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Journal Cover Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
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   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3089 journals]
  • Osteopathic manipulative treatment for low back and pelvic girdle pain
           during and after pregnancy: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Authors: Helge Franke; Jan-David Franke; Sebastian Belz; Gary Fryer
      Pages: 752 - 762
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 4
      Author(s): Helge Franke, Jan-David Franke, Sebastian Belz, Gary Fryer
      Background Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint during pregnancy. This study examined the effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) for LBP in pregnant or postpartum women. Methods Randomized controlled trials unrestricted by language were reviewed. Outcomes were pain and functional status. Mean difference (MD) or standard mean difference (SMD) and overall effect size were calculated. Results Of 102 studies, 5 examined OMT for LBP in pregnancy and 3 for postpartum LBP. Moderate-quality evidence suggested OMT had a significant medium-sized effect on decreasing pain (MD, −16.65) and increasing functional status (SMD, −0.50) in pregnant women with LBP. Low-quality evidence suggested OMT had a significant moderate-sized effect on decreasing pain (MD, −38.00) and increasing functional status (SMD, −2.12) in postpartum women with LBP. Conclusions This review suggests OMT produces clinically relevant benefits for pregnant or postpartum women with LBP. Further research may change estimates of effect, and larger, high-quality randomized controlled trials with robust comparison groups are recommended.

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T22:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.05.014
       
  • Does leg predomination affect measuring vasti muscle onsets during single
           leg squatting' A reliability study
    • Authors: Javid Mostamand; Dan L. Bader; Zoë Hudson
      Pages: 763 - 766
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 4
      Author(s): Javid Mostamand, Dan L. Bader, Zoë Hudson
      Introduction Although measuring vasti muscle onset may reveal whether pain relief is associated with altering this parameter during activities in subjects with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), it may be necessary to determine whether the inherent properties of the dominant leg influences the reliability of measuring VMO-VL muscle onset. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of leg predomination on reliability testing of the VMO-VL muscle onset measurement during single leg squatting in healthy subjects. Methods The onset of VMO and VL muscles of ten healthy subjects with a right dominant leg was assessed during single leg squatting. Data was collected from the muscle bellies of the VMO and VL. This procedure was performed on the both legs, during three separate single leg squats from a neutral position to a depth of approximately 30° of knee flexion. Subjects were then asked to repeat the test procedure after a minimum of a week's interval. The full wave rectified onsets of VMO and VL were then calculated. Results There was no significant difference between the VMO-VL onset mean values of paired test of right and left knees. The ICC (intra class correlation coefficient) values during within and between sessions tests showed the poor reliability of these measurements on both knees. Conclusion The low intratester reliability of within and between sessions measurement of VMO-VL onset on the both dominant and non-dominant legs revealed that repeatability of these measurements have little accepted reliability, however similar values of these measurements indicated that leg predomination does not affect the measurements during single leg squatting.

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T22:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.002
       
  • Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on balance, strength,
           and mobility of an older adult with chronic stroke: A case report
    • Authors: Christopher S. Cayco; Edward James R. Gorgon; Rolando T. Lazaro
      Pages: 767 - 774
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 4
      Author(s): Christopher S. Cayco, Edward James R. Gorgon, Rolando T. Lazaro
      This study described the effects of a proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) program on balance, strength, and mobility in an older adult with chronic stroke. The patient was male, aged 69 years, with right hemiplegia for 17 years, and had diminished balance, balance confidence, lower extremity (LE) strength, and gait velocity. He received 1 h of PNF-based therapy thrice a week for six weeks. Outcome measures were: Mini-BESTest, limits of stability (LOS), Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), Five Time Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSST), Upright Motor Control Test (UMCT), and 10 Meter Walk Test (10 MWT). The patient improved on the Mini-BESTest (25/28, from 21/28), FTSST (27.47 s, from 30.27 s), UMCT knee extension (moderate, from weak), and 10 MWT (0.82 m/s, from 0.67 m/s); and positive changes in LOS dimensions. PNF was effective in enhancing balance, strength, and mobility in an older adult with chronic stroke and may mitigate falls risk in this population. More research is needed to determine its impact in a larger sample of older people with chronic stroke.

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T22:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.008
       
  • The acute effects of ankle mobilisations on lower extremity joint
           kinematics
    • Authors: Louis P. Howe
      Pages: 775 - 780
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 4
      Author(s): Louis P. Howe
      Introduction Previous investigations have identified compensatory movement strategies (CMS) within the lower extremity or lumbopelvic complex during closed chain exercises may be associated with a loss of ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM). The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of ankle mobilisations on proximal joint kinematics during a movement task that demands a high amount of ankle dorsiflexion ROM. Methods Eight healthy males (mean (SD) age 25 (4) years) demonstrating side-to-side asymmetry during the weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT) and CMS during the single-leg step-down exercise were accepted for this study. Participants completed five repetitions of a single-leg step-down, both before and after an ankle mobilisation intervention aimed at improving joint athrokinematics. A Vicon motion capture system recorded 3D joint and segment kinematics of the ankle, knee, hip and pelvis. A paired samples t-test was used to identify significant changes of lower extremity joint kinematics during the single-leg step-down, before and after mobilisation. Results Following the mobilisation intervention, statistically significant gains in ankle dorsiflexion ROM were identified during the WBLT [mean difference 2.425 (0.9377) centimeters, t = −7.315, p < 0.01]. No evidence was found of altered joint kinematics during the single-leg step-down. Conclusion These findings indicate that increases in ankle dorsiflexion ROM do not automatically integrate into functional movement tasks.

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T22:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.007
       
  • Does ultrasound therapy add to the effects of exercise and mobilization in
           frozen shoulder' A pilot randomized double-blind clinical trial
    • Authors: Safoora Ebadi; Bijan Forogh; Ehsan Fallah; Arash Babaei Ghazani
      Pages: 781 - 787
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 4
      Author(s): Safoora Ebadi, Bijan Forogh, Ehsan Fallah, Arash Babaei Ghazani
      Objective This study intended to determine the extent to which Ultrasound could add to the effects of exercise and manual therapy in the rehabilitation treatment of primary adhesive capsulitis. Design A pilot double blind randomized clinical trial was carried out on 50 patients suffering from primary adhesive capsulitis. Intervention included continuous 3 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2 Ultrasound, applied for the first group and sham Ultrasound for the second group. In addition specific stretching and strengthening exercises as well as glenohumeral joint mobilization were delivered to both groups. Pain (VAS), functional ability (using Oxford Shoulder Score) and shoulder range of motion were assessed at the baseline, after 10 sessions of treatment, and at 3 months follow-up. An intention to treat Mixed ANOVA analysis was performed to explore the interaction effects of time and group on outcome measures. Results No significant interaction effect of time and group was seen on pain, function and Range of Motion (p > 0.05), meaning that the amount of improvement in all outcome measures were alike in the two groups. Conclusion Applying continuous Ultrasound along with a regimen of semi supervised exercise and mobilization in patients with primary adhesive capsulitis did not have any additional effect to the placebo Ultrasound, on outcome measures. Larger scale studies are needed to confirm the findings.

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T22:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.013
       
  • Attention-demand effects on respiration in chronic low back pain patients
    • Authors: Babak Goosheh; Majid Ravanbakhsh; Mahyar Salavati; Ismail Ebrahimi Takamjani; Behnam Akhbari; Amir Hossein Kahlaee
      Pages: 788 - 793
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 4
      Author(s): Babak Goosheh, Majid Ravanbakhsh, Mahyar Salavati, Ismail Ebrahimi Takamjani, Behnam Akhbari, Amir Hossein Kahlaee
      Increasing attention is being drawn towards the involvement of systems other than the musculoskeletal one in the presence of low back pain (LBP). Recent evidence suggests both cognitive and respiratory functions to be affected in LBP patients. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of performance of a cognitive task on the respiratory function in LBP patients with that in control participants. Capnography and spirometry parameters of 48 participants (24 in each group) were assessed under 3 cognitive loading conditions (no, easy and difficult cognitive task). The results showed that in both groups the respiratory function was significantly affected by the introduction of the cognitive task (p < 0.05) and in the same manner (p > 0.05). Capnography and spirometry variables alterations were significantly correlated in the no-LBP group (p < 0.05) but there was no significant relationship between respiratory parameters and capnography and disability indices in the LBP group (p > 0.05). The findings of the current study suggest that while performing a cognitive task affects respiratory function, the possible differences of LBP patients and control participants may not be elicited under simple non-physically demanding postural conditions.

