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Journal Cover   Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2589 journals]
  • Effects of unilateral posteroanterior mobilization in subjects with
           sacralized lumbosacral transitional vertebrae
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Phuntsog Angmo , P.P. Mohanty , Monalisa Pattnaik
      AIM OF THE STUDY To find out the efficacy of unilateral posteroanterior (PA) mobilization over type IA and type IIA sacralized lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in patients with low back pain with or without leg pain. Research design: experimental randomized control study. Sample size: 30 subjects, Sampling: simple random sampling. GROUP A- 15 subjects –self lumbar mobility and stretching exercises + Unilateral PA mobilization + hot pack. GROUP B- 15 subjects – self lumbar mobility and stretching exercises + hot pack. Before initiating treatment, subjects were assessed for dependent variables: Pain intensity by VAS, Forward bending and side bending ROM by modified finger to floor method with the help of an inch-tape and functions by Modified Oswestry Functional Disability Questionnaires. Post test measurements were taken after completion 2 weeks of therapy. The results of the study suggest that unilateral PA pressure is an effective mobilization method in reducing low back pain, improving ROM and related disability as compared to impairment based exercises alone in patients with low back pain with or without radiation to lower limbs having abnormally large transverse processes and hypomobile type IA and II A lumbo-sacral transitional vertebrae.


      PubDate: 2015-02-22T21:03:53Z
       
  • Multimodal Compared to Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Tension-type
           Headache in Adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Peter Przekop , Allison Przekop , Mark G. Haviland
      Chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) in children and adolescents is a serious medical condition, with considerable morbidity and few effective, evidence-based treatments. We performed a chart review of 83 adolescents (age range = 13-18 years; 67 girls and 16 boys) diagnosed with CTTH. Two treatment protocols were compared: multimodal (osteopathic manipulative treatments, mindfulness, and qi gong) and pharmacologic (amitriptyline or gabapentin). Four outcomes (headache frequency, pain intensity, general health, and health interference) were assessed at three time points (baseline, 3 months, and 6 months). A fifth outcome, number of bilateral tender points, was recorded at baseline and 6 months. All five were evaluated statistically with a linear mixed model. Although both multimodal and pharmacologic treatments were effective for CTTH (time effects for all measures were significant at p < .001), results from each analysis favored multimodal treatment (the five group by time interaction effects were significant at or below the p < .001 level). Headache frequency in the pharmacologic group, for example, reduced from a monthly average (95% Confidence Interval shown in parentheses) of 23.9 (21.8, 26.0) to 16.4 (14.3, 18.6) and in the multimodal group from 22.3 (20.1, 24.5) to 4.9 (2.6, 7.2) (a substantial group difference). Pain intensity (worst in the last 24 hours, 0-10 scale) was reduced in the pharmacologic group from 6.2 (5.6, 6.9) to 3.4 (2.7, 4.1) and from 6.1 (5.4, 6.8) to 2.0 (1.2, 2.7) in the multimodal group (a less substantial difference). Across the other three assessments, group differences were larger for general health and number of tender points and less so for pain restriction. Multimodal treatment for adolescent CTTH appears to be effective. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these promising results.


      PubDate: 2015-02-22T21:03:53Z
       
  • Physical Activity, Fear Avoidance, and Chronic Non-Specific Pain: A
           Narrative Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Nicole Nelson , James R. Churilla
      Background Chronic non-specific pain (CNSP) and physical inactivity have become increasingly prevalent in the United States; however, the associations between the two remain unclear. The lack of clarity may be due to the presence of a third variable, the individual’s pain coping strategy. Objectives We had three specific aims. 1) To review the associations between fear-avoidance beliefs and behaviors, and levels of physical activity and disability. 2) To review the theoretical mechanisms behind chronic non-specific pain and the potential mediating role of physical activity. 3) Finally, to report the most commonly recommended interventions for fear-avoidant individuals suffering with chronic pain. Conclusions Further investigation is needed to fully understand the associations between physical activity, chronic non-specific pain, and fear avoidant beliefs and behaviors. Precise relationships notwithstanding, there is strong evidence to suggest that physical activity is an integral piece to the chronic non-specific pain puzzle. For this reason, it is incumbent upon clinicians to strongly recommend participation in regular, yet properly progressed, physical activity to chronic non-specific pain sufferers.


      PubDate: 2015-02-22T21:03:53Z
       
  • A Critical Evaluation of Quintner et al: Missing the Point
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 February 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt , Robert D. Gerwin
      The objective of this article is to critically analyze a recent publication by Quinter, Bove and Cohen, published in Rheumatology, about myofascial pain syndrome and trigger points (Quintner et al 2014). The authors concluded that the leading trigger point hypothesis is flawed in reasoning and in science. They claimed to have refuted the trigger point hypothesis. The current paper demonstrates that the Quintner et al paper is a biased review of the literature replete with unsupported opinions and accusations. In summary, Quintner et al have not presented any convincing evidence to believe that the Integrated TrP Hypothesis should be laid to rest.


      PubDate: 2015-02-05T19:22:16Z
       
  • Muscle Timing in Injured and Non-injured leg of Athletes with Chronic
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sara Fereydounnia , Azadeh Shadmehr , Saeed Talebian Moghadam , Gholamreza Olyaei , Shohreh Jalaei , Ali Tahmasebi
      Objective The aim of this study was to investigate premotor time, motor time and reaction time of the injured and non-injured leg muscles of athletes with chronic ankle instability in response to a visual stimulus during forward jumping. Methods Surface electromyography was performed on injured and non-injured leg of eight athletes with chronic ankle instability during forward jumping. Results Results showed that premotor time of the peroneus longus was significantly longer in non-injured leg compared with injured leg (489.37 ± 220.22 ms vs. 306.46 ± 142.92 ms, P = 0.031); on the contrary, motor time of the peroneus longus was significantly shorter in non-injured leg compared with injured leg (569.04 ± 318.62 ms vs. 715.12 ± 328.72 ms, P = 0.022). No significant difference was noted in the timing of other calf muscles (P > 0.05). Conclusion According to the results of this study, rehabilitation protocols, regarding ankle instability, need to put greater emphasis on tasks that require proper timing of muscles and muscle re-education so that protocols could reduce residual symptoms after sprain and prevent recurrent sprains.


