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Journal Cover Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3175 journals]
  • The science of respiratory characteristics in individuals with chronic low
           back pain: Interpreting through statistical perspective
    • Authors: Vikram Mohan; Aatit Paungmali; Patraporn Sitilertpisan
      Pages: 11 - 12
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 1
      Author(s): Vikram Mohan, Aatit Paungmali, Patraporn Sitilertpisan


      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.017
       
  • Effect of a lateral glide mobilisation with movement of the hip on
           vibration threshold in healthy volunteers
    • Authors: Darren A. Smith; Jacob Saranga; Andrew Pritchard; Nikolaos A. Kommatas; Shinu Kovelal Punnoose; Supriya Tukaram Kale
      Pages: 13 - 17
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 1
      Author(s): Darren A. Smith, Jacob Saranga, Andrew Pritchard, Nikolaos A. Kommatas, Shinu Kovelal Punnoose, Supriya Tukaram Kale
      Background Mulligan's mobilisation-with-movement (MWM) techniques are proposed to achieve their clinical benefit via neurophysiological mechanisms. However, previous research has focussed on responses in the sympathetic nervous system only, and is not conclusive. An alternative measure of neurophysiological response to MWM is required to support or refute this mechanism of action. Recently, vibration threshold (VT) has been used to quantify changes in the sensory nervous system in patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain. Objective To investigate the effect of a lateral glide MWM of the hip joint on vibration threshold compared to a placebo and control condition in asymptomatic volunteers. Methods Fifteen asymptomatic volunteers participated in this single-blinded, randomised, within-subject, placebo, control design. Participants received each of three interventions in a randomised order; a lateral glide MWM of the hip joint into flexion, a placebo MWM, and a control intervention. Vibration threshold (VT) measures were taken at baseline and immediately after each intervention. Mean change in VT from baseline was calculated for each intervention and then analysed for between group differences using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results A one-way ANOVA revealed no statistically significant differences between the three experimental conditions (P = 0.812). Conclusion This small study found that a lateral glide MWM of the hip did not significantly change vibration threshold compared to a placebo and control intervention in an asymptomatic population. This study provides a method of using vibration threshold to investigate the potential neurophysiological effects of a manual therapy intervention that should be repeated in a larger, symptomatic population.

      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.001
       
  • How many physical therapy sessions are required to reach a good outcome in
           symptomatic lumbar spondylolisthesis' A retrospective study
    • Authors: Silvano Ferrari; Jorge Hugo Villafañe; Pedro Berjano; Carla Vanti; Marco Monticone
      Pages: 18 - 23
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 1
      Author(s): Silvano Ferrari, Jorge Hugo Villafañe, Pedro Berjano, Carla Vanti, Marco Monticone
      Background There is a lack of conclusive information about the optimal dosage of physical therapy treatments in Spondylolisthesis (SPL) patients. Purpose The present study attempted to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of two different doses in reaching similar clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 64 consecutive patients admitted for physical therapy with symptomatic lumbar grade I SPL (42 ± 15years, 57% female) was conducted. At the end of the treatment, all participants were retrospectively assigned to one of two groups, receiving either 5–8 or 9–12 sessions (experimental or control group, respectively) of physical therapy treatments. The Prone Bridge Test (PBT) and the Supine Bridge Test (SBT) were used to measure muscular endurance. Results The area under the ROC curve for the PBT was 0.64 (95% CI 0.45–0.83) and for the SBT was 0.57 (95% CI 0.33–0.80). The optimal cutoff points were 25.5s for the PBT and 55.0s for the SBT. Logistic regression revealed that PBT (OR = 1.062) was associated with SPL. The final regression model explained 77.4% (R2 = 0.341; p = 0.024) of the variability. Conclusions In this sample, the number of sessions required to achieve satisfactory outcomes ranged from 5 to 12. The clinical results of the subjects in the 5–8 sessions group were similar to the 9–12 sessions group. Individual's coping mechanisms could be considered in future studies to understand which patients will require more therapeutic sessions.

      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.006
       
  • The effects of neck mobilization in patients with chronic neck pain: A
           randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Muhammad Nazim Farooq; Mohammad A. Mohseni-Bandpei; Syed Amir Gilani; Muhammad Ashfaq; Qamar Mahmood
      Pages: 24 - 31
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 1
      Author(s): Muhammad Nazim Farooq, Mohammad A. Mohseni-Bandpei, Syed Amir Gilani, Muhammad Ashfaq, Qamar Mahmood
      Objective To determine the effect of mobilization and routine physiotherapy on pain, disability, neck range of motion (ROM) and neck muscle endurance (NME) in patients having chronic mechanical neck pain (NP). Methods Sixty eight patients with chronic mechanical NP were randomly allocated into two groups by using a computer generated random sequence table with 34 patients in the multi-modal mobilization group and 34 patients in the routine physiotherapy group. Baseline values for pain, disability, NME, and neck ROM were recorded using visual analogue scale (VAS), neck disability index (NDI), neck flexor muscle endurance test and universal goniometer respectively, before the treatment. Each patient received 10 treatment sessions over a period of four weeks and at the end of four weeks all the outcome measures were recorded again. Results A paired t-test revealed significant pre to post treatment differences for all outcome measures in both groups (p ≤ 0.001 in all instances). An independent t-test revealed statistically significant differences for pain, disability, NME, and neck ROM in favor of the multi-modal mobilization group with a between group difference of 1.57 cm for VAS (p < 0.001), 11.74 points for NDI (p = 0.001), 18.45 s for NME (p < 0.001) and 6.06–8.24° for neck ROM (p < 0.05). Conclusion The results suggest that a combination of cervical mobilization with routine physiotherapy is more effective for reducing pain and disability and improving NME and neck ROM in patients with chronic mechanical NP compared to routine physiotherapy alone.

      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.007
       
  • Cognitive Functional Therapy (CFT) for chronic non-specific neck pain
    • Authors: Ney Meziat-Filho; Maicom Lima; Jessica Fernandez; Felipe J.J. Reis
      Pages: 32 - 36
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 1
      Author(s): Ney Meziat-Filho, Maicom Lima, Jessica Fernandez, Felipe J.J. Reis
      This case report presents the effect of Cognitive Functional Therapy (CFT) in a patient with chronic non-specific neck pain. The patient believed that pain signified tissue damage, and demonstrated pain catastrophizing, hypervigilance, stress sensitivity, and movement impairment of the neck, during extension and rotation. The CFT intervention integrated a cognitive approach with manual therapy and active exercises to encourage the patient to trust her neck again. One month after the first appointment, the patient had recovered confidence, and the pain and disability had disappeared almost entirely.

      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.010
       
  • Conservative management of thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis: An
           Italian survey of current clinical practice
    • Authors: Jorge Hugo Villafañe; Kristin Valdes; Virginia O'Brien; Monica Seves; Raquel Cantero-Téllez; Pedro Berjano
      Pages: 37 - 39
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jorge Hugo Villafañe, Kristin Valdes, Virginia O'Brien, Monica Seves, Raquel Cantero-Téllez, Pedro Berjano
      Objective The purpose of this study was to elucidate expert opinion on the conservative treatment of thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A 21-item survey to determine the practice patterns of Italian hand therapists who treat arthritis of the CMC joint was developed and distributed through a professional online survey service to assure confidentiality and anonymity. Results Of the respondents, 80.8% were physical therapists; the remaining 19.2% were occupational therapists. 84.6% of the specialists who make decisions regarding patient pain management education. Conclusions There is variability in the knowledge and practice patterns of Italian hand therapists relating to conservative management of thumb CMC OA.

      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.015
       
  • Investigating the anticipatory postural adjustment phase of gait
           initiation in different directions in chronic ankle instability patients
    • Authors: Zahra Ebrahimabadi; Sedigheh Sadat Naimi; Abbas Rahimi; Heydar Sadeghi; Seyed Majid Hosseini; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban; Syed Asadullah Arslan
      Pages: 40 - 45
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 1
      Author(s): Zahra Ebrahimabadi, Sedigheh Sadat Naimi, Abbas Rahimi, Heydar Sadeghi, Seyed Majid Hosseini, Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban, Syed Asadullah Arslan
      Objective The main objective of the present study was to analyze how supra spinal motor control mechanisms are altered in different directions during anticipatory postural phase of gait initiation in chronic ankle instability patients. It seems that supra spinal pathways modulate anticipatory postural adjustment phase of gait initiation. Yet, there is a dearth of research on the effect of chronic ankle instability on the anticipatory postural adjustment phase of gait initiation in different directions. Method A total of 20 chronic ankle instability participants and 20 healthy individuals initiated gait on a force plate in forward, 30° lateral, and 30° medial directions. Results According to the results of the present study, the peak lateral center of pressure shift decreased in forward direction compared to that in other directions in both groups. Also, it was found that the peak lateral center of pressure shift and the vertical center of mass velocity decreased significantly in chronic ankle instability patients, as compared with those of the healthy individuals. Conclusion According to the results of the present study, it seems that chronic ankle instability patients modulate the anticipatory postural adjustment phase of gait initiation, compared with healthy control group, in order to maintain postural stability. These changes were observed in different directions, too.

