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Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies    [13 followers]  Follow    
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2556 journals]   [SJR: 0.458]   [H-I: 18]
  • Why are there so many discussions about the nomenclature of fasciae'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Carla Stecco



      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Effectiveness of a program of therapeutic exercises on the quality of life
           and lumbar disability in women with stress urinary incontinence
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Adriana de Carvalho Lacombe , Virginia Martello Riccobene , Leandro Alberto Calazans Nogueira
      Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is a common condition and can cause social isolation and decreased quality of life. The literature demonstrates that perineal exercises are effective in promoting urinary continence and lumbar stability. This uncontrolled (group) pilot study, using a pre-test-post-test design, investigated whether a weekly session of Holistic Gymnastics® conducted during a one-year period, could change outcomes in a group of twenty women diagnosed with SUI. In the first and last evaluation, the subjects underwent a clinical examination and were asked to complete two questionnaires, one regarding quality of life and the other about lumbar disability. Improvement in the quality of life was observed in nine out of ten domains. There was also an improvement in lumbar disability. These results suggest that a program with therapeutic exercises can be effective in controlling urinary incontinence and improve the quality of life and lumbar disability in woman with SUI.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Correlation between severity of temporomandibular disorder and mandibular
           range of motion
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Cid André Fidelis de Paula Gomes , Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Janaina Rodrigues da Silva , Patricia Mattos de Oliveira , Fabiano Politti , Daniela Aparecida Biasotto-Gonzalez
      The aim of the present study was to determine the association between the severity of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and mandibular range of motion (ROM). For such, a cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 92 women from the university community. The Fonseca's anamnestic index (FAI) was used to determine the severity of TMD, as follows: without TMD (n = 23), mild TMD (n = 23), moderate TMD (n = 23), and severe TMD (n = 23). Mouth opening, lateral excursion and protrusion of the mandible were measured. Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the association between the FAI and mandibular ROM. Comparisons among groups were performed using the Kruskal–Wallis test with Dunn's post hoc test. No significant associations were found between TMD severity based on the classification of the FAI and ROM of functional mouth opening (rs = −0.001, p = 0.987), maximum active mouth opening (rs = −0.023, p = 0.822), passive mouth opening (rs = −0.026, p = 0.803), left lateral excursion (rs = 0.125, p = 0.231), right lateral excursion (rs = 0.087, p = 0.406) or protrusion (rs = −0.148, p = 0.157). Moreover, no statistically significant differences among severity groups were found (p > 0.05). Based on the findings of the present study, the severity of signs and symptoms of TMD was not associaed with mandibular range of motion.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Effectiveness of Myofascial release in the management of chronic low back
           pain in nursing professionals
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): M.S. Ajimsha , Binsu Daniel , S. Chithra
      Objective To investigate whether Myofascial release (MFR) when used as an adjunct to specific back exercises (SBE) reduces pain and disability in chronic low back pain (CLBP) in comparison with a control group receiving a sham Myofascial release (SMFR) and specific back exercises (SBE) among nursing professionals. Design Randomized, controlled, single blinded trial. Setting Nonprofit research foundation clinic in Kerala, India. Participants Nursing professionals (N = 80) with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Interventions MFR group or control group. The techniques were administered by physiotherapists certified in MFR and consisted of 24 sessions per client over 8 weeks. Main outcome measure The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) was used to assess subjective pain experience and Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale (QBPDS) was used to assess the disability associated with CLBP. The primary outcome measure was the difference in MPQ and QBPDS scores between week 1 (pretest score), week 8 (posttest score), and follow-up at week 12 after randomization. Results The simple main effects analysis showed that the MFR group performed better than the control group in weeks 8 and 12 (P < 0.005). The patients in the MFR group reported a 53.3% reduction in their pain and 29.7% reduction in functional disability as shown in the MPQ and QBPDS scores in week 8, whereas patients in the control group reported a 26.1% and 9.8% reduction in their MPQ and QBPDS scores in week 8, which persisted as a 43.6% reduction of pain and 22.7% reduction of functional disability in the follow-up at week 12 in the MFR group compared to the baseline. The proportion of responders, defined as participants who had at least a 50% reduction in pain between weeks 1 and 8, was 73% in the MFR group and 0% in the control group, which was 0% for functional disability in the MFR and control group. Conclusions This study provides evidence that MFR when used as an adjunct to SBE is more effective than a control intervention for CLBP in nursing professionals.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • The effect of dry needling on pain, pressure pain threshold and disability
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Maryam Ziaeifar , Amir Massoud Arab , Noureddin Karimi , Mohammad Reza Nourbakhsh
      Dry needling (DN) has been used recently by physical therapists as a therapy of choice for patients with myofascial trigger points (TrP). The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of DN in the treatment of TrPs in the upper trapezius (UT) muscle. A sample of convenience of 33 patients with TrP in the UT muscle participated in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to a standard (N = 17) or experimental group (N = 16). The treatment protocol for the standard group consisted of trigger point compression technique (TCT) on MTP, while the patients in the experimental group received DN. Pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds were assessed for both groups before and after the treatment sessions. In addition, the Disability of Arm, Hand, and Shoulder (DASH) was administered. Statistical analysis (paired t-test) revealed a significant improvement in pain, PPT and DASH scores after treatment in the experimental (DN) and standard (TCT) group compared with before treatment (P < 0.05). The ANCOVA revealed significant differences between the DN and TCT groups on the post-measurement VAS score (P = 0.01). There was, however, no significant difference between the two groups on the post-measurement score of the PPT (P = 0.08) and DASH (P = 0.34). DN produces an improvement in pain intensity, PPT and DASH and may be prescribed for subjects with TrP in UT muscles especially when pain relief is the goal of the treatment.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Does fascia hold memories'
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Paolo Tozzi
      The idea that tissues may possess some sort of memory is a controversial topic in manual medicine, calling for research and clinical exploration. Many bodyworkers, at some point in their practice, have experienced phenomena that may be interpreted as representing a release of memory traces when working on dysfunctional tissues. This feeling may have been accompanied by some type of sensory experience, for the therapist and/or the patient. In some cases, early traumatic experiences may be recalled. When this happens, the potency of the memory may be erased or eased, along with restoration of tissue function. Hence the questions: can memories be held in the fascia' And: are these memories accessible during manual fascial work' Modern research has proposed a variety of different interpretations as to how memory might be stored in soft tissues, possibly involving other forms of information storage not exclusively processed neurologically (Box 1).


