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Journal Cover   Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
  [SJR: 0.522]   [H-I: 23]   [14 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2800 journals]
  • Effects of Self-Myofascial Release: A Systematic Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 August 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Beardsley Chris, Jakob Škarabot
      Background Self-myofascial release (SMFR) is a type of myofascial release performed by the individual themselves rather than by a clinician, typically using a tool. Objectives To review the literature regarding studies exploring acute and chronic clinical effects of SMFR. Methods PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched during February 2015 for studies containing words related to the topic of SMFR. Results Acutely, SMFR seems to increase flexibility and reduce muscle soreness but does not impede athletic performance. It may lead to improved arterial function, improved vascular endothelial function, and increased parasympathetic nervous system activity acutely, which could be useful in recovery. There is conflicting evidence whether SMFR can improve flexibility long-term. Conclusion SMFR appears to have a range of potentially valuable effects for both athletes and the general population, including increasing flexibility and enhancing recovery.


      PubDate: 2015-08-31T14:14:35Z
       
  • The Torsional Upper Crossed Syndrome: A Multi-Planar Update to
           Janda’s Model, with a Case Series Introduction of the Mid-Pectoral
           Fascial Lesion as an Associated Etiological Factor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 August 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Craig E. Morris, Debra Bonnefin, Caroline Darville
      The Upper Crossed Syndrome (UCS) was presented by Janda to introduce neuromotor aspects of upper body muscle imbalances, describing sagittal plane postural asymmetries as barriers to recovery from chronic locomotor system pain syndromes. The UCS describes muscle imbalances of key antagonists causing forward postures of the head and shoulders and associated changes in the spinal curves –particularly an increased thoracic kyphosis – as well as changed function in the shoulder girdle. The role of fascial tissue has gained remarkable interest over the past decade, previously emphasizing its anatomic compartmental and binding role, while more recently emphasizing load transfer, sensory and kinetic chain function. The authors introduce the Mid-Pectoral Fascial Lesion (MPFL) as a myofascial disorder, describing 11 ipsilateral chest wall cases. While managing these cases, the authors encountered and subsequently designated the Torsional Upper Crossed Syndrome (TUCS) as a multi-planar addition to Janda's classic sagittal plane model. This article integrates published updates regarding the role of posture and fascia with the effects of chest wall trauma and a newly described associated postural syndrome as illustrated with this case series. An effective therapeutic approach to release the MPFL is then briefly described.


      PubDate: 2015-08-31T14:14:35Z
       
  • The Power and Importance of Abstracts
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 August 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2015-08-31T14:14:35Z
       
  • Onset and maximum values of electromyographic amplitude during prone hip
           extension after neurodynamic technique in patients with lumbosciatic pain:
           a pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 August 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Giselle Horment-Lara, Carlos Cruz-Montecinos, Rodrigo Nuñez-Cortes, Pablo Letelier-Horta, Luis Henriquez-Fuentes
      Objective The mechanisms underlying the effects of neurodynamic techniques are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide a starting point for future research on explaining why neurodynamic techniques affect muscular activities in patients with sciatic pain. Methods A double-blind trial was conducted in 12 patients with lumbosciatica. Surface electromyography activity was assessed for different muscles during prone hip extension. Pre- and post-intervention values for muscle activity onset and maximal amplitude signals were determined. Results There was a significant reduction in the surface electromyography activity of maximal amplitude in the erector spinae and contralateral erector spinae (p < 0.05). Additionally, gluteus maximus (p < 0.05) activity onset was delayed post-intervention. Conclusions Self-neurodynamic sliding techniques modify muscular activity and onset during prone hip extension, possibly reducing unnecessary adaptations for protecting injured components. Future work will analyze the effects of self-neurodynamic sliding techniques during other physical tasks.


      PubDate: 2015-08-31T14:14:35Z
       
  • The effect of adding whole body vibration training to strengthening
           training in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: A randomized clinical
           trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 August 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hamid reza Bokaeian, Amir Hoshang Bakhtiary, Majid Mirmohamadkhani, Jamile Moghimi
      Strengthening training (ST) and whole body vibration training (WBV) alone may improve symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee. In this study, we investigated the effect of adding WBV training to quadriceps and hamstring muscles strengthening training on functional activity, pain, quality of life and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis. 28 volunteers were randomly allocated to two groups; 1) quadriceps and hamstring muscles strengthening training (ST group, 13 patients) and 2) quadriceps and hamstring muscles strengthening training along with WBV training (ST + WBV group, 15 patients). The treatment protocol for both groups involved 3 sessions per week for 8 weeks. All measurements were performed before and after intervention. The measurements included: pain by means of a visual analogue scale (VAS), quality of life by means of the WOMAC scale, functional activity by the 2 minute walking test (2MWT), time up & go test (TUGT) and 50-foot walking test (50FWT) and the muscle peak torque (MPT), total work (TW) and muscle power (MP) as muscle performance of quadriceps and hamstring muscles by an Isokinetic Biodex machine. After intervention, the comparison of mean changes between two groups showed improvement in the WBV+ST group in terms of 2MWT, MPT, TW and MP variables(P<0.05). However, no significant difference was found between the experimental groups in term of pain, quality of life, TUGT and 50FWT. These results suggest that adding whole body vibration training to strengthening training may provide better treatment effects for patients with knee osteoarthritis.


