for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 2801 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29     

The end of the list has been reached. Please navigate to previous pages.

  First | 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29     

Journal Cover Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
  [SJR: 0.522]   [H-I: 23]   [14 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2801 journals]
  • Therapeutic Effects of Connective Tissue Manipulation on Wound Healing and
           Bacterial Colonization Count among Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leonard Henry Joseph, Aatit Paungmali, John Dixon, Liz Holey, Amaramalar Selvi Naicker, Ohnmar Htwe
      This study investigated the therapeutic effects of connective tissue manipulation (CTM) in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). A total of 20 participants (10 in CTM group and 10 in conventional treatment group (CG)) with DFU underwent the conventional DFU treatment. In addition, the CTM group received CTM twice per week for 6 weeks. The percentage wound area reduction (PWAR) and bacterial colonization count (BCC) in log10 colony-forming units (CFU) per ml wound fluid was evaluated at baseline and six weeks. Results showed a significant change in PWAR in CTM (p<0.05, t = 3.82, Df = 9, CI L= 0.98 U=3.81) and CG (p<0.05, t = 2.97, Df = 9,CI L= 0.26 U=1.98). Mean reduction of BCC showed a significant reduction (p<0.05), with percentage of BCC reduction higher in CTM group (6.45%) than CG (3.55%). The findings suggest CTM as an effective adjunct therapy for DFU to enhance conventional treatments.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:48:43Z
       
  • Myofascial Triggerpoint Release (MTR) for Treating Chronic Shoulder Pain:
           A New Approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Christopher-Marc Gordon, Frank Andrasik, Robert Schleip, Niels Birbaumer, Massimiliano Rea
      Background This study comprehensively evaluated a myofascial triggerpoint release (MTR) technique for shoulder pain. Methods Twenty-three (from an initial sample of 25) patients experiencing shoulder pain received MTR, in four 10-minute sessions over a period of 2 weeks, applied exclusively on the more painful shoulder, with assessments being recorded both before and after treatment (and for pain at 1 and 13 months). Measures of stiffness and elasticity were collected to monitor the process of therapy, while subjective measures of pain and objective measures of pressure pain thresholds tracked primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes focused on suffering, stress, and quality of life. Results A statistically significant decrease in stiffness and increase in elasticity was observed post intervention for the treated side only, while pressure pain thresholds improved on the untreated side as well. Reports of pain significantly decreased after treatment, with gains being maintained at 1 and 13 months following treatment. Levels of suffering, stress, and quality of life revealed statistically significant improvement as well. Conclusions MTR resulted in clinically significant improvements in the primary measures of pain, objective mechanical tissue properties, and secondary measures in patients with chronic shoulder pain.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:48:43Z
       
  • Comparison between static stretching and the Pilates method on the
           flexibility of older women
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Laís Campos de Oliveira, Raphael Gonçalves de Oliveira, Deise Aparecida de Almeida Pires-Oliveira
      Introduction Flexibility decreases with advancing age and some forms of exercise, such as static stretching and Pilates, can contribute to the improvement of this physical ability. Objective: To compare the effects of static stretching and Pilates on the flexibility of healthy older women, over the age of 60 years. Method Thirty-two volunteers were randomized into two groups (Static stretching or Pilates) to perform exercises for 60 minutes, twice a week, for three months. Evaluations to analyze the movements of the trunk (flexion and extension), hip flexion and plantar and dorsiflexion of the ankle were performed before and after the intervention, using a fleximeter. Results The static stretching exercises improved the trunk flexion and hip flexion movements, while the Pilates improved all evaluated movements. However, over time, the groups presented differences only for the trunk extension movement. Conclusion For some body segments, Pilates may be more effective for improving flexibility in older women compared to static stretching.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:48:43Z
       
  • Respiratory dysfunction in patients with chronic neck pain: what is the
           current evidence'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Zacharias Dimitriadis, Eleni Kapreli, Nikolaos Strimpakos, Jacqueline Oldham
      Respiratory function of patients with neck pain has not been given much consideration in usual clinical practice. The problem has however been highlighted occasionally by renown clinical scientists and recently there is a growing interest in the investigation of respiratory function in this clinical population. The aim of this review is to critically present the emerging evidence and discuss the similarities and differences observed. Although the evidence for some respiratory parameters is conflicting, it seems to be generally agreed that others such as maximal voluntary ventilation, strength of respiratory muscles, chest mechanics and partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide are affected in patients with chronic neck pain. The effect size of the respiratory dysfunction regarding these respiratory parameters can be approximately described as moderate. These findings not only suggest a more thoughtful drug prescription, but they may lead to consideration of incorporation of respiratory assessment and treatment into routine physiotherapy practice. Indeed preliminary studies exploring the incorporation of treatment into usual practice have provided very promising results not only in relation to respiratory function, but also for other parameters of clinical interest. There remains however imminent need for randomized controlled trials to confirm the evidence base for such an approach.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:48:43Z
       
  • Evidence for the existence of nociceptors in rat thoracolumbar fascia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Siegfried Mense, Ulrich Hoheisel
      Recently, the existence of nociceptive fibers in fascia tissue has attracted much interest. Fascia can be a source of pain in several disorders such as fasciitis and non-specific low back pain. However, little is known about the properties of fascia nociceptors and possible changes of the fascia innervation by nociceptors under pathological circumstances. In this histologic study, the density of presumably nociceptive fibers and free nerve endings was determined in the three layers of the rat TLF: inner layer (IL, covering the multifidus muscle), middle layer (ML) and outer layer (OL). As markers for nociceptive fibers, antibodies to the neuropeptides CGRP and SP as well as to the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) were used. As a pathological state, an inflammation of the TLF was induced with injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant. The density of CGRP- and SP-positive fibers was significantly increased in the inner and outer layer of the inflamed fascia. In the thick middle layer, no inflammation-induced change occurred. In additional experiments, a neurogenic inflammation was induced in the fascia by electrical stimulation of dorsal roots. In these experiments, plasma extravasation was visible in the TLF, which is clear functional evidence for the existence of fascia nociceptors. The presence of nociceptors in the TLF and the increased density of presumably nociceptive fibers under chronic painful circumstances may explain the pain from a pathologically altered fascia. The fascia nociceptors probably contribute also to the pain in non-specific low back pain.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:48:43Z
       
  • The effect of Kinesio taping technique on trigger points of the piriformis
           muscle
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fahimeh Hashemirad, Noureddin Karimi, Roshanak Keshavarz
      Background Kinesio taping (KT) is a novel method which has recently emerged as a viable option to treat various musculoskeletal and neuromuscular deficits. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of KT on pain and hip joint range of motion (ROM) in individuals with myofacial trigger points in the piriformis muscle. Methods 51 patients with involment of the piriformis muscle were assigned to experimental (N = 33) or control (N = 18) groups. The experimental group received KT with unloading techniques on the piriformis muscle and they were asked to keep this tape in place for three days. Pain and internal rotation (IR) of hip joints were measured at baseline, immediately after the KT application, and at a 72-hour follow-up. Results The analysis of repeated measurement ANOVA yielded no main effects, but the interactions between group and time for each dependent variable (pain and ROM) were significant. A post-hoc analysis revealed significant improvment in pain and hip IR immediately postapplication and at a 72-hour follow up in the KT group, while no significant change were found on dependent variables in the control group. Discussion Our findings suggests that KT application may be effective for pain relief and increasing ROM in patients with myofacial trigger points in the piriformis muscle.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:48:43Z
       