      PubDate: 2015-02-05T19:22:16Z
       
  • Contrasting views of myofascial pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2015-02-05T19:22:16Z
       
  • Training for Improved Neuro-Muscular Control of Balance in Middle Aged
           Females
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gregory S. Anderson , Fabio Deluigi B. Kin , Guido Belli , Claudio Tentoni , Michael B. Gaetz
      This study examined improvements in static balance and muscle electromygraphic (EMG) activity following a four week progressive training program in 16 middle aged females (mean age = 46.9 ± 8.7 yrs; height 161.1 ± 6.0cm; weight 65.4 ± 11.2 kg). Participants trained 3 times per week for 4 weeks, for 50 minutes per session, progressing base of support, stability, vision, resistance and torque in each of six basic exercises. Pre and post training measures of balance included feet together standing, a tandem stance and a one-leg stand (unsupported leg in the saggital plane) performed with the eyes closed, and a Stork Stand (unsupported leg in the frontal plane) with both eyes open and closed. In each position postural deviations were tallied for each individual while muscle recruitment was determined using root mean squared (RMS) EMG activity for the soleus, biceps femoris, errector spinae, rectus abdominis and internal oblique muscles of the dominant foot side. Balance scores were significantly improved post training in both the Balance Error Score System (p<0.05) and stork stand positions (p<0.01). Muscle activity was reduced post-training in all muscles in each condition except the soleus in the tandem position, although not all significantly. Reduced biceps femoris activity suggest that improved core stability allowed participants to move from a hip to an ankle postural control strategy through improved coordination of muscles involved in balance and reduced body sway. The core muscles were able to control body position with less activity post training suggesting improved muscle coordination and efficiency. These results suggest that short term progressive floor to BOSU™ balance training can improve standing balance in middle aged women.


      PubDate: 2015-02-05T19:22:16Z
       
  • An Evidence-Informed Review of the Current Myofascial Pain Literature
           – March 2015
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt , Michelle Layton , Todd Hooks , Rob Grieve
      The second article in this review series considers multiple recent publications about myofascial pain, trigger points (TrPs) and other related topics. The article is divided into several sections, including a Basic Research section (4 articles), a section on Soft Tissue Approaches (5 articles), a Dry Needling and Acupuncture section (7 articles), an Injection section (2 articles), a section on. Modalities (1 article), Other Clinical Approaches (3 articles) and finally a Reviews section (7 articles). The thirty publications reviewed in this article originated in all corners of the world.


      PubDate: 2015-01-30T13:25:59Z
       
  • Does Anterior Knee Pain Severity and Function Relate to the Frontal Plane
           Projection Angle and Trunk and Hip Strength in Women with Patellofemoral
           Pain?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gabriel Peixoto Leão Almeida , Ana Paula de Moura Campos Carvalho e Silva , Fábio Jorge Renovato França , Maurício Oliveira Magalhães , Thomaz Nogueira Burke , Amélia Pasqual Marques
      The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between knee pain severity and function with the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) and trunk and hip peak torque (PT) in women with patellofemoral pain (PFPS). Twenty-two women with PFPS were assessed. Knee pain severity (KPS) was assessed with an 11-point visual analog scale and function with an Anterior Knee Pain Scale. The FPPA was recorded with a digital camera. PT of extensors, abductors, and the lateral rotators of hip and lateral core stability were measured with a handheld dynamometer. FPPA was the only predictor for the KPS. Regarding predictors of function, PT of lateral core stability and the extensor and abductor of the hip explained 41.4% of the function. Increase in FPPA was associated with greater KPS, and the lowest PT of lateral core stability, hip abductors, and extensors was associated with lower function in women with PFPS.


      PubDate: 2015-01-30T13:25:59Z
       
  • Van Der Wal’s response to Stecco's fascial nomenclature editorial
           Some Considerations as to Nomenclature in the Domain of the Fascia and
           Connective Tissue
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jaap van der Wal