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging of the supraspinatus muscle: Intra- and
           interrater reliability of thickness and cross-sectional area
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Alessandro Schneebeli , Michele Egloff , Amelia Giampietro , Ron Clijsen , Marco Barbero
      Objective To examine intra- and interrater reliability of thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements of the supraspinatus muscle using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI). Methods Two physical therapists acquired b-mode images of the supraspinatus muscles in twenty-five healthy subjects. Thickness and CSA were measured. Intra- and interrater reliability were examined. Results Intrarater reliability for thickness was high, (ICC1.1 0.91) for rater 1 and (ICC1.1 0.92) for rater 2. Intrarater reliability for CSA was also high, (ICC1.1 0.90) for rater 1 and (ICC1.1 0.85) for rater 2. Interrater reliability for the thickness was high, (ICC3.1 0.86). For CSA, interrater reliability was moderate, (ICC3.1 0.70). Conclusion Supraspinatus muscle thickness and CSA can be reliably measured by physical therapists in healthy subjects. These findings confirm that RUSI has an interesting potential for physiotherapy clinical practice, especially to assess morphometric changes in skeletal muscles. Further research is needed in subjects with shoulder disorders.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Changes in sitting posture affect shoulder range of motion
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Rotsalai Kanlayanaphotporn
      Objective To assess the effect of slouched sitting on shoulder range of motion (ROM). Method 30 asymptomatic males aged between 18 and 35 years with no history of shoulder problems within the last 6 months. Shoulder ROMs in flexion and abduction as well as external rotation and internal rotation in 90° of shoulder abduction were measured while the subjects sat in 3 different sitting postures. Results There were statistically significant mean differences among the 3 sitting postures regarding thoracic kyphosis and shoulder ROMs (p < 0.001). Post hoc analyzes demonstrated significant differences in all comparisons (p < 0.001). Conclusion Changes in sitting posture affect shoulder ROMs in all directions tested. Greater changes in shoulder ROMs were associated with greater increase in thoracic kyphosis. These findings suggest that even subtle changes in thoracic kyphosis need to be considered during shoulder evaluation.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • The effects of a global postural reeducation program on an adolescent
           handball player with isthmic spondylolisthesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Carlos Barroqueiro , Nuno Valente Morais
      This report describes and evaluates a physical therapy intervention in a 15-year-old male handball player with low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis and associated spinopelvic misalignment (shear–stress type). Upon examination, increased lumbar lordosis, horizontal sacrum and anterior pelvic tilting were mainly associated with altered resting length and extensibility of the iliopsoas, hip adductors and erector spinae muscles. The intervention was directed at improving the muscles resting length and extensibility balance within a global postural alignment perspective (global postural reeducation). After the treatment period, lumbar lordosis, sacral slope and anterior pelvic tilting decreased 17.2°, 16.5° and 15.1° respectively. Global postural reeducation was effective in changing spinopelvic alignment related to low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. This treatment option should be considered as a potential nonsurgical alternative for this condition.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Anatomical structure and nerve branching pattern of the human
           infraspinatus muscle
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Philip A. Fabrizio , F. Richard Clemente
      The function of the infraspinatus muscle, critical to rotator cuff function, is dependent upon the muscle's structure and innervation pattern. The morphology of the infraspinatus muscle has been inconsistently described in the literature. Additionally, the branching pattern of the suprascapular nerve in the infraspinous fossa has not been addressed in the literature. The purposes of this study were to determine: the arrangement of the infraspinatus muscle bellies; the branching patterns of the suprascapular nerve to the infraspinatus muscle; if the infraspinatus muscle was composed the neuromuscular compartments. Forty-eight infraspinatus muscles from 24 embalmed cadavers were studied using standard dissection techniques to determine morphological characteristics and innervation patterns. Results demonstrated that the infraspinatus muscles were comprised of three separate muscular partitions with each partition residing in a thin fascial compartment but all residing deep to the posterior scapular fascia. A first order suprascapular nerve branch was present in 91.6% of superior, 100% of middle, and 70.8% of inferior partitions. A first order nerve was present in all 3 muscular compartments of the same infraspinatus muscle in 62.5% of cases. Second order nerve branches were present in 8.3% of superior, 0% of middle, and 29.2% of inferior partitions. These findings help to determine a more complete and accurate understanding of the structure of the infraspinatus muscle. A better understanding of its structure could lead to a better understanding of the function of the muscle. Such information will enable more effective rehabilitation strategies for injuries involving the infraspinatus component of the rotator cuff.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • The effect of base of support stability on shoulder muscle activity during
           closed kinematic chain exercises
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Khosro Khademi Kalantari , Simin Berenji Ardestani
      Method A total of thirty eligible subjects (17 female and 13 male, age = 22.26 ± 0.99 years, height = 170.96 ± 8.42 cm, weight = 61.63 ± 9.92 kg) were tested in six different randomly ordered positions. Surface Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), long head of the biceps (LB), teres major (TM) and posterior deltoid (PD) muscles in the dominant shoulder in 6 different closed kinetic chain (CKC) positions. Objective To investigate changes in muscular activity of the shoulder muscles at different base of support stability levels. Results Muscle activity was greater in the most stable position for all muscles except UT (P < 0.01). Conclusion Shoulder muscle activity did not increase in parallel with a reduction in base of support stability in the present study.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Hybrid markerless tracking of complex articulated motion in golf swings
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sim Kwoh Fung , Kenneth Sundaraj , Nizam Uddin Ahamed , Lam Chee Kiang , Sivadev Nadarajah , Arun Sahayadhas , Md. Asraf Ali , Md. Anamul Islam , Rajkumar Palaniappan
      Sports video tracking is a research topic that has attained increasing attention due to its high commercial potential. A number of sports, including tennis, soccer, gymnastics, running, golf, badminton and cricket have been utilised to display the novel ideas in sports motion tracking. The main challenge associated with this research concerns the extraction of a highly complex articulated motion from a video scene. Our research focuses on the development of a markerless human motion tracking system that tracks the major body parts of an athlete straight from a sports broadcast video. We proposed a hybrid tracking method, which consists of a combination of three algorithms (pyramidal Lucas-Kanade optical flow (LK), normalised correlation-based template matching and background subtraction), to track the golfer's head, body, hands, shoulders, knees and feet during a full swing. We then match, track and map the results onto a 2D articulated human stick model to represent the pose of the golfer over time. Our work was tested using two video broadcasts of a golfer, and we obtained satisfactory results. The current outcomes of this research can play an important role in enhancing the performance of a golfer, provide vital information to sports medicine practitioners by providing technically sound guidance on movements and should assist to diminish the risk of golfing injuries.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • A review of the utilization of baropodometry in postural assessment
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): José Luís Pimentel Rosário
      Postural deviations have been linked to a series of different kinds of pain and dysfunction. Since the human foot is the basis of support and propulsion for gait, and baropodometric analysis assesses dysfunctions of the feet, it may be valuable in terms of postural assessment. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to investigate which studies have used this baropodometric equipment and how the equipment was used, as well as to discuss the scientific problems and solutions associated with the study and clinical practice of baropodometry. Twenty-eight of the 48 articles found in the Pubmed and Lilacs databases were used. The baropodometer has the potential to provide excellent research in the postural field and related areas. However, baropodometry requires standardization and an improved calibration system. Further significant scientific papers, using properly calibrated equipment, are important in order to improve the quality of the technique and display evidence of its clinical and scientific value.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • The sitting active and prone passive lag test: An inter-rater reliability
           study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Deepak Sebastian , Raghu Chovvath , Ramesh Malladi
