to practitioners to schedule the rehabilitation and training programs. Ten women (25 ± 9 years) volunteered for the study; inclusion criteria were as follows: subjects must have experienced the RB and the analyzed exercises for at least 6 months, and have no previous injuries in the lower limbs. Seven exercises were performed for 30 seconds with the RB and subsequently on barefoot. Data from muscle activation of vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF), lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and 2D kinematics were collected. The RB triggered postural changes, characterized by larger hip extension (4 exercises) and knee extension (6 exercises) for the landing. RB reduced activation mainly in LG (6 exercises) while no changes were observed for VL (except exercise 1) and BF. RB change kinematics and muscle activation suggesting changes in the way the legs absorb and transmit force during jumps. LG was the main muscle affected by the use of RB.

      PubDate: 2017-03-11T17:48:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.002
       
  • Within-day and between-day reliability of thickness measurements of
           abdominal muscles using ultrasound during abdominal hollowing and bracing
           maneuvers
    • Authors: Mahnaz Aboufazeli; Nima Afshar-Mohajer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mahnaz Aboufazeli, Nima Afshar-Mohajer
      Ultrasonography imaging has been used as a non-invasive method to estimate the thickness and relative activities of the abdominal muscles in patients with lower back pain (LBP). However, the statistical reliability of US thickness measurements of abdominal muscles, including transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles during abdominal hollowing (AH) and abdominal bracing (AB) maneuvers has not been well-investigated. This study was performed on a total of 20 female subjects (10 with LBP and 10 without LBP) in the age range of 25 to 55 years to assess within-day and between-day reliability of the measurements. US measurements on maneuvers were repeated after two hours for the within-day reliability and after five days for the between-day reliability assessment. High intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) values (>0.75) for within-day and between-day reliability assessments during AH maneuver were concluded. The ICC values were moderate for reliability assessment during AB. The ICC values for AH were greater than AB both for within- and between-day reliabilities. The small standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change values (0.16 to 0.78 and 0.44 to 2.15, respectively) were found for both AH and AB. We recommend real-time US imaging as a reliable way of determining the thicknesses of the TrA and IO muscle (and to some extent, EO muscle) for both healthy and LBP patients.

      PubDate: 2017-03-11T17:48:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.006
       
  • The effects of dorso-lumbar motion restriction on EMG activity of selected
           muscles during running
    • Authors: Joseph J. Morley; Edward Traum
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Joseph J. Morley, Edward Traum
      The effects of restricting dorso-lumbar spine mobility on electromyographic activity of the erector spinae, quadriceps femoris, hamstrings and gastrocnemius muscles in runners was investigated. Thermoplastic casting material was fashioned into a rigid orthosis and used to restrict spinal motion during running. Volunteers ran on a treadmill at 2.78 m/sec, under normal conditions and with spinal motion restricted. Surface electromyographic data was collected during both sets of trials. Normal electromyographic data was also compared with previous authors to determine similarity with their electromyographic data. Results Casted running resulted in an increase in erector spinae (p < 0.01) and quadriceps femoris (p = 0.02) electromyography activity. Total stride time and swing time of gait were decreased during casted running (p < 0.01), indicating a shift towards shorter and thus more frequent steps to run the same distance. The normal electromyographic data collected was in agreement with previously reported work. Conclusions Neurological control over muscle and the fascia surrounding it is responsible for joint movement and load transfer. Experimentally restricting spinal motion during running demonstrated an increase in erector spinae and rectus femoris electromyographic activity. This lends support to the hypothesis that decreased spinal mobility may be a contributing factor to overuse muscle injuries in runners.

      PubDate: 2017-03-11T17:48:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.009
       
  • Postural insoles on gait in children with cerebral palsy: Randomized
           controlled double-blind clinical trial
    • Authors: Hugo Pasin Neto; Luanda André Collange Grecco; Luis Alfredo Braun Ferreira; Natália Almeida Carvalho Duarte; Manuela Galli; Claudia Santos Oliveira
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hugo Pasin Neto, Luanda André Collange Grecco, Luis Alfredo Braun Ferreira, Natália Almeida Carvalho Duarte, Manuela Galli, Claudia Santos Oliveira
      The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of postural insoles on gait performance in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP).Twenty four children between four and 12 years of age were randomly allocated either the control group (n = 12) or experimental group (n = 12).The control group used placebo insoles and the experimental group used postural insoles. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed under three conditions: barefoot, in shoes and in shoes with insoles. Three evaluations were carried out: 1)immediately following placement of the insoles; 2)after three months of insole use; and 3)one month after suspending insole use. Regarding the immediate effects and after three months use of insole, significant improvements in gait velocity and cadence were found in the experimental group, along with an increase in foot dorsiflexion, a reduction in knee flexion and a reduction in internal rotation. Conversely, these changes were not maintained in the third assessment, one month after withdrawal of the insoles. The use of postural insoles led to improvements in gait performance in children with CP.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T05:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.005
       