      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.016
       
  • Asymmetry of activation of lateral abdominal muscles during the
           neurodevelopmental traction technique
    • Authors: Anna Gogola; Rafał Gnat; Małgorzata Zaborowska; Dorota Dziub; Michalina Gwóźdź
      Pages: 46 - 51
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 1
      Author(s): Anna Gogola, Rafał Gnat, Małgorzata Zaborowska, Dorota Dziub, Michalina Gwóźdź
      Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the symmetry and pattern of activation of lateral abdominal muscles (LAM) in response to neurodevelopmental traction technique. Design and participants Measurements of LAM thickness were performed in four experimental conditions: during traction with the force of 5% body weight (5% traction): 1) in neutral position, 2) in 20° posterior trunk inclination; during traction with the force of 15% body weight (15% traction): 3) in neutral position, 4) in 20° posterior trunk inclination. Thirty-seven healthy children participated in the study. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measures To evaluate LAM activation level ultrasound technology was employed (two Mindray DP660 devices (Mindray, Shenzhen, China) with 75L38EA linear probes). An experiment with repeated measurements of the dependent variables was conducted. Results Side-to-side LAM activation asymmetry showed relatively high magnitude, however, significant difference was found only in case of the obliquus externus (OE) during stronger traction (P < 0.05). The magnitude of LAM thickness change formed a gradient, with the most profound transversus abdominis (TrA) showing the smallest change, and the most superficial OE – the greatest. The inter-muscle differences were most pronounced between the OE and TrA (P < 0.001). Conclusions During the neurodevelopmental traction technique there is a difference in individual LAM activation level, with deeper muscles showing less intense activation. In statistical terms, the only signs of side-to-side asymmetry of LAM activation are visible in case of the OE, however, the magnitude of asymmetry is relatively high. The results allow to identify patterns of activation of LAM in children showing typical development that will serve as a reference in future studies in children with neurological disorder.

      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.03.019
       
  • Working with the ghost in the machine – Practical
    • Authors: Matt Wallden; Paul Chek
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matt Wallden


      PubDate: 2018-03-19T17:21:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.03.002
       
  • Anticipating the 5th International Fascia Research Congress
    • Authors: Susan Shockett; Thomas Findley
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Susan Shockett, Thomas Findley


      PubDate: 2018-03-07T15:57:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.03.001
       
  • The ghost in the machine – Is musculoskeletal medicine lacking
           soul'
    • Authors: Matt Wallden; Paul Chek
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Matt Wallden, Paul Chek
      In recent times there have been, concurrently, increasing volumes of research questioning whether biomechanics have any relevance at all to musculoskeletal medicine; and a blossoming field of Pain Science identifying that perception of, and context for, pain is often more important than the tissues generating the pain in the first instance. From the academic world to social media, much excitement has been generated in supporting this new direction. However, most of the great work arising from the Pain Science arena is focused on pain itself and on the patients' conscious beliefs around their pain. A redirection of focus toward function beyond the pain, and awareness of how unconscious behavioral programming accounts for the majority of lifestyle habits and perceptions, may facilitate more effective outcomes. Other unconscious processes which are known to contribute to persistent pain, yet are still largely unacknowledged in musculoskeletal practice, are those involved in central sensitivity. A plethora of systemic and visceral conditions are known to contribute to central sensitivity yet are barely considered in typical clinical screening or management. The more that is understood about the complexity of these and other interacting factors in pain, the more the inadequacies of our prevailing research and clinical methodologies are exposed. The question posed is, are unconscious processes the next key field of exploration and “harvest” in musculoskeletal medicine and, if so, how can we most effectively address them'

      PubDate: 2018-03-07T15:57:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.019
       
  • Effects of taijiquan and qigong practice over behavioural disorders in
           school-age children: A pilot study
    • Authors: Jorge Manuel S.M. Rodrigues; Mariana Isabel C.P. Mestre; Luís Carlos Matos; Jorge Pereira Machado
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jorge Manuel S.M. Rodrigues, Mariana Isabel C.P. Mestre, Luís Carlos Matos, Jorge Pereira Machado
      Child development and wellness are strictly dependent on several factors among them physical activity, a proper nutrition and, of critical importance, a healthy mind. Psychopathologies like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) have a direct negative impact on social, academic or occupational functioning of the affected children. If left untreated, these pathologies may progress to adulthood, thus requiring research strategies on conventional and nonconventional modalities of treatment. In this pilot study, conducted during the academic year 2015/2016, a combination of exercises of TaijiQuan (TJQ) and Qi Gong (QG) were taught to four selected children, three males and one female, aged between 6 and 10, suffering from the above mentioned behavioural disorders. The main goal was to understand if it is possible to achieve any kind of improvement in their condition, by evaluating the scores of the Achenbach Teacher's Report Form (TRF) in the beginning and ending of the experimental period. Results showed very interesting improvements in symptoms of CD, ODD and ADHD-HI (hyperactive-impulsive), while ADHD-PI (predominantly inattentive) showed only minor improvements. The overall symptom improvement was 43% across pathologies, which demonstrates that TJQ and QG may be a promising treatment of symptoms for children with behavioural disorders. More research is needed with controlled experimental designs and statistically representative samples in order to fully comprehend the versatility of these modalities.

      PubDate: 2018-03-07T15:57:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.019
       
  • Manual therapy treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis
    • Authors: Shir Lotan; Leonid Kalichman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Shir Lotan, Leonid Kalichman
      Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a common orthopedic condition with a prevalence of 2%–3% in children aged 10–16 years. Conservative interventions remain controversial and are usually based on physical therapy exercises and treatments. Manual therapy techniques may also serve as adequate treatments for AIS due to their ability to improve range of motion and decrease muscle tone and pain. Objective To critically assess the current literature on the effectiveness of manual therapy methods used to treat AIS. Methods PubMed, PEDro, BioMed Central, and Google Scholar databases were searched from inception until December 2016 using keywords associated with scoliosis and manual therapy. Criteria for inclusion were studies investigating the effect of manual therapy methods on AIS treatment. We analyzed all published material with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials (RCT). Trials of any methodological quality written in English were included in the review. Major findings Fourteen papers were reviewed, all presenting manual therapy treatments such as manipulation, mobilization, and soft tissue techniques used to treat AIS. All case studies showed a significant improvement, post-treatment, in most measured parameters. Observational studies showed mixed results. Only one RCT concluded manual therapy techniques were ineffective in improving trunk morphology and spine flexibility in AIS patients. Conclusion Case reports and small-scale clinical trials of poor methodological quality presented in this review did not allow us to draw a clear conclusion about the effectiveness of manual therapy in the treatment of AIS. On the other hand, they provide us a basis to assume that manual therapy techniques such as myofascial release and spinal manipulative techniques may potentially be effective in treating AIS in conjunction with other conservative treatments. Further high-quality studies are essential to determine the effectiveness of the different manual therapy techniques.

      PubDate: 2018-03-07T15:57:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.005
       
  • Patient-reported improvements of pain, disability and health-related
           quality of life following chiropractic care for back pain – A national
           observational study in Sweden
    • Authors: F. Gedin; V. Dansk; A.-C. Egmar; T. Sundberg; K. Burström
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): F. Gedin, V. Dansk, A.-C. Egmar, T. Sundberg, K. Burström
      Background Chiropractic care is a common but not often investigated treatment option for back pain in Sweden. The aim of this study was to explore patient-reported outcomes (PRO) for patients with back pain seeking chiropractic care in Sweden. Methods Prospective observational study. Patients 18 years and older, with non-specific back pain of any duration, seeking care at 23 chiropractic clinics throughout Sweden were invited to answer PRO questionnaires at baseline with main follow-up after four weeks targeting the following outcomes: Numerical Rating Scale for back pain intensity (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index for back pain disability (ODI), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index) and a visual analogue scale for self-rated health (EQ VAS). Results 246 back pain patients answered baseline questionnaires and 138 (56%) completed follow-up after four weeks. Statistically significant improvements over the four weeks were reported for all PRO by acute back pain patients (n = 81), mean change scores: NRS -2.98 (p < 0.001), ODI -13.58 (p < 0.001), EQ VAS 9.63 (p < 0.001), EQ-5D index 0.22 (p < 0.001); and for three out of four PRO for patients with chronic back pain (n = 57), mean change scores: NRS -0.90 (p = 0.002), ODI -2.88 (p = 0.010), EQ VAS 3.77 (p = 0.164), EQ-5D index 0.04 (p = 0.022). Conclusions Patients with acute and chronic back pain reported statistically significant improvements in PRO four weeks after initiated chiropractic care. Albeit the observational study design limits causal inference, the relatively rapid improvements of PRO scores warrant further clinical investigations.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.012
       
  • Efficacy of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization in comparison to
           gastrocnemius-soleus stretching for dorsiflexion range of motion: A
           randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Carrie A. Rowlett; William J. Hanney; Patrick S. Pabian; Jordon H. McArthur; Carey E. Rothschild; Morey J. Kolber
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Carrie A. Rowlett, William J. Hanney, Patrick S. Pabian, Jordan E. Holland, Carrie E. Rothschild, Morey J. Kolber
      Objectives To determine the efficacy of IASTM of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex in comparison to a traditional stretching intervention on dorsiflexion ROM. Methods Sixty healthy participants were randomly allocated to one of 3 groups: IASTM (n = 20), stretching (n = 20), or control group (n = 20). The dependent variables for this study was dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) via three measurement methods which included Modified root position 1- knee extended (MRP1), Modified root position 2- knee flexed (MRP2), and weight bearing lunge test (WBLT). A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was utilized to analyze the ROM differences between the groups (IASTM, stretching, and control groups), with a post-hoc Tukey and pairwise least significant difference tests to assess individual pairwise differences between the groups. Results The MANOVA found significant ROM differences between the three intervention groups (F6,110 = 2.40, p = .032). Statistically significant differences were identified between both the IASTM and control as well as the stretching and control group through the WBLT and MRP2 assessments, but not in the MRP1 assessment. Further, there was no statistically significant difference between the IASTM and stretching groups using any of the three methods. Conclusion A single session of IASTM or stretching increased ankle dorsiflexion ROM in WBLT and MRP2. No significant difference was noted in the MRP1. Both IASTM and stretching appear to have a greater effect on soleus muscle flexibility as evidenced by ROM gains measured with the knee in a flexed position. No clinically significant difference was identified between the intervention groups in weight-bearing conditions; thus empowering patients with the use of self-stretching would seemingly be reasonable and efficient. Combined effects of stretching and IASTM warrant further investigation for increasing dorsiflexion range of motion as a summative effect is unknown.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.008
       