      Background & purpose To determine inter-rater reliability in identifying a knee extension lag using the sitting active and prone passive lag test (SAPLT). Methods 56 patients with a diagnosis of knee pain were randomly assigned and independently examined by two physical therapists at a time, to determine the presence of an active or a passive extension lag at the knee. An active lag was determined by the inability of the erectly seated subject to actively extend the involved knee in maximal dorsiflexion of the ankle to the same level as the normal knee held in maximal extension and ankle in maximal dorsiflexion, as seen by the levels of the toes. A passive lag was determined by placing the subject prone with the knees just past the edge of the table and determining the high position of the heel in a fully resting extension position compared to the heel on the normal side. Results For the sitting active lag test, the inter-rater reliability was ‘good’ (Kappa 0.792, SE of kappa 0.115, 95% confidence interval). For the prone passive lag test, the inter-rater reliability was ‘good’ (Kappa 0.636, SE of kappa 0.136, 95% confidence interval). Conclusion The SAPLT may be incorporated as a simple yet effective test to determine the presence of a knee extension lag. It identifies the type of restraint, active, passive or both, and is suggestive of the most appropriate management.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Reliability of sagittal pelvic position assessments in standing, sitting
           and during hip flexion using palpation meter
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Daniel Camara Azevedo , Henrique Santos , Ricardo Luiz Carneiro , Guilherme Trivellato Andrade
      The objective of this study was to investigate reliability of assessing sagittal pelvic position using the palpation meter (PALM) in healthy subjects while sitting, standing and while in different hip flexion angles in standing. Twenty healthy subjects were assessed two times by the same examiner, with a 48-h interval between test sessions. Reliability indices of PALM measures (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC) were calculated. ICC values showed excellent intra-rater reliability for measurements of sagittal pelvic position in standing and sitting position and for both standing hip flexion angles (ICC = .89–.96). SEM values ranged from .5° (hip flexion 90°) to 1.5° (sitting position). SDC values ranged from 1.5° (hip flexion 90°) to 4.0° (sitting position). The results of this study showed excellent intra-rater reliability for assessing sagittal pelvic position in standing, sitting and hip flexion in healthy subjects using the PALM.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Chiropractic care for foot drop due to peroneal nerve neuropathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Vinicius T. Francio
      Peroneal nerve palsy is the most common entrapment neuropathy in the lower extremity, and the presentation of foot drop is a frequent initial manifestation of this disorder. This condition can have a marked influence on the patient's activities of daily living, and is classified as ‘Impairment of Body Structure.’ Current literature provides little direction to its evaluation and management, and the importance to differentially diagnose the causes of foot drop. Therefore, the purpose of this case report is to describe the application of chiropractic manipulative therapy, for a 14-year-old female with an insidious onset of foot drop.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • The effects of Pilates exercise on sleep quality in postpartum women
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Farzaneh Ashrafinia , Mandana Mirmohammadali , Hamid Rajabi , Anooshirvan Kazemnejad , Khosro SadeghniiatHaghighi , Mehrnoosh Amelvalizadeh , Hui Chen
      Prolonged poor sleeping quality can decrease women's ability to perform their maternal and family duties after delivery. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a Pilates training program on sleep quality in primigravida postpartum women in a randomized clinical trial. Eighty postpartum women were randomly divided into intervention and control groups (n = 40). Home-based 30-min Pilate's exercises were started 72 h after the delivery and performed five times per week for consecutive 8 weeks. Sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) prior to the intervention and 4th and 8th weeks afterwards. The intervention group showed a significant improvement in subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, daytime dysfunction and global PSQI score (P < 0.001); however, there was no difference in sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency and sleep disturbance between the groups. In conclusion, Pilates exercises appeared to improve sleep quality in primigravida postpartum women.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Yoga meets positive psychology: Examining the integration of hedonic
           (gratitude) and eudaimonic (meaning) wellbeing in relation to the extent
           of yoga practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Itai Ivtzan , Angeliki Papantoniou
      The present study aims to explore the existence of a relationship between the extent of yoga practice and two dimensions of psychological wellbeing: meaning in life and gratitude. Both of the variables are positive psychology constructs; there is theoretical affinity and empirical evidence that they are related to overall psychological wellbeing. One hundred and twenty four participants aged 18 years and above, with yoga experience ranging from none to over six years, responded to a number of scales. The extent of yoga practice was measured by the number of years during which individuals practiced yoga at least two times a week. Participants responded to the following scales: MLQ (Meaning in Life Questionnaire) and GQ-6 (Gratitude Questionnaire). This study hypothesised that the number of years practicing yoga would be positively correlated to the score obtained on the aforementioned scales. Positive correlations were identified between the extent of yoga practice and meaning in life and gratitude. Important implications regarding the contribution of yoga to both hedonic and Eudaimonic happiness are discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Health psychology as a context for massage therapy: A conceptual model
           with CAM as mediator
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Glenn M. Hymel , Grant J. Rich
      Health psychology represents a context within which massage therapy research, education, and practice can be positioned for the mutual benefit of both. Furthermore, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) more often than not plays a mediating role in relating massage therapy to health psychology. On occasion, though, the linkage between health psychology and massage therapy can be quite direct without the mediating influence of CAM. This paper, accordingly, advances a conceptual model via both flowchart and Venn diagram displays for viewing the health psychology context for massage therapy with the possibility of CAM as a mediating factor. Attention is also given to the broad range of issues constituting contemporary health psychology as well as its correspondence to an equally diverse array of client populations and health conditions addressed in massage therapy research. Future directions in the areas of health psychology, CAM, and massage therapy are proposed with a view toward a mutual and reciprocal benefit accruing to these behavioral and health science arenas.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Strain counterstrain technique to decrease tender point palpation pain
           compared to control conditions: A systematic review
           with meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Christopher Kevin Wong , Tim Abraham , Parisa Karimi , Carly Ow-Wing
      Background Strain counterstrain (SCS) is an indirect osteopathic manipulative technique that uses passive positioning to relieve tender point (TP) palpation pain and associated dysfunction. Objective The purposes of this systematic review with meta-analysis were to 1) determine the pooled effect of SCS on TP palpation pain compared to a control condition and 2) assess the quality of the overall evidence. Data source A search conducted using the MEDLINE with AMED, PUBMED, CINAHL, and SCOPUS databases for publications from January 2002 and April 2012 yielded 29 articles for eligibility screening. Study selection Included studies were limited to randomized control trials comparing TP palpation pain after isolated SCS treatment compared to control conditions assessed with a visual analog scale. Other study designs or manipulative treatments were excluded. Data extraction Two reviewers adhered to a predetermined study protocol following current Cochrane Collaboration recommendations to independently extract the data with standardized extraction forms and assess studies for methodological quality and determine risks of bias. Results Five randomized control trials were included for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The pooled effect of SCS was a reduction of TP palpation pain (p < 0.001, 95% CI −0.291 to −0.825). The overall evidence quality was low: while all studies met at least 8 of 12 methodological quality criteria, most were low quality. Conclusions This systematic review and meta-analysis found low quality evidence suggesting that SCS may reduce TP palpation pain. Future studies with larger samples of better quality studies with patient populations that assess long-term pain, impairment, and dysfunction outcomes could enrich the literature.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Whether lidocaine or dry needling should be the favored treatment after
           meta analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Lin Liu , Qiang-min Huang , Long-bing Wang