  • Isometric endurance test of the cervical flexor muscles – reliability
           and normative reference values
    • Authors: Jari Ylinen; Petri Salo; Salme Järvenpää; Arja Häkkinen; Riku Nikander
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jari Ylinen, Petri Salo, Salme Järvenpää, Arja Häkkinen, Riku Nikander
      Objective To obtain reference values for the isometric endurance test (IET) of the cervical flexor muscles, investigate its reproducibility, and compare the results with the maximal isometric strength test (MIST) of the cervical flexor muscles. Design Cross-sectional non-comparative study with single group repeated measurements. Methods Altogether 219 healthy females aged 20 to 59 years volunteered to participate in the study. The IET was performed in the supine position and MIST seated. The reproducibility was evaluated by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and an analysis described by Bland and Altman. The relationship between the two measuring methods was evaluated by Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results The mean (SD) IET time was 60 (33) seconds with no significant differences between the age groups of each decade. The ICC for intrarater repeatability was 0.80. However, the Bland-Altman analysis suggested moderate variation in repeated measurements. Pearson’s correlation coefficient between the IET and MIST was 0.56. Conclusion Normative reference values for the IET are presented. Although the ICC showed good repeatability, one should consider that the change at follow-up visits has to be considerable to be clinically relevant. The correlation between the endurance time and maximal flexion strength was moderate. Thus IET of the cervical flexor muscles may be used in the clinic like the Biering-Sorenson test has been used to assess fatigue of the trunk extensor muscles.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T05:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.02.006
       
  • Low handgrip strength levels among adolescents in a city in Southern
           Brazil
    • Authors: Diego Augusto Santos Silva; Andreia Pelegrini; João Antônio Chula de Castro; Tiago Rodrigues de Lima; Gabriel Renaldo de Sousa; João Marcos Ferreira de Lima Silva; Edio Luiz Petroski
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Diego Augusto Santos Silva, Andreia Pelegrini, João Antônio Chula de Castro, Tiago Rodrigues de Lima, Gabriel Renaldo de Sousa, João Marcos Ferreira de Lima Silva, Edio Luiz Petroski
      Objective To estimate the prevalence of low handgrip strength (HGS) levels and sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviours and body fatness status related in adolescents. Method: Cross-sectional epidemiological study with 636 adolescents aged 14-19 years in a city in southern Brazil. HGS was measured by dynamometer. Sociodemographic and behavioural data were collected using self-report questionnaires. Body mass and height was measured by Body Mass Index. Results: Prevalence of low HGS levels was 47% (63.5% boys, 37.7% girls). Boys aged 14-16 years were more likely to have low HGS levels. Girls who were of higher socioeconomic status and who were less physically active were more likely to have low HGS levels. Overweight girls were less likely to have low HGS levels. Conclusions: High prevalence of low HGS levels was observed in adolescents. Increased HGS levels should be focused on younger boys and normal-weight girls with higher socioeconomic status and lower levels of physical activity.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T05:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.004
       