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T22:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.016
       
  • Electromyographic activities of the abdominal muscles during 30% and 75%
           of maximum expiratory pressure
    • Authors: Hiroshi Ishida; Mai Fujisawa; Ryo Yokoyama; Tadanobu Suehiro; Susumu Watanabe
      Pages: 794 - 797
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 21, Issue 4
      Author(s): Hiroshi Ishida, Mai Fujisawa, Ryo Yokoyama, Tadanobu Suehiro, Susumu Watanabe
      The aim of this study was to quantify the activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and internal oblique (IO) muscles during 30% and 75% of maximum expiratory pressure (PE max). Fifteen healthy male university students participated in this study. Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the RA, EO, and IO muscles were measured during 30% and 75% of PE max and then normalized relative to maximum voluntary contractions (%MVC). All muscles during 75% of PE max showed significantly higher %MVC compared to that during 30% of PE max (P < 0.01). The EO and IO muscles showed significantly higher %MVC compared to the RA muscle during 30% and 75% of PE max (P < 0.05). Muscle endurance and strength induced by expiratory muscle strength training might be different in each abdominal muscle.

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T22:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.004
       
  • Correlations between the Helkimo indices and the maximal mandibular
           excursion capacities of patients with temporomandibular joint disorders
    • Authors: Victor Moreira Leamari; Alex de Freitas Rodrigues; Rubens Camino Junior; João Gualberto C. Luz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Victor Moreira Leamari, Alex de Freitas Rodrigues, Rubens Camino Junior, João Gualberto C. Luz
      Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) may present with diverse signs and symptoms, and one very significant is the limitation of mandibular movements. Additionally, the Helkimo indices allow for the reliable quantification of the signs and symptoms of TMD. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether there are any correlations between the Helkimo indices and the maximal mandibular excursion capacity in a group of patients with TMD. Eighty patients (72 women and 8 men, mean age 33.6 years) with diagnosis of TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were evaluated to obtain the Helkimo indices and their maximal mandibular excursion capacities. Normal or decreased maximum mandibular movements, i.e., opening, lateral and protrusion were compared with the anamnestic index, muscular pain symptoms, joint pain symptoms and the dysfunction index. Chi-squared analysis was used to compare normal and decreased movement capacities in terms of the Helkimo indices, and the muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. The statistical analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19.0. There were statistically significant differences in the clinical dysfunction index with the maximum opening (p = .011) and lateral movements (p = .024) but not with the maximum protrusion. There were no significant differences in the anamnestic index or the muscle pain and TMJ pain items of the clinical dysfunction index according to the mandibular excursions. The occurrences of limitations in the maximum opening and lateral movements are indications of greater TMD intensity.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.12.008
       
  • Gamification
    • Authors: D.C. Craig Liebenson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): D.C. Craig Liebenson


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.12.009
       
  • Association between hyper-pronated foot and the degree of severity of
           disability in patients with non-specific low back pain
    • Authors: Arun Prasad Balasundaram; Dipankar Choudhury
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Arun Prasad Balasundaram, Dipankar Choudhury
      Background It has been established that Hyper-pronation of the foot may lead to postural changes in the lower limbs, with a resultant pelvic ante-version, and a subsequent risk of development of low back pain. However, the association between the presence of a hyper-pronated foot and the severity of disability in low back pain is currently not known. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine whether the presence of a hyper-pronated foot has any impact on the degree of severity of disability (functional status) in patients with non-specific low back pain. Methods An observational study was conducted in an outpatient setting, where patients diagnosed as having non-specific low back pain were included. The degree of severity of disability was measured using the Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire, and the foot hyper-pronation was assessed with the execution of the Navicular Drop test. Descriptive statistics and Linear regression analyses were conducted. Results Of the 71 patients included, 14 demonstrated having a unilateral hyper-pronation of the foot. The mean scores for the functional status and hyper-pronation of the foot were 37.15 (SD = 10.40) and 6.06 (SD = 3.42) respectively. An association was not found between the severity of disability and the presence of foot hyper-pronation (B = .87, p = .78). Conclusions Hyper-pronation of the foot could lead to the development of non-specific low back pain, but the degree of severity of the disability is not influenced by the presence of a hyper-pronated foot. The alterations in lower limb mechanics leading to back pain are a complex issue, and thus needs further research.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.012
       
  • A comparison of foot kinetic parameters between pronated and normal foot
           structures during forward jump landing
    • Authors: Hosein Kouhzad Mohammadi; Mohammad Mehravar; Khosro Khademi Kalantari; Sedighe Sadat Naimi; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban; Farshad Okhovatian; Asghar Rezasoltani; Mohammad Ali Mohseni Bandpei; Navid Taheri
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hosein Kouhzad Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehravar, Khosro Khademi Kalantari, Sedighe Sadat Naimi, Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban, Farshad Okhovatian, Asghar Rezasoltani, Mohammad Ali Mohseni Bandpei, Navid Taheri
      Background Pronated foot is one of the most important factors that may lead to musculoskeletal injuries of the lower extremities. It is known that in a pronated foot, excessive mechanical loads are applied to the lower limb structures, which result in the altered foot biomechanics, including vertical ground reaction forces (VGRFs) and rate of loading (ROL). Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the changes in foot kinetic parameters in the pronated compared to the normal foot structures. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 15 individuals (mean age of 23.27 ± 3.28 years) with asymptomatic pronated feet and 15 normal subjects (mean age of 23.40 ± 3.11 years) were recruited from both genders by using a simple non-random sampling method. VGRF, ROL, and the resultant vector of time to stabilization (RVTTS) were evaluated during the forward jump landing task by using a force plate. Results The findings showed that the following parameters were significantly higher in the group of pronated feet than in the normal subjects: VGRF (3.30 ± 0.17 vs. 2.81 ± 0.15, p = .042), ROL (0.10 ± 0.01 vs. 0.07 ± 0.006, p = .020), and RVTTS (2592.80 ± 141.24 vs. 2114.00 ± 154.77, p = .030). Conclusion All the measured foot kinetic parameters were higher in the pronated foot subjects than in the normal participants. An impaired movement control and greater forces imposed on the foot region of the pronated foot compared to the normal foot individuals were discovered indicating the former group's possible increase of susceptibility to various musculoskeletal injuries.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.12.006
       
  • Cardiac autonomic response after cranial technique of the fourth ventricle
           (cv4) compression in systemic hypertensive subjects
    • Authors: Ana Christina Certain Curi; Alex Souto Maior Alves; Julio Guilherme Silva
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Ana Christina Certain Curi, Alex Souto Maior Alves, Julio Guilherme Silva
      Objective The aim of this study was to compare blood pressure (BP) behavior and heart rate variability (HRV) among hypertensive stage I and normotensive individuals who were submitted to the cranial technique of the 4th ventricle compression (CV4), an osteopathic technique. Methods In this experimental controlled study, thirty men between 40 and 60 years old were evaluated and divided into two groups: normotensive (NT) and hypertensive (HT). The CV4 maneuver was applied in both groups and BP was measured at 5 (five) different stages: pre and post-intervention, 5, 10 and 15min after technique. Time-frequency parameters were obtained from measurements of RR intervals. Data were analyzed using an ANOVA two-way for analysis of the condition factor (NT and HT) and times with p-value ≤ .05. Results There was a reduction in the BP of the HT group. A significant intergroup difference (p = .01) was noticed, with respect to the standard deviation of successive normal R-R intervals (SDNN) values, mainly between pre-intervention and 15min stages. Concerning root mean square of the mean squared differences (RNSSD) values, the highlights were differences between pre-intervention and 10min (p = .01) only in the NT group. There was an increase in high frequencies (HF) values and a low frequencies (LF) attenuation in both groups at all different stages. Conclusion The data showed a BP reduction in the HT group in pre-intervention/15min and an increase in parasympathetic activity and decreased sympathetic activity in both groups. This suggests a change in the sympathetic-vagal balance. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the data on BP reduction mechanisms with CV4.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.013
       
  • Analysis of the electromiographic activity of lower limb and motor
           function in hippotherapy practitioners with cerebral palsy
    • Authors: Mariane Fernandes Ribeiro; Ana Paula Espindula; Janaine Brandão Lage; Domingos Emanuel Bevilacqua Júnior; Luanna Honorato Diniz; Ednéia Corrêa de Mello; Alex Abadio Ferreira; Mara Lúcia Fonseca Ferraz; Vicente de Paula Antunes Teixeira
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mariane Fernandes Ribeiro, Ana Paula Espindula, Janaine Brandão Lage, Domingos Emanuel Bevilacqua Júnior, Luanna Honorato Diniz, Ednéia Corrêa de Mello, Alex Abadio Ferreira, Mara Lúcia Fonseca Ferraz, Vicente de Paula Antunes Teixeira
      Objective Investigation of the effects of hippotherapy treatment on lower limb muscle activity and gross motor function in subjects with cerebral palsy (CP), comparing them to a group of subjects with adequate motor development. Methods Evaluation was made of seven individuals with spastic diparetic CP, average age 9.3 (±3.3) years (CP group), Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I and II, and eight individuals with adequate motor development, average age 10.9 (±3.2) years (control group). The groups were submitted to 25 sessions of hippotherapy, each lasting 30 min, on a weekly basis, and the muscle activity of the lower limbs was evaluated using surface electromyography during the 1st, 10th, 20th, and 25th sessions. For the CP group, Gross Motor Function Measurement (GMFM-88) was performed before and after hippotherapy treatment. Results There was higher muscle activity in the 10th session, compared to the other sessions, with greater activity of the tibialis anterior muscles, for both groups studied. After treatment, the CP group showed significant improvement in the GMFM total score, and in the scores for dimensions D and E. Conclusion Hippotherapy sessions improved the muscle responses in both groups, and improved the gross motor function of the subjects with CP.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.12.007
       