      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Static and dynamic body balance following provocation of the visual and
           vestibular systems in females with and without joint hypermobility
           syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 2
      Author(s): Katerina Iatridou , Dimitris Mandalidis , Efstathios Chronopoulos , George Vagenas , Spyros Athanasopoulos
      Objectives Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue characterized by excessive joint movement, musculoskeletal pain and neurophysiological deficits (i.e. decreased proprioceptive acuity, altered neuromuscular reflexes). Such deficits may affect body balance thus increasing the risk of injury. The present study aimed at examining static and dynamic body balance following challenge of the visual and vestibular systems in individuals with JHS. Methods The sample consisted of 21 females with JHS and 20 controls without signs of JHS. Static body balance was assessed by the degree of anteroposterior and mediolateral deviation of the center of pressure, during 20-sec single-leg stances with eyes opened (EO), eyes closed (EC) and eyes opened with head extension (EO-HE) using a foot pressure platform. Dynamic body balance was assessed by the number of landing and balance errors committed during a multiple single-leg-hop-stabilization test. Results Nonparametric analysis showed that the JHS-group demonstrated significantly greater (a) mediolateral deviation during single-leg-stance with EO (p < 0.01), (b) mediolateral and anteroposterior deviation during single-leg-stance with EO-HE (p < 0.05), and (c) number of landing errors (p < 0.05) compared to the control group. Conclusions Poor static balance following challenge of the vestibular system may be justified by vestibular deficiency and/or insufficient proprioceptive capabilities of the neck. Impairments of dynamic balance in individuals with JHS may be attributed to proprioceptive deficits, which can alter feedforward and feedback mechanisms.