  • The effects of neck mobilization in patients with chronic neck pain: A
           randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Muhammad Nazim Farooq; Mohammad A. Mohseni-Bandpei; Syed Amir Gilani; Muhammad Ashfaq; Qamar Mahmood
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Muhammad Nazim Farooq, Mohammad A. Mohseni-Bandpei, Syed Amir Gilani, Muhammad Ashfaq, Qamar Mahmood
      Objective To determine the effect of mobilization and routine physiotherapy on pain, disability, neck range of motion (ROM) and neck muscle endurance (NME) in patients having chronic mechanical neck pain (NP). Methods Sixty eight patients with chronic mechanical NP were randomly allocated into two groups by using a computer generated random sequence table with 34 patients in the multi-modal mobilization group and 34 patients in the routine physiotherapy group. Baseline values for pain, disability, NME, and neck ROM were recorded using visual analogue scale (VAS), neck disability index (NDI), neck flexor muscle endurance test and universal goniometer respectively, before the treatment. Each patient received 10 treatment sessions over a period of four weeks and at the end of four weeks all the outcome measures were recorded again. Results A paired t-test revealed significant pre to post treatment differences for all outcome measures in both groups (p < 0.001 in all instances). An independent t-test revealed statistically significant differences for pain, disability, NME, and neck rotation in favor of the multi-modal mobilization group with a between group difference of 1.57 cm for VAS (p < 0.001), 11.74 points for NDI (p = 0.001), 18.45 seconds for NME (p < 0.001) and 6.06 to 8.24 degrees for neck ROM (p < 0.05). Conclusion The results suggest that a combination of cervical mobilization with routine physiotherapy is more effective for reducing pain and disability and improving NME and neck ROM in patients with chronic mechanical NP compared to routine physiotherapy alone.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T05:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.007
       
  • The effects of clinical Pilates exercises on patients with shoulder pain:
           A randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Esra Atılgan; Aydan Aytar; Aslıcan Çağlar; Ayça Aytar Tığlı; Gamze Arın; Gökmen Yapalı; Pınar Kısacık; Utku Berberoğlu; Hülya Özlem Şener; Edibe Ünal
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Esra Atılgan, Aydan Aytar, Aslıcan Çağlar, Ayça Aytar Tığlı, Gamze Arın, Gökmen Yapalı, Pınar Kısacık, Utku Berberoğlu, Hülya Özlem Şener, Edibe Ünal
      Aim The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Clinical Pilates exercises on patients with shoulder pain. Material and Methods Thirty-three patients, experiencing shoulder pain continuously for at least four weeks were selected as study subjects. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, namely Clinical Pilates exercise (n=17) group and conventional exercise (n=16) group. The patients were treated for five days a week, the total treatment being carried out for 10 days. The assessment of pain and disability amongst the patients were done at the baseline and at the end of the treatment sessions, using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI). Results The clinical Pilates exercise group showed a significant improvement in all scores used for assessment (p<0.05), while the conventional exercise group demonstrated a significant improvement only in the SPADI total score (p<0.05). A comparison of scores for the VAS, SPADI-Pain and SPADI-Total between the two groups, revealed a significant improvement in the Clinical Pilates exercise group (p<0.05). Conclusion It was demonstrated by the study that Clinical Pilates exercise is an efficient technique for patients experiencing shoulder pain, as it helps reduce pain and disability among them.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T05:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.02.003
       
  • Reliability of Kinematic Measures in Subjects With Anterior Cruciate
           Ligament Deficiency During Dual-Task Walking
    • Authors: Salman Nazary-Moghadam; Mahyar Salavati; Ali Esteki; Behnam Akhbari; Sohrab Keyhani; Afsaneh Zeinalzadeh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Salman Nazary-Moghadam, Mahyar Salavati, Ali Esteki, Behnam Akhbari, Sohrab Keyhani, Afsaneh Zeinalzadeh
      Objective To define the throughout within- and between-day reliability of gait parameters in single - and dual-task conditions in subjects with and without anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLD). Methods Fourteen subjects with ACLD and 14 healthy subjects completed a walking task on a treadmill with three levels of velocity (self-selected, high and low), with or without performing an auditory Stroop task over two sessions each 3-5 days apart. The gait kinematic parameters, including maximum and minimum hip flexion, total hip range of motion, maximum and minimum knee flexion and total knee range of motion were recorded using a motion analysis system. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), the standard error of measurement (SEM), and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to determine inter- and intrasession reliability of kinematic and cognitive measures. Results ICCs for ACLD group in dual-task and single task conditions ranged between 0.50 to 0.93 and 0.53 to 0.93, respectively. ICC values for healthy groups in dual-task and single task conditions ranged between 0.36 to 0.90 and 0.39 to 0.87, respectively. When comparing relative reliability across kinematic variables in different velocities, ICC values were generally identical in all three levels of velocity. Conclusion The findings suggest that dual-tasking could also be applied reliably for the assessment of functional activities in subjects with and without ACLD.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T05:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.02.004
       
