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Journal Cover   International Journal of Project Management
  [SJR: 1.092]   [H-I: 67]   [36 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0263-7863
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2800 journals]
  • Relationship quality and satisfaction: Customer-perceived success factors
           for on-time projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Paul Williams, Nicholas J. Ashill, Earl Naumann, Eric Jackson
      Project managers have traditionally evaluated project success using the “iron triangle” of time, costs, and quality. In recent years, however, customer satisfaction and other client relationship attitudes have emerged as additional criteria in assessing project success. This paper explores the comparatively under-researched areas of customer satisfaction and client relationship quality in project management. Specifically, we differentiated between projects that were completed on-time and those that were not on-time. We then explored the drivers of customer satisfaction and relationship quality at different stages in the project for each respective group. Data was collected from 588 customers who had installed large-scale building service systems from a multi-national Fortune 100 firm. The results indicate that the drivers of customer satisfaction and relationship quality changed significantly, in both order and magnitude, during the course of a project depending on whether projects were delivered on-time or late. The changes in these drivers have important implications for project managers in keeping clients satisfied during the course of the project, and also in maintaining on-going relationships with the client in the future.


      PubDate: 2015-08-16T13:13:31Z
       
  • Project configuration by means of network theory
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Cristina Ruiz-Martin, David J. Poza
      In this paper, we propose a novel approach to determine an appropriate sequence to develop the components of a project management plan. Some newcomers to project management become overwhelmed due to the complex relations within these components. Network theory is a widely used tool in fields with complex relations within entities, but it has not yet been applied to configure a project management plan. Although our approach is compatible with any project management standard, the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) is an excellent example to illustrate how to apply this methodology due to the complex interdependence among its processes.


      PubDate: 2015-08-12T12:56:37Z
       
  • Examining new product development project termination decision quality at
           the portfolio level: Consequences of dysfunctional executive advocacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 7
      Author(s): Thomas G. Lechler, Janice L. Thomas
      When to terminate a new product development (NPD) project is an important economic decision and an interesting managerial dilemma. To date research examining NPD termination decisions has been largely focused on the single project level examining the impact of formal termination decision processes. This study examines these decisions at the organizational level exploring the impact of both executive advocacy behaviors and organizational context on the quality of 150 termination decisions in 40 German R&D units of pharmaceutical companies. We confirm that adopting termination decision processes such as formal decision criteria and decision committees has positive influences on the quality of the termination decision. However, our results also demonstrate that dysfunctional executive advocacy behavior has a greater negative influence on the quality of project termination decision suggesting that, while organizational governance components can and should be used to mediate executive behaviors, these factors alone will not ensure high quality NPD termination decisions.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 7