  • Systems based model: A Holistic Approach to Developmental Movement
           Education
    • Authors: Myles Jay Polsgrove; Roch Lockyer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Myles Jay Polsgrove, Roch Lockyer
      Considering the human body as a dynamic system, a given movement is the result of contributing sub-systems (Thelen and Smith, 1993). In this view, gains in movement performance occur as subsystem performance becomes optimized. Movement instruction offered from a systems perspective is aimed optimizing learner's performance through evolving understanding and through application. The Holistic Approach to Developmental Movement Education (HADME) is a systems based instructional model that depicts the interactive process between learner and practitioner. This mind-body approach utilizes 11 steps to optimize movement performance: A) Current Understandings, B) Increased Insights of Evaluation, C) Truthful Reflection of Current State, D) Systematic Modification to Optimize Performance, E) Application of the Change Tool to Change Target Pattern, F) Fine-Tune Learner Perception Tool Application, G) Improved Understanding Through a Point of Control, H) Expanded Systemic Understanding of Learner's Knowledge/Movement, I) Isolation of Target Muscle for a Constant Steady Flowing Movement, J) Gained Conceptual Understanding of Movement and K) Increased Knowledge of Systemic Inputs. The instructor adopting this viewpoint may experience continual insights on how to best optimize the performance for an increasing range of leaners display unique systemic variations. Gaining insights on how to overcome movement limitations through optimizing subsystem performances, the learner taking part in a HADME may experience greater movement enjoyment and hopefully, a more active lifestyle.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.018
       
  • Osteopathic manipulative treatment in pudendal neuralgia: A case report
    • Authors: D. Origo; A.G. Tarantino
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): D. Origo, A.G. Tarantino
      Pudendal neuralgia is characterised by pain in the pudendal dermatome. It could be due to a stenosis of the pudendal canal, a compression along its pathway, or a pelvic trauma. Pudendal nerve entrapment (PNE) syndrome is frequently involved in pudendal neuralgia onset. This case report describes the osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) of a patient with functional PNE. A 40-year-old female presented with a 12-month history of intense pelvic pain resistant to 3 months of pharmacologic treatment that arose after three proctological surgeries. A perineal retracted painful scar was visible upon examination. PNE syndrome diagnosis was based on Nantes criteria. The electromyogram of the nerve showed an increased motor response latency of the left pudendal nerve. Visual analogue scale (VAS), female National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Tampa scale of kinesiophobia (TSK) were used to assess patient's symptoms at baseline (T0), after pharmacologic treatment (T1), after OMT (T2), and at 6-month follow-up. Five treatments, including direct and indirect techniques, were performed for 1 month. OMT reduced pelvic neuralgia and disability indexes without any complications, maintaining a positive outcome at 6-month follow-up (VAS: T0 = 10, T1 = 10, T2 = 1.8, T3 = 1.5), (NIH-CPSI: T0 = 34, T1 = 30, T2 = 7, T3 = 6), (ODI: T0 = 48, T1 = 29, T2 = 9, T3 = 5) and (TSK: T0 = 51, T1 = 41, T2 = 20, T3 = 17). This is the first report of a patient diagnosed with functional PNE managed with OMT. A link between PNE, scar and pelvic somatic dysfunctions could suggest double crush syndrome.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.016
       
  • The effects of dry needling and neurodynamic exercise on idiopathic
           peripheral neuropathy: A case report
    • Authors: Andrew J. Nasr; Jason Zafereo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Andrew J. Nasr, Jason Zafereo
      A single patient (male, 67) with a medical diagnosis of idiopathic peripheral neuropathy (G60.9) was referred to physical therapy. The patient presented with signs and symptoms consistent with peripheral neuropathy, including bilateral single leg balance deficits, sensation impairments, and antalgic gait. Treatment consisted of dry needling (DN) with electrical stimulation and a home exercise program involving a neurodynamic exercise to be performed daily. Dry needling included the use of thin filiform needles to stimulate the underlying structures directed at eliciting a change within the tissues. The needles were left in situ and connected to an electrical stimulation unit. The neurodynamic exercise used in this case study was designed to target the distal branches of the sciatic nerve. The patient was directed to complete 3 sets of 10 repetitions in the slumped position and moving between ankle plantar flexion and dorsiflexion. The patient was treated for a total of 4 visits over a 5-week period. The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), Romberg Test, and sensation testing were collected at baseline and then again after the 4th treatment. A Global Rating of Change (GROC) score was obtained at the end of treatment. After the 4th visit, functional self-report scores were not improved (93.75%–86.9% at completion), while NPRS decreased to 2 from a baseline rating of 4. The eyes closed portion of the Rhomberg balance test improved from 5 s on the right limb to 15 s and from 8 s to 20 s on the left limb. Sharp/dull sensation testing of the L4 dermatome also improved from 2 out of 5 correctly selected on the left lower limb to 5 out of 5. At the S1 level, sensation improved on the left lower limb from 2 out of 5 to 4 out of 5 and from 2 out of 5 on the right lower limb to 5 out of 5. The patient's GROC score was rated as quite a bit better (+5). The outcomes of this case study suggest that clinicians may consider the addition of DN with electrical stimulation and neurodynamic exercises to the treatment of this patient population given the sizeable and rapid improvements in pain, balance, and sensation testing following only 4 treatments.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.006
       
  • Effect of remote myofascial release on hamstring flexibility in
           asymptomatic individuals – A randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Durga Girish Joshi; Ganesh Balthillaya; Anupama Prabhu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Durga Girish Joshi, Ganesh Balthillaya, Anupama Prabhu
      Background The existence of continuity between fascia and muscles that may be anatomically distant from each other is emphasized in the tensegrity principle. Despite evidence from in vitro studies, there is a dearth of literature concerning the in vivo behavior of these connections. Aim To compare the effect of Static Stretching (SS) of hamstrings with remote Myofascial Release (MFR) (bilateral plantar fascia and suboccipital region) and a combination of SS and remote MFR on hamstring flexibility. The secondary aim of this study was to investigate the difference between therapist administered and self-administered interventions. Design Three arm assessor-blinded Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT). Participants Fifty-eight asymptomatic participants (16 Males; Mean age 22.69 ± 2.65 years). Method Participants with tight hamstrings defined by a passive Knee Extension Angle (KEA) > 20° were included in the study and were assigned to one of the three groups. Group A (n = 19) was SS, group B (n = 20) was remote MFR, group C (n = 19) was a combination group who received both SS and remote MFR. Seven sessions of therapist administered intervention were delivered over a period of 10 days, which was followed by a 2-week self-administered home program. KEA and Sit and Reach Test (SRT) were used as outcomes and measurements were performed at baseline, end of the seventh session and after atwo-week follow-up. Results The results demonstrated that hamstring flexibility improved in all three groups after therapist administered interventions (p < 0.05), whereas, group C demonstrated additional benefits. None of the groups showed a statistically significant (p > 0.05) change in the KEA with self-intervention. Conclusion The findings of this study indicated that all three interventions were effective in improving hamstring flexibility in young asymptomatic individuals when performed by the therapist.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.008
       
  • The use of dry needling as a diagnostic tool and clinical treatment for
           cervicogenic dizziness: A narrative review & case series
    • Authors: James Escaloni; Raymond Butts; James Dunning
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): James Escaloni, Raymond Butts, James Dunning
      Study design Narrative Review & Case Series. Background No “gold standard” test presently exists to confirm a diagnosis of cervicogenic dizziness, a condition whereby the neuromusculoskeletal tissues of the cervical spine are thought to contribute to imbalance and dizziness. Clusters of tests are presently recommended to provoke signs and symptoms of the condition. In this regard, dry needling may provide a valuable diagnostic tool. Targeting the musculoskeletal structures of the upper neck with dry needling may also provide a valuable treatment tool for patients that suffer from cervicogenic dizziness. While dry needling has been used to treat various musculoskeletal conditions, it has not been specifically reported in patients with cervicogenic dizziness. Case description Three patients were screened for signs and symptoms related to cervicogenic dizziness in an outpatient physical therapy clinic. These patients presented with signs and symptoms often associated with (though not always) cervicogenic dizziness, including a positive flexion-rotation test, altered cervical range of motion, and tenderness with manual assessment of the upper cervical extensors. In addition, dry needling targeting the obliquus capitis inferior muscle was used diagnostically to reproduce symptoms as well as to treat the patients. Outcomes Two of the patients reported full resolution of their dizziness and a significant improvement in their function per standardized outcome measures. While the third patient did not report full resolution of her cervicogenic dizziness, she noted significant improvement, and dry needling was helpful in guiding further treatment. Importantly, the effect of the treatment was maintained in all three patients for at least 6 months. Discussion This case series with narrative review covers various testing procedures for cervicogenic dizziness and explores the use of dry needling targeting the suboccipital muscles to evaluate and treat this patient population. The physiologic changes that occur in the periphery, the spine and the brain secondary to dry needling and their potential relevance to the mechanisms driving cervicogenic dizziness are discussed in detail.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.015
       