  • Immediate effect of myofascial release on range of motion, pain and biceps
           and rectus femoris muscle activity after total knee replacement
    • Authors: Danielle Cristine Carvalho Muniz e Silva; Dângelo José de Andrade Alexandre; Júlio Guilherme Silva
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Danielle Cristine Carvalho Muniz e Silva, Dângelo José de Andrade Alexandre, Júlio Guilherme Silva
      Objectives The role of a myofascial release (MFR) on flexion contractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine its immediate effect on such patients. Methods In this A-B single subject experimental study, 33 TKA's patients with knee flexion contracture had their gluteal, posterior fascia lata, posterior crural and plantar fasciae released. Patient's knee range of motion (KROM), pain and muscle electric activity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. Results An increase in electric activity of the biceps femoris muscle was identified after treatment (pre RMS = 0.087 ± 0.066 V; post RMS = 0.097 ± 0.085 V; p = 0.037). Mean gain of KROM was 5.72°± 6.27, correspondent to an 11.9% improvement (p = 0.01). Eight subjects had their pain decreased on 56.9% (p = 0.04). Conclusions MFR increased muscle activity, reduced pain and improved the KROM of TKA patients. Thus, MFR is a useful resource of rehabilitation after TKA.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.12.003
       
  • Integration of a neurodynamic approach into the treatment of dysarthria
           for patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease: A pilot study
    • Authors: Barbara Ateras; Harry von Piekartz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Barbara Ateras, Harry von Piekartz
      Purpose Differences between standard dysarthria treatment and the same treatment with the integration of neurodynamic techniques tailored to the severity of dysarthria in patients with Parkinson's disease were examined. Method In total, 10 subjects with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and rigid–hypokinetic dysarthria were enrolled in this quasi-randomized, controlled, single-blind, pre–post study. In each of 12 therapy sessions the control group (n = 5) received standard dysarthria treatment (usual care), while the intervention group (n = 5) received the same treatment with the addition of integrated neurodynamic treatment (special care). Results There was no significant difference between the two groups for either the pre-test (p = 0.739) or the post-test (p = 0.156) results. However, significant differences between the pre-test and post-test results within each group (intervention group p = 0.001; control group p = 0.003) were found. Conclusions The significant differences in the pre–post comparison within the groups may indicate a high probability of a positive effect of standard dysarthria treatment on the severity of dysarthria. In between-group comparisons, the study results indicated no evidence of a significant difference between standard dysarthria treatment with or without neurodynamics. Due to the small sample size, the effectiveness of the integration of neurodynamics into speech therapy cannot be definitively concluded for now. In order to be able to have generalized applicability, future studies with larger numbers of participants are required.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.12.004
       
  • Thoracic hyperkyphosis non invasively measured by general practitioners is
           associated with chronic low back pain: A cross-sectional study of 1364
           subjects
    • Authors: Jorge Hugo Villafañe; Luciano Bissolotti; Fabio Zaina; Chiara Arienti; Sabrina Donzelli; Stefano Negrini
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jorge Hugo Villafañe, Luciano Bissolotti, Fabio Zaina, Chiara Arienti, Sabrina Donzelli, Stefano Negrini
      Objective The aim of this study was to examine the association between trunk sagittal posture and nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) by evaluating plumb-line distances in subjects recruited in an everyday clinical setting. Methods Of the 1364 subjects recruited, 63.1% were female (mean age ± SD: 56.2 ± 16.8 years). Subjects were categorized into CLBP and control groups and were prospectively assessed over a 3-month period. They provided information about their daily activities and their history of CLBP. Prognostic factors were analysed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A physical examination was performed to record demographic (i.e. age, height and weight) and pain characteristics, and the intensity of pain was assessed using a numerical visual analogue scale. Disability was assessed using the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). A simple measure generally used for sagittal plane screening purposes during growth was also utilized. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that gender (OR = 1.70), RMDQ score (OR = 0.51) and thoracic hyperkyphosis (C7 + L3 at the plumb-line distance) (OR = 1.57) were associated with CLBP. The final regression model explained 85.6% (R2 = 0.56; P < 0.001) of the variability. Conclusions General practitioners can clinically and easily assess trunk posture in subjects with low back pain to identify subjects at higher risk of CLBP.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.12.001
       
  • Effects of eight-week “gyroscopic device” mediated resistance training
           exercise on participants with impingement syndrome or tennis elbow
    • Authors: Mojtaba Babaei-Mobarakeh; Amir Letafatkar; Amir Hosein Barati; Zohre Khosrokiani
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mojtaba Babaei-Mobarakeh, Amir Letafatkar, Amir Hosein Barati, Zohre Khosrokiani
      Background Rehabilitation of injuries in the upper extremity and reestablishment of muscle strength throughout the range of motion in overhead movements, are the major concerns of athletes and coaches in the sports field. Purpose To determine the effect of eight-week “gyroscopic device” mediated resistance training exercise on grip strength, wrist and shoulder strength and proprioception, and upper extremity performance, in participants with impingement syndrome or tennis elbow. Design and methods For this study, in a university rehabilitation clinic 45 volleyball players (aged 22–28) purposefully were selected and divided into 3 groups: shoulder impingement (group I), tennis elbow (group II), and control (group III). The experimental groups performed the “gyroscopic device” mediated resistance training, three sessions a week over 8 wks. Grip strength, wrist and shoulder strength and proprioception, and upper extremity performance were measured before and after implementation of the intervention (eight-week resistance training using a “gyroscopic device”) using a hand hold dynamometer, isokinetic dynamometer, and Y balance test respectively. Results After 8 weeks of “gyroscopic device” exercise, improvement in the shoulder, wrist and grip strength, shoulder and wrist proprioception and performance scores of both experimental groups was significant. There were no significant differences between study groups I and II, both groups, however, demonstrated significant differences when compared to the control group, but between group I and the control group, and between group II and the control group, the difference was significant. However, no significant change was seen in the control group. Conclusions Due to the significant effects of the “gyroscopic device” mediated exercise on grip strength, wrist and shoulder strength and proprioception, and performance of the upper extremity, use of the exercise can be recommended for subjects with impingement syndrome or tennis elbow impairment in measured variables. More research is needed to confirm the result of this study.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.12.002
       
  • Muscle thickness and echo intensity measurements of the rectus femoris
           muscle of healthy subjects: Intra and interrater reliability of transducer
           tilt during ultrasound
    • Authors: Hiroshi Ishida; Tadanobu Suehiro; Keita Suzuki; Susumu Watanabe
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hiroshi Ishida, Tadanobu Suehiro, Keita Suzuki, Susumu Watanabe
      This study aimed to assess the intra and interrater reliability of transducer tilt during the ultrasound (US) measurements of the muscle thickness and the echo intensity of the rectus femoris muscle (RF). Fourteen healthy male subjects (20.8 ± 0.8 years) participated in this study. The transducer tilt was measured using a digital angle gauge (°) during US. Two experimenters took two images to measure the muscle thickness (mm) and the echo intensity (a.u.: arbitrary unit). The intra and interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM), and minimal detectable change (MDC) were also calculated. These measurements were immediately repeated. The ICC for the intrarater reliability for the transducer tilt, muscle thickness, and echo intensity were 0.96 (SEM: 0.9°, MDC: 2.6°), 0.99 (SEM: 0.4 mm, MDC: 0.1 mm), and 0.97 (SEM: 0.6 a.u., MDC: 1.7 a.u.), respectively. The ICC for the interrater reliability for the transducer tilt, muscle thickness, and echo intensity were 0.40 (SEM: 4.0°, MDC: 11.1°), 0.96 (SEM: 0.7 mm, MDC: 2.0 mm), and 0.95 (SEM: 0.9 a.u., MDC: 2.4 a.u.), respectively. The intrarater reliability of the transducer tilt was reliable, but the interrater reliability was questionable. Meanwhile, both the intra- and interrater reliability of the muscle thickness and the echo intensity were reliable.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.12.005
       
  • Fascial well-being: Mechanotransduction in manual and movement therapies
    • Authors: Leon Chaitow
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T00:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.011
       
  • Using first bout effect to study the mechanisms underlying eccentric
           exercise induced force loss
    • Authors: Orawan Prasartwuth; Roongtip Suteebut; Jitapa Chawawisuttikool; Utku Yavuz S; Kemal Turker S
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Orawan Prasartwuth, Roongtip Suteebut, Jitapa Chawawisuttikool, Utku Yavuz S, Kemal Turker S
      Introduction The first bout of eccentric exercise is known to have a protective effect on the consequent bouts. This effect is still disputable as it is not known whether it protects muscle damage by reducing force production or by improving force recovery in the healing process. The underlying mechanisms of this protective effect have not been fully understood. Objectives To determine the mechanisms of this protective effect, three different loads were used for the first eccentric bout. This was done to investigate whether the protective effect is related to the size of the load in the first bout. To determine the neural adaptations, voluntary activation was assessed and to determine the muscular adaptations, the resting twitch was measured. Method Thirty healthy participants were selectively allocated into three groups (low-, moderate- and high-load group) to match for maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (n = 10 per group). Participants in each group performed only one of the three sets of ten eccentric (ECC) exercises of the elbow flexors (10%, 20% and 40% of MVC) as their first eccentric bout. The second bout of eccentric exercise was performed two weeks later and was identical for all the three groups, i.e., 40% ECC. Results The results showed that for the first bout, MVC, voluntary activation and the resting twitch displayed significant (p < 0.0001) interaction (group x time). This was not the case however for the second bout as there was no significant (group x time) interaction in all outcome variables immediately after exercise. When the first and second bouts were compared, it was found that the high-load group had faster recovery in MVC at day 1 and 4 corresponding to voluntary activation and only at day 4 corresponding to the resting twitch. Conclusions In this study, it was found that high-load exercise aids fast recovery either via neural or muscular adaptations.

