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Journal Cover   Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
  [SJR: 0.522]   [H-I: 23]   [16 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2586 journals]
  • Cognitive Function and Exercise Training for Chronic Renal Disease
           Patients: A Literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): A. Kaltsatou , S.S. Grigoriou , C. Karatzaferi , C.D. Giannaki , I. Stefanidis , G.K. Sakkas
      Objective Cognitive impairment is very often in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Even though, exercise is considered to be a quantifiable activity that improves cognition in animals and humans, it seems that only few studies have examined the relationship between cognitive function and CKD from the perspective of physical activity and cognitive performance. Thus, this evidence based review summarizes the present level of knowledge regarding the effects of exercise training on cognitive function in CKD patients. Data sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted in PubMed and Scopus from May 2014 through June 2014, by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. Review Methods Eligibility of the studies based on titles, abstracts and full-text articles was determined by two reviewers. Studies were selected using inclusion and exclusion criteria. We included only those studies that: they assessed cognitive function in humans and animals using validated neuropsychological methods in chronic renal diseases patients; they used exercise training protocols; they addressed randomized control trials or controlled trials or clinical trials designed to evaluate cognitive impairment; and articles were written in English. Studies were excluded when they concerned behavioral approaches and underpowered studies. Results According to the current review only few studies have examined the issue of cognitive function in CKD patients. These studies indicate that these patients often exhibit cognitive impairment, which is highly associated with poor outcomes. It has been supported that exercise training can induce positive changes in brain metabolism favoring better score in cognitive function in Chronic Kidney Disease patients while the physiological mechanisms, which explain the influence of physical activity on cognition, have focused on changes in neurotransmitters, neurotrophins and vasculature. Conclusion Systematic exercise training seems to improve cognitive function in Chronic Kidney Disease patients but further research is warranted to further clarify the mechanisms involved.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T07:19:49Z
       
  • Common postural defects among music students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Patricia Blanco , MPino-Díaz Pereira , Aurora Martínez
      Postural quality during musical performance affects both musculoskeletal health and the quality of the performance. In this study we examined the posture of 100 students at a Higher Conservatory of Music in Spain. By analysing video tapes and photographs of the students while performing, a panel of experts extracted values of 11 variables reflecting aspects of overall postural quality or the postural quality of various parts of the body. The most common postural defects were identified, together with the situations in which they occur. It is concluded that most students incur in unphysiological postures during performance. It is hoped that use of the results of this study will help correct these errors.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T07:19:49Z
       
  • Bracing and exercise-based treatment for idiopathic scoliosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leonid Kalichman , Liron Kendelker , Tomer Bezalel
      Background Various conservative therapies are available for treating adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), however, the disparities between them and the evidence of their efficacy and effectiveness is still unclear. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of different conservative treatments on AIS. Methods A literature-based narrative review of the English language medical literature. Results and Conclusions The most appropriate treatment for each patient should be chosen individually and based on various parameters. Bracing has been found to be a most effective conservative treatment for AIS. There is limited evidence that specific physical exercises also an effective intervention for AIS. Exercise-based physical therapy, if correctly administered, can prevent a worsening of the curve and may decrease need for bracing. In addition, physical exercises were found to be the only treatment improving respiratory function. Combining bracing with exercise increases treatment efficacy compared with a single treatment. Additional, well-designed and good quality studies are required to assess the effectiveness of different conservative methods in treating AIS.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T07:19:49Z
       
  • Influence of kinesio tape application direction on peak force of biceps
           brachii muscle: a repeated measurement study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Elisha Vered , Liron Oved , Daniel Zilberg , Leonid Kalichman
      Background According to the kinesio tape (KT) method, proximal-to-distal (P-to-D) application of KT should facilitate muscle activity (increase strength), distal-to- proximal (D-to-P) should decrease muscle activity (decrease strength) and applications in other directions should not influence muscle strength. Objective To evaluate the influence of KT application direction on peak force of biceps brachii in healthy subjects. Methods 16 students participated in a single group repeated measurements study. KT was applied randomly on both anterior arms as follows: no KT; P-to-D; D-to-P; or two horizontal stripes. Peak force of biceps was measured after each application by a blinded investigator. Results No difference in biceps peak force was found after evaluating no KT, P-to-D and D-to-P. After the horizontal application, peak force was found statistically significantly higher than in the other conditions. Conclusions Traditional assumptions of the KT method, suggesting that P-to-D application stimulates muscle and D-to-P relaxes the muscle, seem to be false. However, we do confirm that applying KT in various directions differently effects muscle strength.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T07:19:49Z
       
  • Fascial eponyms may help elucidate terminological and nomenclatural
           development
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sue Adstrum
      It has been reported that at least 700 anatomical eponyms were in existence at the end of the 19th century, yet the number of eponyms expressly relating to fasciae is unknown, and these anatomical expressions have yet to be described as a group. This study accordingly aimed to assemble a comprehensive-as-possible list of these terms, to investigate their customary usage, and to consider whether their existence might usefully shed light on contemporary fascia-relating terminological development. A search for fascia-relating eponyms incorporated within a range of English language anatomical and medical publications during the past 400 years resulted in the discovery of 44 eponyms that explicitly refer to aspects of fascia. This article outlines and discusses the origin, meaning, and use of these terms, and concludes that an understanding of the history of fascial eponyms may be of value when addressing contemporary concerns with the language used to describe fascia.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T07:19:49Z
       