  • Effect of Movement Control and stabilization Exercises in People with
           Extension Related Non -Specific Low Back Pain- A pilot Study
    • Authors: Sara Salamat; Saeed Talebian; Hosein Bagheri; Nader Maroufi; Mohammad Jafar Shaterzadeh; Gitta Kalbasi; Kieran O’Sullivan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sara Salamat, Saeed Talebian, Hosein Bagheri, Nader Maroufi, Mohammad Jafar Shaterzadeh, Gitta Kalbasi, Kieran O’Sullivan
      Background Exercise is considered an effective treatment strategy for non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). In spite of the wide use of exercise protocols, it is not clear what type of exercise is more effective in decreasing pain, disability and normalizing muscle activation patterns in people with chronic low back pain. Objectives To assess the effects of two exercise protocols (stabilization vs movement control) on pain and disability scores and the flexion relaxation ratio (FRR) of lumbar multifidus (LM) and iliocostalis lumbarum pars thoracic (ICLT) in people with extension related non-specific chronic low back pain. Study design Pilot randomized control trial. Methods 32 subjects with active extension pattern chronic low back pain (stabilization group=16, movement control group=16) participated in this study. Treatment groups received 4 weeks of exercise therapy. Outcomes were based on pain score (Numeric rating Scale-NRS), disability (Oswestry Disability Index- ODI) and FRR of the LM and ICLT. Results Four people dropped out of the study in each group for reasons unrelated to the protocols of the study. Pain and disability reduced in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups. The FRR of LM did not change in either treatment group after treatment. However, the FRR of ICLT was significantly increased after treatment in the movement control group. Conclusion Both movement control and stabilization exercises reduced pain and disability in the short-term among people with extension pattern NSCLBP, with no difference in effectiveness between the groups. However, movement control exercises were more effective in normalizing back muscle activation patterns than stabilization exercises.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T05:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.02.005
       
  • Immediate effect of common peroneal nerve electrical stimulation on
           quadriceps muscle arthrogenic inhibition in patients with knee
           osteoarthritis
    • Authors: Hossein Rafsanjani; Khosro Khademi-Kalantari; Asghar Rezasoltani; Sedigheh Sadat Naimi; Mehri Ghasemi; Shapour Jaberzadeh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hossein Rafsanjani, Khosro Khademi-Kalantari, Asghar Rezasoltani, Sedigheh Sadat Naimi, Mehri Ghasemi, Shapour Jaberzadeh
      Objective To investigate the immediate effect of electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve on the maximum voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methodology Fifteen subjects with knee osteoarthritis (mean age: 50.5±13 years) participated in this study. To measure the arthrogenic inhibition ratio of quadriceps, a burst of electrical stimulation was superimposed on the maximum voluntary contraction, and the percentage of change in the force production was computed. The same measurement was also performed with concurrent electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve. Results All the patients with knee osteoarthritis showed significant arthrogenic inhibition of the quadriceps muscle. The stimulation of the common peroneal nerve was able to reduce this inhibition and increase the capacity of the muscle to produce a significantly higher knee extension force (p=0.028). Conclusions Electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve concurrent with the maximum voluntary effort can remove the arthrogenic inhibition of the quadriceps muscle in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This finding could have clinical implications in the management of patients with knee disorders.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T05:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.003
       
  • The effects of strengthening exercises for wrist flexors and extensors on
           muscle strength and counter-stroke performance in amateur table tennis
           players
    • Authors: Raoyrin Chanavirut; Nontawit Udompanich; Phraophimon Udom; Ponlapat Yonglitthipagon; Wanida Donpunha; Saowanee Nakmareong; Juinichiro Yamauchi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Raoyrin Chanavirut, Nontawit Udompanich, Phraophimon Udom, Ponlapat Yonglitthipagon, Wanida Donpunha, Saowanee Nakmareong, Juinichiro Yamauchi
      This study aims to evaluate the effects of strengthening exercises on wrist flexor and extensor strength, hand grip strength, and counter-stroke performance. Thirty amateur table tennis players were recruited and randomly allocated into two groups: the control and the training group (n=15/group). Pre- and post-data were collected. The training group performed home exercises for six weeks using a bucket filled with water, while the controls were asked to keep their lifestyle as usual. The general characteristics were no significant differences. The training group showed significantly higher levels of wrist flexor and extensor strength than the control group (p<0.05). However, the difference in hand grip strength was not statistically significant. Both groups showed significant improvement in counter-stroke performance (p<0.05), however, there was no difference between the groups. In conclusion, specific strengthening exercises increase wrist flexor and extensor strength, but they have no effect on either hand grip strength or counter-stroke performance.