      PubDate: 2015-01-25T13:20:18Z
       
  • Interrater reliability of a Pilates movement-based classification system
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Kwan Kenny Yu , Evelyn Tulloch , Paul Hendrick
      Objective To determine the interrater reliability for identification of a specific movement pattern using a Pilates Classification system. Method Videos of 5 subjects performing specific movement tasks were sent to raters trained in the DMA-CP classification system. Results Ninety-six raters completed the survey. Interrater reliability for the detection of a directional bias was excellent (Pi = 0.92, and K free = 0.89). Interrater reliability for classifying an individual into a specific subgroup was moderate (Pi = 0.64, K free = 0.55) however raters who had completed levels 1–4 of the DMA-CP training and reported using the assessment daily demonstrated excellent reliability (Pi = 0.89 and K free = 0.87). Conclusion The reliability of the classification system demonstrated almost perfect agreement in determining the existence of a specific movement pattern and classifying into a subgroup for experienced raters. There was a trend for greater reliability associated with increased levels of training and experience of the raters.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Conservative treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome: Comparison between laser
           therapy and fascial manipulation®
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Elisa Pratelli , Marco Pintucci , Pina Cultrera , Enrico Baldini , Antonio Stecco , Antonio Petrocelli , Pietro Pasquetti
      The etiopathogenesis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is multifactorial and most cases are classified as idiopathic (Thurston 2013). A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effectiveness of Fascial Manipulation® (FM) and Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for CTS. This prospective trial included 42 patients (70 hands with symptoms) with clinical and electroneuromyographic diagnosis of CTS. The patients were randomly assigned to receive multiple sessions of FM or multiple session of LLLT. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) were performed at baseline, end of treatment and after three months. The group that received FM showed a significant reduction in subjective pain perception and an increased function assessed by BCTQ at the end of the treatment and follow-up. The group that received LLLT showed an improvement in the BCTQ at the end of the treatment but the improvement level was not sustained at the three month follow-up. FM is a valid alternative treatment for CTS.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Transmission of muscle force to fascia during exercise
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Thomas Findley , Hans Chaudhry , Sunil Dhar
      Objective As the muscle contracts, fibers get thicker, forcing the fascial tubular layers surrounding the muscle (endomysium, perimysium and epimysium) to expand in diameter and hence to shorten in length. We develop a mathematical model to determine the fraction of force generated by extremity muscles during contraction that is transmitted to the surrounding tubes of fascia. Methods Theory of elasticity is used to determine the modulus of elasticity, radial strain and the radial stress transmitted to the fascia. Results Starting with published data on dimensions of muscle and muscle force, we find radial stress is 50% of longitudinal stress in the soleus, medial gastrocnemius, and elbow flexor and extensor muscles. Conclusion Substantial stress is transmitted to fascia during muscular exercise, which has implications for exercise therapies if they are designed for fascial as well as muscular stress. This adds additional perspective to myofascial force transmission research.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Effectiveness of myofascial release: Systematic review of randomized
           controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): M.S. Ajimsha , Noora R. Al-Mudahka , J.A. Al-Madzhar
      Introduction Myofascial release (MFR) is a form of manual therapy that involves the application of a low load, long duration stretch to the myofascial complex, intended to restore optimal length, decrease pain, and improve function. Anecdotal evidence shows great promise for MFR as a treatment for various conditions. However, research to support the anecdotal evidence is lacking. Objective To critically analyze published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the effectiveness of MFR as a treatment option for different conditions. Data sources Electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane library, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), with key words myofascial release and myofascial release therapy. No date limitations were applied to the searches. Study selection Articles were selected based upon the use of the term myofascial release in the abstract or key words. The final selection was made by applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the full text. Studies were included if they were English-language, peer-reviewed RCTs on MFR for various conditions and pain. Data extraction Data collected were number of participants, condition being treated, treatment used, control group, outcome measures and results. Studies were analyzed using the PEDro scale and the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine's Levels of Evidence scale. Conclusions The literature regarding the effectiveness of MFR was mixed in both quality and results. Although the quality of the RCT studies varied greatly, the result of the studies was encouraging, particularly with the recently published studies. MFR is emerging as a strategy with a solid evidence base and tremendous potential. The studies in this review may help as a respectable base for the future trials.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Effectiveness of a program of therapeutic exercises on the quality of life
           and lumbar disability in women with Stress Urinary Incontinence
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Adriana de Carvalho Lacombe , Virginia Martello Riccobene , Leandro Alberto Calazans Nogueira
      Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is a common condition and can cause social isolation and decreased quality of life. The literature demonstrates that perineal exercises are effective in promoting urinary continence and lumbar stability. This uncontrolled (group) pilot study, using a pre-test-post-test design, investigated whether a weekly session of Holistic Gymnastics® conducted during a one-year period, could change outcomes in a group of twenty women diagnosed with SUI. In the first and last evaluation, the subjects underwent a clinical examination and were asked to complete two questionnaires, one regarding quality of life and the other about lumbar disability. Improvement in the quality of life was observed in nine out of ten domains. There was also an improvement in lumbar disability. These results suggest that a program with therapeutic exercises can be effective in controlling urinary incontinence and improve the quality of life and lumbar disability in woman with SUI.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Myofascial origin of shoulder pain: A literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Stanislav Sergienko , Leonid Kalichman
      Background Shoulder pain is a common problem imposing a considerable burden on the affected person and society. Since interventions targeting traditional musculoskeletal conditions are usually only moderately effective, myofascial origin can be suggested as an alternative possible source of shoulder pain. Objectives To examine current evidence associated with myofascial origin of shoulder pain, with emphasis on diagnosis, prevalence and treatment efficacy. Methods PubMed, Google Scholar and PEDro databases were searched from inception until December 2013 for terms relating to myofascial pain in the shoulder area. Results Two studies showed a high reliability of the following diagnostic characteristics during palpation: presence or absence of the taut band, spot tenderness, jump sign, pain recognition and referred pain sensation. Three prevalence studies showed a significant greater number of active myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) on the painful shoulder side. Reduced muscle strength, accelerated muscle fatigue, inconsistent muscle activation pattern under load and reduced antagonist reciprocal inhibition were found in subjects with latent MTrPs in four observational studies. Six interventional studies demonstrated the effectiveness of dry needling, myofascial manipulation, ischemic compression, laser therapy and multimodal treatment. Conclusion MTrPs in shoulder muscles is a common condition among patients with shoulder complaints and can be reliably diagnosed by palpation. The reviewed interventions seem to be effective in reducing pain, increasing range of motion and improving function of the painful shoulder.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Yoga therapy and ambulatory multiple sclerosis Assessment of gait
           analysis parameters, fatigue and balance
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Senem Guner , Fatma Inanici
      Background and Objective Gait impairment, falls due to balance problems and fatigue are among the most important complaints in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and cause significant functional limitation. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to help symptom management and to improve quality of life is growing among MS patients. Yoga is widely used as one of these CAM interventions, however, the number of studies that show the efficacy of yoga training in MS is inadequate. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of a short term yoga program on fatigue, balance and gait in patients with MS. Method Eight volunteer ambulatory MS patients with clinically definite relapsing remitting MS whose Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) is less than or equal to 6.0, and eight healthy subjects were included in the study. Patients participated in 12 weeks of a bi-weekly yoga program under supervision. At their baseline and after yoga therapy, the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) are used to assess fatigue and balance. Three dimensional gait analysis is done using the Vicon 612 system with six cameras and two Bertec force plates, before and after therapy. Results After short term yoga therapy, statistically significant achievements were obtained in fatigue, balance, step length and walking speed. Although sagittal plane pelvis and hip angles, ankle plantar flexor moment, powers generated at the hip and ankle joints at the pre-swing were improved, the improvements were not statistically significant. Conclusion Yoga therapy is a safe and beneficial intervention for improving fatigue, balance and spatiotemporal gait parameters in patients with MS. Further studies with a larger sample size and longer follow-up will be needed to evaluate the long term effects of yoga therapy.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Is pressure pain sensitivity over the cervical musculature associated with
           neck disability in individuals with migraine'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Maria Claudia Gonçalves , Thaís Cristina Chaves , Lidiane Lima Florencio , Gabriela Ferreira Carvalho , Fabíola Dach , Cesar Fernández-De-Las-Penãs , Débora Bevilaqua-Grossi
