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Journal Cover Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1360-8592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3040 journals]
  • Effect of ischemic compression for cervicogenic headache and elastic
           behavior of active trigger point in the sternocleidomastoid muscle using
           ultrasound imaging
    • Authors: Mehdi Jafari; Farid Bahrpeyma; Mansoureh Togha
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mehdi Jafari, Farid Bahrpeyma, Mansoureh Togha
      Objectives To investigate the effect of ischemic compression on clinical outcomes of a cervicogenic headache and elastic behavior of myofascial trigger points. Design Randomized, controlled trial was undertaken. Setting Outpatient headache clinic. Subjects 19 subjects with a cervicogenic headache originating from myofascial trigger point within the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Interventions Subjects were randomized in treatment group (n = 9) and control group (n = 10). Subjects in the treatment group received 4 sessions of ischemic compression in the myofascial trigger point region. Main measures Headache intensity, frequency, and duration, trigger point elastic modulus, trigger point area, pressure tolerance, and pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after treatment. Results Subjects in the treatment group compared with those in control group showed significant improvements in headache intensity (P = 0.002), headache frequency (P = 0.005), headache duration (P = 0.015), pressure tolerance (P < 0.001), pressure pain threshold (P = 0.039), and myofascial trigger point area (P = 0.017). Changes in myofascial trigger point elastic modulus did not reach a significant level (P > 0.05). Conclusion The improvements in outcome measures suggest that ischemic compression may be effective in subjects with a cervicogenic headache originating from a myofascial trigger point in the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Data suggest that biomechanical properties of MTrP and severity of headache symptoms are not directly linked, and other mechanisms could be more influential in contributing to symptoms.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.001
       
  • Comparison of acute effects of superficial and deep dry needling into
           trigger points of suboccipital and upper trapezius muscles in patients
           with cervicogenic headache
    • Authors: Asefeh Sedighi; Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari; Soofia Naghdi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Asefeh Sedighi, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Soofia Naghdi
      Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of superficial and deep dry needling into trigger points of suboccipital and upper trapezius muscles in patients with cervicogenic headache. Methods Thirty participants (8 men, 22 women) aged 19 to 60 years (mean age ± SD, 39 ± 10 y) with a clinical diagnosis of cervicogenic headache were randomly divided into superficial and deep groups. Headache index, trigger points tenderness, cervical range of motion (CROM), functional rating index was assessed at baseline, immediate and 1 week after the treatment. Results Two approaches of dry needling showed reduction in headache index and trigger points tenderness. Deep dry needling showed greater improvement of cervical range of motion (p < .001) and functional rating index (p < .01). Conclusion The application of dry needling into trigger points of suboccipital and upper trapezius muscles induces significant improvement of headache index, trigger points tenderness, functional rating index and range of motion in patients with cervicogenic headache. Deep dry needling had greater effects on CROM and function.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.002
       
  • The effects of preventive rubber band training on shoulder joint imbalance
           and throwing performance in handball players: a randomized and prospective
           study
    • Authors: Naryana Cristina Mascarin; Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira; Rodrigo Luiz Vancini; Antonio Carlos da Silva; Marilia Santos Andrade
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Naryana Cristina Mascarin, Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira, Rodrigo Luiz Vancini, Antonio Carlos da Silva, Marilia Santos Andrade
      Objectives To investigate the effects of a strength training program (STP) using rubber band exercises. Methods Twenty-five athletes were divided into two groups: muscular imbalance in the dominant (D) and in the non-dominant (ND) upper limbs. Each group was subdivided into experimental and control groups. Experimental groups performed eighteen sessions of STP. Athletes were submitted to ball throwing and isokinetic strength tests to assess the muscular strength of the shoulder rotator muscles and conventional and functional balance ratios. Results STP improved external rotator peak torque (18.0±0.8 to 21.3±1.0Nm, p<0.01) and total work (29.3±0.9 to 34.5±1.5J, p<0.01) in the D experimental group, while only total work (34.8±2.5 to 37.6±3.1J, p<0.03) improved in the D control group. The ND experimental group also presented significant improvement in external rotator peak torque (18.8±0.8 to 21.1±1.3Nm, p<0.01) and total work values (29.0±1.4 to 34.6 to 1.6J, p<0.01) while there was no strength improvement in the ND control group. The ND experimental group showed an improvement in conventional (61.5±3.5 to 72.7±3.0%, p=0.03) and functional (1.0±0.1 to 1.6±0.08, p<0.01) ratios. STP did not improve the conventional ratio in the D experimental group. However, STP produced a large effect size. The D experimental group presented an improvement in ball velocity (49.0±2.4 to 52.5±2.2km/h, p=0.04) in standing position throwing. Conclusions STP improves muscular strength of external rotator muscles and muscular balance.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.003
       
  • PILATES INCREASES THE ISOKINETIC MUSCULAR STRENGTH OF THE KNEE EXTENSORS
           AND FLEXORS IN ELDERLY WOMEN
    • Authors: Laís Campos de Oliveira; Raphael Gonçalves de Oliveira; Deise Aparecida de Almeida Pires-Oliveira
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Laís Campos de Oliveira, Raphael Gonçalves de Oliveira, Deise Aparecida de Almeida Pires-Oliveira
      Introduction Pilates has been shown to be effective for increasing muscle strength in older adults, however, some variables have not yet been explored. Objective Investigate the effects of Pilates on the isokinetic muscular strength of the knee extensors and flexors at 60º/s, in elderly women. Method Thirty-two women were randomized into two groups: control group (CG, n = 16, age = 64.2 ± 0.8 years; BMI = 25.0 ± 1.2 Kg/m2), and experimental group (EG, n = 16, age = 63.6 ± 1.0 years, BMI = 24.7 ± 1.3 Kg/m2). Isokinetic evaluation of the knee extensor and flexor muscles was performed at 60°/s, pre- and post-intervention, considering the peak torque (N.m) and total work (J) for the right and left lower limbs. The CG participated in static stretching and the EG in Pilates sessions, twice a week for 12 weeks. Results The results demonstrated that the EG presented a significant improvement (p < 0.01) in all tests performed, when comparing the pre- and post-intervention (intragroup), with an effect size (Cohen's d) reaching 2.03 and 1.33 for the knee flexor and extensor muscles respectively. Comparing the CG and EG (intergroup), post-intervention, a significant improvement was observed (p ≤ 0.01) in favor of the EG for all variables, with an effect size (Cohen's d) reaching 1.59 and 1.15 for the knee flexor and extensor muscles respectively. Conclusion The results indicated that 12 weeks of Pilates increases the isokinetic muscular strength of the knee extensors and flexors in elderly women and can be considered for this purpose when prescribing physical exercise programs.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.006
       
  • Procedures of assessment on the quantification of thoracic kyphosis and
           lumbar lordosis by radiography and photogrammetry: a literature review
    • Authors: Alessandra Beggiato Porto; Victor Hugo Alves Okazaki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Alessandra Beggiato Porto, Victor Hugo Alves Okazaki
      The quantification of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis can be assessed in different ways; among them radiography and photogrammetry. However, the assessment procedures are not consistent in the literature for either method. The objective of this study was to conduct a literature review about postural assessment through radiography and photogrammetry, for delineating the procedures for both methods. In total 38 studies were selected by an online search in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases with the keywords: radiograph and posture, postural alignment, photogrammetry or photometry or biophotogrammetry. For the radiographic method, the results showed divergences in arm positioning and in the calculation of thoracic and lumbar angles. The photogrammetry demonstrated differences in relation to the camera, tripod, plumb line and feet positioning, angle calculation, software utilization, and the use of footwear. Standardization is proposed for both methods to help establish normative values and comparisons between diagnoses.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.008
       