      PubDate: 2017-11-30T20:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.008
       
  • The effect of time restricted visual sensory input on asymmetry of ground
           reaction force components in female children
    • Authors: Mozhgan Faraji Aylar; AmirAli Jafarnezhadgero; Fatemeh Salari Esker; Robert Barber; D.G.E. Robertson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mozhgan Faraji Aylar, AmirAli Jafarnezhadgero, Fatemeh Salari Esker, Robert Barber, D.G.E. Robertson
      The association between visual sensory and the asymmetry index of sit-to-stand ground reaction force characteristics is not fully understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate asymmetry index of sit-to-stand ground reaction forces, their times–to-peak, vertical loading rate, impulses, and free moment in blind and sighted children. 15 female children with congenital blindness and 30 healthy girls with no visual impairments volunteered to participate in this study. The girls with congenital blindness were placed in one group and the girls with no visual impairments were randomly divided into two groups of 15. The two condition groups consisted of, one eyes open and the other, eyes closed. The participants in the eyes closed group were asked to close their eyes for 20 min before the test, whereas those in the eyes open group kept their eyes open. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected using an eight-camera motion analysis system synchronized with two force plates embedded in the floor. A MANOVA test was run for between-group comparisons. There were no distinctive biomechanical alternations in all axes of ground reaction forces and their times-to-peak, vertical loading rate, impulses and free moments in congenital blindness and eyes closed groups compared with the eyes open group. However, eyes closed was associated with increased total time and second phase duration of sit-to-stand performance by 69% (p = 0.008) and 62% (p = 0.008), respectively. These findings reveal that individuals who are visually restricted in the short term, do not develop stereotypical movement strategies for sit-to-stand.

      PubDate: 2017-11-30T20:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.010
       
  • An examination of the relationship between dynamic knee joint stiffness
           and gait pattern of children with cerebral palsy
    • Authors: Manuela Galli; Veronica Cimolin; Claudia Condoluci; Pier Francesco Costici; Reinald Brunner
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Manuela Galli, Veronica Cimolin, Claudia Condoluci, Pier Francesco Costici, Reinald Brunner
      Dynamic joint stiffness represents the resistance that a joint opposes to an applied moment. Stiffness arises in conditions of joint laxity, instability and increased co-contraction and is commonly utilized as a means to stabilize the joint. The knee joint seems to be crucial for determining the walking pattern. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the gait pattern, globally quantified by the Gait Profile Score (GPS), which indicates the ‘quality’ of a particular walking strategy, and knee dynamic joint stiffness (Kk) in children with diplegia. Kk is expressed by plotting the values of the knee flexion-extension moment versus the knee flexion-extension angle during weight acceptance. In this interval, the linear regression was fitted. The angular coefficient of the linear regression corresponded to the joint stiffness index. Sixty-one children with diplegia and 18 healthy individuals took part in this study. From their gait analysis data, the GPS (with its Gait Variable Scores-GVSs) and the Kk were calculated. Data showed that GPS (p = 2.73 × 10−21) and GVSs values for the patients with diplegia were higher in comparison to healthy controls. The Kk values for patients were not statistically different from those of controls. The correlation between Kk and GPS did not show the presence of any significant relationship (r = −0.04; p > 0.05). Thus, the functional limitation in diplegic children does not seems to be strictly related to Kk.

      PubDate: 2017-11-30T20:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.009
       
  • Quadriceps force production during straight leg raising at different hip
           positions with and without concomitant ankle dorsiflexion
    • Authors: Saeed Mikaili; Khosro Khademi-Kalantari; Asghar Rezasoltani; Parisa Arzani; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Saeed Mikaili, Khosro Khademi-Kalantari, Asghar Rezasoltani, Parisa Arzani, Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban
      Objective Due to the significant prevalence of knee disorders and patellofemoral pain syndrome, as well as the importance of quadriceps strengthening in knee rehabilitation programs, it is necessary to specify the best method to activate and strengthen the quadriceps muscles. The current study aimed at comparing the maximum generated isometric force during an active straight-leg-raising (SLR) maneuver in a sitting position by changing the hip rotational position with and without the simultaneous contraction of the ankle dorsiflexor muscles. Methodology The current study was performed on 30 healthy males recruited with a non-random and available sampling method. The maximum generated force was measured during the SLR maneuver in six compound internal and external rotations and in a neutral position with and without ankle dorsiflexor contraction. The obtained generated force was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results The generated forces in the SLR with and without contracting the ankle dorsiflexors were significantly different (p = 0.001), and taking different positions of hip rotation led to significant changes in the generated force (p = 0.005). Conclusion The adoption of external hip rotation with the contraction of ankle dorsiflexors during the SLR maneuver generated the most force. Based on the interaction of these conditions, the general recommendation is to perform the SLR exercise in an external hip rotation with the simultaneous contraction of the ankle dorsiflexors in subjects with quadriceps muscle weakness.

      PubDate: 2017-11-30T20:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.006
       
  • Trait anxiety and sensory processing profile characteristics in patients
           with non-specific chronic low back pain and central sensitisation - A
           pilot observational study
    • Authors: Jacqui R. Clark; Gillian Yeowell; Peter C. Goodwin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jacqui R. Clark, Gillian Yeowell, Peter C. Goodwin
      Introduction People with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) and central sensitisation (CS) exhibit sensory processing alterations, somatosensory hypersensitivity and differences in the brain's emotional networks. The concept that CS relates to pre-morbid trait sensory processing and anxiety characteristics is unknown. The aims of this pilot observational study were to test concept plausibility in a NSCLBP population with central sensitisation by investigating: 1) the range of Central Sensitisation Inventory scores, to determine the extent of symptoms of central sensitisation, 2) whether there are identifiable patient characteristics of trait anxiety and trait sensory profile differences; and 3) whether potential relationships exist between trait anxiety, trait sensory profiles and the extent of symptoms of central sensitisation. Methods People with NSCLBP and CS were recruited from physiotherapy outpatient clinics in New Zealand and the United Kingdom. Outcomes included the Central Sensitisation Inventory (CSI), Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile and the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (trait section) with the Marlow Crown Sociable Desirability Scale. Descriptive and non-parametric tests for correlation were used to analyse the data, p=<0.05. Results Of the 21 people recruited, 16 (76.2%) had CSI scores ≥40 in association with 1) an abnormally high prevalence of extreme scores of a) high trait Sensory Sensitive, Sensation Avoiding and Low Registration sensory profiles and b) low trait Sensation Seeking profile, 2) high trait anxiety sub-types and 3) minimal low trait anxiety. Moderate correlations were identified between trait sensory profiles and 1) CS pain (Sensory Sensitive R = 0.57, p < 0.01, CI = 0.07 to 0.88, p < 0.01, Sensation Seeking R = −0.47, p < 0.05, CI = −0.72 to −0.02) and 2) trait anxiety (Sensory sensitive: R = 0.65, p < 0.01, CI = 0.27 to 0.91) and Low Registration (R = 0.49, p < 0.05, CI = 0.03 to 0.84). The CSI scores moderately correlated with trait anxiety (R = 0.63, p < 0.01, CI = 0.22 to 0.86). Conclusion These results provide concept plausibility that the extent of CS pain in people with NSCLBP might be associated with pre-morbid trait anxiety sub-types and abnormal trait sensory processing profiles. A larger study to confirm the findings is warranted.