  • Can osteopathic manipulative treatment modify the posture in elderly
           people' – A single-case study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): F. Pellerin , P. Guihéneuc , G. Guihard
      In this research, we have studied the consequences of three consecutive osteopathic manipulative sessions (OMS) on postural control by using a single-case research (SCR) design. The patient was a 77 years old woman complaining of altered balance and low-back pain. OMS were delivered by a single practitioner. The pain level was self-rated by using a visual Borg scale. The posture was monitored on a force platform. Postural parameters were deduced from the analysis of the centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacement. The statistical significance of the observed differences was established by using an SCR-related effect size indicator (i.e. Taunovlap). Our results indicate that OMS decrease the patient's pain, modify CoP mean position and decreased the length and velocity of the CoP displacement. Furthermore, modifications of the body oscillations were observed after OMS. This work indicates that OMS can improve body balance and that SCR allows the objective evaluation of the consequences of OMS.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Muscle strengthening activities and fibromyalgia: A review of pain and
           strength outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Nicole L. Nelson
      Objective The primary aim of this review was to investigate whether fibromyalgia (FM) patients can engage in sufficient muscle strengthening activity (MSA) to elicit positive strength and functional outcomes, while not exacerbating pain. The second aim was to report strength training recommendations based upon the findings of this review. Methods Studies published between January 1, 2000 and May 1, 2014 were located using the electronic databases CINHAL, PubMed and Google Scholar. Studies were included if a strength training component (e.g. resistance machines, bodyweight, exercise tubing, dumbbells) was part of the intervention, and if the investigation reported pain and/or strength outcomes. A total of eleven comparative controlled trials were included in this review. Results The majority of the studies demonstrated encouraging increases in strength, along with significant reductions in pain. Conclusions MSA can be a safe and effective mode of exercise for FM patients, particularly when progressed from low intensities.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • One repetition maximum bench press performance: A new approach for its
           evaluation in inexperienced males and females: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Antonino Bianco , Davide Filingeri , Antonio Paoli , Antonio Palma
      The aim of this study was to evaluate a new method to perform the one repetition maximum (1RM) bench press test, by combining previously validated predictive and practical procedures. Eight young male and 7 females participants, with no previous experience of resistance training, performed a first set of repetitions to fatigue (RTF) with a workload corresponding to ⅓ of their body mass (BM) for a maximum of 25 repetitions. Following a 5-min recovery period, a second set of RTF was performed with a workload corresponding to ½ of participants' BM. The number of repetitions performed in this set was then used to predict the workload to be used for the 1RM bench press test using Mayhew's equation. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and blood lactate were monitored before, during and after each 1RM attempt. A significant effect of gender was found on the maximum number of repetitions achieved during the RTF set performed with ½ of participants' BM (males: 25.0 ± 6.3; females: 11.0x± 10.6; t = 6.2; p < 0.001). The 1RM attempt performed with the workload predicted by Mayhew's equation resulted in females performing 1.2 ± 0.7 repetitions, while males performed 4.8 ± 1.9 repetitions. All participants reached their 1RM performance within 3 attempts, thus resulting in a maximum of 5 sets required to successfully perform the 1RM bench press test. We conclude that, by combining previously validated predictive equations with practical procedures (i.e. using a fraction of participants' BM to determine the workload for an RTF set), the new method we tested appeared safe, accurate (particularly in females) and time-effective in the practical evaluation of 1RM performance in inexperienced individuals.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Comparative analysis of ultrasound changes in the vastus lateralis muscle
           following myofascial release and thermotherapy: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Kazuna Ichikawa , Hitoshi Takei , Hideyuki Usa , Shoh Mitomo , Daisuke Ogawa
      Objectives This study aimed to compare the effects of myofascial release (MFR) and hot pack therapy (HPT) on fascial gliding and flexibility of the vastus lateralis muscle. Methods Three treatments were applied to the left vastus lateralis muscles of each participant (12 healthy males): MFR for 4 min, superficial HPT for 10 min, and superficial HPT for 20 min. Deep fascial motion was measured by B-mode ultrasound, whereas muscle stiffness was measured by real-time elastography (RTE) and a durometer before and after the interventions. Results Only MFR resulted in changes in both deep fascial motion and muscle stiffness measured by RTE. Durometer-measured muscle stiffness revealed changes following both MFR and 20-min HPT but not 10-min HPT. Conclusions HPT may produce only superficial effects. Because MFR improved all measured parameters, continuous stretching and pressure are probably important for improving fascial gliding and flexibility of the vastus lateralis muscle.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Rethinking design parameters in the search for optimal dynamic seating
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Jennifer Pynt
      Dynamic seating design purports to lessen damage incurred during sedentary occupations by increasing sitter movement while modifying muscle activity. Dynamic sitting is currently defined by O'Sullivan et al. ( 2013a) as relating to ‘the increased motion in sitting which is facilitated by the use of specific chairs or equipment’ (p. 628). Yet the evidence is conflicting that dynamic seating creates variation in the sitter's lumbar posture or muscle activity with the overall consensus being that current dynamic seating design fails to fulfill its goals. Research is needed to determine if a new generation of chairs requiring active sitter involvement fulfills the goals of dynamic seating and aids cardio/metabolic health. This paper summarises the pursuit of knowledge regarding optimal seated spinal posture and seating design. Four new forms of dynamic seating encouraging active sitting are discussed. These are 1) The Core-flex with a split seatpan to facilitate a walking action while seated 2) the Duo balans requiring body action to create rocking 3) the Back App and 4) Locus pedestal stools both using the sitter's legs to drive movement. Unsubstantiated claims made by the designers of these new forms of dynamic seating are outlined. Avenues of research are suggested to validate designer claims and investigate whether these designs fulfill the goals of dynamic seating and assist cardio/metabolic health. Should these claims be efficacious then a new definition of dynamic sitting is suggested; ‘Sitting in which the action is provided by the sitter, while the dynamic mechanism of the chair accommodates that action’.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Exercise mode heterogeneity among reported studies of the qigong practice
           Baduanjin
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Kevin Antonishen
      There has not been a uniform method for the practice of Baduanjin, and most published research reports involving this set of traditional Chinese exercise have provided incomplete descriptions of the movements used for those studies. This paper reviews elements of past research methodologies of Baduanjin intervention studies and provides considerations for future research. Ambiguities and inconsistencies in the descriptions of the movements, along with some implications which arise from this are discussed.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • The relationship between isokinetic muscle strength and spasticity in the
           lower limbs of stroke patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): I. Abdollahi , A. Taghizadeh , H. Shakeri , M. Eivazi , S. Jaberzadeh
      Objective In this study the relationship between degree of spasticity and strength of knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscles of post stroke hemiparetic patients has been investigated. Materials & methods The participants of this study were 40 stroke patients whose elapsed time of stroke onset was at least 3 months. Their age averaged 59 years. Spasticity was measured with the Modified Ashworth Scale. Isokinetic muscle strength was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer. Two methods of torque normalization – subtractive and weight based normalization – were used for comparing torques among participants. Results Kendall's tau-b coefficient was calculated for investigating this relationship. This coefficient was not significant for the relationship between weight based normalized data and modified Ashworth scale (MAS) in any of each muscle groups (α = 0.05). This coefficient was significant for the relationship between the subtractive normalization method and MAS in knee extensors (P = 0.005, α = 0.01) and ankle plantar flexors (P = 0.002, α = 0.01). Conclusion This study suggests a negative relationship between spasticity and muscle strength and provided evidence that spastic muscles are weaker.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Abdominal muscle strength is related to the quality of life among older