      The objective was to determine if disability due to neck pain is correlated with pressure pain sensitivity in the cervical muscles in patients with migraine. Thirty-two volunteers with migraine completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles were also assessed. Data were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (r s) and linear regression models (α < 0.05). Moderate negative correlations between NDI and PPT were obtained for the sternocleidomastoid (r s  = −0.42; p = 0.001), upper trapezius (r s  = −0.33; p = 0.001) and suboccipital muscles (r s  = −0.41; p = 0.001). The linear regression revealed no association between NDI and PPT of sternocleidomastoid (β = 0.01; R 2 = 0.17), upper trapezius (β = 0.01; R 2 = 0.11) and suboccipital muscles (β = 0.02; R 2 = 0.17). NDI scores and PPT of the cervical muscles correlated moderately and was inversely proportional in patients with migraine, but the association was not linear, so both outcomes should be considered in the assessment of this population.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Effectiveness of body awareness interventions in fibromyalgia and chronic
           fatigue syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Imke Courtois , Filip Cools , Joeri Calsius
      Objectives Patients with long-lasting pain problems often complain of lack of confidence and trust in their body. Through physical experiences and reflections they can develop a more positive body- and self-experience. Body awareness has been suggested as an approach for treating patients with chronic pain and other psychosomatic conditions. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of body awareness interventions (BAI) in fibromyalgia (FM) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Methods Two independent readers conducted a search on Medline, Cochrane Central, PsycINFO, Web of knowledge, PEDro and Cinahl for randomized controlled trials. Results We identified and screened 7.107 records of which 29 articles met the inclusion criteria. Overall, there is evidence that BAI has positive effects on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) (MD −5.55; CI −8.71 to −2.40), pain (SMD −0.39, CI −0.75 to −0.02), depression (SMD −0.23, CI −0.39 to −0.06), anxiety (SMD −0.23, CI −0.44 to −0.02) and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) (SMD 0.62, CI 0.35–0.90) when compared with control conditions. The overall heterogeneity is very strong for FIQ (I 2 92%) and pain (I 2 97%), which cannot be explained by differences in control condition or type of BAI (hands-on/hands-off). The overall heterogeneity for anxiety, depression and HRQoL ranges from low to moderate (I 2 0%–37%). Conclusions Body awareness seems to play an important role in anxiety, depression and HRQoL. Still, interpretations have to be done carefully since the lack of high quality studies.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • The Pilates breathing technique increases the electromyographic amplitude
           level of the deep abdominal muscles in untrained people
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alexandre Wesley Carvalho Barbosa , Camila Antunes Guedes , Douglas Novaes Bonifácio , Angélica de Fátima Silva , Fábio Luiz Mendonça Martins , Michelle Cristina Sales Almeida Barbosa
      Objective To evaluate the behaviour of the upper rectus abdominis, lower rectus abdominis and transverse abdominis/internal oblique (TrA/IO) by using surface electromyography during trunk flexion with and without the Pilates breathing technique. Methods Nineteen female subjects (without experience of the Pilates method) were recruited. The muscles were evaluated while trunk flexion was performed by using the Pilates breathing technique (POW) and Step Barrel device, followed by another contraction without the technique (NORM). Normality was accepted, and the paired t-test was used to determine data differences (p < 0.05). Results Significant differences were noted in the amplitude level of activation between TrA/IO-POW and TrA/IO-NORM. The activation amplitude level of TrA/IO-POW significantly increased compared with all the other muscles under the NORM condition. Conclusion The breathing technique of the Pilates method associated with trunk flexion increases TrA/IO electrical activity.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Creating integrative work: A qualitative study of how massage therapists
           work with existing clients
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Luann Drolc Fortune , Glenn M. Hymel
      Introduction As one of the most often used complementary treatments, massage is increasingly positioned as an essential component of integrative medicine. Recent studies evaluate the clinical efficacy of massage therapy, but few studies explore how massage therapists (MTs) execute their work and exercise clinical reasoning in natural settings. Purpose To gain foundational knowledge about clinical reasoning and applied knowledge, this study examined how 10 MTs executed an entire session with established clients. Results support translational research design and inform educators. Methods Ethnomethodology and phenomenology informed the qualitative design. Data were collected by videotaping actual sessions and interviewing the participants immediately afterward while viewing the videos. Computer-aided analysis identified data patterns for thematic interpretation. Results The MTs shared tacit knowledge that directed their work: a) maintaining a primarily biomechanical focus, b) prerequisite safe touch, c) multitasking not allowed, d) MTs assume physical risk, and e) the work affects multiple bodily systems. The MTs sensed effectiveness experientially by adopting common tactics: a) visualizing the manual engagement points, b) assuming the client controlled the physiological release, and c) educating the client. Within these commonalities, they operationalized their work in complex and singular ways, with the particular client relationship critical to structuring the session and evaluating the outcome. Conclusion MTs viewed their work primarily as a biomechanical intervention, but understood therapeutic massage as serving multiple functions. Process-oriented clinical reasoning mirrored models found in psychotherapy and was informed by experience, intuition, and training, which resulted in an intentionally holistic approach.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • The efficacy of surface electromyographic biofeedback assisted stretching
           for the treatment of chronic low back pain: A case-series
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Aimee Moore , Jamie Mannion , Robert W. Moran
      Individuals with low back pain (LBP) commonly present with an impaired flexion–relaxation (FR) response, characterised as continued lumbar muscle activation at maximal voluntary flexion. The aim of the present investigation was to explore the effectiveness of a surface electromyographic assisted stretching (SEMGAS) programme in improving FR. Nine volunteers with chronic LBP and an impaired FR took part in weekly biofeedback SEMGAS sessions and performed a home-based stretching programme, for 5 weeks. FR, Oswestry Disability Index, Numeric Pain Rating Scale and Sit and Reach were recorded pre and post-intervention as well as at a 4–6-week follow-up. Of the nine participants included, three improved FR to statistically significant levels. These three participants also achieved a clinically important change in pain intensity scores. The results suggest that SEMGAS may provide benefits to some individuals with chronic LBP and impaired FR, although larger scale investigation of SEMGAS alone is indicated.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Relationship between functional capacity, joint mobility and pulmonary
           function in patients with systemic sclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tatiana Rafaela Lemos Lima , Fernando Silva Guimarães , Leilson Araujo Silva , Débora Pedroza Guedes Silva , Sara Lucia Silveira Menezes , Agnaldo José Lopes
      Background In systemic sclerosis (SS), pulmonary involvement is currently the leading cause of mortality. Joint impairments limit the range of motion (ROM), which may reduce the functional capacity of these patients. Aim To assess the correlation between the functional capacity, joints mobility, and pulmonary function parameters in adults with SS. Method This was a cross-sectional study including ten SS patients who underwent goniometry, spirometry, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLco) assessment, and the 6-min walk distance (6 MWD). Results Significant correlations were found between the 6 MWD and the tibiotarsal plantarflexion ROM (r = 0.65; P < 0.01), tibiotarsal dorsiflexion ROM (r = 0.64; P < 0.01), and hip adduction ROM (0.52; P < 0.05). Significant correlation was also observed between the 6 MWD and DLco (r = 0.61; P < 0.01). Conclusions Although the 6 MWD can be influenced by cardiovascular and pulmonary impairments in SS, our results suggest that the musculoskeletal dysfunction play an important role in the functional capacity of these patients.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • A Unifying Neuro-Fasciagenic Model of Somatic Dysfunction - underlying
           mechanisms and treatment - PART I
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Paolo Tozzi
      This paper offers an extensive review of the main fascia-mediated mechanisms underlying various dysfunctional and pathophysiological processes of clinical relevance for manual therapy. The concept of somatic dysfunction is revisited in light of the diverse fascial influences that may come into play in its genesis and maintenance. A change in perspective is thus proposed: from a nociceptive model that for decades has viewed somatic dysfunction as a neurologically-mediated phenomenon, to a unifying fascial model that integrates neural influences into a multifactorial and multidimensional interpretation of dysfunctional process as being partially, if not entirely, mediated by the fascia.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Comparative study of stretching modalities in healthy women: Heating and
           application time
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jose Luis Rosario , Álexis Foletto
      A lack of muscle flexibility affects the functionality of the human body, making it difficult to carry out certain activities of daily living. The aim of the present study was to compare the technique of passive static stretching on hamstring muscles in isolation, or combined with heating techniques and different application times. Fifty women were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 10 each): The Microwave Diathermy Group had the hamstrings heated by microwave before stretching; Treadmill Group, in which warm-up walking was performed before stretching; 30-Second Group, in which 30 s of stretching was performed; 10-Minute Group, which involved stretching for 10 min and Control Group. In all groups, the leg extension range of motion was assessed, and the flexibility by the third finger-ground test was performed before and after application. The individuals in the experimental groups performed three stretching sessions on three consecutive days. All statistical analysis was performed with p ≤ 0.05. The results showed that all treatments were effective compared to the control group. The Treadmill Group and the 10-Minute group were superior for an acute effect (soon after the stretch – related to a decreased muscular viscoelasticity). The 10-Minute Group was the most effective for the chronic effect (long lasting – related to increased numbers of sarcomeres). A 10-minute stretch, when performed over four subsequent days, is suggested for faster increase in flexibility. The results could suggest a systemic warming (such as the one provided by a treadmill workout) before stretching for an acute gain of flexibility in the same day. It was possible to identify the inefficiencies associated with the use of microwaves in terms of stretching to gain flexibility. In fact, the values recorded were similar to stretching without any heat at all.