      PubDate: 2014-04-16T22:00:12Z
       
  • Conditioning the Upper Trapezius
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): M. Wallden



      PubDate: 2014-03-13T12:15:05Z
       
  • Inadvertent Recovery in Communication Deficits Following The Upper limb
           Mirror Therapy in Stroke: A Case Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Kamal Narayan Arya , Shanta Pandian
      Broca’s aphasia is the most challenging communication deficit in stroke. Left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a key region of the mirror-neuron system, gets lesioned in Broca’s aphasia. Mirror therapy (MT), a form of action-observation, may trigger the mirror neurons. The aim of this study was to report a case of poststroke subject with Broca’s aphasia, who exhibited an inadvertent and significant improvement in speech after MT for the paretic upper limb. The 20-month old stroke patient underwent MT through goal-directed tasks. He received a total absence of spontaneous speech, writing, and naming. After 45 sessions of task-based MT for the upper limb, he showed tremendous recovery in expressive communication. He had fluent and comprehensive communication; however, with a low pitch and minor pronunciation errors. He showed a substantial change (from 18/100 to 79/100) on the Communicative Effective Index, particularly, on items such as expressing emotions, one-to-one conversation, naming, and spontaneous conversation.


      PubDate: 2014-03-03T12:15:28Z
       
  • Is pressure pain sensitivity over the cervical musculature associated with
           neck disability in individuals with migraine'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Maria Claudia Gonçalves , Thaís Cristina Chaves , Lidiane Lima Florencio , Gabriela Ferreira Carvalho , Fabíola Dach , Cesar Fernández-De-Las-Penãs , Débora Bevilaqua-Grossi
      The objective was to determine if disability due to neck pain is correlated with pressure pain sensitivity in the cervical muscles in patients with migraine. Thirty-two volunteers with migraine completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles were also assessed. Data were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (rs) and linear regression models (α<0.05). Moderate negative correlations between NDI and PPT were obtained for the sternocleidomastoid (r s =-0.42; p=0.001), upper trapezius (r s =-0.33; p=0.001) and suboccipital muscles (r s =-0.41;p=0.001). The linear regression revealed no association between NDI and PPT of sternocleidomastoid (β=0.01; R 2=0.17), upper trapezius (β=0.01; R 2=0.11) and suboccipital muscles (β=0.02; R 2=0.17). NDI scores and PPT of the cervical muscles correlated moderately and was inversely proportional in patients with migraine, but the association was not linear, so both outcomes should be considered in the assessment of this population.