      PubDate: 2017-03-06T05:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.02.002
       
  • Effect of yoga on the menstrual pain, physical fitness, and quality of
           life of young women with primary dysmenorrhea
    • Authors: Ponlapat Yonglitthipagon; Somruthai Muansiangsai; Wilanee Wongkhumngern; Wanida Donpunha; Raoyrin Chanavirut; Wantana Siritaratiwat; Lukana Mato; Wichai Eungpinichpong; Taweesak Janyacharoen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Ponlapat Yonglitthipagon, Somruthai Muansiangsai, Wilanee Wongkhumngern, Wanida Donpunha, Raoyrin Chanavirut, Wantana Siritaratiwat, Lukana Mato, Wichai Eungpinichpong, Taweesak Janyacharoen
      The aim of the present study was to investigate effect of specially designed yoga program on the menstrual pain, physical fitness, and quality of life (QOL) of non-athlete women with primary dysmenorrhea (PD) aged 18–22 years. Thirty-four volunteers were randomly assigned into control and yoga groups. Menstrual pain, physical fitness, and QOL were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the 12-week study period. The yoga group was asked to practice yoga for 30 min per day, twice a week, for 12 weeks at home, while the control group did not receive any form of exercise over the study period. There were significant improve in menstrual pain, physical fitness, and QOL in the yoga group more than the control group. Therefore, this specially designed yoga program may be a possible complementary treatment for PD.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.014
       
  • A critical overview of the current myofascial pain literature –
           March 2017
    • Authors: Jan Dommerholt; Rob Grieve; Todd Hooks; Michelle Finnegan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt, Rob Grieve, Todd Hooks, Michelle Finnegan
      After two years of having contributed to this overview series of articles, we sadly say goodbye to Dr. Rob Grieve. We would like to thank Dr. Grieve for his insightful contributions and analyses of the myofascial pain literature. Dr. Grieve would have preferred to continue, but his many university and research responsibilities had to take priority. We are looking forward to reviewing his future research endeavors in this article. We are pleased that Dr. Li-Wei Chou, MD, PhD has agreed to replace Dr. Grieve and join our team. Dr. Chou is Assistant Professor at China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan and he has an impressive publication record with many research studies and book chapters. In this edition of the overview article, we once again have included articles from around the world with a combination of basic research and clinical studies and case reports. The majority of papers deal with dry needling, but there are also several more basic research studies and manual therapy papers.

      PubDate: 2017-02-08T16:01:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.02.001
       
  • Effects of Kinesio Taping® on knee function and pain in athletes with
           patellofemoral pain syndrome
    • Authors: Elaheh Aghapour; Fahimeh Kamali; Ehsan Sinaei
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Elaheh Aghapour, Fahimeh Kamali, Ehsan Sinaei
      Objective To compare the knee performance and pain in athletes with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) before and after applying Kinesio Tape® (KT) on vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) muscle. Participants Fifteen participants (10 females, five males) with unilateral PFPS were examined and compared under taped and untaped conditions. Intervention VMO of the involved leg was taped from origin to insertion, with 75% of KT's maximal length tension. Main Outcome Measures Maximal eccentric and concentric peak torques of quadriceps were measured at 60 and 180°/s angular velocities by an isokinetic dynamometer. Functional performance and pain were evaluated by functional tests (step-down and bilateral squat) and visual analog scale, respectively. Results Paired t-test showed statistically significant increase in VMO peak torque and also repetition of step- down test and bilateral squat after using KT. Pain intensity was also decreased significantly following KT application (p<0.05). Conclusions KT application over VMO can decrease pain and improve the functional performance, generally and quadriceps muscle strength, particularly, in athletes with PFPS. However, more research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of this therapeutic procedure.

      PubDate: 2017-02-01T17:11:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.012
       
  • Telocytes: Connective Tissue Repair and Communication cells
    • Authors: Leon Chaitow
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow


      PubDate: 2017-02-01T17:11:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.011
       