      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Factors governing construction project delivery selection: A content
           analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Maoshan Qiang, Qi Wen, Hanchen Jiang, Shangnan Yuan
      Comprehensively identifying factors governing project delivery system (PDS) selection is crucial for construction projects. This paper aims at constructing a holistic system of governing factors. Based on review of previous studies, project condition factors and performance objective factors were identified to construct the factor system. To explore the perspective divergences, content analyses on Chinese and developed countries' literature were performed. The emphasizing frequencies of factors were calculated. T tests were performed to compare the relative importance of factors. Principal component analysis was employed to identify key factors. The results show that three groups of factors, namely, internal project conditions, external project conditions and project performance objective factors are the main factors governing PDS selection. Some factors are of different importance in China and developed countries, mirroring the management maturity and philosophy gaps. The proposed factor system acts as a guidance to PDS selection and lays solid foundation for future studies.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Exploring program management competences for various program types
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Maxim Miterev, Mats Engwall, Anna Jerbrant
      This paper challenges the implicit ‘one-size-fits-all’ assumption that dominates mainstream program management competence literature. Findings from case studies of 10 programs executed in a large pharmaceutical company suggest that different programs require different competences of program managers. Based on the Pellegrinelli's (1997) program typology we put forward a framework, linking specific management competences to program types. By establishing the link between the program typologies literature and program management competence literature, the paper shows that programs should not be treated as a generic and homogenous category in discussions on program management competences. In addition, the findings highlight program content as a significant contingency variable for understanding program management dynamics. The paper suggests a conceptual framework that combines program types with program management competence profiles that could be applied to appointment decisions, staff assessments and organizational development.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Project selection in project portfolio management: An artificial neural
           network model based on critical success factors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Francesco Costantino, Giulio Di Gravio, Fabio Nonino
      While a growing body of literature focuses in detecting and analyzing the main reasons affecting project success, the use of these results in project portfolio management is still under investigation. Project critical success factors (CSFs) can serve as the fundamental criteria to prevent possible causes of failures with an effective project selection process, taking into account company strategic objectives, project manager’s experience and the competitive environment. This research proposes an innovative methodology to help managers in assessing projects during the selection phase. The paper describes the design, development and testing stages of a decision support system to predict project performances. An artificial neural network (ANN), scalable to any set of CSFs, classifies the level of project’s riskiness by extracting the experience of project managers from a set of past successful and unsuccessful projects.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Roles of owners' leadership in construction safety: The case of high-speed
           railway construction projects in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Chunlin Wu, Dongping Fang, Nan Li
      Owners' role in project safety improvement is drawing increasing attention in the academia. Their greatest leverage is the leadership to influence safety perception, motivation and behavior of other stakeholders. However, previous studies have not paid enough attention to owners' leadership and its impacting mechanisms, nor have they identified effective leadership behaviors related to high safety performance. This paper seeks to present a comprehensive interpretation of owners' role in construction safety by identifying their effective leadership practices and specific managerial measures. A case study was undertaken on Chinese high-speed railway construction projects currently undergoing significant safety improvement thanks to their owner's commitment to safety. The ethnographic research method was applied to collect empirical data, i.e. the owner's safety leadership and management practices. Based on grounded theory, four categories of safety leadership practices were identified to interpret what types of leaders are required in construction projects. Four safety managerial chains driven by safety leadership were synthesized. They give insights into the measures which owners can implement to improve construction safety. Concrete and specific measures were explored for construction owners, especially those in developing countries, to enhance their safety leadership and management. These findings can be used by construction owners to improve their safety leadership and reinforce their involvement in project safety management, especially when their industry is facing significant safety challenges and demanding transformational development.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Evaluation of deterministic state-of-the-art forecasting approaches for
           project duration based on earned value management
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 7
      Author(s): Jordy Batselier, Mario Vanhoucke
      In recent years, a variety of novel approaches for fulfilling the important management task of accurately forecasting project duration have been proposed, with many of them based on the earned value management (EVM) methodology. However, these state-of-the-art approaches have often not been adequately tested on a large database, nor has their validity been empirically proven. Therefore, we evaluate the accuracy and timeliness of three promising deterministic techniques and their mutual combinations on a real-life project database. More specifically, two techniques respectively integrate rework and activity sensitivity in EVM time forecasting as extensions, while a third innovatively calculates schedule performance from time-based metrics and is appropriately called earned duration management or EDM(t). The results indicate that all three of the considered techniques are relevant. More concretely, the two EVM extensions exhibit accuracy-enhancing power for different applications, while EDM(t) performs very similar to the best EVM methods and shows potential to improve them.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Credit enhancement factors for the financing of independent power producer
           (IPP) projects in Asia
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 7
      Author(s): Abu Naser Chowdhury, Po-Han Chen, Robert L.K. Tiong
      Public and private parties give a number of guarantees and commitments in the form of credit enhancement for successful investment and implementation of independent power producer (IPP) projects in Asia. A research is thus conducted to find the suitable credit enhancement factors for these projects. From 27 out of 28 credit enhancement factors that were validated by IPP professionals, factor analysis revealed five factor groupings which are — (1) shareholders' credit enhancement, (2) host government's credit enhancement, (3) multi-lateral development banks (MDBs), export credit agencies (ECAs) and other parties' credit enhancement, (4) capital structure mechanism, and (5) commercial bank's credit enhancement. From these critical credit enhancement groupings, it is further noticed that contingency equity support, standby credit guarantee, subordinated debt mechanism, financing with political risk insurance from MDBs and ECAs, escrow account, and standby letter of credit are of great importance for financing decision of IPP projects in Asia.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • The impact of inter-organizational relationships on contractors' success