  • The effectiveness of Pilates on balance and falls in community dwelling
           older adults: a randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sharon Josephs, Mary Lee Pratt, Emily Calk Meadows, Stephanie Thurmond, Amy Wagner
      Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether Pilates is more effective than traditional strength and balance exercises for improving balance measures, balance confidence and reducing falls in community dwelling older adults with fall risk. Method Thirty-one participants with fall risk were randomly assigned to the Pilates group (PG) or the traditional exercise group (TG). Both groups participated in 12 weeks of exercise, 2 times/week for 1 hour. Results There was significant improvement in the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale for both the PG (mean difference = 6.31, p < .05) and the TG (mean difference = 7.45, p = .01). The PG also showed significant improvement in the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (mean difference = 10.57, p = .008). Conclusion Both Pilates and traditional balance programs are effective at improving balance measures in community dwelling older adults with fall risk, with the Pilates group showing improved balance confidence.


      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:48:43Z
       
  • Process for Massage Therapy Practice and Essential Assessment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Ann Blair Kennedy, Jerrilyn Cambron, Patricia A. Sharpe, Ravensara S. Travillian, Ruth P. Saunders
      Background Little evidence exists about processes in massage therapy practice. Investigating current frameworks is warranted. This qualitative study is a secondary data analysis using grounded theory to understand how massage therapy experts describe massage therapy practice. Methods 31 massage therapy experts were invited to a 2-day symposium to discuss best practices for the profession. Through qualitative analysis, memoing, and discussion, the data were summarized into themes. Results Three themes were identified around massage therapy practice: 1) client centered, 2) structure for practice, and 3) influencing factors. Each theme is clarified and expanded. Discussion Conceptual models were developed for research and clinical practice and a definition for massage therapy practice was identified. Challenges and limitations are discussed. Conclusion The goal of providing these models is to give massage therapists tools to deliver the best possible care. The models need testing to see if they help advance the profession.


      PubDate: 2016-02-02T12:04:38Z
       
  • The effect of extremity strength training on fibromyalgia symptoms and
           disease impact in an existing multidisciplinary treatment program
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Dan Vaughn, Tamara Kas, Megan Colby, Maureen Case
      Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of upper and lower body extremity strengthening exercise in patients with Fibromyalgia (FM) within an existing multidisciplinary treatment program. Participants Patients between the ages of 18 – 65 with the medical diagnosis of FM. Methods Comparative study design. The control and experimental group received the same multidisciplinary treatment except that the experimental group performed upper and lower extremity strengthening exercises. Outcome Measures The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) was administered at evaluation and discharge from the program in order to measure change in quality of life (QOL). Results Statistically significant changes in FIQ scores were found for both groups. The addition of extremity strengthening in the experimental group produced an average 4 points greater reduction in FIQ score, however, these results are not considered statistically significant. Conclusions This study appears to validate the success of a multidisciplinary approach in treating patients with FM, with the possibility for further benefit with the addition of extremity strengthening.


      PubDate: 2016-02-02T12:04:38Z
       
  • The biomechanical model in manual therapy: is there an ongoing crisis or
           just the need to revise the underlying concept and application'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Christian Lunghi, Paolo Tozzi, Giampiero Fusco
      Different approaches to body biomechanics are based on the classical concept of “ideal posture” which is regarded as the state where body mass is distributed in such a way that ligamentous tensions neutralize the force of gravity and muscles retain their normal tone, as result of the integration of somatic components related to posture and balance mechanisms. When compromised, optimal posture can be restored through the balanced and effective use of musculoskeletal components; however, various research findings and the opinion of experts in this field suggest a move away from the dogmas that have characterized the idea of health dependent on ideal posture, to promote instead dynamic approaches based on the interdependency of the body systems as well as on the full participation of the person in the healing process. Following these concepts, this article proposes a revised biomechanical model that sees posture as the temporary result of the individual’s current ability to adapt to the existing allostatic load through the dynamic interaction of extero-proprio-interoceptive information integrated at a neuromyofascial level. Treatments using this revised model aim to restore the optimal posture available to the person in that particular given moment, through the efficient and balanced use of neuro–myofascia–skeletal components in order to normalize aberrant postural responses, to promote interoceptive and proprioceptive integration and to optimize individual responses to the existing allostatic load. The latter is achieved via multimodal programs of intervention, in a salutogenic approach that, from a traditional perspective, evolves on an anthropological basis, to the point of centering its work on the person.


      PubDate: 2016-01-28T01:35:47Z
       
  • Effects of Achilles tendon vibration, surface and visual conditions on
           lower leg electromyography in young adults with and without recurrent
           ankle sprains
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Anat V. Lubetzky, Robert Price, Sarah W. McCoy
      Functional ankle instability is associated with decreased ankle muscle function. Compliant surfaces and eyes-closed training are commonly used for rehabilitation and prevention of ankle sprains. Brief Achilles tendon vibration is commonly used in the study of postural control. To test the level of activation of tibialis anterior (TIB) and fibularis longus (FIB), bilateral Achilles tendon vibration was applied for the middle 20 seconds in a series of 60-second trials, when 10 healthy young adults and 10 adults with history of repeated ankle sprains were standing bipedal: on floor, on memory foam, or on a Both Sides Up (BOSU) ball, with eyes open, and on floor and foam with eyes closed. Differences in Integrated surface electromyography (IEMG) of TIB and FIB were significant for both groups pre, during, and post vibration (Friedman Tests, p < 0.001 for all). In both groups, the highest IEMG for TIB was obtained during vibration when standing on foam with eyes closed, whereas the highest IEMG for FIB was obtained during vibration when standing on the BOSU. Bipedal stance on BOSU and brief Achilles tendon vibration may be a useful intervention when a session’s goal is to facilitate lower leg muscles activation. Future research should explore training effects as well as the effect of FIB tendon vibration.


      PubDate: 2016-01-22T01:22:32Z
       
  • Angry Posture
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jose Luis Rosário, Maria Suely Bezerra Diógenes, Rita Mattei, José Roberto Leite
      Postural abnormalities can affect the emotions and vice-versa. The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of a relationship between subjective anger and body posture in 28 women, aged between 20 and 39 years, with a normal body mass index (or underweight) and an absence of neurological, psychiatric or musculoskeletal disorders. The postural parameters photographed were the inclination of the shoulders, protrusion of the head, hyperextension of the knees and shoulder elevation. The degree of anger was rated by analogue scales representing current and usual anger. The results indicated that a relationship exists between current anger and the inclination of the shoulders (p = 0.03), protrusion of the head (p = 0.05) and hyperextension of the knees (p = 0.05). Correlations were found between usual anger, shoulder elevation (p = 0.05) and hyperextension of the knees (p = 0.05). In conclusion, posture is associated with emotions, and usual anger can lead to shoulder protraction.