      PubDate: 2015-08-26T10:07:44Z
       
  • Learning the Single Leg Dead Lift
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 August 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): D.C. Craig Liebenson



      PubDate: 2015-08-22T09:57:58Z
       
  • Understanding and Working with the Psychodynamics of Practitioner-Patient
           Relationships in the Manual Therapies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 August 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Dr Danny Sher, Mannie Sher
      In this paper, we argue that practitioner-patient relationships in the manual therapies would be strengthened by a deeper understanding of the psychodynamics and emotions of those relationships. We suggest that in many cases, a purely bio-mechanical approach may neglect underlying psychological and emotional reasons of the patient's presenting condition, and consequently, lead to a less than adequate outcome for the patient. We offer easily adopted suggestions that could enhance the practice of practitioners of manual therapies as well as other professions that rely on the application of physical methods of diagnosis and treatment. These suggestions could lead to improved prognosis and increased professional satisfaction for practitioners. This paper describes five key dynamics that characterize practitioner-patient relationships: (i) pain as a form of communication; (ii) the ‘heart-sink’ patient; (iii) dependency; (iv) the erotic transference; (v) endings and loss.


      PubDate: 2015-08-22T09:57:58Z
       
  • Effect of Butler’s neural tissue mobilization and Mulligan’s
           bent leg raise on pain and straight leg raise in patients of low back ache
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Neha Tambekar, Shaila Sabnis, Apoorva Phadke, Nilima Bedekar
      Low back ache (LBA) is a common musculoskeletal disorder sometimes associated with a positive limited Straight leg raise (SLR) test. Mulligan's bent leg raise (BLR) and Butler's neural tissue mobilization (NTM) are commonly used techniques for the treatment of low back ache where SLR is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of both the techniques on pain and limited SLR in patients with LBA. Thirty one patients with LBA with radiculopathy were randomly allocated into 2 groups; BLR [n=16] NTM [n=15]. The outcome measures i.e. visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and universal goniometer for measuring SLR range of motion (SROM) were assessed at the baseline, post intervention and after 24 hours (follow up).Within group analysis using paired t-test revealed a significant difference between pre-treatment and post-treatment VAS and SROM score(p < 0.05). However no difference was seen between pre-treatment and follow up (p > 0.05). The study showed that both techniques produce immediate improvement in pain and SLR range but this effect was not maintained during the follow up period.


      PubDate: 2015-08-18T09:35:05Z
       
  • A tailored exercise program versus general exercise for a subgroup of
           patients with low back pain and movement control impairment: SHORT-TERM
           results of a randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jeannette Saner, Judith M. Sieben, Jan Kool, Hannu Luomajoki, Carolien HG. Bastiaenen, Rob A. de Bie
      Background Exercise is an effective treatment for patients with sub-acute and chronic low back pain (LBP). Patients with a movement control impairment (MCI) can be diagnosed as a subgroup of patients with LBP. Unknown is which exercise intervention is most beneficial for this subgroup. This study assessed the short-term effect of a specific exercise program targeting movement control impairment versus general exercise treatment on disability in patients with LBP and MCI. Methods In a multicentre parallel group randomised controlled pragmatic trial, patients with sub-acute and chronic LBP were included. Further inclusion criteria were disability of ≥5 points on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and ≥2 positive tests out of a set of 6 movement control impairment tests. A total of 106 patients were randomly assigned to either tailored movement control exercise intervention (MC, n=52) or a general exercise intervention (GE, n=54); both 9-18 individual treatment sessions, over a maximum of 12 weeks. . The primary outcome was disability measured with the Patient Specific Functional scale (PSFS). Secondary outcome was the Roland-Morris disability scale (RMDQ). Measurements were taken pre- and posttreatment. Results No significant difference was found following the treatment period. Baseline-adjusted between-group mean difference for the PSFS was 0.5 (SD = 0.5; p = 0.32) in favour of MC exercises. The Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire revealed a significant, but not clinically relevant, between-group difference of 2.0 points (SD = 0.8; p= 0.01). Conclusion Disability in LBP patients was reduced considerably by both interventions. However, the limited contrast between the two exercise programs may have influenced outcomes.


      PubDate: 2015-08-13T14:02:19Z
       
  • Functional Atlas of the Human Fascial System, C. Stecco. Churchill
           Livingstone, Edinburgh (2015)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt



      PubDate: 2015-08-08T21:30:07Z
       
  • Effect of static neck flexion in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon in
           healthy males and females
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Roghayeh Mousavi-Khatir, Saeed Talebian, Nader Maroufi, Gholam Reza Olyaei
      Introduction Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, especially among skilled workers who must keep their necks in a flexed position frequently during the day. The present study investigated changes in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon parameters after sustained neck flexion. Methods The participants were 40 healthy subjects grouped by gender (20 females, 20 males). They were exposed to static neck flexion at the full angle of cervical flexion for 10 min. Each subject underwent three trials of cervical flexion and re-extension before and after this period. Differences in onset and cessation angle of flexion-relaxation phenomenon, maximum neck flexion angle, amplitude of neck muscle activation and flexion-relaxation ratio were evaluated. Results The maximum neck flexion angle significantly increased after sustained flexion. The onset of flexion-relaxation was significantly delayed during flexion, but cessation angle remained unchanged. Myoelectric activity of the cervical erector spinae muscles increased significantly after maintaining flexion, especially in female subjects. The flexion-relaxation ratio also decreased significantly. Conclusion It was concluded that 10 min of static flexion results in a delay in flexion-relaxation phenomenon and a shorted silence period. Also the cervical erector spinae muscles are required to be active longer and generate more activity. These neuromuscular changes may be a risk factor for neck pain.