      PubDate: 2017-11-30T20:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.007
       
  • Biomechanical factors associated with running economy and performance of
           elite Kenyan distance runners: A systematic review
    • Authors: Nassib Tawa; Quinette Louw
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Nassib Tawa, Quinette Louw
      Background Running economy (RE) is a determinant of performance in endurance sports and is a complex multi-factorial measure which reflects the combined functioning of bio-mechanical, neuro-muscular, metabolic and cardio-respiratory factors some of which are hereditary or adapt to coaching. Kenyan distance runners have dominated major global events with their unmatched performance for decades and this phenomenon has prompted several investigations aimed at establishing possible factors associated with their performance. This systematic review was aimed at establishing up-to date quantitative synthesis of evidence on biomechanical factors associated with running economy and performance of elite Kenyan distance runners and to provide an algorithm for future research and coaching strategies. Methods A comprehensive electronic search was conducted through June 2017. Quality appraisal was independently done by both reviewers using the STROBE checklist. Descriptive summaries and tables were used to illustrate biomechanical outcomes, mean differences and confidence intervals. Evidence from reviewed studies was graded according to the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) hierarchy for aetiological factors and meta-analysis was performed where applicable. Results Eight cross-sectional studies were included. The overall methodological score was moderate (58%). Elite Kenyan distance runners have significant longer gastroc-Achilles tendons compared to their counterparts while their shank length is not significantly longer. There is no certainty of evidence regarding the association between their characteristic unique profile of tall and slender bodies, low BMI and low body mass, short ground contact and flight times, greater forward lean torso and faster and greater forward leg swing with RE and performance. Conclusion Our findings presents evidence on biomechanical factors associated with RE and performance of elite Kenyan distance runners. Despite these findings, there are a number of limitations inherent to this review including; low level of evidence, minimal number of included studies, small sample size and lack of appropriate control subjects. However, we considered these shortcomings and summarised the best available evidence in attempt to give direction to future research and coaching strategies.

      PubDate: 2017-11-30T20:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.004
       
  • Short-term effects of kinesio taping on trigger points in upper trapezius
           and gastrocnemius muscles
    • Authors: Leonid Kalichman; Inbar Levin; Itzhak Bachar; Elisha Vered
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leonid Kalichman, Inbar Levin, Itzhak Bachar, Elisha Vered
      Background Kinesio taping is a possible therapeutic modality for myofascial pain, nevertheless, very scarce research has been performed on this subject. Objective To evaluate the immediate and short-term effect of kinesio taping application on myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in the upper trapezius and gastrocnemius muscles. Methods Two randomized, single-blinded, controlled trials were simultaneously executed on the upper trapezius and gastrocnemius muscles. Different participants in each study were randomly assigned to an active intervention (N = 15) or control (N = 15) group. Kinesio taping was applied on the gastrocnemius or upper trapezius muscles by positioning three “I” strips in a star shape (tension on base) directly above the MTrPs in the active intervention group and a few centimeters away from the MTrPs in the controls. Results The second evaluation on both sides showed lower PPT values than the first evaluation in the control group, denoting that the spots were more sensitive. The third evaluation showed even lower values. The active intervention group showed a contralateral side pattern similar to the controls. However, on the side of the kinesio taping application, the PPT values of the second evaluation were higher (the spots were less sensitive) and after 24 h returned to the original values. The difference between the PPT measurements on the MTrPs’ side of the active intervention group vs. the controls (time-group interaction) was significant (F (2,56) = 3.24, p = 0.047). Conclusions We demonstrated that a kinesio taping application positioned directly above the MTrPs may prevent an increase in sensitivity (decrease in PPT) immediately after application and prevent further sensitization up to 24 h later. The fact that two different muscles were similarly affected by the kinesio taping application, confirmed that the results were not in error. Further studies are needed to directly test the effect of a kinesio taping application on post-treatment soreness.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T21:55:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.005
       
  • No immediate analgesic effect of diadynamic current in patients with
           nonspecific low back pain in comparison to TENS
    • Authors: Bijan Forogh; Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari; Tannaz Ahadi; Ehsan Fallah; Safoora Ebadi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Bijan Forogh, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Tannaz Ahadi, Ehsan Fallah, Safoora Ebadi
      Background and design:Chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNSLBP) has major socioeconomic as well as personal impact in many industrialized and developing countries. Physiotherapy is a common intervention for this group of patients and using anti-pain physical modalities is a common part of the physical therapy. In a randomized controlled trial we investigated the immediate effect of the Diadynamic current in comparison to TENS on reducing the pain in patients suffering from non-specific chronic low back pain. Methods Thirty patients were randomized into the Diadynamic current and TENS groups.Electrical stimulation was applied for 10 min in the Diadynamic group and for 15 min in the TENS group for one session. Pain, on a 100 mm Visual Analog Scale, and Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT), using an Algometer, was measured before the treatment, after the current application, 20 min later and after 48 h. Results Pain was decreased significantly after 20 min following the current application only in the TENS group, with no improvement at all in measurement points in the group receiving Diadynamic current. PPT was increased immediately after current application in both groups but did not last until later measurements. Conclusion Diadynamic current had no positive effect on prompt relief of pain in patients suffering from recurrent CNSLBP.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T21:55:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.003
       
  • An ultrasonographic investigation of deep neck flexor muscles
           cross-sectional area in forward and normal head posture
    • Authors: Roya Eshaghi Moghadam; Leila Rahnama; Noureddin Karimi; Mohsen Amiri; Mahsa Rahnama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Roya Eshaghi Moghadam, Leila Rahnama, Noureddin Karimi, Mohsen Amiri, Mahsa Rahnama
      Background As one of the most common work-related musculoskeletal disorders and postural deviations, forward head posture (FHP), is considered to lead to muscle imbalance. Objectives Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the bilateral cross-sectional area (CSA) of the deep neck flexor muscles at rest and during five stages of the craniocervical flexion (CCF) test in individuals with FHP and the controls with normal head posture. Methods Eighteen students with FHP and 18 controls with normal head posture, all females aged 18–35 years, participated in this study. Participants were categorized into two groups based on their craniovertebral angle. The CSA of the deep neck flexors was measured using ultrasonography while participants lay supine on the table with a pressure biofeedback unit placed under their necks in order to let the examiner measure the CSA of the muscles during rest and five stages of the CCF test including 22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 mmHg of the pressure biofeedback unit. Results A significant effect of contraction level was observed in both groups, indicating significant increases of the CSA of the deep neck flexors during contraction (F = 64.37, P < 0.001). No significant difference was evident for the CSA of the deep neck flexors between the groups, although the increase in the CSA of the deep neck flexors was up to 28 mmHg in the normal head posture group compared to 26 mmHg in the FHP group. Conclusions The results of the present study showed no significant difference between the performance of the deep neck flexors during the CCF test in FHP and normal head posture individuals, which challenge the common belief of the deep neck flexors weakness in individuals sustaining from FHP.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T21:55:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.002
       
  • Do different methods for measuring joint moment asymmetry give the same
           results'
    • Authors: AmirAli Jafarnezhadgero; Morteza Madadi-Shad; Fatemeh Salari Esker; D.G.E. Robertson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): AmirAli Jafarnezhadgero, Morteza Madadi-Shad, Fatemeh Salari Esker, D.G.E. Robertson
      Gait asymmetry is defined as a loss of perfect agreement between the dominant and non-dominant lower limbs. Conflicting results from gait asymmetry studies may be due to different definitions of asymmetry, different research methods, and/or different variables and formulas used for asymmetry calculation. As a result, this makes it difficult to compare joint asymmetry values between studies. An accurate and precise understanding of asymmetry during human walking is an important step towards developing enhanced rehabilitation protocols for pathological gait. This study examined bilateral lower extremity joint moment asymmetry during the stance phase of walking using three different methods. Fourteen male children (with flat feet) aged 8–14 years participated in this study. The three-dimensional lower limb kinetics was evaluated during a comfortable gait. Then, right and left lower limb joint moments were used to calculate the joint moment asymmetry via three different methods (Lathrop-Lambach method: equation used by Lathrop-Lambach et al. (2014); Su method: equation used by Su et al. (2015); Nigg method: equation used by Nigg et al. (2013)). Repeated-measures ANOVAs (α = 0.05) were used to compare the values of net joint moment asymmetry calculated by the three methods. The results of the statistical analyses found that the amounts of moment symmetry between limbs calculated by the first two methods were significantly greater than that of using the Nigg method (except for the values of the frontal ankle moment computed by the Lathrop-Lambach method). Furthermore, in comparison of the first two methods, using the Su method showed a reduction in moment asymmetry for all joints and for all moments (p < 0.05). We conclude that, although all of three common methods for determining asymmetry between limbs have documented merit, they sometimes differ dramatically in results.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T21:55:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.015
       
  • Experiences of hatha yogic exercises among patients with obstructive
           pulmonary disease: A qualitative study
    • Authors: Marian E. Papp; Maria Henriques; Gabriele Biguet; Per E. Wändell; Malin Nygren-Bonnier
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Marian E. Papp, Maria Henriques, Gabriele Biguet, Per E. Wändell, Malin Nygren-Bonnier
      Background and aim Obstructive pulmonary disease can involve dyspnea and deconditioning. Hatha yogic exercises are a form of psychophysical attention-based activity. Research of experiences after participating in an adapted hatha yoga (YE) intervention remains limited. The aim of the present study was to explore the experiences of patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) in a 12-week hatha yoga intervention (YE). Method Fifteen patients (10 women and 5 men, median age = 61, range: 44–76 years) who had participated in YE were interviewed after the intervention. Interview data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Three main categories emerged: “To focus and be aware of oneself”, “To gain new knowledge through practice” and “To master one's own situation”. The overall theme “From limitation to opportunity – to experience breathing as a tool in daily life” illustrates a learning process on different levels. The participants described improved physical symptoms and breathing techniques, greater energy/stamina and body awareness along with a new sense of control over their breathing in different situations. Conclusions Patients with obstructive pulmonary disease may strengthen their self-awareness and improve control of symptoms and learning new ways of breathing after practicing YE, which may provide a tool to control disease symptoms in daily life. Trial registration numberNCT02233114.