      PubDate: 2016-01-22T01:22:32Z
       
  • Repeat-measures longitudinal study evaluating behavioural and
           gastrointestinal symptoms in children with autism before, during and after
           visceral osteopathic treatment (VOT)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Ioná Bramati-Castellarin, Vinood B. Patel
      This study investigated the influence of visceral osteopathic technique (VOT) on the behaviour and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of children with autism using a validated questionnaire to measure outcome. Methods The 49 recruited autistic children suffered GI symptoms and impaired social interaction and communication, but were otherwise healthy. Thirty minute VOT sessions were applied to the abdomens of the children over a 6 week period whilst their GI and behavioural parameters were recorded. Outcomes were measured using a modified Autism Research Institute Secretin Outcomes Survey Form, the ‘S.O.S Form’. Four questionnaires were completed by parents before treatment (control period), four completed during treatment (treatment period) and one completed six weeks after the last treatment (post treatment period). Subjects acted as their own controls. Results Results from repeat ANOVA demonstrated a positive, overall significant, symptomatic improvement (p<0.05) in ‘social behaviour and communication’ and ‘digestive signs’ subscales of the questionnaire comparing before and after VOT treatment. Significant improvement in vomiting (p = 0.00029), poor appetite (p = 0.039) and eye contact (p = 0.035) was also demonstrated after VOT application. Discussion and conclusion The experimental hypothesis has been supported indicating a positive effect of VOT on some of the measured GI symptoms and behavioural patterns in this group of children with autism. This data indicates that the application of VOT may be of benefit to children with autism and GI disturbance.


      PubDate: 2016-01-18T00:59:08Z
       
  • Clinical Review Section A Critical Overview of the Current Myofascial Pain
           Literature – January 2016
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt, Michelle Finnegan, Rob Grieve, Todd Hooks
      Reflecting on the past year, the number of publications on myofascial pain continues to increase in a steady rate. The current review includes 30 basic and clinical studies, case reports, reviews, and reports from fifteen different countries about trigger points (TrP), myofascial pain (MP), dry needling (DN) and other related interventions. We are pleased that during 2015 this article made the top 15 of most downloaded articles as many as three times! In general, the quality of published papers is improving as well. Nevertheless, several papers included in this overview, mention the application of “ischemic compression”, which is a questionable concept in the context of TrP inactivation. As we have outlined previously, in the current thinking about myofascial pain, TrPs feature significant hypoxia and a lowered pH (Ballyns et al 2011, Shah and Gilliams 2008), and attempts to induce more ischemia would be counterproductive. Already in 1999, Simons,Travell and Simons changed the terminology from ischemic compression to TrP compression (Simons et al 1999) and we recommend that contemporary researchers and clinicians adopt the new terminology and stop using the term “ischemic compression.”


      PubDate: 2016-01-18T00:59:08Z
       
  • Immediate effects of hamstring stretching alone or combined with ischemic
           compression of the masseter muscle on hamstrings extensibility, active
           mouth opening and pain in athletes with temporomandibular dysfunction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Luis Espejo-Antúnez, Elisa Castro-Valenzuela, Fernando Ribeiro, Manuel Albornoz-Cabello, Anabela Silva, Juan Rodríguez-Mansilla
      Objective To assess the immediate effects of hamstrings stretching alone or combined with ischemic compression of the masseter muscle on hamstrings extensibility, active mouth opening and pain in athletes with temporomandibular dysfunction and hamstrings shortening. Methods Forty-two participants were randomized to receive the stretching technique (n=21) or the stretching plus the ischemic compression (n=21). Outcome measures were: hamstrings extensibility, active mouth opening, pressure pain thresholds and pain intensity. Results Both interventions improved significantly active mouth opening (group 1: 35.7±6.7 to 39.1±7.6mm, p<0.001; group 2: 34.0±6.2 to 37.6 ± 5.6mm, p<0.001), active knee extension (group 1: 33.1±8.5 to 40.8±8.2º, p<0.001; group 2: 28.9±6.5 to 35.5±6.4º, p<0.001) and pain. No significant differences were found between interventions. Conclusion Hamstrings stretching induced an acute improvement in hamstrings extensibility, active mouth opening and pain. Moreover, the addition of ischemic compression did not induce further improvements on the assessed parameters.


      PubDate: 2016-01-09T18:23:28Z
       
  • Editorial: Simulation of Abstract Models of Structural Homeostasis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Dorothea Blostein



      PubDate: 2016-01-09T18:23:28Z
       
  • Developing and testing an instrument to assess aquaticity in humans
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Danae Varveri, Andreas D. Flouris, Nikitas Smirnios, Elizana Pollatou, Christina Karatzaferi, Giorgos K. Sakkas
      We developed and validated an aquaticity assessment test (AAT) for the evaluation of human physical adequacy in the water. Forty-six volunteers (25M/21F; 20±8 years,) participated and performed 10 easy-to-administer and practical aquatic tasks. Group A was formed by 36 elite athletes (M/F 20/16, 24.7±10yrs) from two sports categories depending on their affinity to the water environment: terrestrial (wrestling, cycling, dancing) and aquatic (swimming, synchronized swimming, free diving) sports. Group B was formed by 10 non-athlete participants (5M/5F, 14.4±1.4yrs) and was assessed by two independent evaluators. Participants in Group A performed the aquatic tasks once to develop the final AAT items and cutoffs. Participants in Group B performed the aquatic tasks twice on different days to assess repeatability. Factor analysis recommended all 10 aquatic tasks to be included in the final AAT, resulting in scores ranging from 9.5-49.5. The AAT scores were statistically different between the terrestrial and the aquatic sports’ participants (p<0.001). The duration of the test was 25 minutes from the time of water entry. Receiver operating characteristics curve analyses demonstrated that the cutoffs for low and high aquaticity levels in this sample were ≤23.7 and ≥43.3, respectively. Reliability analyses demonstrated that the aquaticity scores obtained on different days and by different examiners highly correlated (p<0.001) and were not significantly different (p>0.05). The AAT appears to be a valid and reliable tool for the evaluation of human physical adequacy in the water. It is an easy and user-friendly test which can be performed in any swimming pool without a need for highly trained staff and specialized equipment, however more research needs to be done in order to be applied in other population group.