           adults with lumbar osteoarthritis
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Suenimeire Vieira , Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Hugo Evangelista Brandino , Vânia Tie Koga Ferreira , Marcos Eduardo Scheicher
      The aim of the present study was to determine the association between abdominal muscle strength and quality of life among older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis. A blind, cross-sectional study was conducted involving 40 older adults: 20 with lumbar osteoarthritis (12 women and 8 men, mean age of 65.90 ± 4.80 years) and 20 controls (14 women and 6 men, mean age of 67.90 ± 4.60 years). The volunteers were submitted to an abdominal muscle strength test. Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire. Both abdominal muscle strength and quality of life scores were significantly lower in the group with lumbar osteoarthritis in comparison to the controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, significant and positive associations were found between abdominal muscle strength and the subscales of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.05, 0.421 ≥ rs ≤ 0.694). Based on the present findings, older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis with greater abdominal muscle strength have a better quality of life.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Massage therapy effects in a long-term prosthetic user with fibular
           hemimelia
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Erika Rae Larson
      Background Individuals with lower limb amputation (LLA) commonly experience low back pain (LBP). Although massage effects on LBP are well-documented, research regarding massage for individuals with LLA is scarce. Objectives This study evaluated the effectiveness of massage therapy to promote activity level, decrease LBP, and improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a long-term prosthetic user. Methods The 50-day study consisted of two baseline sessions, seven treatment sessions that included a 50-min massage applied to major gait muscles, and two follow-up sessions. Pedometer-measured ambulatory activity level, visual analog scale-measured pain level, and RAND-36 Health Survey 1.0-determined HRQOL were assessed. Results Pain level decreased, HRQOL increased, and no change occurred in ambulatory activity level. Conclusion For the participant, therapeutic massage intervention lead to successful LBP symptom management.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • The effects of acute bout of cycling on auditory &amp; visual reaction
           times
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Zinat Ashnagar , Azadeh Shadmehr , Shohreh Jalaei
      Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an acute bout of cycling exercise on auditory choice reaction time, visual choice reaction time, auditory complex choice reaction time and visual complex choice reaction time. Methods 29 subjects were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. The subjects of the experimental group carried out a single bout of submaximal cycling exercise. The auditory choice reaction time, visual choice reaction time, auditory complex choice reaction time and visual complex choice reaction times were measured before and after the exercise session. The reaction time tests were taken from the subjects by using Speed Anticipation and Reaction Tester (SART) software. In the control group, the reaction time tests were performed by the subjects with an interval of 30 min. Results In the experimental group, the percentage changes of mean auditory choice and complex choice reaction time values were significantly decreased in comparison with the control group (P < 0.05). Although the visual choice and complex choice reaction times were decreased after the exercise, the changes were not significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion An acute bout of cycling exercise improved the speed of auditory and visual reaction times in healthy young females. However, these positive changes were significantly observed only in the auditory reaction time tests in comparison with the control group.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Predictor variables for forward scapular posture including posterior
           shoulder tightness
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Ji-Hyun Lee , Heon-seock Cynn , Chung-Hwi Yi , Oh-yun Kwon , Tae-Lim Yoon
      The purpose of this study was (1) to determine the relationships between the degree of forward scapular posture and the pectoralis minor index, the strength of the serratus anterior, the thoracic spine angle, and posterior shoulder tightness, and (2) to identify predictors of forward scapular posture, including posterior shoulder tightness. The study recruited eighteen subjects with forward scapular posture and objectively measured the acromion distance, the pectoralis minor index, and the strength of the serratus anterior muscle of each participant. The amount of glenohumeral horizontal adduction and internal rotation were evaluated to measure posterior shoulder tightness. There were high intra-rater reliabilities in all measurements. The measurement results showed a statistically strong negative correlation between the degree of forward scapular posture and the pectoralis minor index. They also revealed a moderate positive correlation between the degree of forward scapular posture and the thoracic spine angle and a moderate negative relationship between the degree of forward scapular posture and the amount of the glenohumeral horizontal adduction. A multiple regression analysis indicated that a total multiple regression model explained 93% of the amount of forward scapular posture. All predictor variables, including posterior shoulder tightness, should be considered while assessing, managing, and preventing forward scapular posture.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Preventive and therapeutic effect of treadmill running on chronic
           stress-induced memory deficit in rats
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Maryam Radahmadi , Hojjatallah Alaei , Mohammad Reza Sharifi , Nasrin Hosseini
      Previous results indicated that stress impairs learning and memory. In this research, the effects of preventive, therapeutic and regular continually running activity on chronic stress-induced memory deficit in rats were investigated. 70 male rats were randomly divided into seven groups as follows: Control, Sham, Stress–Rest, Rest–Stress, Stress–Exercise, Exercise–Stress and Exercise–Stress & Exercise groups. Chronic restraint stress was applied 6 h/day for 21days and treadmill running 1 h/day. Memory function was evaluated by the passive avoidance test. The results revealed that running activities had therapeutic effect on mid and long-term memory deficit and preventive effects on short and mid-term memory deficit in stressed rats. Regular continually running activity improved mid and long-term memory compared to Exercise–Stress group. The beneficial effects of exercise were time-dependent in stress conditions. Finally, data corresponded to the possibility that treadmill running had a more important role on treatment rather than on prevention on memory impairment induced by stress.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Thai traditional massage: Efficiency-assessment of three traditional
           massage methods on office workers: An explorative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Pongjan Yoopat , Christophe Maes , Stefaan Poriau , Kamiel Vanwonterghem
      Thai Traditional Massage (TTM) is popular and widely spread in Thailand. This project is aimed at studying the physiological efficiency of three popular TTM methods based on acupressure Meridian basal lines: the Sen Sib(SS) ten lines, Ratchsamnak (RS), Royal style; and Chaloeysak (CS), Folk style. Thirty healthy female administrative employees participated as patients. All were treated for 30 min with the 3 types of massage with a two-week interval between each treatment. Muscle strain was objectified by measuring strength and endurance with surface electromyography of muscle put under stress during office work: the M. Trapezius (static postural load) and the wrist muscles (M. flexors & extensors Carpi-Radialis) (dynamic contractions) as well as measuring the subjective Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) before and after the sessions. An ANOVA-statistical analysis showed that strength in shoulders was not significantly different, but some forearm fatigue was decreased significantly among the three massage techniques.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • The immediate and 24-hour follow-up effect of unilateral lumbar
           Z-joint mobilisation on posterior chain neurodynamics
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): G. Shankar Ganesh , Patitapaban Mohanty , Swati Smita Pattnaik
      Few studies have reported the effects of lumbar spine mobilization on neurodynamics. In a recent study, Szlezak et al. (2011) reported immediate improvement of posterior chain neurodynamics [range of passive straight leg raise (SLR)] following ipsilateral lumbar spine zygopophyseal (Z) joint mobilization. We re-duplicated the study with a 24 h follow-up measurement. Sixty healthy college students were assigned to two groups, mobilization and control. The mobilization group received ipsilateral grade 3 Maitland mobilizations to Z joint at a frequency of 2 MHz for 3 min and the control group received no treatment. The SLR was measured before and after the intervention for both the groups on the day of testing and 24-h later. Repeated measures ANOVA showed statistically significant pre to post improvement in SLR range after mobilization. The improvement was retained at 24-h. The results of the study are consistent with Szlezak et al. (2011).