      PubDate: 2014-03-03T12:15:28Z
       
  • The Happy Antics Programme: Holistic Exercise for People with Dementia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Yvonne Khoo J-Lyn , Paul van Schaik , Jackie McKenna
      Background: holistic exercise for people with dementia could have psychological and physical benefits, but there is a lack of research on the experience of this type of exercise. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptance of holistic exercise among people with dementia. Method: a holistic exercise programme for people with dementia was designed and implemented. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken to explore participants’ experience of holistic exercise, transcribed verbatim and analyzed. Results: seven themes were generated from the data. They were enjoyment, relaxation, keeping active, social interaction, pain relief, learning something new and intention to continue, respectively. Conclusion: the results of the current small-scale study provide evidence for the feasibility and acceptance of holistic exercise for people with dementia. In addition, participants appeared to benefit in terms of psychological and physical wellbeing.


      PubDate: 2014-03-03T12:15:28Z
       
  • Effects of Yoga on Arm Volume among Women with Breast Cancer Related
           Lymphedema: A Pilot Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mary Insana Fisher , Betsy Donahoe-Fillmore , Laura Leach , Colleen O’Malley , Cheryl Paeplow , Tess Prescott , Harold Merriman
      Lymphedema affects 3-58% of survivors of breast cancer and can result in upper extremity impairments. Exercise can be beneficial in managing lymphedema. Yoga practice has been minimally studied for its effects on breast cancer related lymphedema (BCRL). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of yoga on arm volume, quality of life (QOL), self-reported arm function, and hand grip strength in women with BCRL. Six women with BCRL participated in modified Hatha yoga 3x/week for 8 weeks. Compression sleeves were worn during yoga sessions. Arm volume, QOL, self-reported arm function, and hand grip strength were measured at baseline, half-way, and at the conclusion of yoga practice. Arm volume significantly decreased from baseline (2423.3ml±597.2) to final measures (2370.8ml±577.2) (p=.02). No significant changes in QOL (p=.12), self-reported arm function (p=.34), or hand grip strength (p=.26) were found. Yoga may be beneficial in the management of lymphedema.


      PubDate: 2014-03-03T12:15:28Z
       
  • Influence of Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Treatment Techniques on
           Myofascial Trigger Points
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Dawn T. Gulick
      Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of instrument assisted soft tissue techniques (IASTT) on myofascial trigger points (MTrP). Design Randomized, controlled study with the researcher assessing the MTrP sensitivity blinded to the treatment rendered. Participants Phase 1 = 27; Phase 2 = 22 Intervention MTrPs were identified in the upper back. In phase 1, two MTrPs (right & left) were identified. One was treated with IASTT, the other was a control. In phase 2, one MTrP was identified in a treatment and a control group. In each phase, the treatment groups received six treatments of IASTT. Outcome measures Sensitivity threshold of the MTrP was assessed with a dolorimeter. Results There was a significant improvement in both groups over time but there was no difference between the treatment and control groups. Conclusions The use of a pressure dolorimeter may have served as a form of ischemic compression treatment. This assessment tool may have been a mitigating factor in the over-shadowing any potential influence of the IASTT on the MTrP. Thus, another assessment tool needs to be identified for MTrP assessment. Until that technique is identified, the effect of IASTT on MTrPs in inconclusive.


      PubDate: 2014-03-03T12:15:28Z
       
  • The Trapezius – Clinical &amp; Conditioning Controversies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 February 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matt Wallden



      PubDate: 2014-02-26T07:23:43Z
       
  • The Modified Bear Exercise
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): D.C. Craig Liebenson



      PubDate: 2014-02-26T07:23:43Z
       
  • Muscle pain and use of Statin drugs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2014-02-21T12:14:19Z
       
  • Creating Integrative Work: A Qualitative Study of How Massage Therapists
           Work with Existing Clients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Luann Drolc Fortune , Glenn M. Hymel
      Introduction As one of the most often used complementary treatments, massage is increasingly positioned as an essential component of integrative medicine. Recent studies evaluate the clinical efficacy of massage therapy, but few studies explore how massage therapists (MTs) execute their work and exercise clinical reasoning in natural settings. Purpose To gain foundational knowledge about clinical reasoning and applied knowledge, this study examined how 10 MTs executed an entire session with established clients. Results support translational research design and inform educators. Methods Ethnomethodology and phenomenology informed the qualitative design. Data were collected by videotaping actual sessions and interviewing the participants immediately afterwards while viewing the videos. Computer-aided analysis identified data patterns for thematic interpretation. Results The MTs shared tacit knowledge that directed their work: a) maintaining a primarily biomechanical focus, b) prerequisite safe touch, c) multitasking not allowed, d) MTs assume physical risk, and e) the work affects multiple bodily systems. The MTs sensed effectiveness experientially by adopting common tactics: a) visualizing the manual engagement points, b) assuming the client controlled the physiological release, and c) educating the client. Within these commonalities, they operationalized their work in complex and singular ways, with the particular client relationship critical to structuring the session and evaluating the outcome. Conclusion MTs viewed their work primarily as a biomechanical intervention, but understood therapeutic massage as serving multiple functions. Process-oriented clinical reasoning mirrored models found in psychotherapy and was informed by experience, intuition, and training, which resulted in an intentionally holistic approach.


      PubDate: 2014-02-10T22:10:44Z
       
  • Upper cervical mobility, posture and myofascial trigger points in subjects
           with episodic migraine: case-control study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Tali Danit , Menahem Itay , Vered Elisha , Leonid Kalichman
      Objectives to evaluate the association between episodic migraines and the prevalence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the sternocleidomastoid and upper trapezius, forward head posture (FHP), neck range of motion (ROM) and cervical facet joint stiffness. Methods 20 physiotherapy students with episodic migraines and 20 age- and sex matched healthy controls were included in this observational case-control study. Demographics and headache status were evaluated through questionnaires. Active neck ROM, presence of MTrPs, and cervical facet joint mobility were assessed by physical examination. FHP was measured using a lateral digital photograph taken in a sitting position. Results No significant differences were found in neck ROM measurements and FHP between the migraine and control groups. Significant differences were found in the prevalence of cervical facet joints stiffness in Occiput-C1 (χ2=4.444, p=0.035) and C1-C2 (χ2=10.157, p=0.001), but not in other segments. Significant differences were found in the prevalence of active and latent MTrPs between the migraine and control subjects in the right trapezius (χ2=11.649, p=0.003) and right sternocleidomastoid (χ2=8.485, p=0.014). Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that the prevalence of MTrPs in neck muscles and hypomobility in the upper cervical facet joints are associated with migraines.