  • Reliability of modified adheremeter and digital pressure algometer in
           measuring normal abdominal tissue and C-section scars
    • Authors: Rachel Kelly-Martin; Laura Doughty; Marina Garkavi; Jennifer B. Wasserman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Rachel Kelly-Martin, Laura Doughty, Marina Garkavi, Jennifer B. Wasserman
      Objective This study tested inter- and intrarater reliability of the digital pressure algometer and modified adheremeter and concurrent validity in the algometer in both normal abdominal tissue and in chronically painful C-section scars. Study design Correlational Reliability/Validity. Background The algometer is used to measure pressure-pain threshold (PPT). The adheremeter is a tool to measure tissue extensibility. Painful abdominal scars are being treated successfully with soft-tissue techniques yet reliable measurement tools for this tissue have not been reported. Methods and measures 59 subjects with normal abdominal tissue were marked at a point 2 inches inferolateral to the umbilicus. Two separate testers measured PPT twice with an algometer and tissue extensibility in superior/left/inferior/right directions with a modified adheremeter. 29 subjects with painful C-section scars were marked at 2.5 cm intervals along the scar. A total of 115 points were measured in the same manner as above. C-section subjects also were asked to rate their pain using the numeric pain rating scale (NPRS). Each tester was blinded to all other measurements. Results For PPT, intraclass correlations (ICC's) ranged from 0.814 to 0.933 with a standard error of measurement (SEM) ranging from 1.65N to 5.9 N. For tissue mobility, ICC's ranged from 0.430 to 0.914; SEM ranging from 1.67 mm to 3.7 mm. All but 2 measures had ICCs that were good-excellent. Inferior glide in C-section tissues showed the least and multi-directional measurement the strongest reliability. The PPT had a moderate negative correlation (r = −0.551) with the NPRS. Conclusions The algometer showed excellent inter- and intra-rater reliability on normal abdominal tissue and C-section scars. It showed moderate criterion validity when compared against the NPRS. The modified adheremeter showed good-excellent inter- and intra-rater reliability on both normal abdominal tissue and C-section scars. Both measures have clinical and research applications for women's health practitioners.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.017
       
  • Effect of neuromuscular training on functional throwing performance and
           speed in asymptomatic cricket players
    • Authors: S.A. Hydar Abbas; H. Karvannan; V. Prem
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): S.A. Hydar Abbas, H. Karvannan, V. Prem
      Objective To determine the effect of neuromuscular training on functional throwing performance and speed among asymptomatic cricket players. Design Single-subject A-B-A design. Method Forty-three male asymptomatic sub-elite cricket players were recruited from Karnataka Institute of Cricket, Bangalore, India, with a mean age of 20.4 ± 2.03 years. Throwing accuracy and throwing speed were measured using Functional Throwing Performance Index (FTPI) and radar gun respectively, at zero, 12, 24 and 30 weeks in accordance with the A-B-A single-subject design. The neuromuscular training of the throwing arm was performed for 12 weeks, two days a week of supervised training including rhythmic stabilization drills were performed. A non-supervised training session including shoulder strengthening programme was conducted three days a week. Result Participants demonstrated significant improvement in throwing accuracy (p < 0.001) and speed (p < 0.001) after 12 weeks of neuromuscular training. Six weeks post-withdrawal of the neuromuscular training on throwing accuracy was not significant (p = 0.117), However, speed was sustained (p = 0.013). Conclusion Neuromuscular training showed an improved efficiency in throwing performance following 12 weeks of training in sub-elite cricket players. The sustained effect was not observed following 6 weeks of withdrawal of training.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.014
       
  • Effects of Qigong practice in office workers with chronic non-specific low
           back pain: A randomized control trial
    • Authors: Suttinee Phattharasupharerk; Nithima Purepong; Sukanya Eksakulkla; Akkradate Siriphorn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Suttinee Phattharasupharerk, Nithima Purepong, Sukanya Eksakulkla, Akkradate Siriphorn
      Objective To investigate the effects of Qigong practice, Guan Yin Zi Zai Gong level 1, compared with a waiting list control group among office workers with chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNLBP). Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted at offices in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region. Seventy-two office workers with CNLBP were screened for inclusion/exclusion criteria (age 20–40 years; sitting period more than 4 h per day) and were allocated randomly into two groups: the Qigong and waiting list groups (n = 36 each). The participants in the Qigong group took a Qigong practice class (Guan Yin Zi Zai Gong level 1) for one hour per week for six weeks at their workstation. The participants were encouraged to conduct the Qigong exercise at home every day. The waiting list group received general advice regarding low back pain management. The primary outcomes were pain intensity, measured by the visual analog scale, and back functional disability, measured by the Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were back range of motion, core stability performance index, heart rate, respiratory rate, the Srithanya Stress Scale (ST-5), and the global perceived effect (GPE) questionnaire. Results Compared to the baseline, participants in the Qigong group experienced significantly decreased pain intensity and back functional disability. No statistically significant difference in these parameters was found in the waiting list group. Comparing the two groups, Qigong exercise significantly improved pain intensity, back functional impairment, range of motion, core muscle strength, heart rate, respiratory rate, and mental status. The Qigong group also had a significantly higher global outcome satisfaction than the waiting list group. Conclusion Qigong practice is an option for treatment of CNLBP in office workers.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.004
       
  • Sophrology versus resistance training for treatment women with
           fibromyalgia: A randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Hugo Jário de Almeida Silva; José Cortez Assunção Júnior; Franciele Santos de Oliveira; Jaine Maria de Pontes Oliveira; Glauko André Figueiredo Dantas; Caio Alano de Almeida Lins; Marcelo Cardoso de Souza
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hugo Jário de Almeida Silva, José Cortez Assunção Júnior, Franciele Santos de Oliveira, Jaine Maria de Pontes Oliveira, Glauko André Figueiredo Dantas, Caio Alano de Almeida Lins, Marcelo Cardoso de Souza
      Introduction Physical training has been recommended to improve overall well-being in patients with fibromyalgia. Body relaxation exercises also seem to have some beneficial effect, however there is no consensus regarding this modality. Objective Comparing the effectiveness of sophrology and resistance training in improving the pain of women with fibromyalgia. Method A randomized controlled clinical trial with a blind evaluator. Sixty (60) women with a medical diagnosis of fibromyalgia were randomized and included in two groups: sophrology group (SG) who participated in a relaxation program based on sophrology (n = 30), and resistance group (RG) (n = 30) who participated in a resistance training program for biceps, pectoral, triceps, knee extensors, trapezius, knee flexors, hip abductors. Both groups were treated twice a week for 12 weeks and reevaluated every 4 weeks. The assessment instruments used were the Visual Analog Scale for Pain (VAS), the one-repetition maximum test (1 RM), the overall quality of life (SF-36), the 6-min walk test (6MWT), the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Results We found that the RG presented statistically significant decreases in pain (VAS) during the evaluations (p < 0.05) and increased strength of the evaluated muscles (p < 0.05). A statistically significant decrease in pain (p < 0.05) was observed in the SG compared to T0, with no significant differences in muscle strength. Differences between groups were observed, with better indices only for 6MWT and functional capacity domain of the SF36 for the RG (p < 0.05). Conclusion No differences in pain were found between the groups. Resistance training was more effective than sophrology in improving strength and functional capacity of women with fibromyalgia.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.005
       
  • The effects of passive stretching on the blood glucose levels of patients
           with type 2 diabetes
    • Authors: Navid Taheri; Hosein Kouhzad Mohammadi; Gholamreza Jafarian Ardakani; Mojtaba Heshmatipour
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Navid Taheri, Hosein Kouhzad Mohammadi, Gholamreza Jafarian Ardakani, Mojtaba Heshmatipour
      Background Type 2 diabetes is characterized by poor glycemic control due to decreased insulin sensitivity. Physical activity plays an important role in the management of diabetes and reduces blood glucose level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of passive stretching (PS) on the blood glucose level (BGL) of diabetic patients. Materials and Methods In this randomized clinical trial, fifty patients with type 2 diabetes and mean age of 50.7 ± 4.8 years were randomly and equally allocated into control and intervention groups. Patients in the intervention and control groups underwent 20 min of PS and passive movement (PM), respectively. BGL was measured before and immediately after, 20 min after and 1 h after PS/PM in the two study groups. BGL at the mentioned times was compared between and within the groups. Results The findings showed that when compared with before the PS (195.7 ± 30.1), BGL significantly reduced (p < 0.001) immediately after (178.9 ± 29.7), 20 min after (183.2 ± 29.1), and 1 h after (187.8 ± 29.6) the PS. However, BGL after PM (immediately, 20 min and 1 h after PM) did not significantly change (p > 0.05). Conclusion The findings of this study indicated that PS has a significant effect on the reduction of the immediate BGL in type 2 diabetic patients. The trend reduced even though the effect remained for 1 h after PS. It is therefore suggested that the effectiveness of these types of activities should be evaluated over a longer duration of study.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.009
       