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Improvement of clinical and radiographical presentation of Scheuermann
           disease after Schroth therapy treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Tomer Bezalel , Leonid Kalichman
      Background Scheuermann's disease is the most common cause of hyperkyphosis of the thoracolumbar spine. Few case reports have demonstrated the effectiveness of Schroth therapy in improving the thoracic angle curve in Scheuermann's patients; however, additional verification is needed. Case description A 14-year-old female patient presented with Scheuermann's disease. On X-ray, thoracic kyphosis was 55° and lumbar lordosis 55°. The self-rated cosmetic disturbance was graded 10/10 on a verbal numeric scale. The patient received a course of seven weekly Schroth therapy sessions, in addition to daily home exercises tailored specifically for the patient's posture. Five months later, follow-up X-rays revealed thoracic kyphosis of 27° and lumbar lordosis 35°. The patient graded the degree of her cosmetic disturbance as 3/10. Conclusions Schroth therapy seems to be able to decrease the thoracic curve angle of Scheuermann's patients; however, efficacy and effectiveness of this method should be investigated in future prospective controlled clinical trials.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Prevalence and correlates of pain interference in older adults: Why
           treating the whole body and mind is necessary
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Peter Przekop , Mark G. Haviland , Keiji Oda , Kelly R. Morton
      Our study presents pain-related interference rates in a sample of community-dwelling, older adults and determines factors associated with these restrictions. Participants were 9506 respondents to the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study (66.8% female and 33.2% male; average age = 62.3 years). In this sample, 48.2% reported no pain-related interference, whereas 37.7% reported moderate and 14.1% reported severe interference. As hypothesized, older age, female gender, lower education, financial strain, traumatic experiences, worse health, increased body mass index, poor sleep, and depressive symptoms all were associated with higher pain interference ratings (ordered logistic regression/three-level pain criterion; odds ratios p < 0.05). Our findings are similar to those from younger adults, and they suggest enduring effects of trauma on health and reveal the complexity of chronic pain in community-dwelling, older adults.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Cervical extensor endurance test: A reliability study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Deepak Sebastian , Raghu Chovvath , Ramesh Malladi
      Background & purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the inter-rater reliability in detecting the presence of weakness of the neck extensors and differentiate the presence of weakness of the superficial versus the deep neck extensors in a symptomatic population. The presence of weakness of the neck extensors has been described to cause pain and dysfunction in the cervical region. Methods 30 patients with a diagnosis of neck pain were randomly assigned and examined by two musculoskeletal physical therapists at a time, in order to determine the presence of weakness of the superficial versus the deep neck extensors. With the patient lying prone and head and neck past the edge of the table and the cervico-thoracic junction stabilized, the ability of the individual to sustain a chin tuck position in neutral for 20 s was evaluated. A positive finding for weakness of the deep neck extensors is the ‘chin length’ increasing with neck extension, as observed on the inclinometer, indicating a dominance of the superficial extensors of the neck. Weakness of both deep and superficial neck extensors was identified by the presence of neck flexion indicating an inability to hold the head up. Inter-rater reliability was determined using the Cohen's un-weighted kappa statistic. Results For the cervical extensor endurance test, the inter-rater reliability was ‘very good’ (k = 0.800, SE of kappa = 0.109, 95% CI). Conclusion The cervical extensor endurance test may be incorporated as a simple yet effective test to determine the presence of weakness of the neck extensors and differentiate the presence of weakness of the superficial versus the deep neck extensors in a symptomatic population. The accuracy of the CEET as a test is still debatable, as it has not been compared to a diagnostic gold standard. Based on the results of this study, we speculate the CEET may still offer an initial sense of direction for clinicians treating neck dysfunction.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Effectiveness of neural mobilization in patients with spinal
           radiculopathy: A critical review
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 2
      Author(s): Michalis A. Efstathiou , Manos Stefanakis , Christos Savva , Giannis Giakas
      Spinal radiculopathy (SR) is a multifactorial nerve root injury that can result in significant pain, psychological stress and disability. It can occur at any level of the spinal column with the highest percentage in the lumbar spine. Amongst the various interventions that have been suggested, neural mobilization (NM) has been advocated as an effective treatment option. The purpose of this review is to (1) examine pathophysiological aspects of spinal roots and peripheral nerves, (2) analyze the proposed mechanisms of NM as treatment of injured nerve tissues and (3) critically review the existing research evidence for the efficacy of NM in patients with lumbar or cervical radiculopathy.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Correlation between neck slope angle and deep cervical flexor muscle
           thickness in healthy participants
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hiroshi Ishida , Tadanobu Suehiro , Chiharu Kurozumi , Koji Ono , Suguru Ando , Susumu Watanabe
      The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between neck slope angle and deep cervical flexor muscle thickness in healthy subjects. Forty-two healthy male (20.7 ± 2.6 years old) participated in this study. Neck slope angle was measured in a relaxed sitting posture. The deep cervical flexor muscle thickness was measured in a relaxed supine posture. The correlations between neck slope angle and normalized muscle thickness relative to body mass index were determined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. There was a moderate positive correlation between neck slope angle and normalized muscle thickness (r = 0.414, P = 0.006). The result demonstrated that participants with lower neck slope angles had smaller muscle thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor muscles. It appears that the deep cervical flexor muscle thickness might be associated with neck slope angle in a relaxed sitting posture.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T06:41:45Z
       