  • The immediate effect of talocrural joint manipulation on functional
           performance of 15–40 years old athletes with chronic ankle instability:
           A double-blind randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Fahimeh Kamali; Ehsan Sinaei; Sara Bahadorian
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fahimeh Kamali, Ehsan Sinaei, Sara Bahadorian
      Objective To evaluate the immediate effect of talocrural joint manipulation (TCJM) on functional performance of athletes with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Participants Forty athletes (18males, 22females) with CAI divided into TCJM group (n = 20) and sham manipulation group (n = 20). Intervention TCJM was performed as a quick thrust on the involved talus, in the posterior direction. Sham manipulation was maintaining the same position, without any thrust. Main Outcome Measures Functional performance of athletes was assessed with single leg hop; speed and Y balance tests, before and after the interventions. Results All functional tests evaluated in this study improved significantly after TCJM (p-value<0.05). These findings were not seen in the control group. Between-group comparisons also showed significant changes for all the measurements after the interventions (p < 0.05). Conclusions TCJM can significantly increase the functional performance of athletes with CIA and can be an effective supplementary treatment for these subjects. However, this was a pre-post study and future studies with long-term follow-ups may provide more reliable results about the long-term effectiveness of this type of treatment.

      PubDate: 2017-01-25T18:51:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.010
       
  • Pilot study: Post-operative rehabilitation pathway changes and
           implementation of functional closed kinetic chain exercise in total hip
           and total knee replacement patient
    • Authors: C. Abbas; J. Daher
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): C. Abbas, J. Daher
      Objective The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of introducing a functional closed kinetic chain exercise program to an acute care setting to reduce length of hospital stay and assess tolerance to exercise immediately following total hip or total knee arthroplasty. Methods A protocol change implementing a functional closed kinetic chain based exercise program, post total hip (n = 535) and total knee (n = 695) arthroplasty, was performed at Windsor Regional Hospital Ouellette Campus in Windsor, Ontario Canada. A chart review was performed to compare the length of stay, post-surgery, of the new protocol to the length of stay of the previous range of motion and open kinetic chain based protocols of the previous two years. Results A significant (P-value <0.05) number of total hip and total knee arthroplasty patients reduced the length of hospital stay to less than 4 days using the closed kinetic chain program. Conclusion Evidence suggests that closed kinetic chain exercises are tolerated in the acute care setting and may be useful in reducing hospital length of stay post total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

      PubDate: 2017-01-18T18:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.009
       
  • Scientific Evidence Based Effects of Yoga Practices on Various Health
           Related Problems of Elderly Peoples: A Review
    • Authors: A. Mooventhan; L. Nivethitha
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): A. Mooventhan, L. Nivethitha
      More than 50% of the elderly above 60 years of age suffer from chronic medical conditions and the prevalence of which increase with age. Though Yoga has been reported as an effective modality in improving various physical and psychological aspects of elderly populations, a comprehensive review of Yoga and its effects on various health related problems of elderly populations has not been reported yet. Hence, we performed PubMed/Medline search to review relevant articles, using keyword “yoga and elderly”. Relevant articles published since inception till 6th October 2016 were included for the review. Based on the available scientific literature, this review suggests that the regular practice of Yoga can be considered as an effective intervention in improving physical (reduces heart rate, blood pressure, blood glucose, oxidative damage, fatigue, weakness, fear of fall, and improve heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, insulin sensitivity, physical functions, mobility, flexibility, and urinary incontinence), mental (reduces depression, anxiety), emotional (reduces anger, stress, tension and improve self-efficacy), social (improve life satisfaction), and vital (improved vitality) planes of elderly persons with better quality of sleep and quality of life.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.004
       
  • Biological effects of direct and indirect manipulation of the fascial
           system. Narrative review
    • Authors: Giovanni Parravicini; Andrea Bergna
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Giovanni Parravicini, Andrea Bergna
      Introduction Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) is effective in improving function, movement and restoring pain conditions. Despite clinical results, the mechanisms of how OMT works remain unclear. The fascial system is described as a tensional network that envelops the human body. Direct or indirect manipulations of the fascial system are a distinctive part of OMT. Objective This review describes the biological effects of direct and indirect manipulation of the fascial system. Material and methods Literature search was performed in February 2016 in the electronic databases: Cochrane, Medline, Scopus, Ostmed, Pedro and authors’ publications relative to Fascia Research Congress Website. Results Manipulation of the fascial system seems to interfere with some cellular processes providing various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules. Discussion Despite growing research in the osteopathic field, biological effects of direct or indirect manipulation of the fascial system are not conclusive. Conclusion To elevate manual medicine as a primary intervention in clinical settings, it’s necessary to clarify how OMT modalities work in order to underpin their clinical efficacies.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.005
       