      PubDate: 2015-01-22T12:44:52Z
       
  • Functional Knee Extension Test (FKET): inter-rater palpatory agreement and
           visual analysis during a non-weight bearing functional assessment of the
           knee
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Rick A. Ames , Brett S. Jarosz , James Baglin , Cliff Da Costa
      Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inter-rater reliability of the Functional Knee Extension Test (FKET), a non-weight bearing functional assessment of the knee that is utilized within clinical practice. Methods The design was a single-session, test-retest reliability study. Active knee extension was assessed and documented by each examiner for each of the visual, palpatory and vastus medialis obliqus (VMO) components of the FKET on fifty-seven healthcare professionals. Results The Kappa (κ) statistic for the inter-rater reliability for the visual, palpatory and VMO variables of the FKET were slight-to-fair (0.13 to 0.26), fair-to-moderate (0.39 to 0.50), and moderate-to-almost perfect (0.57 to 0.93) reliability, respectively. The p-values for all variables, besides ‘Visual RIGHT: TibTubExt’ and ‘Visual LEFT: TibTubExt’ indicated statistically significant evidence of agreement above random guessing. Estimates for κ on the ‘VMO Quantity: No Contract’ and ‘VMO Timing: Start then stop’ variables could not be calculated as ratings only existed across one row of the crosstabulation. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the palpatory and VMO components of the FKET have sufficient reliability to justify utilization within clinical practice. Future research is needed to determine whether the implementation of a functional knee assessment protocol, including the FKET could enhance levels of reliability in clinical decision-making of knee function.


      PubDate: 2015-01-08T16:03:19Z
       
  • Effects of Alexander Technique Training Experience on Gait Behavior in
           Older Adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matthew O’Neill , David Anderson , Diane Allen , Christopher Ross , Kate A. Hamel
      Heightened fall risk, potentially caused by aging-related changes in gait, is a serious health issue faced by older adults. The Alexander Technique is thought to improve balance and motor function; however, the technique’s effect on gait has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Alexander Technique training in older adults on the temporospatial characteristics of gait and medio-lateral center of mass displacement during fast and comfortably paced over-ground walking. Six licensed Alexander Technique teachers and seven controls between the ages of 60 and 75 years of age participated in the study. Alexander Technique teachers exhibited a reduction in medio-lateral center of mass displacement during fast paced walking compared to comfortably paced walking that was not present in controls. Due to this difference Alexander Technique teachers displayed a smaller medio-lateral Center of Mass displacement compared to controls during fast paced walking. Alexander Technique teachers also demonstrated significantly smaller stride width and lower gait timing variability compared to controls. These findings, which suggest superior control of dynamic stability during gait and potentially reduced fall risk in Alexander Technique teachers, warrant further study.


      PubDate: 2015-01-08T16:03:19Z
       
  • The effect of motor control and tactile acuity training on patients with
           non-specific low back pain and movement control impairment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 January 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Magdalena Gutknecht , Angelika Mannig , Anja Waldvogel , Benedict M. Wand , Hannu Luomajoki
      Background Movement control impairment is a clinical subgroup of non-specific low back pain which can be assessed reliably. There is a strong correlation between tactile acuity and movement control suggesting these two treatments might have additive effects. The first research aim was to determine if patients with a motor control impairment demonstrated improvement in outcome with combined tactile acuity and motor control training. The second aim was to determine if tactile acuity training enhanced the effect of motor control training. Method The primary study was a single-arm cohort study conducted in three physiotherapy practices in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. 40 patients (23 males and 17 females) suffering from non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) and movement control impairment were treated. Patients were assessed at baseline and immediately post treatment. Treatment included exercises to lumbopelvic control and graphaesthesia training to improve tactile acuity. Treatment effects were evaluated using the Roland Morris disability questionnaire (RMQ) and the patient-specific functional scale (PSFS). The performance on a set of six movement control tests and lumbar two-point discrimination were also assessed. The results of this cohort study were compared with a historic control group which was comparable with the primary study but included only motor control exercises. Results All the outcomes improved significantly with the combined training (RMQ - 2.2 pts.¸PSFS - 2.8 pts.; MCTB - 2.02 pts. & TPD - 17.07mm; all p<0.05). In comparison to the outcomes of the historic control, there was no significant differences in movement control, patient-specific functional complaints or disability between the groups. Conclusions The results of this study, based on a before and after intervention comparison, showed that outcome improved significantly following combined tactile acuity and motor control training. However, compared to an earlier study, the tactile acuity training did not have an additional effect to the results. The use of historical controls does not control for allocation bias and the results obtained here require verification in a randomized controlled trial.