  • The Skater Squat
    • Authors: Lachlan Wilmot; D.C. Craig Liebenson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Lachlan Wilmot, D.C. Craig Liebenson


      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.013
       
  • Influence of a Pilates exercise program on the quality of life of
           sedentary elderly people: A randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Daniela Branco Liposcki; Irany Ferreira da Silva Nagata; Géssica Aline Silvano; Karla Zanella; Rodolfo Herberto Schneider
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Daniela Branco Liposcki, Irany Ferreira da Silva Nagata, Géssica Aline Silvano, Karla Zanella, Rodolfo Herberto Schneider
      This study evaluated the influence of a Pilates exercise program on the quality of life (QOL) of sedentary elderly women. Twenty-four elderly women (aged 64.8 ± 3 years) participated in this study. Participants were divided into two groups: a Pilates Group (PG) and a Control Group (CG). The women in the PG performed 30-min sessions of Pilates (on the ground and using appliances) twice a week over six months. To evaluate the QOL, the SF-36 survey was used. The PG achieved significant improvements in 7 out of 8 domains in the survey: functional capacity (p = 0.00), physical aspects (p = 0.03), pain (p = 0.00), general health condition (p = 0.04), vitality (p = 0.02), social aspects (p = 0.03) and mental health (p = 0.05). Our results showed that implementation of a Pilates program can improve QOL of sedentary elderly women.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.007
       
  • The effects of dry needling and radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy on
           latent trigger point sensitivity in the quadriceps: A randomised control
           pilot study
    • Authors: Richie Walsh; Sharon Kinsella; Johnson McEvoy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Richie Walsh, Sharon Kinsella, Johnson McEvoy
      Objectives Latent myofascial trigger points (TrP) can alter joint kinematics, reduce strength and alter activation patterns, affecting athletic performance. TrP sensitivity can be measured with the pressure pain threshold (PPT). Dry needling (DN) has been used to treat latent TrPs, but may cause post-needling soreness. Radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (rESWT) could be used as an alternative to DN during heavy training or competition. Methods After baseline measures, 21 recreational athletes were split into three groups: DN, rESWT or control group, and were treated for three sessions in one week. Follow-up outcome sessions were conducted two to four and seven days after the last treatment. TrP sensitivity was measured using the PPT. Results There was a groupXtime interaction for the PPT (p < 0.05). After a decrease in PPT during treating, there was a significant increase (p < 0.05) in PPT for the DN group (12.92%). The rESWT group also significantly (p < 0.05) increased (13.26%), but did not show any post-treatment soreness during the treatment phase. There was no difference in the PPT in the control group during any session. Conclusion DN is effective for increasing PPT of latent TrPs, but can be associated with post-treatment soreness. rESWT is as effective, but without the post-treatment soreness. Future studies should include treating multiple TrPs in the lower kinetic chain as well as measuring muscle activation and joint function. Furthermore, consideration for the current training load and up-coming competition is needed. Optimum timing and longer follow-up periods of such interventions should be explored. Level of Evidence 2b. Summary Treating latent TrPs in the lower kinetic chain may improve muscle activation. Unlike DN, rESWT does not cause post- treatment soreness. Consideration of training load and up-coming competition is needed to deliver the optimum treatment strategy for athletes with latent TrPs.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.010
       
  • Overflow using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation in post-stroke
           hemiplegics: A preliminary study
    • Authors: Karoline Cipriano Raimundo de Oliveira; Luciane Aparecida Pascucci Sande de Souza; Marina Mendonça Emilio; Lorenna Franco da Cunha; Daiane Menezes Lorena; Dernival Bertoncello
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Karoline Cipriano Raimundo de Oliveira, Luciane Aparecida Pascucci Sande de Souza, Marina Mendonça Emilio, Lorenna Franco da Cunha, Daiane Menezes Lorena, Dernival Bertoncello
      Hemiplegia is the classic condition resulting from a stroke. To assist in recovery, the overflow method can be employed to stimulate the affected limb, using the healthy contralateral lower limb (LL) to activate the plegic upper limb (UL) musculature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of overflow using the PNF method on the plegic upper limb muscles of post-stroke individuals in the acute and chronic stages, as well as on the muscles of healthy individuals. A total of 22 individuals participated in the work, comprising 8 healthy individuals (control group), 6 post-stroke acute stage individuals (acute group), and 8 post-stroke chronic stage individuals (chronic group). The participants were assessed using a questionnaire with sections for personal and disease data and application of the ICF scale and the Fugl-Meyer index. The three groups were submitted to electromyographic evaluation, using the posterior deltoid (PD), anterior deltoid (AD), pectoralis major (PM), and external oblique (EO) muscles in four different positions: P1 (resting the UL, with the LL contralateral to the affected limb positioned in diagonal); P2 (resting the UL, with manual resistance in the contralateral LL); P3 (affected UL positioned in diagonal, with manual resistance in the contralateral LL) e P4 (affected UL positioned in diagonal, with fixed point and manual resistance in the contralateral LL). The electromyography results revealed no significant differences between most of the positions for the four muscles evaluated (p > 0.05). However, high clinical relevance (d > 0.8) was found for muscle activation in positions 2 and 4. It could be concluded that for post-stroke individuals in the acute and chronic stages, overflow using PNF effectively increased activation of the PD, AD, PM, and EO muscles in the P2, as well as position 4.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.011
       
  • Isokinetic assessment of shoulder complex strength in adolescent elite
           synchronized swimmers
    • Authors: Soledad Aguado-Henche; Ana Slocker de Arce; Josefa Carrascosa-Sánchez; Asunción Bosch-Martín; Soledad Cristóbal-Aguado
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Soledad Aguado-Henche, Ana Slocker de Arce, Josefa Carrascosa-Sánchez, Asunción Bosch-Martín, Soledad Cristóbal-Aguado
      Children and adolescent participation in sport has increased in recent years. Synchronized swimming requires correct muscle balance in the shoulder complex. The purpose of this study was to establish isokinetic strength profiles and peak torque ratios of shoulder internal and external rotator muscles in a female high-level synchronized swimming team. Twenty-six adolescent female high-level synchronized swimmers, aged 12–14, participated in this study. Maximal bilateral shoulder concentric external and internal rotation force was measured at 60°/s (5 repetitions) and 180°/s (15 repetitions). The isokinetic concentric strength generated by the internal rotator muscles was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than by the external rotators in both limbs and at both velocities. Significant bilateral differences in the external rotation (ER):internal rotation (IR) strength ratio were noted at 60°/s. Isokinetic assessment is essential in sports medicine, since it is the only test capable of diagnosing any shoulder strength deficit.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.018
       
  • Perceptions of individuals with stroke regarding the use of a cane for
           walking: A qualitative study
    • Authors: Lucas R. Nascimento; Louise Ada; Gerdeany M. Rocha; Luci F. Teixeira-Salmela
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Lucas R. Nascimento, Louise Ada, Gerdeany M. Rocha, Luci F. Teixeira-Salmela
      It is well known that clinical decisions, which include prescription of canes after stroke, should not only be based on biomechanical research. According to the principles of evidence-based medicine, patients' perceptions and preferences should also be investigated to help planning good clinical decisions. The purpose of this study was to comprehend how ambulatory people with stroke, naïve to the use of canes, perceive using a cane during walking. An exploratory, qualitative study was conducted. Twenty-four people, on average 6 years after a stroke, were included. Participants were categorized as slow (<0.4 m/s), intermediate (0.4–0.8 m/s), or fast walkers (>0.8 m/s), based on their baseline walking speed. Participants' spontaneous perceptions regarding the use of a cane were collected during a timed-walk test and analyzed, following standardized recommendations. The discourse of each participant was categorized into “positive perceptions” or “negative perceptions”. Overall, the nature of the perceptions was both positive (i.e., improvements of mobility and/or independence, and improvement of safety/balance and/or reduced risk of falls) and negative (i.e., social stigmatisms, and interference with use of the non-paretic upper limb). However, participants’ perceptions were diverse, depending on their walking ability. Participants categorized as slow walkers perceived the use of a cane as positive, but this positive perception decreased, as walking ability increased. The most positive perceptions came from individuals with severe and moderate walking limitations, who tended to believe that using a cane may be helpful for improving walking, safety, and promoting independence. Fast walkers provided negative perceptions, and may not choose to use canes for walking due to social stigmatisms or interference with use of the non-paretic upper limb.

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.001
       
  • The effect of aerobic exercises among women with mild and moderate
           irritable bowel syndrome: A pilot study
    • Authors: Javid Mostamand; Mozhgan Fani; Maedeh Fani; Navid Chitsaz; Awat Feizi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Javid Mostamand, Mozhgan Fani, Maedeh Fani, Navid Chitsaz, Awat Feizi
      Background Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort. Although patients with IBS are commonly recommended to increase their physical activity, after reviewing the literature, it was found that no study has assessed the effect of aerobic exercises on the severity of symptoms and quality of life in patients with IBS. Therefore the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of aerobic exercises with treadmill on the severity of symptoms and quality of life among women with mild and moderate IBS. Methods Twenty women with mild and moderate IBS were randomly assigned into two groups of treadmill exercise (10 participants) and control (10 participants). The treadmill group had six weeks (30 min, three sessions per week) of aerobic exercises on treadmill. The control group continued their usual daily activities. Results After six weeks of aerobic exercises on a treadmill a significant improvement was observed in the severity of IBS symptoms (p ≤ 0.001) and IBS quality of life (p = 0.001) in the treadmill group compared to the control group. Also in the treadmill group, the severity of symptoms and quality of life demonstrated a significant improvement after the intervention compared to before the intervention (p ≤ 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the severity of symptoms and quality of life in the control group before and after the study (p > 0.05).