  • IMPACT OF PHYSICAL GROWTH, BODY ADIPOSITY AND LIFESTYLE ON MUSCULAR
           STRENGTH AND CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS OF ADOLESCENTS
    • Authors: Diego Augusto Santos Silva; Priscila Custódio Martins
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Diego Augusto Santos Silva, Priscila Custódio Martins
      Objective To investigate the impact of physical growth, body adiposity and lifestyle on cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength of pubescent and post-pubescent adolescents. Methods Cross-sectional study with 1,132 adolescents (14-19 years) in Brazil. Aerobic fitness was measured using the modified Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test. Muscle strength was assessed using manual dynamometer. Maturational stages were defined through the Tanner criteria. Results Boys at pubertal maturation stage showed higher VO2max values than those at the post-pubertal stage when the influence of body adiposity and lifestyle was disregarded. Girls at pubertal maturation stage showed higher VO2max values than those in the post-pubertal stage when the influence of age was disregarded. For muscle strength, no significant differences were found. Conclusions The variables that influence the association between VO2max and maturational stage are different for boys and girls.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.007
       
  • Scientific Evidence Based Effects of Yoga Practices on Various Health
           Related Problems of Elderly Peoples: A Review
    • Authors: A. Mooventhan; L. Nivethitha
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): A. Mooventhan, L. Nivethitha
      More than 50% of the elderly above 60 years of age suffer from chronic medical conditions and the prevalence of which increase with age. Though Yoga has been reported as an effective modality in improving various physical and psychological aspects of elderly populations, a comprehensive review of Yoga and its effects on various health related problems of elderly populations has not been reported yet. Hence, we performed PubMed/Medline search to review relevant articles, using keyword “yoga and elderly”. Relevant articles published since inception till 6th October 2016 were included for the review. Based on the available scientific literature, this review suggests that the regular practice of Yoga can be considered as an effective intervention in improving physical (reduces heart rate, blood pressure, blood glucose, oxidative damage, fatigue, weakness, fear of fall, and improve heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, insulin sensitivity, physical functions, mobility, flexibility, and urinary incontinence), mental (reduces depression, anxiety), emotional (reduces anger, stress, tension and improve self-efficacy), social (improve life satisfaction), and vital (improved vitality) planes of elderly persons with better quality of sleep and quality of life.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.004
       
  • Biological effects of direct and indirect manipulation of the fascial
           system. Narrative review
    • Authors: Giovanni Parravicini; Andrea Bergna
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Giovanni Parravicini, Andrea Bergna
      Introduction Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) is effective in improving function, movement and restoring pain conditions. Despite clinical results, the mechanisms of how OMT works remain unclear. The fascial system is described as a tensional network that envelops the human body. Direct or indirect manipulations of the fascial system are a distinctive part of OMT. Objective This review describes the biological effects of direct and indirect manipulation of the fascial system. Material and methods Literature search was performed in February 2016 in the electronic databases: Cochrane, Medline, Scopus, Ostmed, Pedro and authors’ publications relative to Fascia Research Congress Website. Results Manipulation of the fascial system seems to interfere with some cellular processes providing various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules. Discussion Despite growing research in the osteopathic field, biological effects of direct or indirect manipulation of the fascial system are not conclusive. Conclusion To elevate manual medicine as a primary intervention in clinical settings, it’s necessary to clarify how OMT modalities work in order to underpin their clinical efficacies.

      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.01.005
       
  • Respiratory dysfunction in patients with chronic neck pain: What is the
           current evidence?
    • Authors: Zacharias Dimitriadis; Eleni Kapreli; Nikolaos Strimpakos; Jacqueline Oldham
      Pages: 704 - 714
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 4
      Author(s): Zacharias Dimitriadis, Eleni Kapreli, Nikolaos Strimpakos, Jacqueline Oldham
      Respiratory function of patients with neck pain has not been given much consideration in usual clinical practice. The problem has however been highlighted occasionally by renown clinical scientists and recently there is a growing interest in the investigation of respiratory function in this clinical population. The aim of this review is to critically present the emerging evidence and discuss the similarities and differences observed. Although the evidence for some respiratory parameters is conflicting, it seems to be generally agreed that others such as maximal voluntary ventilation, strength of respiratory muscles, chest mechanics and partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide are affected in patients with chronic neck pain. The effect size of the respiratory dysfunction regarding these respiratory parameters can be approximately described as moderate. These findings not only suggest a more thoughtful drug prescription, but they may lead to consideration of incorporation of respiratory assessment and treatment into routine physiotherapy practice. Indeed preliminary studies exploring the incorporation of such a treatment into usual practice have provided very promising results not only in relation to respiratory function, but also for other parameters of clinical interest. There remains however imminent need for randomized controlled trials to confirm the evidence base for such an approach.

      PubDate: 2016-11-04T22:33:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.02.001
       
  • Multimodal compared to pharmacologic treatments for chronic tension-type
           headache in adolescents
    • Authors: Peter Przekop; Allison Przekop; Mark G. Haviland
      Pages: 715 - 721
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 4
      Author(s): Peter Przekop, Allison Przekop, Mark G. Haviland
      Chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) in children and adolescents is a serious medical condition, with considerable morbidity and few effective, evidence-based treatments. We performed a chart review of 83 adolescents (age range = 13–18 years; 67 girls and 16 boys) diagnosed with CTTH. Two treatment protocols were compared: multimodal (osteopathic manipulative treatments, mindfulness, and qi gong) and pharmacologic (amitriptyline or gabapentin). Four outcomes (headache frequency, pain intensity, general health, and health interference) were assessed at three time points (baseline, 3 months, and 6 months). A fifth outcome, number of bilateral tender points, was recorded at baseline and 6 months. All five were evaluated statistically with a linear mixed model. Although both multimodal and pharmacologic treatments were effective for CTTH (time effects for all measures were significant at p < .001), results from each analysis favored multimodal treatment (the five group by time interaction effects were significant at or below the p < .001 level). Headache frequency in the pharmacologic group, for example, reduced from a monthly average (95% Confidence Interval shown in parentheses) of 23.9 (21.8, 26.0) to 16.4 (14.3, 18.6) and in the multimodal group from 22.3 (20.1, 24.5) to 4.9 (2.6, 7.2) (a substantial group difference). Pain intensity (worst in the last 24 hours, 0-10 scale) was reduced in the pharmacologic group from 6.2 (5.6, 6.9) to 3.4 (2.7, 4.1) and from 6.1 (5.4, 6.8) to 2.0 (1.2, 2.7) in the multimodal group (a less substantial difference). Across the other three assessments, group differences were larger for general health and number of tender points and less so for pain restriction. Multimodal treatment for adolescent CTTH appears to be effective. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these promising results.

      PubDate: 2016-11-04T22:33:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2015.02.003
       
  • T4 syndrome – A distinct theoretical concept or elusive clinical
           entity? A case report
    • Authors: Patricia Miyuki Hirai; Oliver P. Thomson
      Pages: 722 - 727
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 4
      Author(s): Patricia Miyuki Hirai, Oliver P. Thomson
      T4 syndrome has existed as a clinical concept for more than three decades and it has been identified as a source of upper extremity (UE) symptoms. This case report explores the clinical reasoning in the diagnoses and management of a patient with symptoms consistent with T4-type syndrome and critically discusses the concept of T4 syndrome using recent research to help explain the clinical presentation. Manual therapy treatment focused on stimulation of the sympathetic ganglia, decreasing local upper thoracic pain and UE referral pattern noted during passive examination. The successful outcomes included immediate and lasting symptom relief after upper thoracic spinal manipulation. Although treatment has been based on the theory that mechanical thoracic dysfunction can produce sympathetic nervous system (SNS) referred pain, the role the sympathetic reflexes potentially plays on the referral symptoms to the UE presently remains unclear.