      PubDate: 2014-02-10T22:10:44Z
       
  • Selected personal highlights of the 8th Interdisciplinary World Congress
           on Low Back and Pelvic Pain, Dubai, October 2013
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Josephine Key



      PubDate: 2014-01-31T20:45:55Z
       
  • Pilates exercises improve low back pain and quality of life in patients
           with HTLV-1 virus: A randomized crossover clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jaqueline Borges , Abrahão Fontes Baptista , Nayara Santana , Israel Souza , Ramon A. Kruschewsky , Bernardo Galvão-Castro , Katia Nunes Sá
      Background Low back pain is highly prevalent in patients with HTLV-1. The effects of physical activity on this condition are not known, but postural misalignment and motor deficits are frequently present. Objectives To assess the effect of Pilates exercises on chronic low back pain in these patients, and its impact on quality of life. Methods A randomized crossover clinical trial was conducted, involving 22 patients from a reference center in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The VAS was used to evaluate the effect of Pilates on pain intensity and the SF-36 to assess its impact on quality of life. Results Our results provide evidence of positive effects on pain intensity and almost all domains of quality of life when patients followed the Pilates exercise program described. Conclusion The Pilates method may be a useful tool in alleviating the symptoms of low back pain, and had a significant impact on quality of life in this sample of patients.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Effect of a hyperbolide mastication apparatus for the treatment of severe
           sleep bruxism in a child with cerebral palsy: Long-term follow-up
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Lilian Chrystiane Giannasi , Sandra Regina Freitas Batista , Miriam Yumi Matsui , Camila Teixeira Hardt , Carla Paes Gomes , Jose Benedito Oliveira Amorim , Claudia Santos Oliveira , Luis Vicente Franco de Oliveira , Monica Fernandes Gomes
      Purpose Sleep bruxism is common among the various oromotor alterations found in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). Few studies have investigated the use of the mastication device denominated “hyperbola” (HB) and none was found describing the use of such a device for the treatment of bruxism in children with CP. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the HB on electromyographic (EMG) activity in the jaw-closing muscles and the reduction in sleep bruxism in a child with CP using surface EMG analysis before and after nine months of treatment. Methods A seven-year-old boy with severe spastic CP and sleep bruxism was enrolled in this study. The HB was chosen as the treatment option for sleep bruxism in this case because the child did not accept an occlusal splint. The HB has a hyperbolic shape and is made of soft, non-toxic, odorless, tasteless silicone. There are five different sizes of HB manufactured based on the diversity of tooth sizes. This device produces proprioceptive excitation in the dentoalveolar nerve, spindles and Golgi tendon organs. HB has been employed for the treatment of temporomandibular disorder, abnormal oro-dental development, abnormal occlusion, xerostomy, halitosis and bruxism. HB therapy was performed for 5 min six times a day over a nine-week period. Surface EMG of the mandible at rest and during maximum contraction was performed on the masseter and temporalis muscles bilaterally to evaluate electromyographic activity before and after nine months of HB usage. Results HB usage led to a visible tendency toward the reorganization of mastication dynamics, achieving a marked balance in electromyographic activity of the jaw-closing muscles and improving the child's quality of life. Conclusion Based on the findings of the present study, this noninvasive therapy may be useful for individuals with cerebral palsy due to its positive effects and low cost, which allows its use in the public health realm. Further clinical studies with a larger sample size are needed to validate these results and allow the development of a new treatment protocol for patients with spastic cerebral palsy.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Photographic analysis of human posture: A literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): José Luís Pimentel do Rosário
      Introduction The study of posture is not an easy task, mainly because postural assessment is still scientifically inaccurate. Photographs of bipedalism in the frontal and sagittal planes are one of the most widely used methods for this assessment. The aim of this literature review was to determine which anatomical markers authors of scientific papers have taken to minimize the chances of error in measurements. Materials and methods The Medline and Lilacs databases were searched for the period from 2002 to 2012, with the following keywords: “postura”; “posture” and “postural.” Discussion A number of studies have shown a reasonable correlation between radiographic measurements and the placement of markers. It appears possible to use photography as a form of scientific assessment since the anatomical landmarks are well chosen. Conclusion The markers that were suggested in this review: malleolus; posterior calcaneal tuberosity; fibular head; tibial tuberosity; greater trochanter of the femur; anterior angle and/or posterior lateral edge of the acromion; spinous processes (particularly C7); inferior angle of the scapula; sternum manubrium; mental protuberance; and the intertragic notch. Iliac spines, both anterior superior and posterior superior, should only be used with lean subjects.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Accuracy of two forms of infrared image analysis of the masticatory
           muscles in the diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Delaine Rodrigues-Bigaton , Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Amanda Carine Packer , Ana Cláudia de Souza Costa , Ester Moreira de Castro
      The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of two forms of infrared image analysis (area and extension) of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles in the diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 104 female volunteers from the university community. Following the application of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, the volunteers were divided into a TMD group (n = 52) and control group (n = 52), and evaluated using infrared thermography. The area and extension of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were measured on the images. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine diagnostic accuracy (area under the curve), best cutoff point, sensitivity and specificity. A significant difference in skin temperature between groups was only found in the measurement of the area of the left anterior temporalis muscle (p = 0.011). The area under the ROC curve was less than the reference values for all muscles evaluated in the analyses of area and extension. Thus, neither method of infrared thermography tested for the quantification of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles (analysis of area and extension) is consistent with the RDC/TMD for the diagnosis of myogenous TMD in women.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Developmental kinesiology: Three levels of motor control in the assessment
           and treatment of the motor system
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alena Kobesova , Pavel Kolar
      Three levels of sensorimotor control within the central nervous system (CNS) can be distinguished. During the neonatal stage, general movements and primitive reflexes are controlled at the spinal and brain stem levels. Analysis of the newborn's spontaneous general movements and the assessment of primitive reflexes is crucial in the screening and early recognition of a risk for abnormal development. Following the newborn period, the subcortical level of the CNS motor control emerges and matures mainly during the first year of life. This allows for basic trunk stabilization, a prerequisite for any phasic movement and for the locomotor function of the extremities. At the subcortical level, orofacial muscles and afferent information are automatically integrated within postural–locomotor patterns. Finally, the cortical (the highest) level of motor control increasingly becomes activated. Cortical control is important for the individual qualities and characteristics of movement. It also allows for isolated segmental movement and relaxation. A child with impaired cortical motor control may be diagnosed with developmental dyspraxia or developmental coordination disorder. Human ontogenetic models, i.e., developmental motor patterns, can be used in both the diagnosis and treatment of locomotor system dysfunction.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Antagonist coactivation of trunk stabilizer muscles during Pilates
           exercises
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Denise Martineli Rossi , Mary Hellen Morcelli , Nise Ribeiro Marques , Camilla Zamfolini Hallal , Mauro Gonçalves , Dain P. LaRoche , Marcelo Tavella Navega
      The purpose of this study was to compare the antagonist coactivation of the local and global trunk muscles during mat-based exercises of Skilled Modern Pilates. Twelve women performed five exercises and concurrently, surface EMG from internal oblique (OI), multifidus (MU), rectus abdominis (RA) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscles was recorded bilaterally. The percentage of antagonist coactivation between local (OI/MU) and global muscles (RA/IL) was calculated. Individuals new to the practice of these exercises showed differences in coactivation of the trunk muscles between the exercises and these results were not similar bilaterally. Thus, in clinical practice, the therapist should be aware of factors such as compensation and undesirable rotation movements of the trunk. Moreover, the coactivation of global muscles was higher bilaterally in all exercises analyzed. This suggests that the exercises of Skilled Modern Pilates only should be performed after appropriate learning and correct execution of all principles, mainly the Centering Principle.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • NTOS symptoms and mobility: A case study on neurogenic thoracic outlet
           syndrome involving massage therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Robin S. Streit
      Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is a neuromuscular condition affecting brachial plexus functionality. NTOS is characterized by paresthesia, pain, muscle fatigue, and restricted mobility in the upper extremity. This study quantified massage therapy's possible contribution to treatment of NTOS. A 24-year-old female with NTOS received eight treatments over 35 days. Treatment included myofascial release, trigger point therapy, cross fiber friction, muscle stripping, and gentle passive stretching. Abduction and lateral rotation at the glenohumeral (GH joint) assessments measured range of motion (ROM). A resisted muscle test evaluated upper extremity strength. The client rated symptoms daily via a visual analog scale (VAS). Findings showed improvement in ROM at the GH joint. VAS ratings revealed a reduction in muscle weakness, pain, numbness, and ‘paresthesia’. Results suggest massage may be useful as part of a broad approach to managing NTOS symptoms and improving mobility.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Treatment of tension-type headache with articulatory and suboccipital soft
           tissue therapy: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical
           trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gemma V. Espí-López , Antonia Gómez-Conesa , Anna Arnal Gómez , Josep Benítez Martínez , Ángel Oliva Pascual-Vaca , Cleofás Rodríguez Blanco