      PubDate: 2015-01-03T15:52:39Z
       
  • Comparative analysis of ultrasound changes in the vastus lateralis muscle
           following myofascial release and thermotherapy: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Kazuna Ichikawa , Hitoshi Takei , Hideyuki Usa , Shoh Mitomo , Daisuke Ogawa
      Objectives This study aimed to compare the effects of myofascial release (MFR) and hot pack therapy (HPT) on fascial gliding and flexibility of the vastus lateralis muscle. Methods Three treatments were applied to the left vastus lateralis muscles of each participant (12 healthy males): MFR for 4 min, superficial HPT for 10 min, and superficial HPT for 20 min. Deep fascial motion was measured by B-mode ultrasound, whereas muscle stiffness was measured by real-time elastography (RTE) and a durometer before and after the interventions. Results Only MFR resulted in changes in both deep fascial motion and muscle stiffness measured by RTE. Durometer-measured muscle stiffness revealed changes following both MFR and 20-min HPT but not 10-min HPT. Conclusions HPT may produce only superficial effects. Because MFR improved all measured parameters, continuous stretching and pressure are probably important for improving fascial gliding and flexibility of the vastus lateralis muscle.


      PubDate: 2014-12-26T15:36:51Z
       
  • The immediate effect of bilateral self myofascial release on the plantar
           surface of the feet on hamstring and lumbar spine flexibility: A pilot
           randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Rob Grieve , Faye Gooodwin , Mostapha Alfaki , Amey-Jay Bourton , Caitlin Jeffries , Harriet Scott
      Background Self myofascial release (SMR) via a tennis ball to the plantar aspect of the foot is widely used and advocated to increase flexibility and range of movement further along the posterior muscles of a proposed "anatomy train". To date there is no evidence to support the effect of bilateral SMR on the plantar aspect of the feet to increase hamstring and lumbar spine flexibility. Aim The primary aim was to investigate the immediate effect of a single application of SMR on the plantar aspect of the foot, on hamstring and lumbar spine flexibility. The secondary aim was to evaluate the method and propose improvements in future research. Design A pilot single blind randomised control trial. Participants Twenty four healthy volunteers (8 men, 16 women; mean age 28 years ± 11.13). Method Participants underwent screening to exclude hypermobility and were randomly allocated to an intervention (SMR) or control group (no therapy). Baseline and post intervention flexibility was assessed by a sit-and-reach test (SRT). Descriptive statistics for baseline and post intervention SRT and an independent t-test comparing differences in SRT change scores were conducted. Results A statistically significant (p=0.02), greater increase of SRT change scores in the SMR intervention compared to the control group was found with a large effect size (d= 1.05). Conclusion An immediate clinical benefit of SMR on the flexibility of the hamstrings and lumbar spine was indicated and suggestions for methodological improvements may inform future research.


      PubDate: 2014-12-20T15:28:46Z
       
  • Effects of Baduanjin on mental health: A comprehensive review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fung Kei Cheng
      Mental disorders affect not only individual well-being but also community health, which pushes mental care professionals to investigate various solutions to accommodate different needs. The exercise of Baduanjin, a form of Qigong, facilitates improvements in psychological health, potentially serving as an alternative choice for interventions. This comprehensive review analyses 28 publications, among which three are in English and 25 in Chinese, these indicating enhancement in quality of life and mental health for a variety of participants, including college students, middle-aged individuals, the elderly, and patients who suffer from different mental problems or chronic physical illnesses. The outcomes suggest that this cost-effective, learner-friendly and self-pacing exercise should be promoted in individual and group settings for both curative and preventive measures, and for which further investigations are also recommended.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Dr Karel Lewit – Thoughts of an associate, assistant, friend
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Giancarlo Russo



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Dr Karel Lewit 1916–2014
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Craig Liebenson



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • International Myopain Society (IMS) US chapter meeting
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Stewart Wild