      PubDate: 2015-07-31T21:37:30Z
       
  • Effects of the Pilates method on variables related to functionality of a
           patient with traumatic spondylolisthesis at L4-L5: A case study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Laís Campos de Oliveira, Carolina Andolpho Guedes, Fabrício José Jassi, Fábio Antônio Néia Martini, Raphael Gonçalves de Oliveira
      Introduction Traumatic spondylolisthesis at L4-L5 is a rare complication in the spine, which impairs variables related to the functionality of the person affected. Objective To verify the effects of the Pilates method on strength and muscular resistance, flexibility, postural balance and level of pain in a patient with traumatic spondylolisthesis at L4-L5. Methods The following evaluations were performed pre and post-intervention: resistance of the flexor and extensor muscles of the trunk; isokinetic peak torque of the extensor and flexor muscles of the knee; hip and torso flexibility; static postural balance; and the visual analog scale of pain. The treatment consisted of three weekly sessions of Pilates, performed over 12 weeks. Results There was improvement in all the tests, except for one variable related to postural balance. Conclusions The Pilates method was effective for improving muscle strength and resistance, flexibility, balance and postural pain, in a patient with traumatic spondylolisthesis at L4-L5.


      PubDate: 2015-07-28T21:15:36Z
       
  • Effects of Scapular stabilization exercise on pain related parameters in
           patients with scapulocostal syndrome: A randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Vitsarut Buttagat, Naruecha Taepa, Nitchakarn Suwannived, Nattanan Rattanachan
      The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of scapular stabilization exercise (SSE) on pain intensity, pressure pain threshold (PPT), muscle tension and anxiety in patients with scapulocostal syndrome (SCS). Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to receive a 30-minute session of either SSE or control (relaxed by lying supine quietly) for 12 sessions over a period of 4 weeks. Pain intensity, PPT, muscle tension and anxiety were assessed before and after a 4-week intervention period and 2 weeks after the intervention period. The adverse effects were evaluated after completion of the intervention period. Results indicated that the SSE group showed a significant improvement in all parameters after the intervention period and at 2 weeks after the intervention period (p<0.05). For all outcomes, similar changes were not found in the control group. The adjusted post-test mean values of each assessment time point for pain intensity, muscle tension and anxiety were significantly lower in the SSE group than those of the control group (p<0.05). Moreover, the values for PPT were significantly higher in the SSE group (p>0.05). There were no reports of adverse effects in either group. We therefore conclude that SSE can improve pain related parameters and could be an effective intervention for SCS.


      PubDate: 2015-07-28T21:15:36Z
       
  • Kinesiology taping does not change fibularis longus latency time and
           postural sway
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Christophe Correia, Susana Lopes, Rafael Gonçalves, Rui Torres, Francisco Pinho, Pedro Gonçalves, Mário Rodrigues, Rui Costa, Mário Lopes, Fernando Ribeiro
      Background Kinesiology tape seems to improve muscle force, although little is known regarding its effect on latency time and postural sway. Objectives To examine the effects of kinesiology taping on fibularis longus latency time and postural sway in healthy subjects. Methods Thirty participants were equally randomized into three groups, two experimental groups receiving kinesiology tape (EG1, from origin to insertion; EG2, from insertion to origin) and a control group. Before and 20-min after the intervention, postural sway was assessed on a force plateform and fibularis longus latency time was recorded with surface electromyography during a sudden inversion perturbation. Results At baseline, no differences were found between groups regarding age, anthropometrics variables, postural sway and fibularis longus latency time. In both experimental groups, the application of tape did not change postural sway and fibularis longus latency time (EG1: 93.7±15.0 to 89.9±15.6 ms; EG2, 81.24±14.21 to 81.57±16.64, p<0.05). No changes were observed also in the control group. Conclusion Kinesiology tape seems not to enhance fibularis longus reaction time and postural sway in young healthy subjects.


      PubDate: 2015-07-28T21:15:36Z
       
  • Compliance of patients wearing an orthotic device or orthopedic shoes: A
           systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Eva Swinnen , Eric Kerckhofs
      Background Next to the positive effects of orthotic devices for the lower extremities (ODLE) and orthopedic shoes, complaints and criticism of the users possibly lead to rejection. Objective The purpose is to determine the compliance of patients wearing an ODLE or orthopedic shoes and describe the main reasons for using and not using. Methods Different online databases were searched for articles about patients’ compliance with regard to an ODLE or orthopedic shoes. A methodological quality control was conducted. Results Ten studies (1576 patients) were included. The data revealed between 6 and 80% not users. Several reasons for not using the orthotic device were described (e.g. pain, discomfort and cosmetically unacceptable). Conclusions The high percentage of patients who are not wearing the prescribed orthotic devices leads to a high financial loss for the society and a loss of therapeutic effort. These results should be taken into account during the design, construction and selection process of orthotic devices.


      PubDate: 2015-07-06T11:03:54Z
       
  • Effect of the method Pilates on women with temporomandibular disorders: A
           study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Letícia Miranda Resende da Costa , Emanuelle Francine Detogni Schimit , Catiane Souza , Edgar Santiago Wagner Neto , Luciano de Souza da Silva , Claudia Tarragô Candotti , Jefferson Fagundes Loss
      Background There is no consensus regarding the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) on postural changes, but it is believed that an imbalance in one may influence the other. The aim of this study is to evaluate changes in the level of pain, the severity of TMD, the EMG activity of masticatory muscles and posture of young women undergoing training in Pilates, as well as correlating postural changes, pain level, severity of TMD and EMG activity of masticatory muscles. Methods/Design A randomized clinical trial with blinded assessors will be held. 40 patients divided randomly into two groups will be assessed. The control group will receive conventional treatment with occlusal splint while the intervention group, in addition to conventional treatment will participate in Pilates sessions. Both groups will consist of women aged 18 to 35 years with TMD and pain. The research follow-up period will be 15 weeks.