      PubDate: 2016-11-04T22:33:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.06.008
       
  • Does leg predomination affect the measurement of vasti muscle activity
           during single leg squatting? A reliability study
    • Authors: Javid Mostamand; Dan L. Bader; Zoë Hudson
      Pages: 728 - 733
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 20, Issue 4
      Author(s): Javid Mostamand, Dan L. Bader, Zoë Hudson
      Introduction Although measuring vasti muscle activity may reveal whether pain relief is associated with altering this parameter during functional activities in subjects with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), it may be necessary to determine whether the inherent properties of the dominant leg influences the reliability of measuring VMO/VL amplitude. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of leg predomination on reliability testing of the VMO/VL amplitude measurement during single leg squatting in healthy subjects. Methods Using an electromyography (EMG) unit, the ratio amplitudes of VMO and VL muscles of ten healthy subjects with a right dominant leg was assessed during single leg squatting. Data was collected from two silver–silver surface electrodes placed over the muscle bellies of the VMO and VL. This procedure was performed on the both right and left legs, during three separate single leg squats from a neutral position to a depth of approximately 30° of knee flexion. Subjects were then asked to repeat the test procedure after a minimum of a week's interval. The amplitude of VMO and VL were then calculated using root mean square (RMS). Results There was no significant difference between the VMO/VL amplitude mean values of paired test of right (mean, SD of 0.85, 0.10) and left knees (mean, SD of 0.82, 0.10) (p > 0.05). The CV (coefficient of variation) values during within and between session tests, revealed the high repeatability and reproducibility of VMO/VL amplitude measurements on both knees. The ICC (intra class correlation coefficient) values during within and between sessions tests showed the high reliability of these measurements on both knees. Conclusion The high reliability of VMO/VL amplitude measurements on both dominant and non-dominant legs of healthy subjects suggests that the VMO/VL amplitude measurement would not be influenced by the leg predomination during single leg squatting.

      PubDate: 2016-11-04T22:33:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.04.012
       
  • Immediate effect of mental practice with and without mirror therapy on
           muscle activation in hemiparetic stroke patients
    • Authors: Tamise Aguiar Caires; Luciane Fernanda Rodrigues Matinho Fernandes; Lislei Jorge Patrizzi; Rafael de Almeida Oliveira; Luciane Aparecida Pascucci Sande de Souza
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Tamise Aguiar Caires, Luciane Fernanda Rodrigues Matinho Fernandes, Lislei Jorge Patrizzi, Rafael de Almeida Oliveira, Luciane Aparecida Pascucci Sande de Souza
      Mental practice (MP) consists of the repeated mental rehearsal of a physical skill without movement, called motor imagery (MI). Studies show that MP and MI associated mirror therapy (MPMT) may improve muscle control of the upper limbs in hemiparesis. This study aimed to evaluate muscle activation during active flexion of the wrist (MA), MP, and MPMT in patients with history of stroke and hemiparesis. Individuals diagnosed with stroke showing sequelae of upper limb hemiparesis were enrolled. The flexor carpi ulnaris was analyzed using electromyography during tasks (MA, MP, MPMT) involving wrist flexion. Greater electromyographic activity was detected during MP and MPMT techniques compared to active movement (p = 0.02). There was no significant difference between MP and MPMT (p = 0.56). These results were found in both the affected limb and unaffected limb. Immediate effects on muscle activation are experienced during MP and MPMT, and muscle activity was similar with both therapies.

      PubDate: 2016-12-31T22:50:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.010
       
  • The effect of motor control training on kinetics variables of patients
           with non-specific low back pain and movement control impairment:
           prospective observational study
    • Authors: Vahid Mohammadi; Amir Letafatkar; Haydar Sadeghi; AmirAli Jafarnezhadgero; Roger Hilfiker
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Vahid Mohammadi, Amir Letafatkar, Haydar Sadeghi, AmirAli Jafarnezhadgero, Roger Hilfiker
      Introduction The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of motor control training on pain, disability and motor control indices in patients with nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) and movement control impairment (MCI) and also to evaluate the correlation between the changes in disability and the motor control indices. Methods Thirty people with NSLBP and MCI based on a clinical examination were following either motor control training or normal activity over 8 weeks. Result Significant differences between pre and post training in the experimental group were found in pain, disability and motor control indices. There were significant correlations between disability index with vertical ground reaction force (r = 0.43) and center of pressure (anterior-posterior) (r = 0.44) values. Conclusion The results of this study showed that motor control indices are responsive measures to capture change during motor control training directed at retraining neuromuscular control, reducing pain and disability.

      PubDate: 2016-12-24T22:45:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.009
       
  • Reliability of digital photography for assessing lower extremity alignment
           in individuals with flatfeet and normal feet types
    • Authors: Zinat Ashnagar; Mohammad Reza Hadian; Gholamreza Olyaei; Saeed Talebian Moghadam; Asghar Rezasoltani; Hassan Saeedi; Mir Saeed Yekaninejad; Rahimeh Mahmoodi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Zinat Ashnagar, Mohammad Reza Hadian, Gholamreza Olyaei, Saeed Talebian Moghadam, Asghar Rezasoltani, Hassan Saeedi, Mir Saeed Yekaninejad, Rahimeh Mahmoodi
      Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the intratester reliability of digital photographic method for quantifying static lower extremity alignment in individuals with flatfeet and normal feet types. Methods Thirteen females with flexible flatfeet and nine females with normal feet types were recruited from university communities. Reflective markers were attached over the participant's body landmarks. Frontal and sagittal plane photographs were taken while the participants were in a standardized standing position. The markers were removed and after 30 min the same procedure was repeated. Pelvic angle, quadriceps angle, tibiofemoral angle, genu recurvatum, femur length and tibia length were measured from photographs using the Image j software. Results All measured variables demonstrated good to excellent intratester reliability using digital photography in both flatfeet (ICC: 0.79–0.93) and normal feet type (ICC: 0.84–0.97) groups. Conclusion The findings of the current study indicate that digital photography is a highly reliable method of measurement for assessing lower extremity alignment in both flatfeet and normal feet type groups.

      PubDate: 2016-12-24T22:45:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.006
       
  • The acute effect of Bowen therapy on pressure pain thresholds and postural
           sway in healthy subjects
    • Authors: Gonçalo J.S. Félix; Lisa Black; Mário Rodrigues; Anabela G. Silva
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Gonçalo J.S. Félix, Lisa Black, Mário Rodrigues, Anabela G. Silva
      Objective The purpose of the study is to determine the immediate effect of Bowen Therapy in pressure pain threshold and postural sway of healthy individuals. Design Crossover, randomized, and double blinded study. Setting University. Participants Participants aged 18 years old or over, naïve to Bowen therapy were recruited among university students. An a priori sample size calculation determined that 34 participants were needed. Methods or Interventions (or Assessment of Risk Factors): Each participant attended two sessions and received Bowen Therapy and a sham procedure. The order in which Bowen or the sham procedure were administered was randomized. All participants had their postural control and pressure pain thresholds assessed in sessions 1 and 2 both at baseline and at the end of the session. Main outcome measurements Postural control was assessed using a force plate and centre of pressure antero-posterior and medio-lateral displacement, velocity and total sway area were calculated. Pressure pain threshold was measured at 10 different body sites on the paraspinal muscles from C1 to S1 using an electronic algometer. Result The results showed a significant increase in the anteroposterior displacement (p = 0.04) and a significantly lower decrease in the mean velocity (p = 0.01) of the centre of pressure and a significant increase in the pressure pain thresholds of two (out of ten; p ≤ 0.04) body sites in the group receiving Bowen Therapy compared to the group receiving the sham. No other significant differences were found. Conclusions The findings suggest that Bowen Therapy has inconsistent immediate effects on postural control and pain threshold in healthy subjects. Further studies are needed using symptomatic participants.