      PubDate: 2017-11-12T00:24:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.001
       
  • Fascia – The unsung hero of spine biomechanics
    • Authors: P. Mark Driscoll
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): P. Mark Driscoll


      PubDate: 2017-11-05T00:05:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.014
       
  • Validation of the range of dry needling with the fascial winding technique
           in the carpal tunnel using ultrasound
    • Authors: Jordi Gascon-Garcia; Caridad Bagur-Calafat; Montserrat Girabent-Farrés; Ramon Balius
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jordi Gascon-Garcia, Caridad Bagur-Calafat, Montserrat Girabent-Farrés, Ramon Balius
      Objectives To use ultrasound imaging to show how the needles in dry needling applied in the carpal tunnel can reach the transverse carpal ligament, acting on it in the form of traction-stretching when the fascial winding technique is performed. The potential associated risks are also assessed. Design Validation study. Participants Healthy volunteers (n = 18). Methods Four dry needling needles were applied to the carpal tunnel, only using anatomical references, according to the original approach known as "four-pole carpal dry needling", and manipulating the needles following the so-called fascial winding technique according to the authors, in the form of unidirectional rotation. An ultrasound recording of the distance reached was then performed, and compared with the mechanical action achieved on the transverse carpal ligament. Results 93.1% of the needles placed came into contact with the transverse carpal ligament with traction-stretching of the ligament observed when the needles were manipulated with the fascial winding technique in 80.6%. The mean distance from the tip of the needle to the median nerve was 3.75 mm, with CI95% [3.10, 4.41] and it was 7.78 mm with CI95% [6.64, 8.91] to the ulnar artery. Pain immediately after the technique concluded was of mild intensity, almost nil 10 min later, and non-existent after one week. Conclusion Dry needling with fascial winding technique in the carpal tunnel using the four-pole carpal dry needling approach is valid for reaching and traction of the transverse carpal ligament, and may stretch it and relax it. It is also safe with regard to the median nerve and ulnar artery, with a very mild level of pain.

      PubDate: 2017-11-05T00:05:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.013
       
  • Instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization increases myofascial trigger
           point pain threshold
    • Authors: Dawn T. Gulick
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Dawn T. Gulick
      Background A myofascial trigger point (MTrP) has been defined as a hyperirritable, palpable nodule in a skeletal muscle. The signs and symptoms of a MTrP include muscle pain, weakness, and dysfunction. MTrPs are common problems associated with soft tissue pathology. Having an intervention to decrease MTrP pain can be clinically valuable. Purpose To determine if a series of six instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) treatments rendered over three weeks would influence the pressure pain threshold (PPT) of a myofascial trigger point (MTrP). Methods Randomized, control trial of healthy individuals (n = 29) with MTrPs in the upper trapezius muscle. The intervention was six IASTM treatments rendered over three weeks. Each treatment included 1 min of sweeping with the GT-1/HG-2 (handle bar), 1 min of swivel with the knob of the GT-1/HG-2 directly over the MTrP, 2 min of fanning with the GT-4/HG-8 (convex single bevel), and concluded with 1 min of sweeping with GT-1/HG-2. The outcome measure used a dolorimeter to compare PPT before and after three weeks in both the treatment and control groups. Results Paired t-test for PPT pre-test and post-test of the control and treatment groups were p = 0.42159 and p = 0.00003, respectively. A one-way ANOVA of the control and IASTM groups revealed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.0001). The power calculation was greater than 0.99. Conclusions A 5-min intervention using three IASTM techniques can effectively increase the PPT of a MTrP in six treatments over a three-week period of time.

      PubDate: 2017-10-29T23:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.012
       
  • Type effect of inhibitory KT tape on measured vs. perceived maximal grip
           strength
    • Authors: Aislinn Joan Campbell MacPhail; Ivan Pui-Hung Au; Mavis Chan; Dominic Ngo-Tung Mak; Winko Wenkang An; Zoe Yau-Shan Chan; Janet Hanwen Zhang; Kenny Wong; Ann So; Nora Chan; Chris Kwok; Patrick Lau; David Draper; Roy Tsz-Hei Cheung
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Aislinn Joan Campbell MacPhail, Ivan Pui-Hung Au, Mavis Chan, Dominic Ngo-Tung Mak, Winko Wenkang An, Zoe Yau-Shan Chan, Janet Hanwen Zhang, Kenny Wong, Ann So, Nora Chan, Chris Kwok, Patrick Lau, David Draper, Roy Tsz-Hei Cheung
      This study examined the effects of KT tape (KT) applied in an inhibitory manner on muscle activity, measured maximal grip strength, and perceived maximal grip strength in regular KT-users and non-users. This study was a single-blinded crossover study with sixty participants including 27 kT-users and 33 non-users. Participants underwent maximal grip strength tests with and without inhibitory KT applied across the wrist extensors. Muscle activity and maximal grip strength were measured, while perceived maximal grip strength was rated using a visual analogue scale. No significant interaction effect was found between taping conditions and participant KT-experience for muscle activity (F = 0.825, p = 0.367), measured grip strength (F = 1.018, p = 0.317) or perceived grip strength (F = 0.122, p = 0.728). No significant differences were observed in the EMG activity between taping conditions for either KT-users (p = 0.367) or non-users (p = 0.215). A similar trend was found in the measured grip strength (KT-users: p = 0.317; non-users: p = 0.294) and perceived grip strength (KT-users: p = 0.728; non-users: p = 0.063). KT applied in an inhibitory manner does not impede EMG activity, measured maximal grip strength, or perceived maximal grip strength in adults, regardless of their preconceived notions of KT.

      PubDate: 2017-10-29T23:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.011
       
  • The effects of task execution variables on resultant vertical ground
           reaction force acting on foot sole during squat lifting
    • Authors: Iman Vahdat; Farhad Tabatabai Ghomsheh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Iman Vahdat, Farhad Tabatabai Ghomsheh
      The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of task execution variables on the value and point of application of the resultant vertical ground reaction force acting on the foot sole during squat lifting. This can be of particular importance since it may help to recognize the roles of the foot sole parts in bearing the support force during industrial and labor lifting activities. Twelve healthy men lifted a box with 4, 8 and 12 kg masses at fast and slow speeds. Ground reaction force and center of pressure were measured using two parallel Kistler force-plates. In addition, a Vicon system and a 3D linked segment model were used to define the movement pattern. Significant increases resulted for the peak vertical ground reaction force with the increases in the lift speed (P < 0.05) and box weight (P < 0.05). As well a significant increase resulted for the range of center of pressure location with the increase in the box weight (P < 0.05). Moreover, significant interactions (P < 0.05) between the lift speed and box weight were detected. The front and rear parts of the foot had the most important roles in bearing the support force during the beginning and final phases of movement, respectively. Finally, it was concluded that the value and point of application of vertical ground reaction force are seemingly dependent on the momentum of the subject plus box.