      PubDate: 2015-07-06T11:03:54Z
       
  • Multifactoral measures of fall risk in the visually impaired population: A
           pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Victoria Graham , Kierstyn Napier Dovorany
      Objective To determine the feasibility of taking multiple measures of visual and physical function in adults with visual impairment. A second objective was to obtain preliminary data on risk for falls in this population. Design Cohort feasibility study. Setting University ambulatory patient care center and research center. Participants Convenience sample of community-dwelling men and women over age 18 with visual impairment (n=12). Thirteen subjects were enrolled in the study; one was subsequently excluded due to self-reported cognitive decline at time of testing. Subjects were grouped by prospective fall incidence. Interventions Verbal education. Main Outcome Measures Subjective measures of function; objective measures of visual and physical function. Results Visually impaired adults can safely complete a battery of physical functions to predict fall risk. Recent onset of visual impairment was correlated with higher fall risk [-0.53 ± 0.22, p=0.04]. Conclusions It is feasible for an interdisciplinary team to measure risk for falls in adults with a visual impairment. Further investigation is needed to identify predictors of falls in adults of all ages with visual impairment.


      PubDate: 2015-07-06T11:03:54Z
       
  • Both Anticipatory And Compensatory Postural Adjustments Are Adapted While
           Catching A Ball In Unstable Standing Posture
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Vanessa Scariot , Jaqueline L. Rios , Renato Claudino , Eloá C. dos Santos , Hanna B.B. Angulski , Marcio J. Santos
      The main objective of this study was to analyze the role of balance exercises on anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) postural adjustments in different conditions of postural stability. Sixteen subjects were required to catch a ball while standing on rigid floor, trampoline and foam cushion surfaces. Electromyographic activities (EMG) of postural muscles were analyzed during time windows typical for APAs and CPAs. Overall there were a reciprocal activation of the muscles around the ankle and co-activations between ventral and dorsal muscles of the thigh and trunk during the catching a ball task. Compared to the rigid floor, the tibialis anterior activation was greater during the trampoline condition (CPA: p=0.006) and the soleus muscle inhibition was higher during foam cushion condition (APA: p=0.001; CPA: p=0.007). Thigh and trunk muscle activities were similar across the conditions. These results advance the knowledge in postural control during body perturbations standing on unstable surfaces.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • A pilot study of balance performance benefit on myofascial release with a
           tennis ball in chronic stroke patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Du-Jin Park , Young-In Hwang
      Background We hypothesised that the balance of spastic chronic stroke patients is related to myofascial problems. We performed myofascial release (MFR) with a tennis ball on the affected limb, as suggested by Myers. Purpose This study investigated the benefits of 8 weeks of MFR using a tennis ball on the balance of spastic patients. Methods Eight stroke patients were enrolled voluntarily after providing informed consent. All subjects received 8-week interventions with MFR using a tennis ball three times per week. The patients were evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed ‘Up & Go’ (TUG) test before and after 4 and 8 weeks of the intervention. Results There were significant differences in the BBS scores (p=0.001). The TUG time decreased significantly at 4 and 8 weeks (p=0.034). Conclusion Myofascial release appears to improve the balance of spastic chronic stroke patients; however, further studies should evaluate the effective of MFR on walking in stroke patients and determine the mechanism of the effect of MFR.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Does anterior knee pain severity and function relate to the frontal plane
           projection angle and trunk and hip strength in women with patellofemoral
           pain'
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Gabriel Peixoto Leão Almeida , Ana Paula de Moura Campos Carvalho e Silva , Fábio Jorge Renovato França , Maurício Oliveira Magalhães , Thomaz Nogueira Burke , Amélia Pasqual Marques
      The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between knee pain severity and function with the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) and trunk and hip peak torque (PT) in women with patellofemoral pain (PFPS). Twenty-two women with PFPS were assessed. Knee pain severity (KPS) was assessed with an 11-point visual analog scale and function with an Anterior Knee Pain Scale. The FPPA was recorded with a digital camera. PT of extensors, abductors, and the lateral rotators of hip and lateral core stability were measured with a handheld dynamometer. FPPA was the only predictor for the KPS. Regarding predictors of function, PT of lateral core stability and the extensor and abductor of the hip explained 41.4% of the function. Increase in FPPA was associated with greater KPS, and the lowest PT of lateral core stability, hip abductors, and extensors was associated with lower function in women with PFPS.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • A unifying neuro-fasciagenic model of somatic dysfunction –
           Underlying mechanisms and treatment – Part II
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Paolo Tozzi
      This paper offers an extensive review of the main fascia-mediated mechanisms underlying various therapeutic processes of clinical relevance for manual therapy. The concept of somatic dysfunction is revisited in light of the several fascial influences that may come into play during and after manual treatment. A change in perspective is thus proposed: from a nociceptive model that for decades has viewed somatic dysfunction as a neurologically-mediated phenomenon, to a unifying neuro-fascial model that integrates neural influences into a multifactorial and multidimensional interpretation of manual therapeutic effects as being partially, if not entirely, mediated by the fascia. By taking into consideration a wide spectrum of fascia-related factors – from cell-based mechanisms to cognitive and behavioural influences – a model emerges suggesting, amongst other results, a multidisciplinary-approach to the intervention of somatic dysfunction. Finally, it is proposed that a sixth osteopathic ‘meta-model’ – the connective tissue-fascial model – be added to the existing five models in osteopathic philosophy as the main interface between all body systems, thus providing a structural and functional framework for the body's homoeostatic potential and its inherent abilities to heal.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • The immediate effect of bilateral self myofascial release on the plantar
           surface of the feet on hamstring and lumbar spine flexibility: A pilot
           randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Rob Grieve , Faye Goodwin , Mostapha Alfaki , Amey-Jay Bourton , Caitlin Jeffries , Harriet Scott