      PubDate: 2016-12-24T22:45:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.008
       
  • Electromyographic activities of the abdominal muscles during 30 % and 75 %
           of maximum expiratory pressure
    • Authors: Hiroshi Ishida; Mai Fujisawa; Ryo Yokoyama; Tadanobu Suehiro; Susumu Watanabe
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hiroshi Ishida, Mai Fujisawa, Ryo Yokoyama, Tadanobu Suehiro, Susumu Watanabe
      The aim of this study was to quantify the activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and internal oblique (IO) muscles during 30% and 75% of maximum expiratory pressure (PE max). Fifteen healthy male university students participated in this study. Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the RA, EO, and IO muscles were measured during 30% and 75% of PE max and then normalized relative to maximum voluntary contractions (%MVC). All muscles during 75% of PE max showed significantly higher %MVC compared to that during 30% of PE max (P < 0.01). The EO and IO muscles showed significantly higher %MVC compared to the RA muscle during 30% and 75% of PE max (P < 0.05). Muscle endurance and strength induced by expiratory muscle strength training might be different in each abdominal muscle.

      PubDate: 2016-12-24T22:45:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.004
       
  • Hypoalgesic effects of three different manual therapy techniques on
           
    • Authors: Jose Luis Alonso-Perez; Almudena Lopez-Lopez; Roy La Touche; Sergio Lerma-Lara; Emilio Suarez; Javier Rojas; Mark D. Bishop; Jorge Hugo Villafañe; Josué Fernández-Carnero
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jose Luis Alonso-Perez, Almudena Lopez-Lopez, Roy La Touche, Sergio Lerma-Lara, Emilio Suarez, Javier Rojas, Mark D. Bishop, Jorge Hugo Villafañe, Josué Fernández-Carnero
      Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate extent to which psychological factors interact with a particular manual therapy (MT) technique to induce hypoalgesia in healthy subjects. Methods Seventy-five healthy volunteers (36 female, 39 males), were recruited in this double-blind, controlled and parallel study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive: High velocity low amplitude technique (HVLA), joint mobilization, or Cervical Lateral glide mobilization (CLGM). Pressure pain threshold (PPT) over C7 unilaterally, trapezius muscle and lateral epicondyle bilaterally, were measured prior to single technique MT was applied and immediately after to applied MT. Pain catastrophizing, depression, anxiety and kinesiophobia were evaluated before treatment. Results The results indicate that hypoalgesia was observed in all groups after treatment in the neck and elbow region (P < 0.05), but mobilization induces more hypoalgesic effects. Catastrophizing interacted with change over time in PPT, for changes in C7 and in manipulation group. Conclusions All the MT techniques studied produced local and segmental hypoalgesic effects, supporting the results of previous studies studying the individual interventions. Interaction between catastrophizing and HVLA technique suggest that whether catastrophizing level is low or medium, the chance of getting success is high, but high catastrophizing may rebound in poor outcome after HVLA intervention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Registration Number: NCT02782585.

      PubDate: 2016-12-24T22:45:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.005
       
  • Successful treatment of rotator cuff tear using Fascial Manipulation®
           in a stroke patient
    • Authors: Marco Pintucci; Marcel Simis; Marta Imamura; Elisa Pratelli; Antonio Stecco
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Marco Pintucci, Marcel Simis, Marta Imamura, Elisa Pratelli, Antonio Stecco
      Rotator cuff tear is a common disease affecting patients after stroke. It's a cause of pain and dysfunction that may compromise normal stroke rehabilitation. For many cases there is still controversy between the decision whether to use surgical or conservative intervention. Treatment for cuff tears range from physical therapy to surgery. This paper describes for the first time the effect of Fascial Manipulation® (FM®) on rotator cuff tear in a post stroke patient. A 69 year old female stroke patient with full absence of distal components of the tendons of the rotator cuff, functional limitations on active movement of shoulder flexion and abduction of the left arm and perceived pain scored 10/10 on the Visual Analogic Scale, was assessed and treat with one session of FM® A basic theory that explains the healing results of FM® is that mechanoreceptors, such as spindle cells and other receptors, are located in the deep fascia and activated when movement are performed. Increased viscosity of the deep fascia and muscles due to increased viscosity of hyaluronic acid (HA) molecules prevents the normal gliding of fascia during movement inhibiting normal proprioception and muscle function.

      PubDate: 2016-12-24T22:45:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.007
       
  • Reliability of SEMG measurements for trunk muscles during lifting variable
           loads in healthy subjects
    • Authors: M. Ghofrani; G.R. Olyaei; S. Talebian; H. Bagheri; P. Kazemi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): M. Ghofrani, G.R. Olyaei, S. Talebian, H. Bagheri, P. Kazemi
      Objective The reliability of surface electromyography (SEMG) derived parameters is of high importance, but there is distinct lack of studies concerning the reliability during dynamic contractions. Particularly, the similarity index reliability has not been investigated during functional task yet. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of trunk muscle activities measured by means of surface electromyography during lifting tasks over repeated trials within a day. Methods Seven volunteers were assessed twice a day. SEMG signals were recorded bilaterally from seven trunk muscles. Intra class correlation coefficients (ICC) and standard error of similarity index, magnitude and timing were calculated. Results Investigation of ICC and correlation between trials showed that similarity index (ICC 0.73 – 0.97, correlation 0.6 – 0.95) is more reliable and repeatable than muscles magnitude (ICC 0.41 – 0.69, correlation 0.54 – 0.65) and it’s timing (ICC 0.41- 0.69, correlation 0.31 – 0.74) while timing had the least reliability. Conclusion Similarity index can be mentioned as an appropriate motor control index and evaluation of muscle recruitment pattern should be done by considering similarity index and magnitude.

      PubDate: 2016-12-16T22:07:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.003
       
  • Six weeks of Mat Pilates training are enough to improve functional
           capacity in Elderly Women
    • Authors: Josefina Bertoli; Grazieli Maria Biduski; Cíntia de la Rocha Freitas
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Josefina Bertoli, Grazieli Maria Biduski, Cíntia de la Rocha Freitas
      The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Mat Pilates on functional capacity (FC) of elderly women before and after six weeks of intervention. Eighteen women aged 62.28 (± 2.34) participated in the study. Timed Up and Go test, Timed Up Stairs, Timed Down Stairs, 30-s Chair Stand, Chair Sit-and-Reach and Back Scratch tests were assessed. The results showed significant improvements in all FC tests after six weeks of Mat Pilates intervention. Summarizing, only six weeks of Mat Pilates training of 60 minutes per session, three times a week, three series beginning with six repetitions and eight repetitions at the last two weeks of intervention, were enough to improve FC in elderly women. Furthermore, the exercises difficulty increased from beginners to intermediate.

      PubDate: 2016-12-09T21:34:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.001
       
  • A comparison of scapulothoracic muscle electromyographic activity in
           subjects with and without subacromial impingement syndrome during a
           functional task
    • Authors: Kh Ayatollahi; F. Okhovatian; K.K. Kalantari; A. Akbarzade Baghban
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Kh Ayatollahi, F. Okhovatian, K.K. Kalantari, A. Akbarzade Baghban
      Shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) is the common cause of shoulder pain and disability and the individuals suffering from it are usually in different levels of physical activity covering an extensive age range. In spite of limited scientific evidence for an altered motor pattern in the shoulder muscles of patients with SIS, they are frequently referred to physiotherapists in an attempt to optimize coordination and strength of the affected muscles. The aim of this study was to compare scapular muscle activity in a general population of subjects with and without SIS during an arm elevation task executed at different speeds in two load conditions. The study is that of a comparative observational using a simple convenience sampling method, comprising 8 females (31.63±9.39) with SIS and 10 females (29.10±6.57) without SIS, matched in terms of age, body mass index (BMI) and levels of physical activity. The surface EMG (SEMG) of all the trapezius muscles, i.e., -upper fibers (UT), middle fibers (MT), and lower fibers (LT) serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid were recorded during shoulder elevation in a scapular plane at three speeds (slow, moderate, and fast) and two load conditions (with and without load). Data were analyzed using independent t-tests and three-factor repeated measures analysis of variance and Bonferroni method for paired comparisons. The EMG tests results in muscle activities revealed no significant differences between the two groups at three speeds, and with and without load. The findings do not support the claim that SIS necessarily accompanies changes in scapula thoracic and glenohumeral muscle activity.