      PubDate: 2017-10-29T23:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.010
       
  • Immediate effects of diaphragmatic myofascial release on the physical and
           functional outcomes in sedentary women: A randomized placebo-controlled
           trial
    • Authors: Débora Fortes Marizeiro; Ana Carolina Lins Florêncio; Ana Carla Limas Nunes; Nataly Gurgel Campos; Pedro Olavo de Paula Lima
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Débora Fortes Marizeiro, Ana Carolina Lins Florêncio, Ana Carla Limas Nunes, Nataly Gurgel Campos, Pedro Olavo de Paula Lima
      Background Although diaphragmatic myofascial release techniques are widely used in clinical practice, few studies have evaluated the simultaneous acute effects of these techniques on the respiratory and musculoskeletal systems. Objective To evaluate the immediate effects of diaphragmatic myofascial release in sedentary women on the posterior chain muscle flexibility; lumbar spine range of motion; respiratory muscle strength; and chest wall mobility. Design A randomized placebo-controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis, and blinding of assessors and participants. Participants Seventy-five sedentary women aged between 18 and 35 years. Intervention The sample was randomly allocated into one of two groups; the experimental group received two diaphragmatic myofascial release techniques in a single session, and the control group received two placebo techniques following the same regimen. Outcomes measures The primary outcome was chest wall mobility, which was analyzed using cirtometry. The secondary outcomes were flexibility, lumbar spine range of motion, and respiratory muscle strength. Outcomes were measured before and immediately after treatment. Results The manual diaphragm release techniques significantly improved chest wall mobility immediately after intervention, with a between-group difference of 0.61 cm (95% CI, 0.12–1.1) for the axillary region, 0.49 cm (95% CI, 0.03–0.94) for the xiphoid region, and 1.44 (95% CI, 0.88–2.00) for the basal region. The techniques also significantly improved the posterior chain muscle flexibility, with a between-group difference of 5.80 cm (95% CI, 1.69–9.90). All movements except flexion of the lumbar spine significantly increased. The effects on respiratory muscle strength were non-significant. Conclusion The diaphragmatic myofascial release techniques improve chest wall mobility, posterior chain muscle flexibility, and some movements of the lumbar spine in sedentary women. These techniques could be considered in the management of people with reduced chest wall and lumbar mobility. Trial registration NCT03065283.

      PubDate: 2017-10-29T23:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.008
       
  • The influence of surface angle inclination on muscle activity during
           Pilates based exercises
    • Authors: Asia Yates; Ayla Donlin; George Beneck; Evan Schick
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Asia Yates, Ayla Donlin, George Beneck, Evan Schick


      PubDate: 2017-10-29T23:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.007
       
  • Automatic activity of deep and superficial abdominal muscles during stable
           and unstable sitting position in individuals with chronic low back pain
    • Authors: Amir Massoud Arab; Sanaz Shanbehzadeh; Omid Rasouli; Mohsen Amiri; Fatemh Ehsani
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Amir Massoud Arab, Sanaz Shanbehzadeh, Omid Rasouli, Mohsen Amiri, Fatemh Ehsani
      Objective The purpose of this study was to assess muscle thickness changes in the deep and superficial abdominal muscles, during sitting on stable and unstable surfaces in subjects with and without chronic low back pain (CLBP). Method A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 40 participants (20 CLBP and 20 healthy). Ultrasound imaging was used to assess changes in the thickness of the Transversus abdominis (TrA), Internal Oblique (IO), Rectus abdominis (RA) and External oblique (EO) muscles. Muscle thickness under two different sitting postures; (sitting on a chair and sitting on a Swiss ball), was normalized to actual muscle thickness at rest in the supine lying position and was expressed as a percentage of thickness change of muscles. Result The results showed significantly greater thickness changes in RA muscle in the CLBP patients compared to the healthy subjects, during both stable and unstable sitting positions. Also, significantly lower thickness changes in TrA muscle was observed in subjects with CLBP compared to those without CLBP, during unstable sitting position. Conclusion There was an imbalance between the automatic activity of TrA and RA muscles in the subjects with CLBP, compared to the pain-free controls, during an unstable sitting position. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention, to the altered automatic activity of the abdominal muscles while utilizing a Swiss ball, for rehabilitation of subjects with CLBP.

      PubDate: 2017-10-29T23:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.009
       
  • The influence of surface angle inclination on muscle activity during
           Pilates based exercises
    • Authors: Asia Yates; Ayla Donlin; George Beneck; Evan Schick
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Asia Yates, Ayla Donlin, George Beneck, Evan Schick


      PubDate: 2017-10-29T23:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.007
       
  • Energy efficiency of ambulation–A comparison of various orthopaedic
           possibilities
    • Authors: Jerin Mathew; Kavitha Raja; Febin P. Baby; B. Basima
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jerin Mathew, Kavitha Raja, Febin P. Baby, B. Basima
      Background In most developing countries, accessibility for people using walking aids is limited due to architectural and environmental barriers. As observed from anecdotal accounts, even a minor orthopaedic injury/disorder may restrict a person's ambulation due to fatigue associated with using walking aids. Hence this study was undertaken with the following objective. Objective to estimate the magnitude of energy consumption using energy expenditure index (EEI) during gait under different conditions. Design Repeated measures design (within subjects study). Setting School. Participants Ten healthy, typical young adults between 17 and 25 years of age. Outcome measure Energy Expenditure Index (EEI) was estimated for each of the conditions of the study using consistent measurement procedures. Results the energy consumption with immobilization is greater (anke-16.2%, knee-36.7% and ankle and kee-49.2%) than typical self-selected ambulation. During on ground ambulation the energy cost was greatest for axillary crutches than standard walker with ankle and knee immobilized being the highest in relation to typical ambulation (78.2% greater). Axillary crutches were more efficient than walker during stair climbing. Conclusion for young adults a standard walker may be the right option for over-ground ambulation, when a lower limb joint in immobilized; with axillary crutch use during stair climbing.

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T22:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.005
       
  • Benefits of belly dance on quality of life, fatigue, and depressive
           symptoms in women with breast cancer – A pilot study of a non-randomised
           clinical trial
    • Authors: Leonessa Boing; Maria de Fátima Marcelina Baptista; Gustavo Soares Pereira; Fabiana Flores Sperandio; Jéssica Moratelli; Allana Alexandre Cardoso; Adriano Ferreti Borgatto; Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo Guimarães
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leonessa Boing, Maria de Fátima Marcelina Baptista, Gustavo Soares Pereira, Fabiana Flores Sperandio, Jéssica Moratelli, Allana Alexandre Cardoso, Adriano Ferreti Borgatto, Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo Guimarães
      Objective To analyse the influence of belly dance in the quality of life, fatigue, and depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer. Methods Pilot study with a design of non-randomised clinical trial study analysing 19 women, with 8 allocated in the experimental group and 11 in the control group. The experimental group underwent 12 weeks of belly dance classes, with a frequency of twice a week and duration of 60 min for each lesson. Data collection was made through the use of questionnaires containing general information, quality of life (EORTC QLQ-BR23), fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale) and depressive symptoms (BECK's Depression Inventory) applied on baseline and after intervention. Results The experimental group presented significant improvements after the intervention, with an increase in scores of the functional scale (p = 0.002): body image (p = 0.037) and sexual function (p = 0.027); and a decrease in scores of the symptomatic scale (p = 0.001): systemic therapy side effects (p = 0.005) and arm symptoms (p = 0.001) of quality of life, as well the decrease of fatigue (p = 0.036) and depressive symptoms (p = 0.002). No significant differences were observed in clinical and demographic information at baseline between the experimental and control groups. Also, there was no significant difference on quality of life, fatigue, and depressive symptoms between the two groups. Conclusion Belly dance can be a viable form of physical activity for women with breast cancer. It was associated with benefits for quality of life, fatigue, and depressive symptoms. Even though there were significant pre–post treatment differences, there was no significance difference between the experimental and control group; and therefore, treatment could have been due to natural history.

      PubDate: 2017-10-13T20:47:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.003
       
  • Acute effects of whole body vibration on heart rate variability in elderly
           people
    • Authors: Maria das Graças Bastos Licurci; Alessandra de Almeida Fagundes; Emilia Angela Lo Schiavo Arisawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Maria das Graças Bastos Licurci, Alessandra de Almeida Fagundes, Emilia Angela Lo Schiavo Arisawa
      Background Whole body vibration (WBV) has been widely used as a modality for physical activity. In fact, WBV has been used for physical rehabilitation, and to improve muscle performance; but there is little information about its effects on heart rate variability (HRV). Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vibration on HRV of the elderly using the vibratory platform. Methods Eleven older adults (7 men, 4 women), aged between 60 and 75 years, were subjected to WBV. The study consisted of a single session of WBV with volunteers standing upright for 10 min on the oscillating platform, with frequency of vibration set at 20 Hz (displacement ± 6 mm; orbital vibration). Pre (baseline) and post-WBV electrocardiograph signals were acquired using a cardiac monitor; and data were statistically analyzed using paired Student's t-test or Wilcoxon test, as appropriate. Results The results demonstrated an increase in SDNN (standard deviation (SD) beat-to-beat, N–N intervals), rMSSD (square root of the mean squared difference of successive N–Ns) and pNN50 (proportion of N–N50 divided by total number of N–Ns) post WBV (p = 0.032, p = 0.024 e p = 0.044, respectively), compared to baseline. The present study thus demonstrated that time domain variables (i.e., SDNN, rMSSD, and pNN50) increase post WBV. Conclusions Older individuals are at high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. As seen in the study, WBV improves HRV; and may help reduce risk of cardiac ailments. Moreover, WBV does not require extensive physical activity on the part of the participant. This makes WBV potentially beneficial to the elderly population. Further studies on WBV using different frequencies and training schedules may improve its applicability in clinics.