      PubDate: 2016-01-09T18:23:28Z
       
  • Dynamic Tape. Is it all about controlling load'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Warrick McNeill, Clare Pedersen



      PubDate: 2015-12-29T14:37:23Z
       
  • The effect of climatic conditions on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction
           in 10-12 year old students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hamid Marefati, Exir Vizvari, Mahdi Esmaeilizadeh, Mohammad Hossein Boskabady
      Exercise-induced asthma is seen following vigorous or prolonged exercise or physical exertion. It has been suggested that climatic conditions have an influence on exercise-induced asthma. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of two climatic conditions on exercise-induced deterioration of pulmonary function tests in 10-12 year old students. Two hundred and fifty six students were randomly chosen from two cities namely Kerman and Gorgan (128 subjects in each who were equally from both cities) including 62 girls and 66 boys of 10-12 years old. A questionnaire was used to obtain demographic information and to identify the prevalence of asthma symptoms. Each subject performed a seven-minute free run exercise with maximum effort and sufficient motivation until they reached 70-75% heart rate. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) including, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and maximum expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity (MEF50) were measured before, at the beginning, and 7 and 20 min after physical activity. The prevalence of both asthma (28.12%) and exercise-induced asthma (20.31%) in Kerman students was higher than those of Gorgan students (21.09% and 17%, respectively). All PFT values declined 7 and 20 min post-exercise in both groups. Although all baselines PFT in Kerman students were higher than those of Gorgan students, the decline in PFT values in Kerman students was greater than those of Gorgan students. At 20 min post exercise, the decline in FEV1, PEF and MEF50 in Kerman students was significantly higher than those of Gorgan students (p<0.05 to p<0.01). The results of the present study showed that prevalence of both asthma and exercise-induced asthma in a city with dry and cool climate such as Kerman was higher than in a city with humid climate such as Gorgan. In addition, the results showed that in a humid climate, post-exercise decline in PFT values was less than in a dry climate.


      PubDate: 2015-12-24T14:27:11Z
       
  • Stiffness of resting lumbar myofascia in healthy young subjects quantified
           using a handheld myotonometer and concurrently with surface
           electromyography monitoring
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Kalyani Nair, Alfonse T. Masi, Brian J. Andonian M, J.Barry Alexander, Brandon A. Coates B, John Dougherty, Emily Schaefer, Jacqueline Henderson, Joseph Kelly
      This study aimed to non-invasively quantify passive stiffness of superficial myofascia at a lower lumbar (L3-L4) anatomical level in young healthy male and female subjects and investigate its possible morphological variation. Resting prone lumbar myofascial measurements were quantified using MyotonPro® and statistically analyzed in 20 young healthy individuals over 3-weekly intervals, concurrently with surface electromyography (sEMG). Averaged mean ± SE stiffness (Newton/meter) over three weeks was significantly (p <0.001) greater in males (247.8 ±11.3) than females (208.4 ± 11.3), on the right (237.7± 12.8) than left sides (218.5 ± 12.3), at 10-minutes (231.4 ± 9.1) than initial baseline (224.8 ± 9.1) values. A polymorphism of stiffness values in 10 male and 10 female subjects was suggested by box plot analyses of the 3 weekly measurements and greater inter-individual than intra-individual variances. Greater knowledge of lumbar myofascial stiffness can improve understanding of their contributions in health and chronic low back disorders.


      PubDate: 2015-12-24T14:27:11Z
       
  • Effect of core strength training on dynamic balance and agility in
           adolescent badminton players
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Tarik Ozmen, Mert Aydogmus
      The aim of the present study was to investigate effect of core strength training (CST) on core endurance, dynamic balance and agility in adolescent badminton players. Twenty adolescent (age = 10.8 ± 0.3 years; height = 140.6 ± 4.4 cm, weight = 33.9 ± 5.8 kg) badminton players were randomly divided into two groups as training group (TG) and control (CG) group. All subjects were evaluated with Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Illinois Agility Test, and the core endurance tests. The TG completed CST twice a week, for 6 weeks. There were significant increases in (p < .05) directions of SEBT and core endurance tests (p < .05). However, no significant change was observed for agility (p > .05). The CST resulted in significant gains in directions of the SEBT and core endurances in adolescent badminton players, but not in agility.


      PubDate: 2015-12-21T14:17:43Z
       
  • Exploration of clinical changes following a novel mobilisation technique
           for treatment of chronic low back pain: A single cohort design
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gail C. Hanson, Bruce Jones, Catherine J. Bacon, Robert W. Moran



      PubDate: 2015-12-21T14:17:43Z
       
  • Leg raise increases pressure in lower and upper esophageal sphincter
           pressure among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): P. Bitnar, J. Stovicek, R. Andel, J. Arlt, M. Arltova, M. Smejkal, P. Kolar, A. Kobesova
      The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between posturally increased intra-abdominal pressure and lower/upper esophageal sphincter pressure changes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We used High Resolution Manometry to measure pressure changes in lower and upper esophageal sphincter during bilateral leg rise. We also examined whether the rate of lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure would increase during leg raise differentially in individuals with versus without normal resting pressure. Fifty eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease participated in the study. High resolution manometry was performed in relaxed supine position, then lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure was measured. Finally, the subjects were instructed to keep their legs lifted while performing 90-degree flexion at the hips and knees and the pressure was measured again. Paired t-test and independent samples t-test were used. There was a significant increase in both lower (P<0.001) and upper esophageal sphincter pressure (P=0.035) during leg raise compared to the initial resting position. Individuals with initially higher pressure in lower esophageal sphincter (>10 mmHg) exhibited a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with initially lower pressure (pressure≤10 mmHg; P=0.002). Similarly individuals with higher resting upper esophageal sphincter pressure (>44 mmHg) showed a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with lower resting pressure (≤44 mmHg; P<0.001). The results illustrate the influence of postural leg activities on intraesohpageal pressure in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, indicating by means of high resolution manometry that diaphragmatic postural and sphincter function are likely interrelated in this population.


      PubDate: 2015-12-21T14:17:43Z
       
  • A Guiding Framework to Understand Relationships within the Profession of
           Massage Therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Amanda Baskwill
      An element of professionalization is the development of a body of knowledge and the integration of that knowledge into practice, also known as evidence-informed practice (EIP). EIP was officially adopted in Ontario, Canada, by the massage therapy profession in 2002 when the professional competency document was updated to include competencies related to research literacy (College of Massage Therapists of Ontario 2002). Despite efforts to increase EIP, there continues to be a research-practice gap in massage therapy. However, there also seems to be interest in finding ways to support the increase massage therapists’ capacity to apply research. To support change, it is useful to describe the relationships in the profession that may have an effect on the use of evidence in practice and the development of a broader culture of inquiry. In order to better understand how these relationships may impact on EIP, an ecological model is proposed.