      PubDate: 2016-12-09T21:34:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.12.002
       
  • Simple artificial training device for respiratory muscle strength and lung
           volumes in healthy young male and female subjects: A pilot study
    • Authors: Jirakrit Leelarungrayub; Decha Pinkaew; Araya Yankai; Busaba Chautrakoon; Rungtiwa Kuntain
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jirakrit Leelarungrayub, Decha Pinkaew, Araya Yankai, Busaba Chautrakoon, Rungtiwa Kuntain
      Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a simple artificial device for respiratory muscle strength training and lung volumes using either combined or non-combined exercise with elastic bands in healthy young participants. Methods Forty healthy young participants (20 male and 20 female) aged 19–24 years old were randomized into two main experiments with four sub-groups; (1) artificial device (n = 10) & standard device (n = 10) training, and (2) artificial device training combined with elastic band (EB) exercise (n = 10) & standard device training combined with EB (n = 10) exercise. Respiratory muscle strength with maximal peak inspiratory pressure (PImax), and lung volumes; tidal volume (TV), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), expiratory reserve volume (ERV) and vital capacity (VC) were evaluated before and after training once daily for 3 weeks. Moreover, the peak dyspnea score and vital sign parameters were compared between the experimental groups after final training. Results All parameters had no statistical difference (p > 0.5) between the training devices alone and those combined with EB exercise prior to any experiments. Results from the first experiment showed that training with an artificial device increased all parameters (PImax, VC, IRV, ERV) significantly (p < 0.05), except for TV, when compared to pre training results, which were the same as those in the standard device training group. No statistical difference was shown between these groups after the training period had been performed. Furthermore, results of applying artificial device training combined with EB exercise showed a significant increase in all parameters, except for TV, and they were the same as the increased results in training with the standard device combined with EB exercise. There was no significant difference of data between these groups after the training period. Finally, the results of peak dyspnea score and all vital sign parameters from using the artificial device, with or without EB exercise, showed no statistical difference when compared to use of the standard device. Conclusion This study proposed that a simple artificial device can be used to train the respiratory muscle with or without elastic band exercise in healthy young subjects.

      PubDate: 2016-12-09T21:34:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.012
       
  • Scapular dyskinesis among competitive swimmers
    • Authors: Maayan Bussiba Maor; Tatyana Ronin; Leonid Kalichman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Maayan Bussiba Maor, Tatyana Ronin, Leonid Kalichman
      Aim To evaluate the prevalence of scapular dyskinesis (SD) in competitive swimmers during training sessions. Methods Repeated measurement observational study.20 young competitive swimmers were filmed before, at midpoint and at the end of a training session, performing shoulder flexion and abduction. SD was examined separately by two assessors. Demographic and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaires were collected. Results SD was observed in 30% of the swimmers before training, in 70%, an hour later, and in 80%, upon completion of the training session. The difference between the baseline and mid-practice was close to significance (p-value = 0.055), and between mid-practice and end of practice was significant (p = 0.004). Conclusions This study confirmed that the prevalence of SD increases throughout a training session in most swimmers. The main reason might be fatigue of the muscles which stabilize the scapula, therefore, when examining a sportsmen's shoulder, it is important to examine the SD post-training or following simulation of the training session in the clinic.

      PubDate: 2016-12-02T23:03:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.011
       
  • The effects of inter-trial interval on implicit learning of sequential
           visual isometric pinch task
    • Authors: Fahimeh Hashemirad; Paul B. Fitzgerald; Maryam Zoghi; Masoumeh Hashemirad; Shapour Jaberzadeh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Fahimeh Hashemirad, Paul B. Fitzgerald, Maryam Zoghi, Masoumeh Hashemirad, Shapour Jaberzadeh
      Sequential visual isometric pinch task (SVIPT) has been recently used as a visuomotor sequence task in clinical research. The influence of varying intervals between sequenced trials on the acquisition of implicit sequence learning is not yet determined for SVIPT. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inter-trial interval (ITI) on implicit motor sequence learning using SVIPT. A total of 32 healthy participants with mean age 31.3 ± 4.5 years participated in this study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four ITI groups; (1, 2, 3 and 4 sec). They were instructed to control their force on a force transducer to reach a number of targets which appeared on the computer screen by changing the pinch force exerted onto the transducer. In this study, outcome measures were movement time, error rate and skill, which were measured before and after training. Our results indicated that motor sequence learning similarly affected various ITIs. Indeed, all participants exhibited same improvement in implicit learning of SVIPT even though the ITIs varied from 1 to 4 sec. Our findings suggest that implicit learning of SVIPT is independent of ITI within this range in healthy individuals.

      PubDate: 2016-12-02T23:03:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.014
       
  • Does Ultrasound therapy add to the effects of exercise and mobilization in
           frozen shoulder' A pilot randomized double-blind clinical trial
    • Authors: Safoora Ebadi; Bijan Forogh; Ehsan Fallah; Arash Babaei Ghazani
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Safoora Ebadi, Bijan Forogh, Ehsan Fallah, Arash Babaei Ghazani
      Objective This study intended to determine the extent to which Ultrasound could add to the effects of exercise and manual therapy in the rehabilitation treatment of primary adhesive capsulitis. Design A pilot double blind randomized clinical trial was carried out on 50 patients suffering from primary adhesive capsulitis. Intervention included continuous 3 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2 Ultrasound, applied for the first group and sham Ultrasound for the second group. In addition specific stretching and strengthening exercises as well as glenohumeral joint mobilization were delivered to both groups. Pain (VAS), functional ability (using Oxford Shoulder Score) and shoulder range of motion were assessed at the baseline, after 10 sessions of treatment, and at 3 months follow-up. An intention to treat Mixed ANOVA analysis was performed to explore the interaction effects of time and group on outcome measures. Results No significant interaction effect of time and group was seen on pain, function and Range of Motion (p>.05), meaning that the amount of improvement in all outcome measures were alike in the two groups. Conclusion Applying continuous Ultrasound along with a regimen of semi supervised exercise and mobilization in patients with primary adhesive capsulitis did not have any additional effect to the placebo Ultrasound, on outcome measures. Larger scale studies are needed to confirm the findings.

      PubDate: 2016-12-02T23:03:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.013
       
  • The intra-rater reliability of locating and measuring the severity of
           latent trigger points in the quadriceps
    • Authors: Richie Walsh; Sharon Kinsella; Johnson McEvoy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Richie Walsh, Sharon Kinsella, Johnson McEvoy
      Background Trigger points (TrPs) in the lower-limb are under-investigated and may be a contributory factor in knee pathologies. Objectives The purpose of this study was to establish the intra-rater reliability of assessing the location and severity of latent TrPs in the quadriceps. Methods Twenty-nine asymptomatic subjects were palpated for TrPs in the middle and quadriceps. The location and severity was then measured using the anatomical landmark system (ALS) and pain pressure threshold (PPT). The subject was re-tested the next day. Results The intra-class coefficient [ICC(3,1)] for the ALSs and PPTs were found to be reliable. Gender appears to be a factor in the severity of TrPs in the quadriceps. Females reported some of the features of TrPs more often than males (jump sign, twitch response, referred pain). Conclusion Further investigation is needed to understand the relationship between TrPs around the knee and knee pathologies, particularly in females.