      This study researches the effectiveness of two manual therapy treatments focused on the suboccipital region for tension-type headache. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted over a period of four weeks with a follow-up at one month. Eighty-four patients with a mean age of 39.7 years (SD 11.4) with tension-type headache were assigned to 4 groups which included the following manual therapy treatment: suboccipital soft tissue inhibition; occiput-atlas-axis global manipulation; combination of both techniques; and a control group. The primary assessment consisted of collecting socio-demographic data and headache characteristics in a one-month base period, data such as age, gender, severity of pain, intensity and frequency of headache, among other. Outcome secondary assessment were: impact of headache, disability, ranges of motion of the craniocervical junction, frequency and intensity of headache, and pericranial tenderness. In the month prior to the study, average pain intensity, was rated at 6.49 (SD 1.69), and 66.7% subjects suffered headaches of moderate intensity. After 8 weeks, statistically significant improvements were noted. OAA manipulative treatment and combined therapy treatments proved to be more effective than suboccipital soft tissue inhibition for tension-type headache. The treatment with suboccipital soft tissue inhibition, despite producing less significant results, also has positive effects on different aspects of headache.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • A case study utilizing spinal manipulation and dynamic neuromuscular
           stabilization care to enhance function of a post cerebrovascular accident
           patient
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Michael Oppelt , Dave Juehring , Glenn Sorgenfrey , Phyllis J. Harvey , Susan M. Larkin-Thier
      Introduction This case report demonstrated physical function improvement of a 31-year-old male, four years post cerebral vascular compromise, with 32 weeks of Chiropractic adjustive and Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) rehabilitation care. Methods Chiropractic care occurred weekly over a 32 week care program with the inclusion of DNS treatments over the final 16 weeks. Functional changes were tracked via Low Back Bournemouth assessment, objective findings and independent clinical examination. Results Throughout care the patient progressed with non-assisted ambulation, global improvement in balance and movement pattern, decreased Low Back Bournemouth assessment scores from 43% to 23%. Discussion This therapeutic approach reduced the patient's physical disabilities, enhancing quality of life. Conclusion Chiropractic adjustive care combined with DNS treatment improved functional deficits warranting consideration in subsequent care investigations.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • A pragmatic investigation into the effects of massage therapy on the self
           efficacy of multiple sclerosis clients
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Paul Finch , Susan Bessonnette
      Objective This research was conducted to examine changes in self self-efficacy, (the perception/belief that one can competently cope with a challenging situation) in multiple sclerosis clients following a series of massage therapy treatments. Method This small practical trial investigated the effects of a pragmatic treatment protocol using a prospective randomized pretest posttest waitlist control design. Self-Efficacy scores were obtained before the first treatment, mid-treatment series, after the last treatment in the series, four weeks after the final treatment and again eight weeks after the final treatment had been received. Intervention The intervention involved a series of weekly one hour therapeutic massage treatments conducted over eight weeks and a subsequent eight week follow up period. All treatments were delivered by supervised student therapists in the final term of their two year massage therapy program. Outcome measures Self-Efficacy [SE] was the outcome for the study, measured using the Multiple Sclerosis Self-Efficacy survey [MSSE]. Descriptive statistics for SE scores were assessed and inferential analysis involved the testing of between group differences at each of the measurement points noted above. Results Statistically significant improvement in self-efficacy was noted between treatment (n = 8) and control (n = 7) groups at mid treatment series (t = 2.32; p < 0.02), post treatment series (t = 1.81; p < 0.05) and at four week follow up (t = 2.24; p < 0.02). At the eight week follow up self-efficacy scores had decreased and there was no statistically significant difference between groups (t = 0.87; p < 0.2). Conclusion Study results support previous findings indicating that massage therapy increases the self-efficacy of clients with multiple sclerosis, potentially resulting in a better overall adjustment to the disease and an improvement in psycho-emotional state. The increase in self-efficacy after 4 weeks of treatment suggests that positive response occurs more rapidly that was previously demonstrated. The improvement in self-efficacy endured 4 weeks after the end of the treatment series, which suggests that massage therapy may have longer term effects on self-efficacy that were not previously noted. Lack of inter group difference at the eight week follow up reinforces the notion that on-going treatment is required in order to maintain the positive changes observed.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Osteopathic manipulative treatment of congenital talipes equinovarus: A
           case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 18, Issue 1
      Author(s): Elda Andreoli , Andrea Troiani , Valentina Tucci , Gina Barlafante , Francesco Cerritelli , Gianfranco Pizzolorusso , Cinzia Renzetti , Daniele Vanni , Andrea Pantalone , Vincenzo Salini
      Background Treatment recommendations for congenital talipes equinovarus are focused on conservative treatments. Objectives The aim of this paper is to present a case report of bilateral congenital talipes equinovarus treated with two short-leg serial casting in combination with osteopathic manipulative treatment. Methods A newborn, 12 days old, with severe bilateral congenital talipes equinovarus entered to the Department of Orthopedics at the University of Chieti, Italy. The pediatric orthopedic surgeon applied two single series of short-leg casts, at 12 and 20 days of age. The osteopath scheduled 4 indirect myofascial release techniques sessions. Results At day 33 the newborn achieved a complete correction of the congenital talipes equinovarus deformity and there was no need to apply a third series of casts. Conclusions Results from this single case study create an interesting and clear precedent for considering OMT in future clinical trials.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Relationship between functional capacity, joint mobility and pulmonary
           function in patients with systemic sclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Tatiana Rafaela de Lemos Lima , Fernando Silva Guimarães , Leilson Araujo da Silva , Débora Pedroza Guedes da Silva , Sara Lucia Silveira de Menezes , Agnaldo José Lopes
      Background In systemic sclerosis (SS), pulmonary involvement is currently the leading cause of mortality. Joint impairments limit the range of motion (ROM), which may reduce the functional capacity of these patients. Aim To assess the correlation between the functional capacity, joints mobility, and pulmonary function parameters in adults with SS. Method This was a cross-sectional study including ten SS patients who underwent goniometry, spirometry, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLco) assessment, and the 6-min walk distance (6MWD). Results Significant correlations were found between the 6MWD and the tibiotarsal plantarflexion ROM (r=0.65; P<0.01), tibiotarsal dorsiflexion ROM (r=0.64; P<0.01), and hip adduction ROM (0.52; P<0.05). Significant correlation was also observed between the 6MWD and DLco (r=0.61; P<0.01). Conclusions Although the 6MWD can be influenced by cardiovascular and pulmonary impairments in SS, our results suggest that the musculoskeletal dysfunction play an important role in the functional capacity of these patients.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Comparison of group motor control training versus individual training for
           people suffering from back pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Heike Streicher , Franz Mätzold , Christine Hamilton , Wagner Petra
      This study investigated the effects of “motor-control training” (MCT) using the model of deficits in the activation of transversus abdominis (TrA) in people with recurrent back pain. The purpose of this investigation was to establish whether MCT – implemented within a new group intervention (experimental group) – is able to produce results similar to those of a conventional intervention applied individually (control group) to people suffering from back pain. Using the form of an experimental pre-post-test design, the study consisted of an experimental group (N=18, mean age M= 45.2; SD=18.4; 9 ♂, 9 ♀) and a comparison group (N=13; age=56.6; SD=18.5; 6 ♂, 7 ♀). The training covered a period of six weeks, with two training sessions per week. The amount of training was the same in both groups. Aside from the same extent of training, the participants in the experimental group completed training content in the group interventions identical to that completed by the comparison group in the individual treatments. To clarify: The difference between the two groups was that the participants in the individual-therapy control group received individual feedback on their exercise performance and correction notes from the instructor. This degree of individual attention was not given within the group therapy. The selective activation of the M. transversus abdominis (TrA) was the main focus of the intervention, with the intent of improving its stabilising corset function, especially within the lumbar region, via increased tension of the thoracolumbar fascia. To record the progress of both groups, the anterolateral abdominal muscle recruitment of the M. transversus abdominis (TrA) was measured as a main influencing factor for anterolateral stabilisation of the spine. For measurements of muscle recruitment, rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (M-Turbo™ SonoSite® Erlangen in B-Mode) according to Whittaker (2007) was used. Furthermore, the relationship between pain relief and the development of muscle recruitment was evaluated. Finally, the possible pain relief and the improvement of daily routine disruptions were assessed via the visual analogous scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODI) (Mannion et al 2006 a,b). Both forms of intervention produced significant improvements in abdominal muscle control and pain (p < 0.003; p < 0.007). However, according to Cohen (1988), the effect sizes could be classified as a low to medium effect advantage on the part of the individual treatment (d <0.5). Nevertheless, there were no statistically significant differences between individual and group interventions for the measured parameters, indicating that the group interventions can be considered more efficient because more patients were cured at the same time with similar effort. This result provides new and valuable insights for doctors, sports medicine specialists and physiotherapists, as well as for the sponsors of prescribed treatments, and it confirms the usefulness of integrating the new form of intervention into existing multimodal back therapy training concepts.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T00:03:51Z
       
  • Somatic dysfunction and fascia's gliding-potential
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 December 2013
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2013-12-05T21:09:52Z
       
 
 
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