      PubDate: 2015-12-21T14:17:43Z
       
  • The contribution of postural balance analysis in older adult fallers: A
           narrative review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): L. Pizzigalli, Cremasco M. Micheletti, A. Mulasso, A. Rainoldi
      Objective Falls are a serious health problem for older adults. Several studies have identified the decline of postural balance as one of the main risk factors for falls. Contrary to what may be believed, the capability of force platform measurements to predict falls remains uncertain. The focus of this narrative review is the identification of postural characteristics of older adults at risk of falling using both static and dynamic postural balance assessments. Methods The literature analysis was conducted on Medline/PubMed. The search ended in May 2015. Results Centre of pressure (CoP) path length, CoP velocity and sway in medial lateral and anterior-posterior are the variables that distinguish older adult fallers from non-fallers. Discussion Recommendations to medical personnel on how to provide efficient balance training for older adults are offered, discussing the relevance and limitations of postural stability on static and dynamic board in falling risk prevention.


      PubDate: 2015-12-21T14:17:43Z
       
  • The Windowpane Squat
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Craig Liebenson



      PubDate: 2015-12-21T14:17:43Z
       
  • Does an association exist between the hierarchical motor components of
           upper and lower limbs in stroke'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Kamal Narayan Arya, Shanta Pandian, Dharmendra Kumar
      Background & Objective Abnormal synergisitic linkage exists between the upper and lower limbs. The relation may persist till the last stage of motor recovery. The objective of the present study was to analyze the relation between the motor components of the upper extremity and lower extremity in stroke subjects. Design A cross-sectional and correlational design. Setting Rehabilitation Institute. Participants Fifty-nine poststroke chronic hemiparetic subjects (39 men; Mean age = 48.81 years; Mean poststroke duration = 11.22 months and 34 right-side paresis). Interventions Not-applicable. Outcome measures Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA): upper extremity (FMA-UE) and lower extremity (FMA-LE). Results A moderate positive correlation (r = .65, p < .001) was found between FMA-UE and FMA-LE. FMA-UE (51%) was found to be significantly inferior (p < 0.001; 95% CI = 6 to 17) in comparison to FMA-LE (63%). Conclusion In poststroke subjects, there is a moderate positive relation between the recovery components of affected upper limb and lower limb. Stroke rehabilitation should consider hierarchical motor components of the lower limb and upper limb simultaneously.


      PubDate: 2015-12-13T13:48:24Z
       
  • Effect of Cervical Mobilization and Ischemic Compression Therapy on
           Contralateral Cervical Side Flexion and Pressure Pain Threshold in Latent
           Upper Trapezius Trigger Points
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): G.Shankar Ganesh, Harshita Singh, Shagoofa Mushtaq, Patitapaban Mohanty, Monalisa Pattnaik
      Studies have shown clinical relationship between trigger points and joint impairments. However the cause-and effect relationship between muscle and joint dysfunctions in trigger points could not be established. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of mobilization and ischemic compression therapy on cervical range of motion and pressure pain sensitivity in participants with latent trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle. Ninety asymptomatic participants with upper trapezius latent trigger point were randomized in to 3 groups: mobilization, ischemic compression and a control. The outcomes were measured over a 2 week period. Repeated measures ANOVA showed statistically and clinically significant pre to post improvement in both the interventional groups compared to control (p<0.05). However the effect sizes between the intervention groups were small (<0.3) revealing minimal clinical detectable difference.


      PubDate: 2015-12-03T12:46:08Z
       
  • New is the well-forgotten old: The use of dry cupping in musculoskeletal
           medicine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Evgeni Rozenfeld, Leonid Kalichman
      Cupping is an ancient technique used in treating pain and various disorders. Different techniques have been developed over time, however, applying a cup to create suction over a painful area, is common to all. Dry or fire cupping, used on the intact skin, leaves bluish circular hematomas. Recently, interest in cupping has re-emerged and subsequently, several studies have begun to investigate the mechanisms of cupping therapy. Mechanically, cupping increases blood circulation, whereas physiologically it activates the immune system and stimulates the mechanosensitive fibers, thus leading to a reduction in pain. There is initial scientific evidence that dry cupping is able to reduce musculoskeletal pain. Since cupping is an inexpensive, noninvasive and low-risk (if performed by a trained practitioner) therapeutic modality, we believe that it should be included in the arsenal of musculoskeletal medicine. It is essential to perform additional studies clarifying the biological mechanism and clinical effects of cupping.


      PubDate: 2015-12-03T12:46:08Z
       
  • The effects of dorso-lumbar motion restriction on the ground reaction
           force components during running
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Joseph J. Morley, Edward Traum
      Purpose The effects of restricting dorso-lumbar spine mobility on ground reaction forces in runners was measured and assessed. Methods A semi-rigid cast was used to restrict spinal motion during running. Subjects ran across a force platform at 3.6 metres/second, planting the right foot on the platform. Data was collected from ten running trials with the cast and ten without the cast and analysed. Results Casted running showed that the initial vertical heel strike maximum was increased (p< .02) and that the anterior-posterior deceleration impulse was increased (p< .01). The maximum vertical ground reaction force was decreased in casted running (p<.01), as was the anterior-posterior acceleration impulse (p< .02). There was a trend for increased medial-lateral impulse in the uncasted state, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusions Spinal mobility and fascia contribute to load transfer between joints and body segments. Experimentally restricting spinal motion during running results in measurable and repeatable alterations in ground reaction force components. Alterations in load transfer due to decreased spinal motion may be a factor contributing to selected injuries in runners.


      PubDate: 2015-12-03T12:46:08Z
       
  • The Feldenkrais Method® can enhance cognitive function in independent
           living older adults: A case-series
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gerhild Ullmann, Harriet G. Williams
      Poor cognitive health a major concern of aging individuals, can compromise independent living. More than 16 million people in the United States affected by cognitive impairment. We have studied the effects of the Feldenkrais Method® on cognitive function. In this case series with three participants cognitive function was assessed with the Trail Making Test A and B at baseline and after the Feldenkrais intervention. All participants improved performance on Trail Making Test A and B after completing the Feldenkrais intervention indicating that Feldenkrais lessons may offset age-related decline in cognitive function. The results of this case series warrant larger scale studies on cognitive outcomes of Feldenkrais interventions in clinical and non-clinical populations.


      PubDate: 2015-12-03T12:46:08Z
       
  • Quantification of dry needling on myofascial trigger points using a novel
           ultrasound method; A study protocol
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Navid Taheri, Asghar Rezasoltani, Farshad Okhovatian, Mehdi Karami, Sayed Mohsen Hosseini, Hosein Kouhzad Mohammadi
      Introduction Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a neuromuscular dysfunction consisting of both motor and sensory abnormalities. Considering the high prevalence of MPS and its related disabilities and costs, this study was designed to determine the reliability of new ultrasonographic indexes of the upper trapezius muscle as well as the sensitivity and specificity of 2D ultrasound imaging for diagnostic purposes. Furthermore, we sought to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling (DN) on studied ultrasonographic indexes. Materials and Methods This study will be performed in two steps with two different designs. The first is a pilot study and was designed as a semi-experimental study to determine the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography for the diagnosis of MPS and the reliability of ultrasonographic measurements like muscle thickness, area of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in longitudinal view, echogenicity of MTrPs in longitudinal view, echogenicity of muscle with MTrPs in longitudinal and transverse views, and pennation angle of upper trapezius muscle. The second study is an interventional study which was designed to investigate the effectiveness of DN on ultrasonographic measurements, for which the reliability was determined in the first study. Conclusion we will quantify the effectiveness of DN on MTrPs and muscle tissue by using novel ultrasonographic indexes. The results of the current study will provide baseline information to design more interventional studies to improve the evaluation of other treatments of MPS.