      PubDate: 2016-12-02T23:03:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.015
       
  • Attention-demand effects on respiration in chronic low back pain patients
    • Authors: Babak Goosheh; Majid Ravanbakhsh; Mahyar Salavati; Ismail Ebrahimi Takamjani; Behnam Akhbari; Amir Hossein Kahlaee
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Babak Goosheh, Majid Ravanbakhsh, Mahyar Salavati, Ismail Ebrahimi Takamjani, Behnam Akhbari, Amir Hossein Kahlaee
      Increasing attention is being drawn towards the involvement of systems other than the musculoskeletal one in the presence of low back pain (LBP). Recent evidence suggests both cognitive and respiratory functions to be affected in LBP patients. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of performance of a cognitive task on the respiratory function in LBP patients with that in control participants. Capnography and spirometry parameters of 48 participants (24 in each group) were assessed under 3 cognitive loading conditions (no, easy and difficult cognitive task). The results showed that in both groups the respiratory function was significantly affected by the introduction of the cognitive task (p < 0.05) and in the same manner (p > 0.05). Capnography and spirometry variables alterations were significantly correlated in the no-LBP group (p < 0.05) but there was no significant relationship between respiratory parameters and capnogrpahy and disability indices in the LBP group (p > 0.05). The findings of the current study suggest that while performing a cognitive task affects respiratory function, the possible differences of LBP patients and control participants may not be elicited under simple non-physically demanding postural conditions.

      PubDate: 2016-12-02T23:03:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.016
       
  • The Bench Press: The most misunderstood lift in Strength &amp;
           Conditioning
    • Authors: Brian Carroll; D.C. Craig Liebenson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Brian Carroll, D.C. Craig Liebenson


      PubDate: 2016-11-25T15:22:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.010
       
  • Change and continuity at JBMT
    • Authors: Leon Chaitow
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow


      PubDate: 2016-11-25T15:22:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.009
       
  • A critical overview of the current myofascial pain literature –
           January 2017
    • Authors: Jan Dommerholt
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Jan Dommerholt
      Due to a change in the production schedule of this journal, two issues of this article were due within a month of each other, which precluded the usual group of authors to contribute to the current paper, but they will return with the next issue. This overview includes several articles questioning the use of dry needling (DN) by non-acupuncturists, which continues to be a controversial topic especially in the United States. Several researchers examined the effects of manual trigger point (TrP) techniques applied to TrPs in the upper trapezius muscle. The results were mixed and not necessarily consistent among studies. The research of the clinical management of TrPs is still limited, because of small sample sizes, insufficient power, the inherent risk of the introduction of bias, and poor study methodologies.

      PubDate: 2016-11-18T14:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.005
       
  • Calf stretching in correct alignment. An important consideration in
           plantar fasciopathies
    • Authors: Mark Silvester
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Mark Silvester
      Stretching of the calf muscles is important in the treatment of plantar fasciopathy. In order to correctly stretch the calf muscles without strain on the plantar fascia the correct alignment of the lower limb should be maintained. A clinical method of achieving this is presented along with a practical guide to assisting the patient to become familiar with correct lower limb alignment.

      PubDate: 2016-11-18T14:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.002
       
  • Effect of self-myofascial release on myofascial pain, muscle flexibility,
           and strength: A narrative review
    • Authors: Leonid Kalichman; Chen Ben David
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leonid Kalichman, Chen Ben David
      Background Numerous techniques have been employed to treat myofascial pain syndrome. Self-myofascial release (SMFR) is a relatively new technique of soft tissue mobilization. The simplicity and portability of the SMFR tools allow it to be easily implemented in any type of fitness or rehabilitation program. It is an active method and can be used by anyone at home or at the workplace. Objective To review the current methods of SMFR, their mechanisms, and efficacy in treating myofascial pain, improving muscle flexibility and strength. Methods PubMed, Google Scholar, and PEDro databases were searched without search limitations from inception until July 2016 for terms relating to SMFR. Results and conclusions During the past decade, therapists and fitness professionals have implemented SMFR mainly via foam rolling as a recovery or maintenance tool. Researchers observed a significant increase in the joint range of motion after using the SMFR technique and no decrease in muscle force or changes in performance after treatment with SMFR. SMFR has been widely used by health-care professionals in treating myofascial pain. However, we found no clinical trials which evaluated the influence of SMFR on myofascial pain. There is an acute need for these trials to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of SMFR in the treatment of the myofascial syndrome.

      PubDate: 2016-11-18T14:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.006
       
  • Plantar heel pain
    • Authors: Warrick McNeill; Mark Silvester
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Warrick McNeill, Mark Silvester


      PubDate: 2016-11-18T14:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.001
       
  • Defining the fascial system
    • Authors: Sue Adstrum; Gil Hedley; Robert Schleip; Carla Stecco; Can A. Yucesoy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Sue Adstrum, Gil Hedley, Robert Schleip, Carla Stecco, Can A. Yucesoy
      Fascia is a widely used yet indistinctly defined anatomical term that is concurrently applied to the description of soft collagenous connective tissue, distinct sections of membranous tissue, and a body pervading soft connective tissue system. Inconsistent use of this term is causing concern due to its potential to confuse technical communication about fascia in global, multiple discipline- and multiple profession-spanning discourse environments. The Fascia Research Society acted to address this issue by establishing a Fascia Nomenclature Committee (FNC) whose purpose was to clarify the terminology relating to fascia. This committee has since developed and defined the terms a fascia, and, more recently, the fascial system. This article reports on the FNC's proposed definition of the fascial system.

      PubDate: 2016-11-18T14:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.003
       
  • Comment on ‘Defining the fascial system’
    • Authors: Graham Scarr; CBiol
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Graham Scarr CBiol


      PubDate: 2016-11-18T14:53:06Z
       
  • The acute effects of ankle mobilisations on lower extremity joint
           kinematics
    • Authors: Louis P. Howe
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Louis P. Howe
      Introduction Previous investigations have identified compensatory movement strategies (CMS) within the lower extremity or lumbopelvic complex during closed chain exercises may be associated with a loss of ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM). The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of ankle mobilisations on proximal joint kinematics during a movement task that demands a high amount of ankle dorsiflexion ROM. Methods Eight healthy males (mean (SD) age 25 (4) years) demonstrating side-to-side asymmetry during the weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT) and CMS during the single-leg step-down exercise were accepted for this study. Participants completed five repetitions of a single-leg step-down, both before and after an ankle mobilisation intervention aimed at improving joint athrokinematics. A Vicon motion capture system recorded 3D joint and segment kinematics of the ankle, knee, hip and pelvis. A paired samples t-test was used to identify significant changes of lower extremity joint kinematics during the single-leg step-down, before and after mobilisation. Results Following the mobilisation intervention, statistically significant gains in ankle dorsiflexion ROM were identified during the WBLT [mean difference 2.425 (0.9377) centimeters, t = −7.315, p < 0.01]. No evidence was found of altered joint kinematics during the single-leg step-down. Conclusion These findings indicate that increases in ankle dorsiflexion ROM do not automatically integrate into functional movement tasks.