           in winning public procurement projects: The case of the construction
           industry in the Veneto region
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 7
      Author(s): Silvia Rita Sedita, Roberta Apa
      Our work aims to analyze the inter-organizational relationships of contractors in public procurement projects. We investigate how a contractor's network position affects his success in winningpublic procurement projects, measured as the average value of projects won. To accomplish this objective, we adopt a social network analysis approach. Our evidence come from an empirical analysis of the network positions of general contractors involved in public procurement projects in the construction industry in the Veneto region from 2008 to 2012. We explore through social network measures how partnering ability influences organizational success in winning public procurement projects. We identify three components of partnering ability: breadth; reach; brokerage. Only the first is crucial in determining the success of firms in public procurement practices. Managers involved in public procurement projects in the construction industry should invest in nurturing their partnering abilities by connecting to many partners to be involved in future projects.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • The importance of non-financial determinants on public–private
           partnerships in Europe
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 7
      Author(s): J. Mota, A.C. Moreira
      In previous work regarding public–private partnership (PPP) arrangements the theoretical rationales and empirical results have mainly focused on analyzing the importance of quantitative features related to budget constraints deriving from public deficits, the existence of an infrastructure gap and the efficiency hypothesis. Thus, this study aims to identify the underlying determinants behind the proliferation and execution of PPPs, emphasizing the importance that non-financial (such as political, legal and macroeconomic) determinants have in establishing a PPP, as well as the factors that enhance the attractiveness of a country to encourage the private sector through PPPs in the European context. The results of this study show that the macroeconomic environment – represented by economic freedom, competitiveness and the unemployment rate – is essential for PPPs, as well as the legal system, where regulatory quality and effective rule of law are associated with the effective execution of a PPP. The political environment and previous experience of PPPs are also key factors in making a country more attractive for establishing PPPs.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Cultural practices of governance in the Panama Canal Expansion Megaproject
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Alfons van Marrewijk, Karen Smits
      The academic debate on governance in project management is dominated by research that looks at the structure of governance regimes, but there is very little research on the micro-practices of governance as it actually takes place. This paper fills this gap by focusing on the governance practices of project employees and looking at megaprojects as cultural phenomena. Therefore, a one-year ethnographic field study of the Panama Canal Expansion Megaproject was conducted to examine the cultural practices of governing. In the study, five cultural practices were found to influence the governance of this megaproject: (1) ritualizing the bid-winning ceremony, (2) changing teams, (3) struggling over governance structure, and labeling according to (4) national and (5) organizational cultures. This paper makes a contribution to the current debate by offering a cultural approach of megaprojects and by including a case that shows how ex post micro-processes of governing can start escalation in megaprojects.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Cultural differences in motivation factors influencing the management of
           foreign laborers in the Korean construction industry
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 7
      Author(s): Sangyong Kim, Jin-Dong Kim, Yoonseok Shin, Gwang-Hee Kim
      This study was motivated by the view that cultural differences should be taken into account in the management of Korean and foreign workers on construction sites. We identify motivation factors that are influenced by the cultural differences of the laborers, and their effects on productivity. Based on the results of a preliminary survey of field technicians with at least 15years of work experience, a final set of 27 factors was included in a questionnaire: 5 economic factors, 11 social factors, and 11 psychological factors. Taking cultural differences into account, motivation factors that can have an impact on productivity were determined and broken down by nationality, based on the analysis results. The findings of this research can be used to stimulate social awareness and build an appropriate systemic police. The results can also be used to help develop a management plan based on cultural differences between foreign workers in the construction industry.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Prior ties and trust development in project teams – A case study
           from the construction industry
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 7
      Author(s): Marte Pettersen Buvik, Monica Rolfsen
      The limited duration and the high time constraints facing projects may pose challenges to the development of working relationships in project teams. Relationships can be influenced by the history of interactions and prior ties between team members. Development of trust is crucial but challenging in the context of cross-functional project teams and prior ties can have imperative influence on the team’s ability to create trust. Through a case study in the construction industry, we explore how prior ties between team members influence the development of trust. We identify four important aspects; early formation of integrative work practices, development of a common philosophy, open communication, early and clear role expectations, all contributing to development of trust in an early phase. Our findings offer new, empirical insights into the complex nature of temporary project work and underscore the significance of prior ties in facilitating early trust and integration within project teams.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Project management and its effects on project success: Cross-country and
           cross-industry comparisons
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 7
      Author(s): Marly Monteiro de Carvalho, Leandro Alves Patah, Diógenes de Souza Bido
      This study aims to investigate the effects of project management (PM) on project success under the parameters of scheduling, cost, and margins. We adopt a contingency approach that evaluates the complexity of the project, according to 4 categories, the effect of industry sector and countries. The methodological approach involved a longitudinal field survey in 3 countries (Argentina, Brazil, and Chile) with business units from 10 different industries over a 3-year period, and data from a total of 1387 projects were analyzed. Structural equation modeling was used to test the research hypotheses. The results show a significant and positive relationship between the response variable schedule with PM enablers and project management efforts in training and capabilities development. Project complexity has a significant effect on 2 aspects of project success: margin and schedule. Both cross-country and cross-industry analyses show a significant explanatory effect.