      Background Self myofascial release (SMR) via a tennis ball to the plantar aspect of the foot is widely used and advocated to increase flexibility and range of movement further along the posterior muscles of a proposed “anatomy train”. To date there is no evidence to support the effect of bilateral SMR on the plantar aspect of the feet to increase hamstring and lumbar spine flexibility. Aim The primary aim was to investigate the immediate effect of a single application of SMR on the plantar aspect of the foot, on hamstring and lumbar spine flexibility. The secondary aim was to evaluate the method and propose improvements in future research. Design A pilot single blind randomised control trial. Participants Twenty four healthy volunteers (8 men, 16 women; mean age 28 years ± 11.13). Method Participants underwent screening to exclude hypermobility and were randomly allocated to an intervention (SMR) or control group (no therapy). Baseline and post intervention flexibility was assessed by a sit-and-reach test (SRT). A one way between groups analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted to compare between group outcome SRT measurements. Baseline pre-intervention and control SRT measurements were used as the covariate in the analysis. Results There was a significant increase (p = 0.03) in the intervention SRT outcome measurements compared to the control group, with a large effect size. Conclusion An immediate clinical benefit of SMR on the flexibility of the hamstrings and lumbar spine was indicated and suggestions for methodological improvements may inform future research.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Physical activity, fear avoidance, and chronic non-specific pain: A
           narrative review
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Nicole Nelson , James R. Churilla
      Background Chronic non-specific pain (CNSP) and physical inactivity have become increasingly prevalent in the United States; however, the associations between the two remain unclear. The lack of clarity may be due to the presence of a third variable, the individual's pain coping strategy. Objectives We had three specific aims. 1) To review the associations between fear-avoidance beliefs and behaviors, and levels of physical activity and disability. 2) To review the theoretical mechanisms behind chronic non-specific pain and the potential mediating role of physical activity. 3) Finally, to report the most commonly recommended interventions for fear-avoidant individuals suffering with chronic pain. Conclusions Further investigation is needed to fully understand the associations between physical activity, chronic non-specific pain, and fear avoidant beliefs and behaviors. Precise relationships notwithstanding, there is strong evidence to suggest that physical activity is an integral piece to the chronic non-specific pain puzzle. For this reason, it is incumbent upon clinicians to strongly recommend participation in regular, yet properly progressed, physical activity to chronic non-specific pain sufferers.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Effects of Pilates method in elderly people: Systematic review of
           randomized controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Cristina de Oliveira Francisco , Alessandra de Almeida Fagundes , Bruna Gorges
      The Pilates method has been widely used in physical training and rehabilitation. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of this method in elderly people is limited. Six randomized controlled trials studies involving the use of the Pilates method for elderly people, published prior to December 2013, were selected from the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, Scielo and PEDro. Three articles suggested that Pilates produced improvements in balance. Two studies evaluated the adherence to Pilates programs. One study assessed Pilates' influence on cardio-metabolic parameters and another study evaluated changes in body composition. Strong evidence was found regarding beneficial effects of Pilates over static and dynamic balance in women. Nevertheless, evidence of balance improvement in both genders, changes in body composition in woman and adherence to Pilates programs were limited. Effects on cardio-metabolic parameters due to Pilates training presented inconclusive results. Pilates may be a useful tool in rehabilitation and prevention programs but more high quality studies are necessary to establish all the effects on elderly populations.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Neuroscience education in addition to trigger point dry needling for the
           management of patients with mechanical chronic low back pain: A
           preliminary clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Mario Téllez-García , Ana I. de-la-Llave-Rincón , Jaime Salom-Moreno , Maria Palacios-Ceña , Ricardo Ortega-Santiago , César Fernández-de-las-Peñas
      The objective of the current study was to determine the short-term effects of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) alone or combined with neuroscience education on pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). Twelve patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive either TrP-DN (TrP-DN) or TrP-DN plus neuroscience education (TrP-DN + EDU). Pain intensity (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0–10), disability (Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMQ-, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index-ODI), kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-TSK), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the C5–C6 zygapophyseal joint, transverse process of L3 vertebra, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle were collected at baseline and 1-week after the intervention. Patients treated with TrP-DN + EDU experienced a significantly greater reduction of kinesiophobia (P = 0.008) and greater increases in PPT over the transverse process of L3 (P = 0.049) than those patients treated only with TrP-DN. Both groups experienced similar decreases in pain, ODI and RMQ, and similar increases in PPT over the C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior after the intervention (all, P > 0.05). The results suggest that TrP-DN was effective for improving pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical LBP at short-term. The inclusion of a neuroscience educational program resulted in a greater improvement in kinesiophobia.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Effects of Alexander Technique training experience on gait behavior in
           older adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Matthew M. O'Neill , David I. Anderson , Diane D. Allen , Christopher Ross , Kate A. Hamel
      Heightened fall risk, potentially caused by aging-related changes in gait, is a serious health issue faced by older adults. The Alexander Technique is thought to improve balance and motor function; however, the technique's effect on gait has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Alexander Technique training in older adults on the temporospatial characteristics of gait and medio-lateral center of mass displacement during fast and comfortably paced over-ground walking. Six licensed Alexander Technique teachers and seven controls between the ages of 60 and 75 years of age participated in the study. Alexander Technique teachers exhibited a reduction in medio-lateral center of mass displacement during fast paced walking compared to comfortably paced walking that was not present in controls. Due to this difference Alexander Technique teachers displayed a smaller medio-lateral Center of Mass displacement compared to controls during fast paced walking. Alexander Technique teachers also demonstrated significantly smaller stride width and lower gait timing variability compared to controls. These findings, which suggest superior control of dynamic stability during gait and potentially reduced fall risk in Alexander Technique teachers, warrant further study.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Long-term benefits of somatosensory training to improve balance of elderly