  • Pilot Study of the Effects of Mixed Light Touch Manual Therapies on Active
           Duty Soldiers with Chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Injury to
           the Head
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Lauren Davis , Brenda Hanson , Sara Gilliam
      This pilot study was designed to examine the effects of mixed Light Touch Manual Therapies (LTMT) on headache, anxiety and other symptoms suffered by active duty United States service members experiencing chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Ten service members diagnosed with PTSD and having a self-reported injury to the head acquired at least two years prior, were provided with two hour-long sessions of mixed LTMT given a week apart. Data to assess the immediate and durable effects were gathered before and after the LTMT sessions. Results indicate that headache, anxiety, and pain interference were significantly reduced during the course of the pilot study. This suggests that mixed LTMT may be helpful in reducing some of the symptoms of PTSD and injury to the head. Further studies will be needed to determine if LTMT is an effective non-pharmacological treatment for headache, anxiety or other problems associated with PTSD or injury to the head.


      PubDate: 2015-04-04T22:51:04Z
       
  • Prevalence and characteristics of women who consult with osteopathic
           practitioners during pregnancy; a report from the Australian Longitudinal
           Study on Women’s health (ALSWH)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jane Frawley , Tobias Sundberg , Amie Steel , David Sibbritt , Alex Broom , Jon Adams
      Background/aim The use of complementary medicine (CM) is common during pregnancy with visits to osteopathic practitioners growing in recent years. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of women who consult osteopathic practitioners during pregnancy. Method The study sample was obtained via the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH). The women answered questions about consultations with osteopathic practitioners, pregnancy-related health concerns and attitudes to CM use. Results A total response rate of 79.2% (1,835) was obtained. Of these, 104 women (6.1%) consulted with an osteopath during pregnancy for a pregnancy-related health condition. Women were more likely to consult an osteopath if they suffered from back pain, sadness, weight management issues, or had a history of retained placenta. Conclusion Women are visiting osteopaths for help with common pregnancy health complaints, highlighting the need for research to evaluate the safety, clinical and cost effectiveness of osteopathy in pregnancy.


      PubDate: 2015-04-04T22:51:04Z
       
  • Effects of Pilates Method in Elderly People: Systematic Review of
           randomized controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Cristina de Oliveira Francisco , Alessandra Fagundes , Bruna Gorges
      The Pilates method has been widely used in physical training and rehabilitation. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of this method in elderly people is limited. Six randomized controlled trials studies involving the use of the Pilates method for elderly people, published prior to December 2013, were selected from the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, Scielo and PEDro. Three articles suggested that Pilates produced improvements in balance. Two studies evaluated the adherence to Pilates programs. One study assessed Pilates’ influence on cardio-metabolic parameters and another study evaluated changes in body composition. Strong evidence was found regarding beneficial effects of Pilates over static and dynamic balance in women. Nevertheless, evidence of balance improvement in both genders, changes in body composition in woman and adherence to Pilates programs were limited. Effects on cardio-metabolic parameters due to Pilates training presented inconclusive results. Pilates may be a useful tool in rehabilitation and prevention programs but more high quality studies are necessary to establish all the effects on elderly populations.


      PubDate: 2015-04-04T22:51:04Z
       
  • Transcranial direct current stimulation combined with integrative speech
           therapy in a child with cerebral palsy: A case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Vania L.C. Carvalho Lima , Luanda A. Collange Grecco , Valéria C. Marques , Felipe Fregni , Clara R. Brandão de Ávila
      The aim of this study was to describe the results of the first case combining integrative speech therapy with anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over Broca’s area in a child with cerebral palsy. The ABFW phonology test was used to analyze speech based on the Percentage of Correct Consonants (PCC) and Percentage of Correct Consonants - Revised (PCC-R). After treatment, increases were found in both PCC (Imitation: 53.63% to 78.10%; Nomination: 53.19% to 70.21%) and PPC-R (Imitation: 64.54% to 83.63%; Nomination: 61.70% to 77.65%). Moreover, reductions occurred in distortions, substitutions and improvement was found in oral performance, especially tongue mobility (AMIOFE-mobility before=4 after=7). The child demonstrated a clinically important improvement in speech fluency as shown in results of imitation number of correct consonants and phonemes acquire. Based on these promising findings, continuing research in this field should be conducted with controlled clinical trials.