      PubDate: 2015-12-03T12:46:08Z
       
  • Effects of scapular taping on pain, strength, and electromyographic
           activity in young adults with shoulder pain and scapular dyskinesis: a
           pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leonardo Intelangelo, Diego Bordachar, Alexandre Wesley Carvalho Barbosa
      Objective to assess the immediate effects of scapular taping on pain, isometric force, and the level of activation of several scapular girdle muscles in individuals with shoulder pain and scapular dyskinesis. Materials and methods ten individuals with shoulder pain during arm elevation and scapular dyskinesis were included and evaluated by using a visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure algometry, dynamometry, and surface electromyography. All assessments were performed before and immediately after the application of scapular taping. Results scapular taping did not change the electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle (p=0.041, IC95%: -0.8256 to 10.8752). The positive effects of taping application were related to pain reduction (p=0.025) and improvement in pressure algometry in the middle deltoid muscle (p=0.020, IC95%:-1.8910 to -0.0490). Maximal isometric force did not change after the application of taping (flexo-abduction p=0.4136, external rotation p=0.4261). Significant correlations were noted between the VAS and pressure pain threshold (PPT) for the upper trapezius muscle (r=-0.6643, p=0.0361) as well as for the PPT measures of the middle deltoid and infraspinatus muscles before (r=0.9491, p=0.0001) and after (r=0.9006, p=0.0004) the application of taping. Conclusion scapular taping was not effective for inducing changes in the electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles, nor in altering the isometric force of shoulder flexo-abduction and external rotation. However, taping was effective at improving the pressure algometry values of the middle deltoid. Significant correlations between the pressure algometry of the middle deltoid and infraspinatus muscles, both before and after the application of scapular taping, were noted.


      PubDate: 2015-12-03T12:46:08Z
       
  • Comparative analysis of head-tilt and forward head position during laptop
           use between females with postural induced headache and healthy controls
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sarah Mingels, Wim Dankaerts, Ludo van Etten, Herbert Thijs, Marita Granitzer
      Objectives To compare 1) maximum manually induced head-protraction, head-tilt and forward head position and 2) the evolution of head-tilt and forward head position during a laptop-task between a headache- and control-group. Methods Angles for maximum head-protraction, head-tilt and forward head position of 12 female students with postural induced headache and 12 female healthy controls were calculated at baseline and while performing a laptop-task. Results The headache-group demonstrated an increased passive head-protraction of 22.30% compared to the control-group. The ratio of forward head position during habitual sitting to the maximum head-protraction differed significantly (p = 0.046) between headache-group (1.4 ± 0.4) and the control-group (1.1 ± 0.2). The headache-group showed a biphasic forward head position and head-tilt profile. These profiles differed significantly (p < 0.05) between groups and were negatively correlated (rE = - 0.927). Conclusion The headache-group showed a larger passive head-protraction with a habitual forward head-position further located from the end-range. During the laptop-task forward head position and head-tilt behaved biphasically with a more static forward head position and a more dynamic head-tilt.


      PubDate: 2015-12-03T12:46:08Z
       
  • A Fascia and The Fascial System
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Carla Stecco, Robert Schleip



      PubDate: 2015-11-25T08:13:04Z
       
  • Anma massage (Japanese massage) therapy for patients with Parkinson's
           disease in geriatric health services facilities: Effectiveness on limited
           range of motion of the shoulder joint
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sachie Suoh, Nozomi Donoyama, Norio Ohkoshi
      Objective To determine the efficacy of Anma massage therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in geriatric health services facilities. Methods (1) Immediate treatment effects: 10 PD patients, in the intervention period with Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) scale at stage 5, received 30–40 min sessions of Anma massage therapy. In the non-intervention period, six PD patients did not undergo this therapy. The shoulder joint range of motion (ROM) was measured before and after each session. (2) Continuous treatment effects: Six PD patients in the intervention period received the same massage sessions once a week continuously for seven weeks. One week after the completion of the treatment, the ROM of the shoulder joints was measured. Results (1) Shoulder abduction on the more affected side showed immediate significant improvements. (2) Shoulder abduction on the more affected side and less affected side showed notable effects of continuous treatment procedure leading to significant improvement. Conclusion The above results suggested the efficacy of successive Anma massage therapy.


      PubDate: 2015-11-25T08:13:04Z
       
  • The Functional Movement Screen as a Predictor of Police Recruit
           Occupational Task Performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): C. Bock, M. Stierli, B. Hinton, R. Orr
      Aim The aim of this study was to determine whether poor movement patterns impact on police recruit task performance. Methods: Fifty-three volunteers were randomly selected from a pool of 173 police recruits attending basic recruit training. Relationships between movement performance, as measured by the Functional Movement Screen, and four occupational tasks were investigated. Results: Eleven percent failed the marksmanship and baton strike assessments, 21% failed defensive tactics and 36% failed the tactical options assessment. Mean Functional Movement Screen score was 13.96 points (±1.99 points). Only the tactical options assessment approached a significant difference (p = 0.077) between pass/fail recruits. When Functional Movement Screen scores when graded as pass (14+) or fail (<14) again only the tactical options assessment approached significance (p = 0.057). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that a relationship between an officer’s movement patterns and occupational performance, most notably choice of tactical options, may exist.


      PubDate: 2015-11-21T07:52:08Z
       
  • Reproducibility of the low back clinical postural grouping in adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Ney Meziat-Filho, Roberta Mendonça, Adriano Pezolato, FelipeJ.J. Reis, Leandro Alberto Calazans Nogueira
      Objective The purpose of this study was to analyze the intra- and inter-rater reliability of the Low Back Clinical Postural Grouping (LBCPG). Methods Fifty-eight school adolescents were evaluated by lateral photography. The examiners classified the posture of the participants as: hyperlordotic, sway back, flat back or neutral. The intra- and inter-rater reliability were quantified by the percentage agreement between clinicians and the kappa coefficient with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results The intra-rater percentage agreement was 91.4%, k= 0.87 (95% IC 0.77 – 0.98, p<0.001) for the more experienced rater, and 86.2% k= 0.79 (IC 95% 0.62 – 0.96, p<0.001) for the less experienced rater. The percentage agreement between clinicians was 55.17% k= 0.39 (95% CI: 0.23 – 0.55, p<0.001). The agreement rose to 70.69%, k=0.58 (95% CI 0.41 – 0.74, p<0.001) when an optional second opinion of the raters was also considered. Conclusion: The LBCPG was reliable when used by the same clinician. The strategy of a second opinion could be used to improve the inter-rater reliability in epidemiological studies with large samples.