           with diabetes mellitus
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Patrícia Silva , Priscila Fernanda Figueredo Borges Botelho , Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro , Maíta Mara O.L.L. Vaz , Daniela Cristina Carvalho de Abreu
      We evaluate the effects of somatosensory training on the mean amplitude of the center of pressure (COP) in the upright position and the sustained benefits after 6-month. Twelve elderly patients with type II diabetes (T2DM) participated in the study. Patients with T2DM were allocated to the somatosensory protocol, which consisted of a circuit composed of 13 stations with different textures. The rehabilitation protocol was applied twice a week during the period of 12 weeks. Upright balance, in 2 situations (fixed platform with eyes open and closed) to evaluate the mean amplitude of COP oscillation in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions and the total area of COP oscillation. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-exercise and 6-month follow-up. The somatosensory training protocol was beneficial to reduce the AP oscillation of the COP, remaining after 6 months of the end of intervention in elderly with T2DM.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Effect of massage on DOMS in ultramarathon runners: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Lorenzo Visconti , Gianpiero Capra , Giacomo Carta , Corrado Forni , Denise Janin
      In recent years, the popularity of ultramarathons has increased. During these competitions, musculoskeletal problems are very common. Among the more frequent of those problems is the onset of muscle pain, which is defined in the literature as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The present study aimed to collect epidemiological data regarding the onset of musculoskeletal problems during the Tor des Geants (International ultramarathon race of 330 km in length and 24,000 m in elevation difference) and to describe the effects of massage on reducing pain and overall perceived improvement in a sample of 25 athletes who complained of DOMS. Two hundred and twenty-one treatments were performed on 220 ultramarathon runners, of which 207 were males and 34 were females; the age group most represented ranged from 40 to 50 years. The most common symptom was pain, which occurred in more than 95% of cases, and the most affected area was the lower extremities (90% of subjects). In the analysed subjects, treatment with massage generated a significant (p < 0.0001) improvement. The numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) value was 3.6 points on average (SD 2.1) after massage, and there were no cases of worsening DOMS after massage as determined using the patient global impression of change (PGIC). The values of minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in DOMS management were calculated on the basis of the ROC curves and two other anchor-based methods in the PGIC and were 2.8–3.9 points on the NPRS. In the context analysed, massage was an effective treatment to reduce DOMS during the onset of symptoms.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Effect of remote after-effects of resistive static contraction of the
           pelvic depressors on improvement of restricted wrist flexion range of
           motion in patients with restricted wrist flexion range of motion
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Mitsuo Arai , Tomoko Shiratani
      The objective of the study was to compare the effects of remote after-effects of resistive static contraction of the pelvic depressors (RSCPD) with after-effects of static contraction of upper extremity muscles (SCUE) on improvement of the maximal active range of motion (MAROM) for patients with restricted wrist flexion range of motion (ROM) due to upper limb pain and dysfunction. The participants were 10 outpatients with restricted wrist joints. The mean (SD) age was 53.7 (4.4) years (range, 34–81). The subjects performed two exercise protocols (SCUE and RSCPD) in random order. One-way repeated measures ANOVA showed significant main effects in evaluation of the change in MAROM and IEMG activities for different conditions (after rest, after SCUE, and after RSCPD). The remote after-effects of RSCPD, but not those of SCUE, caused significant improvement in MAROM for restricted wrist flexion ROM.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Massage treatment and medial tibial stress syndrome; A commentary to
           provoke thought about the way massage therapy is used in the treatment of
           MTSS
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sarah Fogarty
      As students and practitioners we are taught about the treatment and causative factors of medial shin pain, in particular’ shin splints' or the more recent term; medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). During the years there have been many theories, conjecture and misunderstandings about the mechanisms of ‘shin splints/medial tibial stress syndrome’ however the ramifications of these mechanisms on how massage treatment is delivered have not being discussed. The evidence for the treatment of MTSS is largely clinical with little evidence of any treatment being proven to be effective in treating MTSS. The aim of this article is to present a summary of the mechanisms of MTSS and a commentary to provoke thought about the way massage therapy is used in the treatment of MTSS based on these mechanisms.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Clinical analysis and baropodometric evaluation in diagnosis of abnormal
           foot posture: A clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Hugo Pasini Neto , Luanda André Collange Grecco , Luiz Alfredo Braun Ferreira , Thaluanna Calil Lourenço Christovão , Natália de Almeida Carvalho Duarte , Cláudia Santos Oliveira
      Foot posture involves the integration of sensory information from the periphery of the body. This information generates precise changes through fine adjustments that compensate for the continuous, spontaneous sway of the body in the standing position. Orthopedic insoles are one of the therapeutic resources indicated for assisting in this process. Evaluation of these podal influences, by clinical examination and/or the assistance of baropodometry becomes crucial. Thus, the aim of the present study was determine the combination of the components of orthopedic insoles using two different evaluation methods. Forty healthy female volunteers between 18 and 30 years participated in the study. The volunteers were submitted to two different evaluations: clinical analysis and baropodometry. During the exams, different insole components were tested. The statistical analysis of the two evaluations revealed differences regarding the normalization of posture following the application of the insole components and in the determination of the combination of these components. The findings suggest that the clinical analysis is a fast and accurate method for determining the immediate benefits of the postural insole components and is therefore the more indicated method for the evaluation of foot posture, but does not present a concrete foundation to differentiate it with respect to baropodometric evaluation in the assessment and diagnosis of foot posture, however, a greater difficulty was encountered in achieving posture normalization when using information obtained through baropodometry.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Sirsasana (headstand) technique alters head/neck loading: Considerations