      PubDate: 2015-04-04T22:51:04Z
       
  • Equilibrium in women with osteoporosis submitted to balance training with
           and without an oscillating vibratory pole
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Juliana Rodrigues Soares Ruzene , Mary Hellen Morcelli , Marcelo Tavella Navega
      Objectives An eight-week balance training program, with and without oscillation of vibratory pole, was shown to have a medium-term persistence effect on the performance of elderly physically-active women with osteoporosis. Methods The 29 women who completed the study were randomly separated into two groups: an Oscillating Pole Group (OPG; 69.6±5.8 years; n=14) and a Non-Oscillating Pole Group (NPG; 70.9±7.4 years; n=15). The improvement in equilibrium was evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale before training, after training and in the Follow-Up (eight-weeks after the conclusion of the training). Results and Discussion: The NPG presented both Post-Training (p=.018 relative to pre-training) and Follow-Up (p=.007) improvements in equilibrium. The improvement for OPG was near significant (p=0.051 relative to pre-training) in Post-Training and significant (p=.038) in the Follow-Up. There were no significant differences between Post-Training and Post-Follow-Up (p=.999) for either group or in the intergroup comparisons (no statistically-significant effect of oscillation of the pole).


      PubDate: 2015-04-04T22:51:04Z
       
  • CraigLiebensonFunctional Training Handbook2014Wolters Kluwer
           HealthISBN-13: 978-1582559209, 472 pages, Also available as a Kindle
           version
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matt Wallden



      PubDate: 2015-04-04T22:51:04Z
       
  • Differential activation of Scapular Muscles, During Arm Elevation, with
           and without Trigger Points
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): N. Bohlooli , A. Ahmadi , N. Maroufi , J. Sarrafzadeh , S. Jaberzadeh
      Background Latent Myofascial Trigger Points (LMTrPs) are defined as certain pain-free hyperirritable spots in a muscle taut band which lead to muscle activation pattern alternation in both loaded and unloaded conditions during scaption. The current study aimed to investigate the onset of upward scapular rotator muscle activations during fast arm elevation in three planes of movement in patients with upper trapezius LMTrPs compared to healthy control participants. Method Three planes of scapular movement were evaluated. The onset of Deltoid (DEL) was considered as the starting point in marking the onset of Upper Trapezius (UT) and Serratus Anterior (SA) muscle activations. Results There were significant differences in the relative muscle latencies between the LMTrPs and the control group. Those with LMTrPs showed a delayed and inconsistent activity of UT during all three planes of elevation (p<0.05) and the same pattern happened for SA during flexion (p<0.05). Conclusions Both hosted and synergistic muscles experience delay in muscle activation and alterations in their recruitment pattern during fast arm elevation in all planes of movement. These changes may serve as adaptive motor control strategies due to the presence of LMTrPs in UT muscles.


      PubDate: 2015-04-04T22:51:04Z
       
  • A Unifying Neuro-Fasciagenic Model of Somatic Dysfunction - underlying
           mechanisms and treatment -PART II
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Paolo Tozzi
      This paper offers an extensive review of the main fascia-mediated mechanisms underlying various therapeutic processes of clinical relevance for manual therapy. The concept of somatic dysfunction is revisited in light of the several fascial influences that may come into play during and after manual treatment. A change in perspective is thus proposed: from a nociceptive model that for decades has viewed somatic dysfunction as a neurologically-mediated phenomenon, to a unifying neuro-fascial model that integrates neural influences into a multifactorial and multidimensional interpretation of manual therapeutic effects as being partially, if not entirely, mediated by the fascia. By taking into consideration a wide spectrum of fascia-related factors - from cell-based mechanisms to cognitive and behavioural influences - a model emerges suggesting, amongst other results, a multidisciplinary-approach to the intervention of somatic dysfunction. Finally, it is proposed that a sixth osteopathic ‘meta-model’ - the connective tissue-fascial model - be added to the existing five models in osteopathic philosophy as the main interface between all body systems, thus providing a structural and functional framework for the body’s homeostatic potential and its inherent abilities to heal.


      PubDate: 2015-03-16T00:43:46Z
       
  • Don’t get caught flat footed – how over-pronation may just be
           a dysfunctional model
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matt Wallden



      PubDate: 2015-03-12T00:25:41Z
       
  • Designing Effective Corrective Exercise Programs: the importance of dosage
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matt Wallden



      PubDate: 2015-03-12T00:25:41Z
       
  • Re: Transmission of muscle force to fascia during exercise: Thomas
           Findley, M.D, Ph.D a, Hans Chaudhry, Ph.D b, Sunil Dhar c, Ph.D. Journal
           of Bodywork &amp; Movement Therapies (2015) 19, 119e123
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): John Sharkey



      PubDate: 2015-03-07T23:35:24Z
       
  • Press and Snatch
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): D.C. Craig Liebenson , Derrick Johnson



      PubDate: 2015-02-27T21:39:33Z
       
  • Response to Dommerholt and Gerwin: Did we miss the point?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): John Quintner , Geoffrey Bove , Milton Cohen