      PubDate: 2018-02-15T14:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.003
       
  • Yoga, fascia and the second law of thermodynamics
    • Authors: Serge Gracovetsky
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Serge Gracovetsky


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.002
       
  • Comparison of a foam rolling session with active joint motion and without
           joint motion: A randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Scott W. Cheatham; Kyle R. Stull
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Scott W. Cheatham, Kyle R. Stull
      Background Foam rolling has become a popular form of self-myofascial release or roller massage among health and fitness professionals. Due to this popularity, foam roller devices can be found in many clinical and fitness settings. Despite the popularity, there are still several unknowns regarding foam rolling such the optimal technique. Specifically, there is a lack of research analyzing different foam roll techniques such as combining active joint motion with foam rolling. Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a foam rolling session to the left quadriceps with active joint motion and without joint motion on passive knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and pressure pain thresholds (PPT). Methods Thirty healthy adults were randomly allocated to one of two intervention groups: active joint motion and no joint motion. Each foam roll intervention to the left quadriceps lasted a total of 2 min. Dependent variables included passive knee flexion ROM and pressure pain threshold measures (PPT). Statistical analysis included subject demographic calculations and appropriate parametric and non-parametric tests to measure changes within and between intervention groups. Results For left knee ROM, the active joint motion group demonstrated the greatest immediate increase in passive ROM (8°, p < .001) than the non-motion group (5°, p < .001). For PPT, the active joint motion group demonstrated the greatest immediate increase (180 kPa, p < .001) followed by the non-motion group (133 kPa, p < .001). Between group comparisons revealed a significance between groups for passive knee ROM (p < .001) and PPT (p < .001). Conclusion A short session of foam rolling with active joint motion appears to have a greater effect on passive joint ROM and PPT than rolling without motion. These observed changes may be influenced by the agonistic muscle activity during active motion. This activity may modulate activity of the antagonist muscle through reciprocal inhibition and other neural pathways. Future research is needed to confirm these findings.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.011
       
  • Immediate effects and one-week follow-up after neuromuscular electric
           stimulation alone or combined with stretching on hamstrings extensibility
           in healthy football players with hamstring shortening
    • Authors: Luis Espejo-Antúnez; María Carracedo-Rodríguez; Fernando Ribeiro; João Venâncio; Blanca De la Cruz-Torres; Manuel Albornoz-Cabello
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Luis Espejo-Antúnez, María Carracedo-Rodríguez, Fernando Ribeiro, João Venâncio, Blanca De la Cruz-Torres, Manuel Albornoz-Cabello
      Objective To assess the immediate and mid-term (after 7 days) effects of electric current combined with simultaneous muscle stretching (EME technique) per comparison to the isolated use of the same current (without applying simultaneous muscle stretching), over the hamstring extensibility in football players with hamstring shortening, and to estimate the clinical benefit of the interventions according to the muscular extensibility. Methods Forty-eight participants were randomized to receive one session of EME technique (n = 26) or one session of the electrical current (EC) alone (n = 22). The measurement of the hamstrings extensibility through the active knee test was carried out before and immediately after each intervention and one week later. Results A significant interaction group x time was observed (F2,84 = 7.112, p = 0.001; partial eta squared = 0.145). The hamstrings extensibility changed significantly immediately after the EME technique (147.3° ± 16.4° to 153.5° ± 14.2°, p < 0.05), but not after the EC only (144.2 ± 10.2° to 141.7 ± 7.8°, p > 0.05). One week after the intervention no significant differences were found to the baseline values in both groups. The number needed to treat to prevent one new case of hamstring shortening was 3. Conclusion The combination of electric current with simultaneous stretching is an effective technique to acutely increase the hamstring extensibility of football players with hamstring shortness.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.017
       
  • Reliability of two pragmatic tools for assessing text neck
    • Authors: Gerson Moreira Damasceno; Arthur Sá Ferreira; Leandro Alberto Calazans Nogueira; Felipe José Jandre Reis; Rodrigo Wagner Lara; Ney Meziat-Filho
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gerson Moreira Damasceno, Arthur Sá Ferreira, Leandro Alberto Calazans Nogueira, Felipe José Jandre Reis, Rodrigo Wagner Lara, Ney Meziat-Filho
      Background There is a hypothesis that the growing use of mobile phones in an inappropriate posture to text and read (text neck) could be a reason for the increasing prevalence of neck pain in the past decade. Before testing if there is an association between text neck and neck pain, it is necessary to develop reliable pragmatic tools appropriate to epidemiological studies. Objectives The primary aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the self-perception of text neck, as well as the reliability of physiotherapists’ classification of the text neck. Methods The convenience sample was composed of 113 high school students between 18 and 21 years old from a cross-sectional study. As their self-perceived posture, participants had to choose in a questionnaire one of four neck postures of a person texting on a mobile phone. The physiotherapists classified lateral photographs taken with the participants texting on a mobile phone in their habitual posture as 1 (normal), 2 (acceptable), 3 (inappropriate), and 4 (excessively inappropriate). Results The results showed that the test–retest reliability of the self-perception was substantial (kappa = 0.73, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.86). The reliability of the physiotherapists’ responses, according to the photographic analysis considering the three raters, was moderate (kappa = 0.5, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.61). Seventy-six percent of the participants with appropriate posture in the photographic analysis self-reported an inappropriate posture. Conclusion This study showed that the self-perception of the neck posture during mobile phone texting is reliable over time and that the physiotherapists’ classification based on photographic analysis was acceptable for epidemiological studies. Participants had a tendency to report that the posture was worse than it actually was in the photographic analysis performed by the physiotherapists.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.007
       
  • Knowledge of self-myofascial release among allied health students in the
           United States: A descriptive comparison survey
    • Authors: Scott W. Cheatham; Kyle R. Stull
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Scott W. Cheatham, Kyle R. Stull
      Background University and collegiate education of the human myofascial system is commonly taught in basic science courses such as anatomy. Allied health programs may expand upon these concepts by teaching interventions such as myofascial release in clinical education courses. Self-myofascial release (SMR) with a device such as a foam roller is an emerging intervention that has become popular among clinicians and active individuals. Currently, it's unknown if allied health programs provide SMR education. Purpose The purpose of this study was to survey and document responses in the knowledge of SMR among allied health students. Methods 12 undergraduate and graduate allied health programs in the United States were sent a 12-question electronic survey that represented three areas: 1) respondent demographics and beliefs, 2) experience with SMR, 3) future practice and education. Descriptive data including response frequency and percentage was calculated and reported for the 12 questions. Results A total of 502 students from the different allied health programs completed the survey which represented a 33.00% response rate (502/1521). Approximately, half of respondents (49.6%, N = 249) reported learning about SMR in their degree program and the other half (50.40%, N = 253) report receiving no education. Most respondents (>50%) currently use or have used an SMR device and believe that SMR produces therapeutic benefits. Furthermore, most respondents (≥50%) had an idea of how they would integrate SMR into their future practice and where to purchase an SMR device. Conclusion A more global consensus on education for emerging therapeutic intervention such as SMR is needed in order to standardize and develop best teaching practices in allied health. This study highlighted the difference among allied health programs in the United States. This research should be a starting point for future survey research on this topic.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.015
       
  • Comparison of muscular activities between subjects with and without
           scapular downward rotation impairment during diagonal pattern of exercises
           
    • Authors: Se-Yeon Park; Du-Jin Park
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Se-Yeon Park, Du-Jin Park
      Backgrounds One form of abnormal scapular alignment is scapular downward rotation (SDR). Changes in muscle function in SDR have not been clearly identified, and SDR exercises also require investigation. Although a diagonal pattern of exercise is commonly used as part of the exercise protocol, a direct comparison of shoulder and scapular diagonal exercises has not yet been conducted. The objectives of this study were to determine the altered activation of the scapular musculature in the SDR group and to investigate which diagonal pattern of exercise effectively activates the scapular musculature. Methods Thirty-two participants (18 in the control group and 14 in the SDR group) volunteered to participate in this study. Electromyographic signals were collected from four muscles, the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and anterior deltoid (AD), during standing performance of diagonal shoulder and scapular exercises. Results The control group showed significantly lower UT activity, UT/LT ratio, and UT/SA values than the SDR group (p < .05). Activation of the AD was significantly higher in the SDR than in the control group (p < .05). SA and AD activation were significantly higher in shoulder diagonal pattern exercises than in scapular diagonal pattern exercises (p < .05). The scapular posterior elevation pattern exercise showed significantly higher UT and LT activities than anterior elevation and shoulder diagonal pattern exercises (p < .05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that reduced activation of the UT could lead to greater activation in the AD in SDR. Scapular posterior elevation exercise is advantageous as selectively activates the trapezius musculature, and shoulder diagonal pattern exercise is advantageous in activating the SA and AD.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.006
       