  • Procedures of assessment on the quantification of thoracic kyphosis and
           lumbar lordosis by radiography and photogrammetry: a literature review
    • Authors: Alessandra Beggiato Porto; Victor Hugo Alves Okazaki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Alessandra Beggiato Porto, Victor Hugo Alves Okazaki
      The quantification of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis can be assessed in different ways; among them radiography and photogrammetry. However, the assessment procedures are not consistent in the literature for either method. The objective of this study was to conduct a literature review about postural assessment through radiography and photogrammetry, for delineating the procedures for both methods. In total 38 studies were selected by an online search in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases with the keywords: radiograph and posture, postural alignment, photogrammetry or photometry or biophotogrammetry. For the radiographic method, the results showed divergences in arm positioning and in the calculation of thoracic and lumbar angles. The photogrammetry demonstrated differences in relation to the camera, tripod, plumb line and feet positioning, angle calculation, software utilization, and the use of footwear. Standardization is proposed for both methods to help establish normative values and comparisons between diagnoses.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.008
       
  • IMPACT OF PHYSICAL GROWTH, BODY ADIPOSITY AND LIFESTYLE ON MUSCULAR
           STRENGTH AND CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS OF ADOLESCENTS
    • Authors: Diego Augusto Santos Silva; Priscila Custódio Martins
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Diego Augusto Santos Silva, Priscila Custódio Martins
      Objective To investigate the impact of physical growth, body adiposity and lifestyle on cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength of pubescent and post-pubescent adolescents. Methods Cross-sectional study with 1,132 adolescents (14-19 years) in Brazil. Aerobic fitness was measured using the modified Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test. Muscle strength was assessed using manual dynamometer. Maturational stages were defined through the Tanner criteria. Results Boys at pubertal maturation stage showed higher VO2max values than those at the post-pubertal stage when the influence of body adiposity and lifestyle was disregarded. Girls at pubertal maturation stage showed higher VO2max values than those in the post-pubertal stage when the influence of age was disregarded. For muscle strength, no significant differences were found. Conclusions The variables that influence the association between VO2max and maturational stage are different for boys and girls.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.007
       
  • PILATES INCREASES THE ISOKINETIC MUSCULAR STRENGTH OF THE KNEE EXTENSORS
           AND FLEXORS IN ELDERLY WOMEN
    • Authors: Laís Campos de Oliveira; Raphael Gonçalves de Oliveira; Deise Aparecida de Almeida Pires-Oliveira
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Laís Campos de Oliveira, Raphael Gonçalves de Oliveira, Deise Aparecida de Almeida Pires-Oliveira
      Introduction Pilates has been shown to be effective for increasing muscle strength in older adults, however, some variables have not yet been explored. Objective Investigate the effects of Pilates on the isokinetic muscular strength of the knee extensors and flexors at 60º/s, in elderly women. Method Thirty-two women were randomized into two groups: control group (CG, n = 16, age = 64.2 ± 0.8 years; BMI = 25.0 ± 1.2 Kg/m2), and experimental group (EG, n = 16, age = 63.6 ± 1.0 years, BMI = 24.7 ± 1.3 Kg/m2). Isokinetic evaluation of the knee extensor and flexor muscles was performed at 60°/s, pre- and post-intervention, considering the peak torque (N.m) and total work (J) for the right and left lower limbs. The CG participated in static stretching and the EG in Pilates sessions, twice a week for 12 weeks. Results The results demonstrated that the EG presented a significant improvement (p < 0.01) in all tests performed, when comparing the pre- and post-intervention (intragroup), with an effect size (Cohen's d) reaching 2.03 and 1.33 for the knee flexor and extensor muscles respectively. Comparing the CG and EG (intergroup), post-intervention, a significant improvement was observed (p ≤ 0.01) in favor of the EG for all variables, with an effect size (Cohen's d) reaching 1.59 and 1.15 for the knee flexor and extensor muscles respectively. Conclusion The results indicated that 12 weeks of Pilates increases the isokinetic muscular strength of the knee extensors and flexors in elderly women and can be considered for this purpose when prescribing physical exercise programs.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.006
       