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • An Evidence-Informed Review of the Current Myofascial Pain Literature
           – January 2015
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt , Rob Grieve , Michelle Layton , Todd Hooks
      This article provides an up-to-date review of the most recent publications about myofascial pain, trigger points (TrPs) and other related topics. We have added some commentaries where indicated with supporting references. In the Basic Research section, we reviewed the work by Danish researchers about the influence of latent TrPs and a second study of the presence and distribution of both active and latent TrPs in whiplash-associated disorders. The section on Soft Tissue Approaches considered multiple studies and case reports of the efficacy of myofascial release (MFR), classic and deep muscle massage, fascial techniques, and connective tissue massage. TrP dry needling (DN) is becoming a common approach and we included multiple studies, reviews, and case reports, while the section on Injection Techniques features an article on TrP injections following mastectomy and several articles about the utilization of botulinum toxin. Lastly, we review several articles on modalities and other clinical approaches.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Long-term benefits of somatosensory training to improve balance of elderly
           with diabetes mellitus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Patrícia Silva , Priscila Fernanda Figueredo Borges Botelho , Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro , Maíta Mara O.L.L. Vaz , Daniela Cristina Carvalho de Abreu
      We evaluate the effects of somatosensory training on the mean amplitude of the center of pressure (COP) in the upright position and the sustained benefits after 6-month. Twelve elderly patients with type II diabetes (T2DM) participated in the study. Patients with T2DM were allocated to the somatosensory protocol, which consisted of a circuit composed of 13 stations with different textures. The rehabilitation protocol was applied twice a week during the period of 12 weeks. Upright balance, in 2 situations (fixed platform with eyes open and closed) to evaluate the mean amplitude of COP oscillation in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions and the total area of COP oscillation. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-exercise and 6-month follow-up. The somatosensory training protocol was beneficial to reduce the AP oscillation of the COP, remaining after 6 months of the end of intervention in elderly with T2DM.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Pilates versus general exercise effectiveness on pain and functionality in
           non-specific chronic low back pain subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fernanda Queiroz Ribeiro Cerci Mostagi , Josilainne Marcelino Dias , Ligia Maxwell Pereira , Karen Obara , Bruno Fles Mazuquin , Mariana Felipe Silva , Monica Angelica Cardoso Silva , Renata Rosa de Campos , Maria Simone Tavares Barreto , Jéssyca Fernandes Nogueira , Tarcísio Brandão Lima , Rodrigo Luiz Carregaro , Jefferson Rosa Cardoso
      Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common causes of disability, and the Pilates method has been associated with improvements in symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Pilates method, when compared to general exercises, on pain and functionality after eight weeks (16 sessions, 2×/week) and a follow-up of three months, in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). A randomised controlled trial composed of 22 subjects was proposed. Subjects were allocated into two groups: the Pilates group (PG) (n = 11) and the general exercise group (GEG) (n = 11). The PG protocol was based on the Pilates method and the GEG performed exercises to manage NSCLBP. There were no differences between the groups. When analysed over time, the GEG demonstrated improvements in functionality between baseline and the end of treatment (P = .02; Cohen's d ¯  = 0.34) and baseline and follow-up (P = .04; Cohen's d ¯  = 0.31). There were no differences between the Pilates and general exercises with regard to pain and functionality in NSCLBP subjects but general exercises were better than Pilates for increasing functionality and flexibility.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Application of Pilates principles increases paraspinal muscle activation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Letícia Souza Andrade , Luís Mochizuki , Flávio Oliveira Pires , Renato André Sousa da Silva , Yomara Lima Mota
      Objective To analyze the effect of Pilates principles on the EMG activity of abdominal and paraspinal muscles on stable and unstable surfaces. Methods Surface EMG data about the rectus abdominis (RA), iliocostalis (IL) and lumbar multifidus (MU) of 19 participants were collected while performing three repetitions of a crunch exercise in the following conditions: 1) with no Pilates technique and stable surface (nP + S); 2) with no Pilates technique and unstable surface (nP + U); 3) with Pilates technique and stable surface (P + S); 4) with Pilates and unstable surface (P + U). The EMG Fanalysis was conducted using a custom-made Matlab® 10. Results There was no condition effect in the RA iEMG with stable and unstable surfaces (F (1,290) = 0 p = 0.98) and with and without principles (F (1,290) = 1.2 p = 0.27). IL iEMG was higher for the stable surface condition (F (1,290) = 32.3 p < 0.001) with Pilates principles (F (1,290) = 21.9 p < 0.001). The MU iEMG was higher for the stable surface condition with and without Pilates principles (F (1,290) = 84.9 p < 0.001).


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Reflections: Reviews, reviewers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Neuroscience education in addition to trigger point dry needling for the
           management of patients with mechanical chronic low back pain: A
           preliminary clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mario Téllez-García , Ana I. de-la-Llave-Rincón , Jaime Salom-Moreno , Maria Palacios-Ceña , Ricardo Ortega-Santiago , César Fernández-de-las-Peñas
      The objective of the current study was to determine the short-term effects of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) alone or combined with neuroscience education on pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). Twelve patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive either TrP-DN (TrP-DN) or TrP-DN plus neuroscience education (TrP-DN + EDU). Pain intensity (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0–10), disability (Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMQ-, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index-ODI), kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-TSK), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the C5–C6 zygapophyseal joint, transverse process of L3 vertebra, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle were collected at baseline and 1-week after the intervention. Patients treated with TrP-DN + EDU experienced a significantly greater reduction of kinesiophobia (P = 0.008) and greater increases in PPT over the transverse process of L3 (P = 0.049) than those patients treated only with TrP-DN. Both groups experienced similar decreases in pain, ODI and RMQ, and similar increases in PPT over the C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior after the intervention (all, P > 0.05). The results suggest that TrP-DN was effective for improving pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical LBP at short-term. The inclusion of a neuroscience educational program resulted in a greater improvement in kinesiophobia.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Electromyographic activity of rectus abdominis muscles during dynamic
           Pilates abdominal exercises
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gabriela Bueno Silva , Mirele Minussi Morgan , Wellington Roberto Gomes de Carvalho , Elisangela Silva , Wagner Zeferino de Freitas , Fabiano Fernandes da Silva , Renato Aparecido de Souza
      Objective To assess the electrical behaviour of the upper rectus abdominis (URA) and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) by electromyography (EMG) during the following dynamic Pilates abdominal exercises: roll up, double leg stretch, coordination, crisscross and foot work. The results were compared with EMG findings of traditional abdominal exercises (sit up and crunch). Methods: Seventeen female subjects (with no experience of the Pilates method) were recruited. The URA and LRA were evaluated while 12 isotonic contractions were performed using the Pilates principles or traditional abdominal exercises. The data were normalised by a maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Normality was accepted, and ANOVA followed by Tukey test was used to determine data differences (P < 0.05). Results: Pilates exercises double leg stretch, coordination, crisscross and foot work promoted greater muscle activation than traditional exercises, mainly in URA. Thus, these exercises have the potential to be prescribed for muscle strengthening programmes.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Abdominal training from a yoga perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Craig Liebenson , Jason Brown