      PubDate: 2015-11-17T16:54:46Z
       
  • 20 years of JBMT – changes and continuity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2015-11-17T16:54:46Z
       
  • Effects of Manual Percussion during Postural Drainage on Lung Volumes and
           Metabolic Status in Healthy Subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jirakrit Leelaurngrayub, Wichai Eungpinichpong., Jakkrit Klaphajone, Mujalin Prasannarong, Kritsana Boontha
      Objective the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of manual percussion during three different positions of postural drainage (PD) on lung volumes and metabolic status. Methods: Twenty six healthy volunteers (13 women and 13 men), with a mean age of 20.15±1.17 years, participated. They were randomized into three standard positions of PD (upper, middle, or lower lobes) and given manual percussion at a frequency of 240 times per minute for 5 minutes. Lung volumes, including tidal volume (TV), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), expiratory reserve volume (ERV) and vital capacity (VC); and metabolic status, such as oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide (VCO2), respiratory rate (RR), and minute ventilation (VE) were evaluated. Results: the lung volumes showed no statistical difference in VC or IRV from percussion during PD in all positions, except for the lower lobe, where increased TV and decreased ERV were found when compared to PD alone. Furthermore, percussion during PD of the upper and middle lobes did not affect RR or VE, when compared to PD alone. In addition, percussion during PD of the middle and lower lobes increased VO2 and VCO2 significantly, when compared to PD alone, but it did not influence PD of the upper lobe. Conclusion: This study indicated that up to 5 minutes of manual percussion on PD of the upper and middle lobes is safe mostly for lung volumes, RR, and VE, but it should be given with care in PD conditions of the lower lobe.


      PubDate: 2015-11-13T16:44:13Z
       
  • Practitioners’ Perceptions of Yoga's Positive and Negative Effects:
           Results of a National United States Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Crystal L. Park, Kristen E. Riley, Tosca D. Braun
      Objectives Yoga is becoming increasingly popular, yet little information is available regarding practitioners’ perceptions of effects of their practice. This study aimed to characterize perceptions of both positive and negative changes practitioners reported in physical and psychosocial domains. Design Cross-sectional internet-based survey. Participants Yoga practitioners (N=542, including 162 teachers) recruited via email and flyers sent to yoga studios across the United States (US). Participants ranged in age from 18 to 85 years (M = 44). Measures Participants rated the extent to which they experienced positive or negative change in physical health and psychosocial dimensions and then listed up to three positive and three negative effects of their practice. Results Both students and teachers reported moderately high levels of positive physical changes and psychosocial changes, although teachers generally reported more positive change. Few negative changes were reported. In open-ended responses, the most commonly reported positive effects were general health and fitness and relaxation. Most commonly reported negative effects were injuries, soreness, emotional triggers/irritability, and expense. Conclusions Findings suggest that yoga practitioners generally perceive high levels of positive changes, but some also experience adverse effects. Future research should assess subjective experiences of change alongside more objective measures of improvement.


      PubDate: 2015-11-13T16:44:13Z
       
  • The Pilates Method Increases Respiratory Muscle Strength and Performance
           as Well as Abdominal Muscle Thickness
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mateus Beltrame Giacomini, Antônio Marcos Vargas da Silva, Laura Menezes Weber, Mariane Borba Monteiro
      The aim of this study was to verify the effects of the Pilates Method (PM) training program on the thickness of the abdominal wall muscles, respiratory muscle strength and performance, and lung function. This uncontrolled clinical trial involved 16 sedentary women who were assessed before and after eight weeks of PM training. The thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles was assessed. The respiratory muscle strength was assessed by measuring the maximum inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressure. The lung function and respiratory muscle performance were assessed by spirometry. An increase was found in MIP (p=0.001), MEP (p=0.031), maximum voluntary ventilation (p=0.020) and the TrA (p<0.001), IO (p=0.002) and EO (p<0.001) thickness after the PM program. No alterations in lung function were found. These findings suggest that the PM program promotes abdominal wall muscle hypertrophy and an increase in respiratory muscle strength and performance, preventing weakness in abdominal muscles and dysfunction in ventilatory mechanics, which could favor the appearance of illnesses.


      PubDate: 2015-11-13T16:44:13Z
       
  • Aquaticity: a discussion of the term and of how it applies to humans
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Danae Varveri, Christina Karatzaferi, Elizana Pollatou, Giorgos K. Sakkas
      The relationship between humans and water and the effects on aspects related to human performance has never been studied. The aim for the current systematic review is to attempt to define the term “aquaticity”, present the factors that describe it and reveal the form in which it presents itself in today’s society, in order to become a distinct scientific field of study. A systematic review of the literature has been conducted using anecdotal reports from the internet and forums as well as scientific articles and books from databases on issues related to aquatic sports. To the best of our knowledge there are no scientific articles dealing with human’s aquaticity. In the current systematic review, four factors have been recognized that are closely related to human aquaticity. Those are related to physical condition in the water, to apnea and ability to immerse, to mental health and to parameters related to body composition. According to our findings, “Aquaticity is the capacity of a terrestrial mammalian organism to function and habitualise in the aquatic environment. The level of aquaticity depends on mental and physical characteristics and can be improved by frequent exposure to the water element”. The ideal state of aquaticity is achieved through the activation of the diving reflex, when the human body is totally immersed in water. The development of knowledge regarding the aquatic environment leads humans to an improved state of aquaticity.


      PubDate: 2015-11-09T16:28:07Z
       
  • Fascial Hierarchies and the relevance of crossed-helical arrangements of
           collagen to changes in shape; Part II: The proposed effect of blood
           pressure (Traube-Hering-Mayer) waves on the fascia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Graham Scarr
      Periodic changes in arterial pressure and volume have long been related to respiratory and sympathetic nerve activity (Traube-Hering-Mayer waves) but their origins and nomenclature have caused considerable confusion since they were first discovered in the eighteenth century. However, although they remain poorly understood and the underlying details of their control are complicated, these waves do provide valuable clinical information on the state of blood pressure regulation in both normal and pathological conditions; and a correlation with oscillatory motions observed by certain practitioners suggests that they may also have some physiological value that relates to changes in the volume of fascial ‘tubes’. Part I of this paper (Scarr 2016) described a complex fascial network of collagen-reinforced tubular sheaths that are an integral part of muscle structure and function, and continuous with ‘higher-level’ fascial tubes surrounding groups of muscles, the limbs and entire body. The anisotropic arrangements of collagen fibres within the walls of these tubes reflect the most efficient distribution of mechanical stresses and have been considered to coordinate changes in shape, and a proposed link between cyclic variations in arterial pressure and volume, and the behaviour of these fascial compartments is now described.