  • Dry needling in chronic abdominal wall pain of uncertain origin
    • Authors: Pandurangan Rajkannan; Rajagopalan Vijayaraghavan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Pandurangan Rajkannan, Rajagopalan Vijayaraghavan
      Background Abdominal wall pain is considered as pain that arises from the abdominal muscles rather than the underlying viscera or the spine. It is frequently overlooked and is often misdiagnosed, as these patients continue to suffer with pain. Many such patients would have even been subjected to a psychiatric evaluation in view of the absence of any ostensible clinical cause for the pain. In this study, we describe the role of myofascial trigger points in the abdominal wall pain that could be a cause of chronic pain and present our findings of pain relief by dry needling technique. Objectives To report the effect of dry needling treatment for patients who suffer from chronic abdominal wall pain of uncertain etiology and in whom specific myofascial trigger points were identified. Methods Twelve patients diagnosed with chronic abdominal wall pain were included in the study. All patients were clinically evaluated and subjected to a combination of imaging techniques. Once categorized as patients suffering from chronic abdominal wall pain, they were subjected to a thorough palpation of the abdominal wall to identify the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) over the abdominal muscles. All had MTrPs over one or more abdominal muscles either unilaterally or bilaterally. Dry Needling using a standard technique was done based on the side and localization of the myofascial trigger points. Numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) was used to measure pain before and after treatment and at the end of four months. All patients were then seen by the primary clinician and re-evaluated. Results Eleven out of twelve patients had significant reduction with a mean difference 5.95 in NPRS in their pain levels at four months follow up. Seven patients had complete resolution of the pain. Some patients had improvement in complaints such as Dysmenorrhea, Urinary Frequency and constipation. Conclusion Dry Needling can be a useful adjunct in treating chronic abdominal wall pain especially in those patients in whom Myofascial Trigger Points in the muscles of abdomen are identified by palpation. Level of evidence Level 4.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.004
       
  • Therapeutic heat and cold around the elbow on the response of median
           neurodynamic test 1
    • Authors: Winora Conchita Gomes; Kavitha Vishal; Ganesh Balthillaya
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Winora Conchita Gomes, Kavitha Vishal, Ganesh Balthillaya
      Objective To compare the effects of the application of therapeutic heat and cold on the mechanical response of the median nerve neurodynamic testing. Design Single-blinded randomized crossover trial. Methodology 56 asymptomatic university students (mean age = 21.82 ± 1.64 years) of either gender with a limited elbow extension range of motion during a Median Neurodynamic Test 1 were recruited. Each subject was administered 3 testing conditions on separate days with a 24-hr washout period. The interventions included 1) therapeutic moist heat around the elbow, 2) therapeutic cold around the elbow and 3) no thermal agent as a controlled condition. Outcome measure of elbow extension range of motion at the Onset of pain and Submaximal pain was recorded before the intervention, immediately after the removal of the thermal agents and at 2 subsequent readings of 30min and 1 h after the removal of the thermal agent. Results there was a significant effect of using a thermal agent with time on the elbow range of motion at the onset of pain [F(2,165) = 3.622, p = 0.029] and submaximal pain[F(2,165) = 3.841, p = 0.023] at the 20th min. A posthoc comparison indicated that at the 20th min the mean elbow range at the onset of pain and submaximal pain for the therapeutic heat condition (m = 33.5, S.D = 13.37 and m = 16.80, S.D = 12.99 respectively) was significantly different than the no thermal agent condition (m = 40.17, S.D = 12.34 and m = 23.4, S.D = 13.82 respectively). However. Therapeutic cold condition did not significantly differ from both the other conditions. Conclusion Therapeutic heat causes an immediate increase in elbow extension range of motion during a Median Neurodynamic Test1 and testing post the application of thermal agents can alter the test response.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.012
       
  • Development of a multivariate model of the six-minute walked distance to
           predict functional exercise capacity in hypertension
    • Authors: Rodrigo de Assis Ramos; Fernando Silva Guimarães; Yannis Dionyssiotis; Dorothea Tsekoura; Jannis Papathanasiou; Arthur de Sá Ferreira
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Rodrigo de Assis Ramos, Fernando Silva Guimarães, Yannis Dionyssiotis, Dorothea Tsekoura, Jannis Papathanasiou, Arthur de Sá Ferreira
      Background Hypertension is associated with deterioration of musculoskeletal function and functional capacity. Existing prediction models for assessment of the 6-min walk test (6MWT) do not capture the disease-related functional capacity. This study developed a multivariate prediction model of the measured 6-min walked distance (6MWDM) in hypertension and proposed target-values based on optimal therapeutic aims. Methods Seventy-six patients (38 men, 56.1 ± 14.3 years, systolic pressure 156.7 ± 17.5 mmHg, diastolic pressure 92.9 ± 6.9 mmHg) underwent anamnesis, physical examination, and laboratory analysis. Functional capacity was assessed using the 6MWT, being the 6MWDM considered as the dependent variable. Independent variables included sex (S, coded ‘male’ = 1, ‘female’ = 0), age (A), body height (H), body mass, mean blood pressure (MBP), and physical activity (IPAQ, coded 1–5). Target-values were derived from theoretical scenarios of optimal blood pressure and physical activity, separately and combined. Results Patients walked 324.5 ± 10.1 m in the average of two trials 30-min apart. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed moderate-to-weak significant associations between 6MWDM and all independent variables. The final multivariate model was 6MWD P  = 611.347–4.446 × MBP + 267.630 × H – 1.511 × A + IPAQ code + S code (adjusted R2 = 0.680, SE of bias = 6.3 m), suggesting that clinical, anthropometric, and hemodynamic information determines functional capacity. Predicted values yielded a group-average of 325 ± 87 m. Target-values under the optimal scenario resulted in 420 ± 60 m. Conclusions Sex (men), higher body height, higher physical activity, lower mean blood pressure, and lower age are independently correlated with higher 6MWDM in patients with hypertension. Target-values can be estimated for therapeutic aims related to hemodynamics and lifestyle.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.010
       
  • A descriptive analysis of shoulder muscle activities during individual
           stages of the Turkish Get-Up exercise
    • Authors: Eric St-Onge; Andrew Robb; Tyson A.C. Beach; Samuel J. Howarth
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Eric St-Onge, Andrew Robb, Tyson A.C. Beach, Samuel J. Howarth
      The Turkish Get-Up (TGU) is a complex and multi-planar exercise; the performer begins in a supine lying position, progresses toward upright standing through a series of 7 stages while holding a mass overhead in one hand, and returns to the original supine lying position through a reversal of the same 7 stages. A descriptive analysis of shoulder muscle activity during the TGU may provide insight toward its use in training and rehabilitation contexts. Our objectives were to: (1) describe the activity patterns from a subset of muscles that span the glenohumeral joint during individual stages of the TGU, and (2) interpret these patterns through comparisons between left- and right-side muscles, and between the up and down phases of the TGU. Twelve individuals with at least one-year experience performing the TGU were included in this study. Surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings were bilaterally obtained from 8 glenohumeral muscle groups while participants performed ten trials of the TGU with a kettlebell in their right hand. Instants representing the start and end of each TGU stage were identified from a synchronized video for each trial, and EMG activities for each muscle were integrated over the duration of each stage. Average integrated EMG and within-participant coefficients of variation were calculated. Overall, the greatest muscular demand occurred during the second (press to elbow support) and fifth (leg sweep) stages. Activities from muscles on the ipsilateral side to the kettlebell (right-side) were greater during stages when the contralateral upper limb did not contribute to supporting the body; however, contralateral (left-side) muscles were invoked during stages when the non-kettlebell-bearing forearm or hand contributed to supporting the body. The results suggest the importance of training both phases of the TGU to gain the most benefit from the exercise and highlights the asymmetric nature of the exercise, which may be particularly relevant for athletes engaged in activities with rotational demands.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.013
       
  • Dry needling versus friction massage to treat tension type headache: A
           randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Fahimeh Kamali; Marzieh Mohamadi; Leila Fakheri; Fatemeh Mohammadnejad
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fahimeh Kamali, Marzieh Mohamadi, Leila Fakheri, Fatemeh Mohammadnejad
      Tension type headache (TTH), the most common type of headache, is known to be associated with myofascial pain syndrome and the existence of myofascial trigger points. There are several treatment options for myofascial trigger points. In this study we compared the effectiveness of dry needling and friction massage to treat patients with TTH. A convenience sample of 44 patients with TTH participated in this randomized clinical trial. The frequency and intensity of headache, pressure pain threshold at the trigger point site, and cervical range of motion were recorded. Then the participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups for dry needling or friction massage, delivered in 3 sessions during 1 week. The participants were evaluated 48 h after the last treatment session. Analysis of covariance, paired t-test and Wilcoxon's test were used for statistical analysis. The results showed that both treatment methods significantly reduced headache frequency and intensity, and increased pain threshold at the trigger points. However, neither treatment had any effect on cervical range of motion except for extension, which increased in the dry needling group. Between-group comparisons showed that dry needling increased pain threshold significantly more than friction massage. There were no significant differences between groups in any other outcome variables. Dry needling and friction massage were equally effective in improving symptoms in patients with TTH. The decreases in frequency and intensity of headache were similar after both dry needing and friction massage.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.009
       