      PubDate: 2015-02-27T21:39:33Z
       
  • Effects of unilateral posteroanterior mobilization in subjects with
           sacralized lumbosacral transitional vertebrae
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Phuntsog Angmo , P.P. Mohanty , Monalisa Pattnaik
      AIM OF THE STUDY To find out the efficacy of unilateral posteroanterior (PA) mobilization over type IA and type IIA sacralized lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in patients with low back pain with or without leg pain. Research design: experimental randomized control study. Sample size: 30 subjects, Sampling: simple random sampling. GROUP A- 15 subjects –self lumbar mobility and stretching exercises + Unilateral PA mobilization + hot pack. GROUP B- 15 subjects – self lumbar mobility and stretching exercises + hot pack. Before initiating treatment, subjects were assessed for dependent variables: Pain intensity by VAS, Forward bending and side bending ROM by modified finger to floor method with the help of an inch-tape and functions by Modified Oswestry Functional Disability Questionnaires. Post test measurements were taken after completion 2 weeks of therapy. The results of the study suggest that unilateral PA pressure is an effective mobilization method in reducing low back pain, improving ROM and related disability as compared to impairment based exercises alone in patients with low back pain with or without radiation to lower limbs having abnormally large transverse processes and hypomobile type IA and II A lumbo-sacral transitional vertebrae.


      PubDate: 2015-02-22T21:03:53Z
       
  • Multimodal Compared to Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Tension-type
           Headache in Adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Peter Przekop , Allison Przekop , Mark G. Haviland
      Chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) in children and adolescents is a serious medical condition, with considerable morbidity and few effective, evidence-based treatments. We performed a chart review of 83 adolescents (age range = 13-18 years; 67 girls and 16 boys) diagnosed with CTTH. Two treatment protocols were compared: multimodal (osteopathic manipulative treatments, mindfulness, and qi gong) and pharmacologic (amitriptyline or gabapentin). Four outcomes (headache frequency, pain intensity, general health, and health interference) were assessed at three time points (baseline, 3 months, and 6 months). A fifth outcome, number of bilateral tender points, was recorded at baseline and 6 months. All five were evaluated statistically with a linear mixed model. Although both multimodal and pharmacologic treatments were effective for CTTH (time effects for all measures were significant at p < .001), results from each analysis favored multimodal treatment (the five group by time interaction effects were significant at or below the p < .001 level). Headache frequency in the pharmacologic group, for example, reduced from a monthly average (95% Confidence Interval shown in parentheses) of 23.9 (21.8, 26.0) to 16.4 (14.3, 18.6) and in the multimodal group from 22.3 (20.1, 24.5) to 4.9 (2.6, 7.2) (a substantial group difference). Pain intensity (worst in the last 24 hours, 0-10 scale) was reduced in the pharmacologic group from 6.2 (5.6, 6.9) to 3.4 (2.7, 4.1) and from 6.1 (5.4, 6.8) to 2.0 (1.2, 2.7) in the multimodal group (a less substantial difference). Across the other three assessments, group differences were larger for general health and number of tender points and less so for pain restriction. Multimodal treatment for adolescent CTTH appears to be effective. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these promising results.


      PubDate: 2015-02-22T21:03:53Z
       
  • Physical Activity, Fear Avoidance, and Chronic Non-Specific Pain: A
           Narrative Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Nicole Nelson , James R. Churilla
      Background Chronic non-specific pain (CNSP) and physical inactivity have become increasingly prevalent in the United States; however, the associations between the two remain unclear. The lack of clarity may be due to the presence of a third variable, the individual’s pain coping strategy. Objectives We had three specific aims. 1) To review the associations between fear-avoidance beliefs and behaviors, and levels of physical activity and disability. 2) To review the theoretical mechanisms behind chronic non-specific pain and the potential mediating role of physical activity. 3) Finally, to report the most commonly recommended interventions for fear-avoidant individuals suffering with chronic pain. Conclusions Further investigation is needed to fully understand the associations between physical activity, chronic non-specific pain, and fear avoidant beliefs and behaviors. Precise relationships notwithstanding, there is strong evidence to suggest that physical activity is an integral piece to the chronic non-specific pain puzzle. For this reason, it is incumbent upon clinicians to strongly recommend participation in regular, yet properly progressed, physical activity to chronic non-specific pain sufferers.


      PubDate: 2015-02-22T21:03:53Z
       
  • A Critical Evaluation of Quintner et al: Missing the Point
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt , Robert D. Gerwin
      The objective of this article is to critically analyze a recent publication by Quinter, Bove and Cohen, published in Rheumatology, about myofascial pain syndrome and trigger points (Quintner et al 2014). The authors concluded that the leading trigger point hypothesis is flawed in reasoning and in science. They claimed to have refuted the trigger point hypothesis. The current paper demonstrates that the Quintner et al paper is a biased review of the literature replete with unsupported opinions and accusations. In summary, Quintner et al have not presented any convincing evidence to believe that the Integrated TrP Hypothesis should be laid to rest.


      PubDate: 2015-02-05T19:22:16Z
       
  • Muscle Timing in Injured and Non-injured leg of Athletes with Chronic
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sara Fereydounnia , Azadeh Shadmehr , Saeed Talebian Moghadam , Gholamreza Olyaei , Shohreh Jalaei , Ali Tahmasebi
      Objective The aim of this study was to investigate premotor time, motor time and reaction time of the injured and non-injured leg muscles of athletes with chronic ankle instability in response to a visual stimulus during forward jumping. Methods Surface electromyography was performed on injured and non-injured leg of eight athletes with chronic ankle instability during forward jumping. Results Results showed that premotor time of the peroneus longus was significantly longer in non-injured leg compared with injured leg (489.37 ± 220.22 ms vs. 306.46 ± 142.92 ms, P = 0.031); on the contrary, motor time of the peroneus longus was significantly shorter in non-injured leg compared with injured leg (569.04 ± 318.62 ms vs. 715.12 ± 328.72 ms, P = 0.022). No significant difference was noted in the timing of other calf muscles (P > 0.05). Conclusion According to the results of this study, rehabilitation protocols, regarding ankle instability, need to put greater emphasis on tasks that require proper timing of muscles and muscle re-education so that protocols could reduce residual symptoms after sprain and prevent recurrent sprains.