      PubDate: 2015-11-09T16:28:07Z
       
  • Acute effects of traditional Thai massage on cortisol levels, arterial
           blood pressure and stress perception in academic stress condition: a
           single blind randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Surussawadi Bennett, Michael John Bennett, Uraiwon Chatchawan, Patcharaporn Jenjaiwit, Rungthip Pantumethakul, Soontorn Kunhasura, Wichai Eungpinichpong
      Traditional Thai massage (TTM) has been applied widely to promote relaxation. However, there is little evidence to support its efficacy on academic stress. A randomised controlled trial was performed to examine the acute effects of TTM on cortisol level, blood pressure, heart rate and stress perception in academic stress. This prospective trial included 36 physiotherapy students with a self perceived stress score of between 3 and 5. They were randomly allocated into the TTM (18 people) group or the control group (18 people). Saliva cortisol level, blood pressure, heart rate and stress perception rating were measured before and after the intervention. Both groups showed a significant reduction in cortisol level and heart rate when compared with baseline (p<0.001). There were no significant differences in cortisol level between the two groups. The results suggest the need for further study into other possible physiological effects on stress of TTM.


      PubDate: 2015-10-28T15:47:06Z
       
  • The Clinical Presentation of Individuals with Femoral Acetabular
           Impingement and Labral Tears: A Narrative Review of the Evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Scott Cheatham, Keelan R. Enseki, Morey J. Kolber
      Femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) has emerged as one of the more commonly recognized intraarticular hip pathologies and is often accompanied with a labral tear. The understanding of the clinical characteristics of individuals with symptomatic FAI has evolved over the past several years due to emerging research. As research progresses, there is often a gap in translating the current evidence to clinical practice. This manuscript presents the latest evidence underpinning the clinical presentation of FAI and labral tears. Evidence is presented within the context of bridging the latest research and clinical practice.


      PubDate: 2015-10-28T15:47:06Z
       
  • Basic Body Awareness Therapy for traumatised refugees Refugee experiences
           of individual Basic Body Awareness Therapy and the level of transference
           into daily life. An interview study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Trine Stårup Madsen, Jessica Carlsson, Maja Nordbrandt, Jonna Anne Jensen
      Purpose The aim of the study was to investigate refugee experiences of individual Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) and the level of transference into daily life. Method A qualitative method using semi-structured interviews. Malterud’s version of Giorgi’s 4-step analysis was used to analyse the data. Participants Three traumatised refugees with PTSD who had completed 14-20 individual BBAT sessions. Results The participants experienced the movements in BBAT as small and simple with big effects. BBAT was found to relieve pain and tension, bring peace of mind and body, and make it easier to sleep. Regular practice was necessary, as were instructions from a physiotherapist, to get the effect from BBAT. Positive changes in the contact to oneself and others were experienced and new coping strategies were developed. Conclusion Traumatised refugees experienced positive effects from BBAT and transference into daily life was experienced to a great extent.


      PubDate: 2015-10-28T15:47:06Z
       
  • Effect of spinal stabilization exercise on dynamic postural control and
           visual dependency in subjects with chronic non-specific low back pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mahyar Salavati, Behnam Akhbari, Ismail Ebrahimi Takamjani, Hossein Bagheri, Kamran Ezzati, Amir Hossein Kahlaee
      Background Motor control approach towards chronic non-specific low back pain (CNLBP) has gained increasing attention. CNLBP patients have shown to be more visually dependent for the postural control process than control subjects but no study has yet investigated the treatment programs effect on this disorder. Methods Forty CNLBP patients volunteered to participate in this experimental study. The subjects were randomly assigned into either stabilization exercise (SE) or control group both receiving 12 sessions of routine physiotherapy for four weeks. The SE group also received intensive stabilization exercise. Balance (in terms of overall (OSI), anteroposterior (APSI) and mediolateral stability indices (MLSI)) and functional disability were assessed by Biodex Balance System ® (BBS) and Oswestry Low Back Disability Questionnaire, respectively prior and after the interventions. The balance tests were performed with open and closed eyes. Results Both interventions significantly decreased all stability indices but the SE group showed a more pronounced improvement in OSI and APSI. In the SE group, vision deprivation had smaller destabilizing effects on OSI and APSI as compared with the control group. The groups were not statistically different prior and after the interventions on all dependent variables. Oswestry index reduction in the SE group was more pronounced but the interaction of time and group variables were not significant on pain intensity. Conclusion Both interventions effectively enhanced stability indices and functional capabilities and reduced pain intensity in CNLBP patients. The SE protocol made the patients less visual dependent perhaps via better stability. Since pain reduction was not different between the groups, more functional improvement in SE group cannot simply be interpreted via the pain interference and might be related to postural control capabilities of the patients.


      PubDate: 2015-10-28T15:47:06Z
       
  • Fascial Hierarchies and the Relevance of Crossed-Helical Arrangements of
           Collagen to Changes in the Shape of Muscles
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Graham Scarr CBiol
      Muscles are composite structures consisting of contractile myofibres surrounded by complex hierarchies of collagen-reinforced fascial sheaths. They are essentially flexible cylinders that change in shape, with the particular alignment of collagen fibres within their myofascial walls reflecting the most efficient distribution of mechanical stresses and coordinating these changes. However, while the functional significance of this crossed-helical fibre arrangement is well established in other species and in different parts of the body, relatively little attention has been given to this within the fascia of humans; and the relevance of this geometric configuration to muscles and surrounding fascial tissues is described.


      PubDate: 2015-10-28T15:47:06Z
       
  • A Reliability Study of the New Sensors for Movement Analysis
           (SHARIF–HMIS)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 October 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mohsen Abedi, Farideh Dehghan Manshadi, Minoo Khalkhali Zavieh, Sajad Ashouri, Hadi Azimi, Mohamad Parnianpour
      Aim SHARIF-HMIS is a new inertial sensor designed for movement analysis. The aim of the presentstudy wasto assess the inter-tester and intra-testerre liability of some kinematic parameters in different lumbar motions making use of this sensor. Materials and Methods 24 healthy persons and 28 patients with low back pain participated in the current reliability study. The test was performed in five different lumbar motions consisting of lumbar flexion in 0, 15, and 30 degrees in the right and left directions. For measuring inter-tester reliability, all the tests were carried out twice on the same day separately by two physiotherapists. Intra-tester reliability was assessed by reproducing the tests after 3 days by the same physiotherapist. Findings The present study revealed satisfactory inter- and intra-tester reliability indices in different positions. ICCs for intra-tester reliability ranged from 0.65 to 0.98 and 0.59 to 0.81 for healthy and patient participants, respectively. Also, ICCs for inter-tester reliability ranged from 0.65 to 0.92 for the healthy and 0.65 to 0.87 for patient participants. Conclusion In general, it can be inferred from the results that measuring the kinematic parameters in lumbar movements using inertial sensors enjoys acceptable reliability.


      PubDate: 2015-10-28T15:47:06Z
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2015