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Effect of massage on DOMS in ultramarathon runners: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Lorenzo Visconti , Gianpiero Capra , Giacomo Carta , Corrado Forni , Denise Janin
      In recent years, the popularity of ultramarathons has increased. During these competitions, musculoskeletal problems are very common. Among the more frequent of those problems is the onset of muscle pain, which is defined in the literature as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The present study aimed to collect epidemiological data regarding the onset of musculoskeletal problems during the Tor des Geants (International ultramarathon race of 330 km in length and 24,000 m in elevation difference) and to describe the effects of massage on reducing pain and overall perceived improvement in a sample of 25 athletes who complained of DOMS. Two hundred and twenty-one treatments were performed on 220 ultramarathon runners, of which 207 were males and 34 were females; the age group most represented ranged from 40 to 50 years. The most common symptom was pain, which occurred in more than 95% of cases, and the most affected area was the lower extremities (90% of subjects). In the analysed subjects, treatment with massage generated a significant (p < 0.0001) improvement. The numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) value was 3.6 points on average (SD 2.1) after massage, and there were no cases of worsening DOMS after massage as determined using the patient global impression of change (PGIC). The values of minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in DOMS management were calculated on the basis of the ROC curves and two other anchor-based methods in the PGIC and were 2.8–3.9 points on the NPRS. In the context analysed, massage was an effective treatment to reduce DOMS during the onset of symptoms.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Adherence to home exercises in non-specific low back pain. A randomised
           controlled pilot trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Anna Sabrina Hügli , Markus Josef Ernst , Jan Kool , Fabian Marcel Rast , Anne-Kathrin Rausch-Osthoff , Angelika Mannig , Sarah Oetiker , Christoph Michael Bauer
      Specific exercises for the improvement of movement control of the lumbopelvic region are well-established for patients with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) and movement control impairment (MCI). However, a lack of adherence to home exercise regimens is often observed. The aim of the study was to explore the differences in home exercise (HE) adherence between patients who perform conventional exercises and those who exercise with Augmented Feedback (AF). Twenty patients with NSLBP and MCI were randomly allocated into two groups. The physiotherapy group (PT group) completed conventional exercises, and the AF group exercised with an AF system that was designed for use in therapy settings. The main outcome measure was self-reported adherence to the home exercise regimen. There was no significant difference in HE duration between the groups (W= 64, p= 0.315). The AF group exercised for a median of 9 min and 4 s (IQR= 3’59’’), and the PT group exercised for 4 min and 19 s (IQR= 8’30’’). Exercising with AF led to HE times that were similar to those of conventional exercise, and AF might be used as an alternative therapy method for home exercise.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Results of chiropractic scoliosis rehabilitation treatment at two years
           post-skeletal maturity in identical female twins
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Brian Dovorany , Mark W. Morningstar , Clayton Stitzel , Aatif Siddiqui
      Background Scoliosis treatment guidelines for non-operative management suggest that patients should be followed for two years beyond skeletal maturity to appropriately evaluate treatment effect. This report outlines the results of identical twin girls' treatment with chiropractic rehabilitation treatment at two years post skeletal maturity. Findings The twins participated in a treatment lasting two weeks, followed by home care maintenance and periodic follow-ups for they reached skeletal maturity. Two year follow up showed reduced Cobb angles of 19° and 15°, respectively. Conclusion Identical twin girls who were evaluated two years after skeletal maturity showed clinically significant improvements in Cobb angle measurements. Controlled, prospective study design for future patients treated in this manner will provide greater insight into how the treatment may have impacted the observed changes.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Movement Health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Warrick McNeill , Lincoln Blandford



      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Effects of strength and balance training on the mobility, fear of falling
           and grip strength of elderly female fallers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Melina Galleti Prata , Marcos Eduardo Scheicher
      The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of virtual reality and strength training on the balance, fear of falling and handgrip strength of older women with a history of falls. The fear of falling, mobility and grip strength were evaluated in 11 elderly fallers (72.4 ± 5.2 years). The faller group was submitted to 12 weeks of virtual reality and muscle strength training. The results showed improvement in mobility (p = 0.0004) and in the fear of falling (p = 0.002). No significant difference was observed for hand grip strength. It can be concluded that virtual reality and muscle strength interventions are beneficial for mobility and fear of falling in older women with a history of falls.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • One repetition maximum bench press performance: A new approach for its
           evaluation in inexperienced males and females: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Antonino Bianco , Davide Filingeri , Antonio Paoli , Antonio Palma
      The aim of this study was to evaluate a new method to perform the one repetition maximum (1RM) bench press test, by combining previously validated predictive and practical procedures. Eight young male and 7 females participants, with no previous experience of resistance training, performed a first set of repetitions to fatigue (RTF) with a workload corresponding to ⅓ of their body mass (BM) for a maximum of 25 repetitions. Following a 5-min recovery period, a second set of RTF was performed with a workload corresponding to ½ of participants' BM. The number of repetitions performed in this set was then used to predict the workload to be used for the 1RM bench press test using Mayhew's equation. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and blood lactate were monitored before, during and after each 1RM attempt. A significant effect of gender was found on the maximum number of repetitions achieved during the RTF set performed with ½ of participants' BM (males: 25.0 ± 6.3; females: 11.0x± 10.6; t = 6.2; p < 0.001). The 1RM attempt performed with the workload predicted by Mayhew's equation resulted in females performing 1.2 ± 0.7 repetitions, while males performed 4.8 ± 1.9 repetitions. All participants reached their 1RM performance within 3 attempts, thus resulting in a maximum of 5 sets required to successfully perform the 1RM bench press test. We conclude that, by combining previously validated predictive equations with practical procedures (i.e. using a fraction of participants' BM to determine the workload for an RTF set), the new method we tested appeared safe, accurate (particularly in females) and time-effective in the practical evaluation of 1RM performance in inexperienced individuals.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
  • Characterization of chronic pain in breast cancer survivors using the
           McGill Pain Questionnaire
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 December 2014
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Vânia Tie Koga Ferreira , Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro , Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Simone Mara de Araújo Ferreira , Ana Maria de Almeida
      The aim of the present study was to characterize pain in breast cancer survivors using the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted with 30 women aged 30 to 80 years who had been submitted to treatment for breast cancer (surgery and complementary treatment) at least 12 months earlier with reports of pain related to the therapeutic procedures. Pain was characterized using the full-length version of the MPQ, which is made up of 78 descriptors divided into four categories: sensory (ten items), affective (five items), evaluative (one item) and miscellaneous (four items). Two indices were also used to measure pain through the use of the descriptors: the number of words chosen (NWC) and the pain rating index (PRI). The most frequent descriptive terms were “agonizing” (n = 16; 53.3%), “tugging” (n = 15; 50%), “sore” (n = 14; 46.7%), “wretched” (n = 14; 46.7%), “troublesome” (n = 13; 43.3%) and “spreading” (n = 11; 36.7%). The sensory category had the highest PRI value based on the descriptors chosen (mean: 0.41). Women with chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer employed the “agonizing”, “tugging” and “sore” descriptors with greatest frequency and rated pain in the sensory category as having the greatest impact.


      PubDate: 2014-12-17T08:57:28Z
       
 
 
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