  • Comparison of acute effects of superficial and deep dry needling into
           trigger points of suboccipital and upper trapezius muscles in patients
           with cervicogenic headache
    • Authors: Asefeh Sedighi; Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari; Soofia Naghdi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Asefeh Sedighi, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Soofia Naghdi
      Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of superficial and deep dry needling into trigger points of suboccipital and upper trapezius muscles in patients with cervicogenic headache. Methods Thirty participants (8 men, 22 women) aged 19 to 60 years (mean age ± SD, 39 ± 10 y) with a clinical diagnosis of cervicogenic headache were randomly divided into superficial and deep groups. Headache index, trigger points tenderness, cervical range of motion (CROM), functional rating index was assessed at baseline, immediate and 1 week after the treatment. Results Two approaches of dry needling showed reduction in headache index and trigger points tenderness. Deep dry needling showed greater improvement of cervical range of motion (p < .001) and functional rating index (p < .01). Conclusion The application of dry needling into trigger points of suboccipital and upper trapezius muscles induces significant improvement of headache index, trigger points tenderness, functional rating index and range of motion in patients with cervicogenic headache. Deep dry needling had greater effects on CROM and function.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.002
       
  • The effects of preventive rubber band training on shoulder joint imbalance
           and throwing performance in handball players: a randomized and prospective
           study
    • Authors: Naryana Cristina Mascarin; Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira; Rodrigo Luiz Vancini; Antonio Carlos da Silva; Marilia Santos Andrade
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Naryana Cristina Mascarin, Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira, Rodrigo Luiz Vancini, Antonio Carlos da Silva, Marilia Santos Andrade
      Objectives To investigate the effects of a strength training program (STP) using rubber band exercises. Methods Twenty-five athletes were divided into two groups: muscular imbalance in the dominant (D) and in the non-dominant (ND) upper limbs. Each group was subdivided into experimental and control groups. Experimental groups performed eighteen sessions of STP. Athletes were submitted to ball throwing and isokinetic strength tests to assess the muscular strength of the shoulder rotator muscles and conventional and functional balance ratios. Results STP improved external rotator peak torque (18.0±0.8 to 21.3±1.0Nm, p<0.01) and total work (29.3±0.9 to 34.5±1.5J, p<0.01) in the D experimental group, while only total work (34.8±2.5 to 37.6±3.1J, p<0.03) improved in the D control group. The ND experimental group also presented significant improvement in external rotator peak torque (18.8±0.8 to 21.1±1.3Nm, p<0.01) and total work values (29.0±1.4 to 34.6 to 1.6J, p<0.01) while there was no strength improvement in the ND control group. The ND experimental group showed an improvement in conventional (61.5±3.5 to 72.7±3.0%, p=0.03) and functional (1.0±0.1 to 1.6±0.08, p<0.01) ratios. STP did not improve the conventional ratio in the D experimental group. However, STP produced a large effect size. The D experimental group presented an improvement in ball velocity (49.0±2.4 to 52.5±2.2km/h, p=0.04) in standing position throwing. Conclusions STP improves muscular strength of external rotator muscles and muscular balance.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.003
       
  • Effect of ischemic compression for cervicogenic headache and elastic
           behavior of active trigger point in the sternocleidomastoid muscle using
           ultrasound imaging
    • Authors: Mehdi Jafari; Farid Bahrpeyma; Mansoureh Togha
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mehdi Jafari, Farid Bahrpeyma, Mansoureh Togha
      Objectives To investigate the effect of ischemic compression on clinical outcomes of a cervicogenic headache and elastic behavior of myofascial trigger points. Design Randomized, controlled trial was undertaken. Setting Outpatient headache clinic. Subjects 19 subjects with a cervicogenic headache originating from myofascial trigger point within the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Interventions Subjects were randomized in treatment group (n = 9) and control group (n = 10). Subjects in the treatment group received 4 sessions of ischemic compression in the myofascial trigger point region. Main measures Headache intensity, frequency, and duration, trigger point elastic modulus, trigger point area, pressure tolerance, and pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after treatment. Results Subjects in the treatment group compared with those in control group showed significant improvements in headache intensity (P = 0.002), headache frequency (P = 0.005), headache duration (P = 0.015), pressure tolerance (P < 0.001), pressure pain threshold (P = 0.039), and myofascial trigger point area (P = 0.017). Changes in myofascial trigger point elastic modulus did not reach a significant level (P > 0.05). Conclusion The improvements in outcome measures suggest that ischemic compression may be effective in subjects with a cervicogenic headache originating from a myofascial trigger point in the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Data suggest that biomechanical properties of MTrP and severity of headache symptoms are not directly linked, and other mechanisms could be more influential in contributing to symptoms.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.001
       
  • Change and continuity at JBMT
    • Authors: Leon Chaitow
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow


      PubDate: 2016-11-25T15:22:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.009
       
 
 
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