      PubDate: 2016-11-18T14:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.007
       
  • Evaluation of knee range of motion: Correlation between measurements using
           a universal goniometer and a smartphone goniometric application
    • Authors: Rafael Aparecido Dos Santos; Viviane Derhon; Michelle Brandalize; Danielle Brandalize; Luciano Pavan Rossi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 November 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Rafael Aparecido Dos Santos, Viviane Derhon, Michelle Brandalize, Danielle Brandalize, Luciano Pavan Rossi
      Background Goniometers are commonly used to measure range of motion in the musculoskeletal system. Recently smartphone goniometry applications have become available to clinicians. Objective Compare angular measures using a universal goniometer and a smartphone application. Methods Thirty four healthy women with at least 20° of limited range of motion regarding knee extension were recruited. Knee flexion angles of the dominant limb were measured with a universal goniometer and the ROM© goniometric application for the smartphone. Three trained examiners compared the two assessment tools. Results Strong correlations were found between the measures of the universal goniometer and smartphone application (Pearson's correlation and interclass correlation coefficient > 0.93). The measurements with both devices demonstrated low dispersion and little variation. Conclusion Measurements obtained using the smartphone goniometric application analyzed are as reliable as those of a universal goniometer. This application is therefore a useful tool for the evaluation of knee range of motion.

      PubDate: 2016-11-18T14:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.11.008
       
  • How many physical therapy sessions are required to reach a good outcome in
           symptomatic lumbar spondylolisthesis' A retrospective study
    • Authors: Silvano Ferrari; Jorge Hugo Villafañe; Pedro Berjano; Carla Vanti; Marco Monticone
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Silvano Ferrari, Jorge Hugo Villafañe, Pedro Berjano, Carla Vanti, Marco Monticone
      Background There is a lack of conclusive information about the optimal dosage of physical therapy treatments in Spondylolisthesis (SPL) patients. Purpose The present study attempted to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of two different doses in reaching similar clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 64 consecutive patients admitted for physical therapy with symptomatic lumbar grade I SPL (42 ±15years, 57% female) was conducted. At the end of the treatment, all participants were retrospectively assigned to one of two groups, receiving either 5-8 or 9-12 sessions (experimental or control group, respectively) of physical therapy treatments. The Prone Bridge Test (PBT) and the Supine Bridge Test (SBT) were used to measure muscular endurance. Results The area under the ROC curve for the PBT was 0.64 (95% CI 0.45–0.83) and for the SBT was 0.57 (95% CI 0.33-0.80). The optimal cutoff points were 25.5s for the PBT and 55.0s for the SBT. Logistic regression revealed that PBT (OR=1.062) was associated with SPL. The final regression model explained 77.4% (R2=0.341; p=0.024) of the variability. Conclusions In this sample, the number of sessions required to achieve satisfactory outcomes ranged from 5 to 12. The clinical results of the subjects in the 5-8 sessions group were similar to the 9-12 sessions group. Individual’s coping mechanisms could be considered in future studies to understand which patients will require more therapeutic sessions.

      PubDate: 2016-10-28T21:56:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.006
       
  • Correlation between cervical flexor muscle thickness and craniocervical
           flexion torque in healthy subjects
    • Authors: Hiroshi Ishida; Tadanobu Suehiro; Susumu Watanabe
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Hiroshi Ishida, Tadanobu Suehiro, Susumu Watanabe
      The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between the size of the cervical flexor muscles and craniocervical (CC) flexion torque. Thirty-eight healthy men participated in this study. Thickness of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SM) muscles were measured using ultrasonography. Maximal isometric CC flexion torque was measured using dynamometry. The DCF and SM muscle thickness and CC flexion torque were normalized relative to body weight. Correlations between normalized muscle thickness and normalized CC flexion torque were determined. A significant positive correlation was observed between normalized DCF muscle thickness and normalized CC flexion torque (r = 0.361, P = 0.028), whereas there was no significant correlation between normalized SM muscle thickness and normalized CC flexion torque (r = 0.233, P = 0.166). DCF muscle thickness appears to have potential clinical application in the performance of CC flexion.

      PubDate: 2016-10-28T21:56:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.004
       
  • Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on balance, strength,
           and mobility of an older adult with chronic stroke: a case report
    • Authors: Christopher S. Cayco; Edward James R. Gorgon; Rolando T. Lazaro
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Christopher S. Cayco, Edward James R. Gorgon, Rolando T. Lazaro
      This study described the effects of a proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) program on balance, strength, and mobility in an older adult with chronic stroke. The patient was male, aged 69 years, with right hemiplegia for 17 years, and had diminished balance, balance confidence, lower extremity (LE) strength, and gait velocity. He received one hour of PNF-based therapy thrice a week for six weeks. Outcome measures were: Mini-BESTest, limits of stability (LOS), Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), Five Time Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSST), Upright Motor Control Test (UMCT), and 10 Meter Walk Test (10MWT). The patient improved on the Mini-BESTest (25/28, from 21/28), FTSST (27.47 s, from 30.27 s), UMCT knee extension (moderate, from weak), and 10MWT (0.82 m/s, from 0.67 m/s); and positive changes in LOS dimensions. PNF was effective in enhancing balance, strength, and mobility in an older adult with chronic stroke and may mitigate falls risk in this population. More research is needed to determine its impact in a larger sample of older people with chronic stroke.

      PubDate: 2016-10-28T21:56:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.008
       
  • Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of total faulty breathing scale
           using visual observation and videogrammetry methods
    • Authors: Vikram Mohan; Maria Perri; Aatit Paungmali; Patraporn Sitilertpisan; Leonard Henry Joseph; Romizan Jathin; Munirah Bt Mustafa; Siti Hawa Bt Mohd Nasir
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Vikram Mohan, Maria Perri, Aatit Paungmali, Patraporn Sitilertpisan, Leonard Henry Joseph, Romizan Jathin, Munirah Bt Mustafa, Siti Hawa Bt Mohd Nasir
      Faulty breathing is an aspect of alteration in the normal fundamental pattern of breathing. The available existence of scales in assessing faulty breathing has not frequently been used. Measurement errors in assessing and quantifying breathing patterns may originate from unclear directions and variation between observers. This study determined the measure reliability of the Total Faulty Breathing Scale (TFBS) for quantifying breathing patterns. Twenty seven participants were recruited comprising healthy and unhealthy subjects. Two examiners assessed their breathing patterns using the TFBS on two different occasions with visual observation and a videogrammetry method. Evaluation of the observational breathing pattern method for intra-rater and inter-rater showed agreement of 96.30% and a kappa score of greater than 0.78, which indicated substantial agreements. The videogrammetry method showed a percent agreement of (100%) with a kappa score of (1.00). This study indicates that the TFBS is a considerably reliable tool for evaluating breathing patterns with both visual observation and a videogrammetry method.

      PubDate: 2016-10-28T21:56:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.007
       
  • Is self-massage an effective joint range-of-motion strategy' A pilot
           study
    • Authors: Estêvão Rios Monteiro; Mark Tyler Cavanaugh; David Michael Frost; Jefferson da Silva Novaes
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Estêvão Rios Monteiro, Mark Tyler Cavanaugh, David Michael Frost, Jefferson da Silva Novaes
      Increases in joint range of motion may be beneficial in both improving performance and reducing the risk of injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate short-term changes in passive hip flexion (HF) and extension (HE) after foam rolling (FR) and roller massage (RM) durations of 60 and 120 seconds. Ten recreationally active men (27.6 ± 2.4 years old; 164.8 ± 6.6 cm; 62.2 ± 8.0 kg; 24.2 ± 2.1 m2/kg) were recruited for this study. Subjects performed foam rolling (FR) and roller massage (RM) on the hamstrings for 60 (FR60 and RM60) and 120 (FR120 and RM120) seconds. Significant differences between FR120 and RM60 were observed in both HF (p < 0.001) and HE (p < 0.001) suggesting an intervention (roller style) effect. Furthermore, significant differences (p < 0.001) between RM60 and RM120 suggest a dosage based response. Thus, the findings indicate that different roller type or rolling volume may affect range-of-motion.