  • Comparison of manipulation and stabilization exercises in patients with
           sacroiliac joint dysfunction patients: A randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Fahimeh Kamali; Mehdi Zamanlou; Ali Ghanbari; Abbass Alipour; Soha Bervis
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fahimeh Kamali, Mehdi Zamanlou, Ali Ghanbari, Abbass Alipour, Soha Bervis
      Background Manual therapy and exercise therapy are two common treatments for low back pain. Although their effects have been discussed in several studies, the superiority of one over the other for patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction is still unclear. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the effects of manipulation (M) and stabilization exercises (S) in patients with subacute or chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Methods The participants in this randomized controlled trial study were patients with subacute or chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction for more than 4 weeks and less than 1 year. A total of 40 patients were randomized with a minimization method to the M (n = 20) or S (n = 20) group; 15 patients in each group received treatment. The treatment program lasted 2 week in group M and 4 weeks in group S. Pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were recorded before and immediately after the treatment period. Results Both groups showed significant improvement in assessed pain and ODI (P < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between groups in post-intervention assessed pain or ODI (P > 0.05). Conclusions Despite the improvements seen after both manipulation and stabilization exercise therapies in patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction, there was no significant between-group difference in the treatment effects. This result suggests that neither manual therapy nor stabilization exercise therapy is superior for treating subacute or chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.014
       
  • The effect of traditional dysphagia therapy on the swallowing function in
           patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A pilot double-blinded randomized
           controlled trial
    • Authors: Maryam Tarameshlu; Leila Ghelichi; Amir Reza Azimi; Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari; Ahmad Reza Khatoonabadi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Maryam Tarameshlu, Leila Ghelichi, Amir Reza Azimi, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Ahmad Reza Khatoonabadi
      Background Dysphagia is common following Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The current rehabilitation program to swallowing therapy is Traditional Dysphagia Therapy (TDT), but there is a dearth of evidence about its effectiveness in MS patients. Objectives This study was aimed to determine the effects of the TDT on the swallowing function in MS patients with dysphagia. Methods A pilot double blind randomized clinical trial was carried out on 20 patients with MS. Patients were randomly divided into experimental group (TDT) comprising sensorimotor exercises and swallowing maneuvers, and Usual Care (UC) comprising diet prescription and postural changes. Patients in both groups received treatments for 6 weeks, 18 treatment sessions, 3 times per week, every other day. The Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA) was the main outcome measure. The swallowing ability was assessed before treatment (T0), after the end of 9th session (T1), after the end of 18th session (T2), and after 6 weeks follow-up (T3). Penetration–Aspiration Scale (PAS) and Pharyngeal Residue Rating Scale (PRRS) as secondary outcome measures were applied at T0 and T2. Results Both groups had improved regarding MASA, PAS and PRRS scores over the time (P < 0.001). The improvements achieved in all outcomes were significantly greater in the TDT group than those of the UC group. The Main effect of the Time × Group interaction was significant for MASA score (P < 0.001). The large effect sizes were found for MASA score in both the TDT (d = 3.91) and the UC (d = 1.11) groups. Conclusions This pilot randomized controlled trial showed that the TDT significantly improved the swallowing function of the MS patients with dysphagia.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T13:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.016
       
  • Postneedling soreness after myofascial trigger point dry needling: Current
           status and future research
    • Authors: Aitor Martín-Pintado-Zugasti; Orlando Mayoral del Moral; Robert D. Gerwin; Josue Fernández-Carnero
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Aitor Martín-Pintado-Zugasti, Orlando Mayoral del Moral, Robert D. Gerwin, Josue Fernández-Carnero
      Post-dry needling soreness is a common complication of myofascial trigger point (MTrP) dry needling treatment. The prevention, management and relevance of this complication remain uncertain. This paper examines the current state of knowledge and suggests directions for further studies in this area. MTrPs are hypersensitive nodules in skeletal muscles' taut bands, present in several pain conditions. Dry needling has been recommended for relieving MTrP pain. MTrP dry needling procedures have shown to be associated with postneedling soreness, which is thought to be a consequence of the neuromuscular damage, and hemorrhagic and inflammatory reaction generated by the needle. Postneedling soreness is a very frequent effect after deep dry needling, usually lasting less than 72 h. It may not be especially distressing for most patients. However, patients presenting with higher levels of postneedling soreness, not perceiving dry needling effectiveness in the first session, or not having high myofascial pain intensity before treatment, could be the most likely to find postneedling soreness more distressing, functionally limiting and to abandon treatment. Future research should assess the clinical relevance of postneedling soreness. Postneedling soreness should be considered when investigating dry needling effectiveness since it could overlie the original myofascial pain and influence the patients’ pain ratings.

      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.003
       
  • Effects of integrated Neuromuscular Inhibition Technique on pain threshold
           and pain intensity in patients with upper trapezius trigger points
    • Authors: Zahra Saadat; Ladan Hemmati; Soraya Pirouzi; Mahnaz Ataollahi; Fatemeh Ali-mohammadi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Zahra Saadat, Ladan Hemmati, Soraya Pirouzi, Mahnaz Ataollahi, Fatemeh Ali-mohammadi
      Introduction Upper trapezius trigger points are among the most common causes of neck pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects of integrated Neuromuscular Inhibition Technique (INIT) on pain intensity and threshold. Materials & Methods Thirty two female participants with upper trapezius trigger points were recruited in this study. The participants were assigned to control (n = 16) or intervention (n = 16). The intervention group received INIT in one session, consisted of muscle energy technique, ischemic compression and strain-counter strain. Pain threshold and intensity were measured using Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and Numerical Pain Scale (NPS). These measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after treatment and 24 h after treatment. Findings The results showed that pain intensity significantly decreased in the intervention group immediately after treatment (P = .01) and 24 h after treatment (P = .009) in comparison with the control group. There were no significant differences in pressure pain threshold between both groups. Conclusion It seems that Integrated Neuromuscular Inhibition Technique can reduce pain intensity in patients with upper trapezius trigger points.

      PubDate: 2018-01-26T00:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.002
       
  • Effects of tactile feedback on lumbar multifidus muscle activity in
           asymptomatic healthy adults and patients with low back pain
    • Authors: Sharon Wang-Price; Jason Zafereo; Kelli Brizzolara; Elizabeth Anderson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2018
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sharon Wang-Price, Jason Zafereo, Kelli Brizzolara, Elizabeth Anderson
      Background Reduced lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle contraction has been observed in patients with low back pain (LBP). Clinicians often use various strategies to ensure LM activation, including tactile feedback and verbal instruction. However, the effects of tactile feedback on muscle activation have not been studied previously. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not tactile feedback would increase LM muscle activity in adults with and without LBP. Methods Twenty asymptomatic adults and 20 patients with existing LBP completed the study. Two electromyographic (EMG) electrodes were applied to both sides of the LM at the L5 segment. EMG activity was collected three times at rest with and without tactile feedback, then five times during contralateral arm lifts with and without tactile feedback. The tactile feedback was applied by direct and continuous hand contact to the bilateral LM over the lumbosacral area. Lastly, two 5-second trials of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) during a bilateral arm lift were performed. EMG activity collected at rest and during contralateral arm lifts was normalized to that collected during MVIC. Normalized EMG values of the right side of the asymptomatic group and the painful side of the LBP group were used for data analysis. Results Statistical analysis showed significantly decreased LM EMG activity with tactile feedback both at rest and during contralateral arm lifts compared to LM EMG activity without tactile feedback. There was no difference in LM EMG between the asymptomatic and the LBP groups. Conclusions The results of the study showed that adding tactile stimulation to verbal instruction appeared to provide an inhibitory effect on LM activity in both asymptomatic healthy adults and patients with LBP. Contrary to common belief, tactical feedback via direct hand contact may reduce LM muscle recruitment, and may lessen the desired treatment effect.

      PubDate: 2018-01-10T11:28:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.001
       
  • Biomechanical factors associated with running economy and performance of
           elite Kenyan distance runners: A systematic review
    • Authors: Nassib Tawa; Quinette Louw
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Nassib Tawa, Quinette Louw
      Background Running economy (RE) is a determinant of performance in endurance sports and is a complex multi-factorial measure which reflects the combined functioning of bio-mechanical, neuro-muscular, metabolic and cardio-respiratory factors some of which are hereditary or adapt to coaching. Kenyan distance runners have dominated major global events with their unmatched performance for decades and this phenomenon has prompted several investigations aimed at establishing possible factors associated with their performance. This systematic review was aimed at establishing up-to date quantitative synthesis of evidence on biomechanical factors associated with running economy and performance of elite Kenyan distance runners and to provide an algorithm for future research and coaching strategies. Methods A comprehensive electronic search was conducted through June 2017. Quality appraisal was independently done by both reviewers using the STROBE checklist. Descriptive summaries and tables were used to illustrate biomechanical outcomes, mean differences and confidence intervals. Evidence from reviewed studies was graded according to the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) hierarchy for aetiological factors and meta-analysis was performed where applicable. Results Eight cross-sectional studies were included. The overall methodological score was moderate (58%). Elite Kenyan distance runners have significant longer gastroc-Achilles tendons compared to their counterparts while their shank length is not significantly longer. There is no certainty of evidence regarding the association between their characteristic unique profile of tall and slender bodies, low BMI and low body mass, short ground contact and flight times, greater forward lean torso and faster and greater forward leg swing with RE and performance. Conclusion Our findings presents evidence on biomechanical factors associated with RE and performance of elite Kenyan distance runners. Despite these findings, there are a number of limitations inherent to this review including; low level of evidence, minimal number of included studies, small sample size and lack of appropriate control subjects. However, we considered these shortcomings and summarised the best available evidence in attempt to give direction to future research and coaching strategies.

      PubDate: 2017-11-30T20:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.11.004
       
 
 
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