      PubDate: 2015-02-05T19:22:16Z
       
  • Contrasting views of myofascial pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2015-02-05T19:22:16Z
       
  • Training for Improved Neuro-Muscular Control of Balance in Middle Aged
           Females
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gregory S. Anderson , Fabio Deluigi B. Kin , Guido Belli , Claudio Tentoni , Michael B. Gaetz
      This study examined improvements in static balance and muscle electromygraphic (EMG) activity following a four week progressive training program in 16 middle aged females (mean age = 46.9 ± 8.7 yrs; height 161.1 ± 6.0cm; weight 65.4 ± 11.2 kg). Participants trained 3 times per week for 4 weeks, for 50 minutes per session, progressing base of support, stability, vision, resistance and torque in each of six basic exercises. Pre and post training measures of balance included feet together standing, a tandem stance and a one-leg stand (unsupported leg in the saggital plane) performed with the eyes closed, and a Stork Stand (unsupported leg in the frontal plane) with both eyes open and closed. In each position postural deviations were tallied for each individual while muscle recruitment was determined using root mean squared (RMS) EMG activity for the soleus, biceps femoris, errector spinae, rectus abdominis and internal oblique muscles of the dominant foot side. Balance scores were significantly improved post training in both the Balance Error Score System (p<0.05) and stork stand positions (p<0.01). Muscle activity was reduced post-training in all muscles in each condition except the soleus in the tandem position, although not all significantly. Reduced biceps femoris activity suggest that improved core stability allowed participants to move from a hip to an ankle postural control strategy through improved coordination of muscles involved in balance and reduced body sway. The core muscles were able to control body position with less activity post training suggesting improved muscle coordination and efficiency. These results suggest that short term progressive floor to BOSU™ balance training can improve standing balance in middle aged women.


      PubDate: 2015-02-05T19:22:16Z
       
  • An Evidence-Informed Review of the Current Myofascial Pain Literature
           – March 2015
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt , Michelle Layton , Todd Hooks , Rob Grieve
      The second article in this review series considers multiple recent publications about myofascial pain, trigger points (TrPs) and other related topics. The article is divided into several sections, including a Basic Research section (4 articles), a section on Soft Tissue Approaches (5 articles), a Dry Needling and Acupuncture section (7 articles), an Injection section (2 articles), a section on. Modalities (1 article), Other Clinical Approaches (3 articles) and finally a Reviews section (7 articles). The thirty publications reviewed in this article originated in all corners of the world.


      PubDate: 2015-01-30T13:25:59Z
       
  • Does Anterior Knee Pain Severity and Function Relate to the Frontal Plane
           Projection Angle and Trunk and Hip Strength in Women with Patellofemoral
           Pain?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gabriel Peixoto Leão Almeida , Ana Paula de Moura Campos Carvalho e Silva , Fábio Jorge Renovato França , Maurício Oliveira Magalhães , Thomaz Nogueira Burke , Amélia Pasqual Marques
      The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between knee pain severity and function with the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) and trunk and hip peak torque (PT) in women with patellofemoral pain (PFPS). Twenty-two women with PFPS were assessed. Knee pain severity (KPS) was assessed with an 11-point visual analog scale and function with an Anterior Knee Pain Scale. The FPPA was recorded with a digital camera. PT of extensors, abductors, and the lateral rotators of hip and lateral core stability were measured with a handheld dynamometer. FPPA was the only predictor for the KPS. Regarding predictors of function, PT of lateral core stability and the extensor and abductor of the hip explained 41.4% of the function. Increase in FPPA was associated with greater KPS, and the lowest PT of lateral core stability, hip abductors, and extensors was associated with lower function in women with PFPS.


      PubDate: 2015-01-30T13:25:59Z
       
  • Van Der Wal’s response to Stecco's fascial nomenclature editorial
           Some Considerations as to Nomenclature in the Domain of the Fascia and
           Connective Tissue
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jaap van der Wal



      PubDate: 2015-01-25T13:20:18Z
       
  • A Unifying Neuro-Fasciagenic Model of Somatic Dysfunction - underlying
           mechanisms and treatment - PART I
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Paolo Tozzi
      This paper offers an extensive review of the main fascia-mediated mechanisms underlying various dysfunctional and pathophysiological processes of clinical relevance for manual therapy. The concept of somatic dysfunction is revisited in light of the diverse fascial influences that may come into play in its genesis and maintenance. A change in perspective is thus proposed: from a nociceptive model that for decades has viewed somatic dysfunction as a neurologically-mediated phenomenon, to a unifying fascial model that integrates neural influences into a multifactorial and multidimensional interpretation of dysfunctional process as being partially, if not entirely, mediated by the fascia.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Effects of Alexander Technique Training Experience on Gait Behavior in
           Older Adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matthew O’Neill , David Anderson , Diane Allen , Christopher Ross , Kate A. Hamel
      Heightened fall risk, potentially caused by aging-related changes in gait, is a serious health issue faced by older adults. The Alexander Technique is thought to improve balance and motor function; however, the technique’s effect on gait has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Alexander Technique training in older adults on the temporospatial characteristics of gait and medio-lateral center of mass displacement during fast and comfortably paced over-ground walking. Six licensed Alexander Technique teachers and seven controls between the ages of 60 and 75 years of age participated in the study. Alexander Technique teachers exhibited a reduction in medio-lateral center of mass displacement during fast paced walking compared to comfortably paced walking that was not present in controls. Due to this difference Alexander Technique teachers displayed a smaller medio-lateral Center of Mass displacement compared to controls during fast paced walking. Alexander Technique teachers also demonstrated significantly smaller stride width and lower gait timing variability compared to controls. These findings, which suggest superior control of dynamic stability during gait and potentially reduced fall risk in Alexander Technique teachers, warrant further study.


      PubDate: 2015-01-08T16:03:19Z
       
 
 
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