           for safety
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Rachel Hector , Jody L. Jensen
      Background This study examined the weight-bearing responsibility of the head and neck at moments of peak force during three headstand techniques. Methods Three matched groups of 15 each (18–60 years old) were formed based upon lower limb entry/exit technique: symmetrical extended, symmetrical flexed, and asymmetrical flexed. All 45 practitioners performed 3 headstands. Kinematics and kinetics were analyzed to locate peak forces acting on the head, loading rate, center of pressure (COP) and cervical alignment. Findings During entry, symmetrical extended leg position trended towards the lowest loads as compared to asymmetrical or symmetrical flexed legs (Cohen's d = 0.53 and 0.39 respectively). Also, symmetrical extended condition produced slower loading rates and more neutral cervical conditions during loading. Interpretation Subjects loaded the head with maximums of 40–48% of total body weight. The data support the conclusion that entering the posture with straight legs together may reduce the load and the rate of change of that load.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Ultrasound imaging of the diagonal dimension of the deep cervical flexor
           muscles: A reliability study on healthy subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Hiroshi Ishida , Tadanobu Suehiro , Chiharu Kurozumi , Koji Ono , Susumu Watanabe
      The purpose of this study is to assess the reliability of a new ultrasound imaging (USI) parameter and procedure for the evaluation of the size of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles. Thirty-one healthy male subjects (21.6 ± 2.5 years old) participated in this study. Two images of the diagonal dimension (DD) of the DCF of the subjects, at 1.5 fingerbreadths below the laryngeal prominence of the thyroid cartilage in a relaxed state, were taken on separate days with a 1-week interval. The intraclass correlation coefficient between the days was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.65–0.91). The standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change were 0.8 mm and 2.1 mm, respectively. The results indicated that the DD may be used as a reliable USI parameter to measure the DCF thickness in healthy subjects.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Assessment of postural stability in patients with cerebellar disease using
           gyroscope data
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Patrik Kutílek , Vladimír Socha , Ondřej Čakrt , Zdeněk Svoboda
      This study examines a relatively new method of studying and quantifying human postural stability in patients with degenerative cerebellar disease. Trunk sway and feet sway were measured during quiet stance. To test the method, ten patients and eleven healthy subjects performed two different stance tasks: standing with eyes open on a firm surface and standing with eyes closed on a foam support surface. Data were recorded using three body-worn gyroscopes (Xsens Technologies B.V.) to measure roll and pitch angular movements of the lower trunk, and left and right foot. The pitch versus roll plots of the trunk and feet were created, and the areas of the convex hull shapes were calculated. It was found that the area of the convex hull of the pitch versus roll plots is suitable for the identification of postural instability disorders caused by degenerative cerebellar disease.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Accuracy of the Fonseca anamnestic index in the identification of
           myogenous temporomandibular disorder in female community cases
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Kelly Cristina dos Santos Berni , Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho , Delaine Rodrigues-Bigaton
      The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) in the identification of myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Two hundred and three female volunteers participated in this study, 117 with myogenous TMD and 86 without TMD. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were first applied as the gold standard for the diagnosis. The volunteers then answered the 10 items on the FAI, which furnished a score ranging from 0 to 100 points. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was used to determine the accuracy of the diagnosis (area under the curve) and the best cutoff point of the tool. Thus, FAI demonstrated a high degree of accuracy for the diagnosis of myogenous TMD (area under the ROC curve of 0.940). The best cutoff point was a score of 47.50. Thus, a score ranging from 0 to 45 points corresponds to the absence of myogenous TMD and scores ranging from 50 to 100 points identifies individuals with the disorder. In conclusion, the high degree of diagnostic accuracy demonstrates that the FAI can be employed for the identification of myogenous TMD in female community cases.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • The effect of chronic shoulder pain on maximal force of shoulder abduction
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): François Naef , Sandra Grace , Zachary Crowley-McHattan , Dean Hardy , Andrew McLeod
      The aim of this study was to determine if chronic shoulder pain had an effect on arm abduction strength and recruitment strategies of the serratus anterior, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius. Method The maximal isometric force at 30° arm abduction and the electromyographic activity of the serratus anterior, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius were recorded for 14 subjects with unilateral chronic shoulder pain and 11 healthy subjects. Results Relative to the group without pain, the group with chronic shoulder pain showed no significant difference in maximal force production during isometric arm abduction. The Mann–Whitney tests showed no differences in the activation of the serratus anterior, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius between the two groups. Discussion and conclusion Subjects with chronic shoulder pain of mild to moderate intensity showed no difference from healthy subjects in arm abduction maximal strength, and recruitment patterns of serratus anterior, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Re: Transmission of muscle force to fascia during exercise [Thomas
           Findley, M.D, Ph.D, Hans Chaudhry, Ph.D, Sunil Dhar, Ph.D. Journal of
           Bodywork &amp; Movement Therapies (2015) 19, 119–123]
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): John Sharkey