      PubDate: 2016-10-21T22:33:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.003
       
  • Effect of a lateral glide mobilisation with movement of the hip on
           vibration threshold in healthy volunteers
    • Authors: Darren A. Smith; Jacob Saranga; Andrew Pritchard; Nikolaos A. Kommatas; Shinu Kovelal Punnoose; Supriya Tukaram Kale
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Darren A. Smith, Jacob Saranga, Andrew Pritchard, Nikolaos A. Kommatas, Shinu Kovelal Punnoose, Supriya Tukaram Kale
      Background Mulligan’s mobilisation-with-movement (MWM) techniques are proposed to achieve their clinical benefit via neurophysiological mechanisms. However, previous research has focussed on responses in the sympathetic nervous system only, and is not conclusive. An alternative measure of neurophysiological response to MWM is required to support or refute this mechanism of action. Recently, vibration threshold (VT) has been used to quantify changes in the sensory nervous system in patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain. Objective To investigate the effect of a lateral glide MWM of the hip joint on vibration threshold compared to a placebo and control condition in asymptomatic volunteers. Methods Fifteen asymptomatic volunteers participated in this single-blinded, randomised, within-subject, placebo, control design. Participants received each of three interventions in a randomised order; a lateral glide MWM of the hip joint into flexion, a placebo MWM, and a control intervention. Vibration threshold (VT) measures were taken at baseline and immediately after each intervention. Mean change in VT from baseline was calculated for each intervention and then analysed for between group differences using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results A one-way ANOVA revealed no statistically significant differences between the three experimental conditions (P=0.812). Conclusion This small study found that a lateral glide MWM of the hip did not significantly change vibration threshold compared to a placebo and control intervention in an asymptomatic population. This study provides a method of using vibration threshold to investigate the potential neurophysiological effects of a manual therapy intervention that should be repeated in a larger, symptomatic population.

      PubDate: 2016-10-21T22:33:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.001
       
  • Does leg predomination affect measuring vasti muscle onsets during single
           leg squatting' A reliability study
    • Authors: Javid Mostamand; Dan L. Bader; Zoë Hudson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Javid Mostamand, Dan L. Bader, Zoë Hudson
      Introduction Although measuring vasti muscle onset may reveal whether the pain relief is associated with altering this parameter during activities in subjects with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), it may be necessary to determine whether the inherent properties of the dominant leg influences the reliability of measuring VMO-VL muscle onset. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of leg predomination on reliability testing of the VMO-VL muscle onset measurement during single leg squatting in healthy subjects. Methods The onset of VMO and VL muscles of ten healthy subjects with a right dominant leg was assessed during single leg squatting. Data was collected from the muscle bellies of the VMO and VL. This procedure was performed on the both legs, during three separate single leg squats from a neutral position to a depth of approximately 30 ° of knee flexion. Subjects were then asked to repeat the test procedure after a minimum of a week’s interval. The full wave rectified onsets of VMO and VL were then calculated. Results There was no significant difference between the VMO-VL onset mean values of paired test of right and left knees. The ICC (intra class correlation coefficient) values during within and between sessions tests showed the poor reliability of these measurements on both knees. Conclusion The low intratester reliability of within and between sessions measurement of VMO-VL onset on the both dominant and non-dominant legs revealed that repeatability of these measurements have little accepted reliability, however similar values of these measurements indicated that leg predomination does not affect the measurements during single leg squatting.

      PubDate: 2016-10-21T22:33:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.002
       
  • A Comparison of the Effect of the Active Release and Muscle Energy
           Techniques on the Latent Trigger Points of the upper Trapezius
    • Authors: Golnaz Sadria; Majid Hosseini; Asghar Rezasoltani; Alireza Akbarzadeh Bagheban; Ahmad Reza Davari; Afsaneh Seifolahi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Golnaz Sadria, Majid Hosseini, Asghar Rezasoltani, Alireza Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Ahmad Reza Davari, Afsaneh Seifolahi
      Background/Aim The increasing use of computer in daily life has brought about numerous musculoskeletal problems. Impairments in the head, neck and shoulders are more common compared with the other parts of the body. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two manual treatments in two separate groups,i.e., active release technique (ART) and muscle energy technique (MET) on the latent trigger points (LTrPs) in the upper trapezius muscle. The set criteria in the study included the active range of cervical lateral flexion, pain intensity on the visual analog scale (VAS), and the upper trapezius muscle thickness. Subjects and Methods: This clinical trial study assessed the outcome measures within and between groups before and after the intervention. The target population were 64 (32 males, 32 females) participants who had been selected from among the the staff members and the students of a rehabilitation school, and the employees of an engineering company who had LTrPs in their upper trapezius muscle and were from 18 to 50 years old. Results The immediate effects of MET and ART on the patients of each groups with LTrPs in their upper trapezius muscle were increased active range of cervical lateral flexion (P<0.001), decreased pain intensity on VAS (P<0.05) and decreased thickness of the upper trapezius muscle (P<0.01). Conclusion Both manual techniques of ART and MET reduced the symptoms of LTrPs in the upper trapezius in the two groups equally, neither technique being superior to the other.

      PubDate: 2016-10-21T22:33:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.10.005
       
  • Manipulation of the body schema - unilateral manual stimulation of lower
           extremity influences weight distribution in standing position
    • Authors: Uffe Laessoe; Lasse Barth; Sindre Skeie; Kate McGirr
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Uffe Laessoe, Lasse Barth, Sindre Skeie, Kate McGirr
      Clinical experience advocates sensory stimulation to increase the body sensation and adjust the body schema, which may be disturbed in some patients. Unilateral massage may affect the body midline orientation, but little evidence is available to support the effect of this practice. Twenty-one healthy young people participated in this experimental study. Two force plates measured weight distribution between the legs in standing position before and after unilateral manual stimulation of the lower extremities. Stimulation of the leg with initial least weight-bearing increased the load on this leg significantly from 48.2% to 49.0% and a similar but reverse effect was seen when stimulating the contra-lateral leg. When analysing the data with respect to stimulation of the non-dominant leg, the stimulation increased the weight-bearing on this leg from 49.6% to 51.3%. These findings indicate that external afferent stimuli may enhance the body perception and influence the body schema and midline orientation.

      PubDate: 2016-10-08T09:46:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.09.013
       
  • A Commentary Review of the Cost effectiveness of Manual Therapies for Neck
           and Low Back Pain
    • Authors: Brent Harper; Kristen Jagger; Adrian Aron; Larry Steinbeck; Antonio Stecco
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 October 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Brent Harper, Kristen Jagger, Adrian Aron, Larry Steinbeck, Antonio Stecco
      Background & Purpose Neck and low back pain (NLBP) are global health problems, which diminish quality of life and consume vast economic resources. Cost effectiveness in healthcare is the minimal amount spent to obtain acceptable outcomes. Studies on manual therapies often fail to identify which manual therapy intervention or combinations with other interventions is the most cost effective. The purpose of this commentary is to sample the dialogue within the literature on the cost effectiveness of evidence-based manual therapies with a particular focus on the neck and low back regions. Methods This commentary identifies and presents the available literature on the cost effectiveness of manual therapies for NLBP. Key words searched were neck and low back pain, cost effectiveness, and manual therapy to select evidence-based articles. Eight articles were identified and presented for discussion. Results The lack of homogeneity, in the available literature, makes difficult any valid comparison among the various cost effectiveness studies. Discussion Potential outcome bias in each study is dependent upon the lens through which it is evaluated. If evaluated from a societal perspective, the conclusion slants toward “adequate” interventions in an effort to decrease costs rather than toward the most efficacious interventions with the best outcomes. When cost data are assessed according to a healthcare (or individual) perspective, greater value is placed on quality of life, the patient’s beliefs, and the “willingness to pay.”

      PubDate: 2016-10-08T09:46:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.09.014
       
  • New evidence of a dynamic fascial maintenance and self-repair process
    • Authors: Leon Chaitow
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2016
      Source:Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
      Author(s): Leon Chaitow


      PubDate: 2016-09-06T00:19:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.08.013
       
 
 
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