      PubDate: 2017-10-13T20:47:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.004
       
  • The comparison of pinch strength among female typists and female
           non-typists
    • Authors: Zahra Rojhani-Shirazi; Ladan Hemmati; Zahra Saadat; Zeinab Shirzadi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Zahra Rojhani-Shirazi, Ladan Hemmati, Zahra Saadat, Zeinab Shirzadi
      Background Typing is a common activity involving repetitive motion that can increase the risk of work-related injuries. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of typing on the pinch strength has not been investigated so far. Objective To investigate the pinch strength amongst female typists and non-typists. Method Thirty female typists and 30 female non-typists, aged 20–30 years old, participated in this prospective study. The pinch strength of the second, third, fourth and fifth fingers of the dominant hand was measured in a sitting position, using a pinch gauge. The data were analyzed using independent sample t-test. Results The results showed that there were significant differences in the pinch strength of the second, third and fourth fingers between the two groups. The strength of these fingers was reduced more than that in female non-typists. Conclusion Our results suggest that pinch strength might have decreased in female typists due to sharing common attentional resources, muscle fiber composition, and muscle fiber fatigue.

      PubDate: 2017-10-13T20:47:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.10.001
       
  • The amount of postural change experienced by adolescent computer users
           developing seated –related upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain
    • Authors: Yolandi Brink; Quinette Louw Karen Grimmer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Yolandi Brink, Quinette Louw, Karen Grimmer
      Background Improved techniques of measuring sitting posture have not led to a more comprehensive understanding of poor posture, nor its association with pain. There is also an evidence gap regarding critical thresholds of sitting postural change over time related to pain production. This paper describes postural angle changes over a 12-month period, and describes the process of placing defensible cut-points in the angle change data, to better understand associations between posture change over time, and onset of upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain (UQMP). Methods This paper reports on data captured at baseline and 12-month follow-up, in adolescents in school using computers. Four sitting postural angles, head flexion (HF), neck flexion (NF), craniocervical angle (CCA) and trunk flexion (TF), and self-reported seated UQMP in the previous month were captured at each time-point. Research questions were: 1) What is the magnitude and direction of change in each postural angle over 12 months' 2) What are best cut-points in the continuous posture change distribution to most sensitively test the association between posture change and UQMP' 3) Is gender-specific cut-points required' The 12-month posture angle change data was divided into quintiles (0–20th%; 21-40th%, 41-60th%, 61-80th%, >80th%), and the odds of UQMP occurring in each posture change quintile were calculated using logistic regression models. Results Two hundred and eleven students participated at baseline, of which 153 were followed-up at one year. Both males and females with postural change into extension (which represents lesser flexion range) were more at risk for the development of UQMP, than any other group. The best cut-point for HF was 40th% (≤−3.9°), NF was 20th% (≤−2.9°) and TF was 40th% (≤−1.1°). For CCA however, change at or beyond 40th % for extension or beyond 60% for flexion was associated with UQMP. Conclusions Identification of critical postural angle change cut-points assists in considering the pain-producing mechanisms for adolescents using desk top computers.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T20:01:04Z
       
  • Transabdominal ultrasound: Can it be used to detect and quantify
           adhesions/reported pain, following Caesarean section'
    • Authors: Katharine Spens; Lance Bird; Philip Bright
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Katharine Spens, Lance Bird, Philip Bright
      Background Caesarean section is common in the UK with post–procedural adhesions causing life-long clinical symptoms and impacting future pregnancies. This study's aim was to explore associations between these surgical adhesions, via transabdominal ultrasound findings, and perceived symptoms. Method Females demonstrating 1–3 transverse, lower-segment Caesareans were included. Visceral slide transabdominal ultrasound elicited positive adhesions (<1 cm movement) and negative adhesions (>1 cm movement). Scar tissue quality was assessed by the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) and Numerical rating scales (NRS) described pain symptoms. The relationship between adhesions was explored using Fisher's exact test and multiple regression analysis. Results Twenty-two subjects (mean-age 35) were recruited; twenty participants (91%) had undergone 1 Caesarean, one each of the remainder had undergone 2 and 3 Caesareans respectively. Increased Visceral slide (>1 cm) was seen as predictive of increased scar pain (R2 = 0.76 (95% CI 0.12–0.28), P < 0.001). Conclusion Caesarean adhesion scans showed significant associations with pain symptomology. Comprehensive adhesion assessment needs to be developed to improve long term outcomes of adhesions. Transabdominal Ultrasound can be considered a useful, quick and non-deleterious alternative diagnostic tool to Laparoscopy, therefore preventing further adhesion formation.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T20:01:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.09.019
       
  • Effects of spinal manipulation and myofascial techniques on heart rate
           variability: A systematic review
    • Authors: Bruno Luis Amoroso Borges; Gustavo Luiz Bortolazzo; Hugo Pasin Neto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Bruno Luis Amoroso Borges, Gustavo Luiz Bortolazzo, Hugo Pasin Neto
      Background The analysis of heart rate variability is important to the investigation of stimuli from the autonomic nervous system. Osteopathy is a form of treatment that can influence this system in healthy individuals as well as those with a disorder or disease. Objectives The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review of the literature regarding the effect of spinal manipulation and myofascial techniques on heart rate variability. Methods Searches were performed of the Pubmed, Scielo, Lilacs, PEDro, Ibesco, Cochrane and Scopus databases for relevant studies. The PEDro scale was used to assess the methodological quality of each study selected. Results A total of 505 articles were retrieved during the initial search. After an analysis of the abstracts, nine studies were selected for the present review. Conclusion Based on the findings, osteopathy exerts an influence on the autonomic nervous system depending on the stimulation site and type. A greater parasympathetic response was found when stimulation was performed in the cervical and lumbar regions, whereas a greater sympathetic response was found when stimulation was performed in the thoracic region.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T20:01:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.09.025
       
  • Leg press exercise can reduce functional hamstring/quadriceps ratio in the
           elderly
    • Authors: Lucas Bet da Rosa Orssatto; Bruno Monteiro de Moura; Raphael Luiz Sakugawa; Regis Radaelli; Fernando Diefenthaeler
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Lucas Bet da Rosa Orssatto, Bruno Monteiro de Moura, Raphael Luiz Sakugawa, Regis Radaelli, Fernando Diefenthaeler
      The aim of this study was to investigate whether 12 weeks of leg press strength training exercise could affect the conventional and functional hamstring/quadriceps ratios in elderly. Twelve elderly participants were submitted to a 12 week progressive training protocol (two sessions/week) using a 45° leg press exercise. A significant increase in the one repetition maximum was observed after 4, 8, and 12 weeks (p = 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively) compared to week 0 and after 8 (p = 0.011) and 12 weeks (p = 0.001) compared to week 4. The concentric knee extensor peak torque was significantly higher at weeks 8 (p = 0.001) and 12 (p = 0.024) compared to week 0. There was no change in the concentric and eccentric knee flexor peak torques (p = 0.629 and 0.274, respectively) and conventional ratio (p > 0.314) after 12 weeks of training. The functional ratio (eccentric knee flexor peak torque:concentric knee extensor peak torque) reduced significantly after 8 (p = 0.034) and 12 (p = 0.036) weeks of strength training. Although the 45° leg press exercise requires knee extensor and flexor, hip extensor, and plantar flexor muscle strength, our findings suggest that the isolated use of the 45° leg press exercise reduces the knee functional ratio after 8 weeks of training. Therefore, 45° leg press exercise alone, without a hamstring exercise, should not be recommended for elderly individuals.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T20:01:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.09.023
       
  • The late effect of Kinesio Taping® on handgrip strength
    • Authors: Rodrigo Sousa Nilo de Araújo Aguiar; Silvia Regina Matos da Silva Boschi; Leandro Lazzareschi; Alessandro Pereira da Silva; Terigi Augusto Scardovelli; Eduardo Filoni; Ana Lúcia Manrique; Annie France Frère
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Rodrigo Sousa Nilo de Araújo Aguiar, Silvia Regina Matos da Silva Boschi, Leandro Lazzareschi, Alessandro Pereira da Silva, Terigi Augusto Scardovelli, Eduardo Filoni, Ana Lúcia Manrique, Annie France Frère
      The Kinesio Taping® elastic tape is increasingly used in physiotherapy treatment. However, there is a lack of scientific research regarding the late effects of its use. This study quantified the late effects of applying the Kinesio Taping® elastic tape by measuring changes in handgrip muscle strength after 24, 48 and 72 h of application. The Kinesio Taping® elastic tape was applied on the dominant and non-dominant limbs of 36 volunteers randomly assigned to three groups: muscle facilitation, muscle inhibition and control group. The statistical test showed there was a statistically significant difference among all groups of dominant limb and non-dominant limb. However, the analysis on intragroup relationship to periods of application (Initial, 24, 48 and 72 h) and the interaction among repeated measures showed there was no statistically significant difference. This result may contribute to the investigation of the late effects of the Kinesio Taping® elastic tape on the physical rehabilitation.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T20:01:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.09.024
       
  • Myofascial Release or Myofascial Induction '
    • Authors: Leon Chaitow
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow


      PubDate: 2017-09-17T18:58:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.09.008
       
 
 
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