      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Response to Dommerholt and Gerwin: Did we miss the point'
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): John L. Quintner , Geoffrey M. Bove , Milton L. Cohen



      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles
           during clinical isometric endurance tests
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3
      Author(s): Shabnam ShahAli , Amir Massoud Arab , Saeed Talebian , Esmaeil Ebrahimi , Andia Bahmani , Noureddin Karimi , Hoda Nabavi
      The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity when supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73–0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study's findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP.


      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 19, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-06-27T09:52:09Z
       
  • Correlation between deep cervical flexor muscle thickness at rest and
           sternocleidomastoid activity during the craniocervical flexion test in
           healthy subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 June 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hiroshi Ishida , Tadanobu Suehiro , Koji Ono , Chiharu Kurozumi , Susumu Watanabe
      The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between the thickness of the deep cervical flexor muscles (longus capitis and longus colli) at rest and sternocleidomastoid activity during the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). Thirteen healthy males participated in this study. The thickness of the deep cervical flexor muscles was measured by ultrasound imaging in a relaxed supine position. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid was measured by electromyography during the CCFT at five incremental levels (22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 mm Hg). Correlations between normalized muscle thickness relative to body mass index and sternocleidomastoid activity were determined. Significant negative correlations were observed between normalized muscle thickness and activity of the sternocleidomastoid at 26 (r = −0.622, P = 0.023) and 28 mmHg (r = −0.653, P = 0.015). Individuals with smaller deep cervical flexor muscles exhibited increased activity in the sternocleidomastoid during the CCFT.


      PubDate: 2015-06-17T19:54:13Z
       
  • About Eccentric Exercise
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Warrick McNeill



      PubDate: 2015-06-06T19:30:31Z
       
  • Sparing Your Spine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Craig Liebenson



      PubDate: 2015-06-06T19:30:31Z
       
  • A Critical Overview of the Current Myofascial Pain Literature – July
           2015
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt , Todd Hooks , Rob Grieve , Michelle Layton
      The current overview includes thirty articles published in the recent past about myofascial pain, trigger points (TrPs) and related topics. In the Basic Research section, several interesting new studies are reviewed addressing the presence of TrPs in patients with low back pain, episodic migraine, or following a meniscectomy. An animal study of the impact of laser fluency opens the door to future studies regarding optimal dosage of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of individuals with TrPs. Six papers focus on TrP dry needling (DN), two on manual therapies, and two on injection therapy. On of the injection papers discusses the occurrence of a cardiac tamponade, which is a very rare potential complication of invasive needling therapies that can easily be avoided with proper needling techniques. Several review studies and other clinical studies conclude this overview. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


      PubDate: 2015-05-31T19:26:53Z
       
  • Manual therapies and hypoalgesia: what are the mechanisms'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 May 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow



      PubDate: 2015-05-21T17:53:33Z
       
  • Erratum to “Can osteopathic manipulative treatment modify the
           posture in elderly people? – A single-case study” [J.
           Bodyw. Mov. Ther. 19 (2015) 380–388]
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 May 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): F. Pellerin , E. Papin-Richard , P. Guihéneuc , S. Niel , G. Guihard



      PubDate: 2015-05-09T07:38:08Z
       
  • Findley &amp; Chaudhry’s response to Sharkey
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Thomas W. Findley , Hans C. Chaudhry



      PubDate: 2015-05-01T07:26:35Z
       
  • Cognitive Function and Exercise Training for Chronic Renal Disease
           Patients: A Literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): A. Kaltsatou , S.S. Grigoriou , C. Karatzaferi , C.D. Giannaki , I. Stefanidis , G.K. Sakkas
      Objective Cognitive impairment is very often in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Even though, exercise is considered to be a quantifiable activity that improves cognition in animals and humans, it seems that only few studies have examined the relationship between cognitive function and CKD from the perspective of physical activity and cognitive performance. Thus, this evidence based review summarizes the present level of knowledge regarding the effects of exercise training on cognitive function in CKD patients. Data sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted in PubMed and Scopus from May 2014 through June 2014, by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. Review Methods Eligibility of the studies based on titles, abstracts and full-text articles was determined by two reviewers. Studies were selected using inclusion and exclusion criteria. We included only those studies that: they assessed cognitive function in humans and animals using validated neuropsychological methods in chronic renal diseases patients; they used exercise training protocols; they addressed randomized control trials or controlled trials or clinical trials designed to evaluate cognitive impairment; and articles were written in English. Studies were excluded when they concerned behavioral approaches and underpowered studies. Results According to the current review only few studies have examined the issue of cognitive function in CKD patients. These studies indicate that these patients often exhibit cognitive impairment, which is highly associated with poor outcomes. It has been supported that exercise training can induce positive changes in brain metabolism favoring better score in cognitive function in Chronic Kidney Disease patients while the physiological mechanisms, which explain the influence of physical activity on cognition, have focused on changes in neurotransmitters, neurotrophins and vasculature. Conclusion Systematic exercise training seems to improve cognitive function in Chronic Kidney Disease patients but further research is warranted to further clarify the mechanisms involved.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T07:19:49Z
       
  • Common postural defects among music students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Patricia Blanco , MPino-Díaz Pereira , Aurora Martínez
      Postural quality during musical performance affects both musculoskeletal health and the quality of the performance. In this study we examined the posture of 100 students at a Higher Conservatory of Music in Spain. By analysing video tapes and photographs of the students while performing, a panel of experts extracted values of 11 variables reflecting aspects of overall postural quality or the postural quality of various parts of the body. The most common postural defects were identified, together with the situations in which they occur. It is concluded that most students incur in unphysiological postures during performance. It is hoped that use of the results of this study will help correct these errors.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T07:19:49Z
       
  • Fascial eponyms may help elucidate terminological and nomenclatural
           development
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2015
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sue Adstrum
      It has been reported that at least 700 anatomical eponyms were in existence at the end of the 19th century, yet the number of eponyms expressly relating to fasciae is unknown, and these anatomical expressions have yet to be described as a group. This study accordingly aimed to assemble a comprehensive-as-possible list of these terms, to investigate their customary usage, and to consider whether their existence might usefully shed light on contemporary fascia-relating terminological development. A search for fascia-relating eponyms incorporated within a range of English language anatomical and medical publications during the past 400 years resulted in the discovery of 44 eponyms that explicitly refer to aspects of fascia. This article outlines and discusses the origin, meaning, and use of these terms, and concludes that an understanding of the history of fascial eponyms may be of value when addressing contemporary concerns with the language used to describe fascia.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T07:19:49Z
       
 
 
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