      PubDate: 2015-08-08T15:24:09Z
       
  • Stochastic earned value analysis using Monte Carlo simulation and
           statistical learning techniques
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Fernando Acebes, María Pereda, David Poza, Javier Pajares, José Manuel Galán
      The aim of this paper is to describe a new integrated methodology for project control under uncertainty. This proposal is based on Earned Value Methodology and risk analysis and presents several refinements to previous methodologies. More specifically, the approach uses extensive Monte Carlo simulation to obtain information about the expected behavior of the project. This dataset is exploited in several ways using different statistical learning methodologies in a structured fashion. Initially, simulations are used to detect if project deviations are a consequence of the expected variability using Anomaly Detection algorithms. If the project follows this expected variability, probabilities of success in cost and time and expected cost and total duration of the project can be estimated using classification and regression approaches.


      PubDate: 2015-07-23T08:39:50Z
       
  • Damaged identities: Examining identity regulation and identity work of
           Gulf project managers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Michael Cowen, Damian Hodgson
      Research on the human side of project management is largely overshadowed by its technically focused counter-part. This results in a dangerous neglect of the impacts of a demanding project life and project managers' efforts to construct and sustain a valuable and valued identity at work. In this study of one Middle Eastern IT company, drawing on project management guides, company documents and interview responses from project managers, we examine the regulation of project manager identity using the lens of ‘identity work’. We show that intense identity work can be triggered from project life within a challenging environment, and identify various coping strategies employed by the managers interviewed. In some cases, however, we found that these pressures may lead to the project manager experiencing a temporarily “damaged” self-identity. We discuss the practical implications arising from our analysis for project management associations and organizations alike, and opportunities for future research.


      PubDate: 2015-07-19T04:14:41Z
       
  • Trust influencing factors in main contractor and subcontractor
           relationships during projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Emmanuel Manu , Nii Ankrah , Ezekiel Chinyio , David Proverbs
      Trust is crucial for achieving optimum benefits from supply chain integration and collaboration in the construction sector. Yet relationships between main contractors and subcontractors continue to be influenced by issues that promote vicious circles of distrust. This research investigates the trust influencing factors in main contractor–subcontractor relationships on projects. Empirical data was gathered from across four case studies through semi-structured interviews, non-participant observations and document reviews, and analysed using thematic analysis. Findings revealed that the change management process, economic climate, payment practices, perceptions of future work opportunities, job performance and the project-specific context influence trustfulness and trustworthiness of the different parties. The findings also imply that stronger trust in the main contractor's supply chain can only be realised and sustained through promotion of trustworthiness-induced rather than benefit-induced trustfulness.


      PubDate: 2015-07-09T09:01:00Z
       
  • When employees and external consultants work together on projects:
           Challenges of knowledge sharing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Torstein Nesheim , Håavard Mørch Hunskaar
      In project settings, personnel with different employment arrangements often work together and interact closely. Here, we study knowledge sharing when employees of the focal firm cooperate with external consultants. We differentiate between “in-group” (inside an employment category) and “out-group” (between employment categories) knowledge sharing and analyze the antecedents of knowledge sharing behavior. In an empirical study of 117 employees and external consultants, we find strong support for the main hypotheses: Internal employees tend to engage in more knowledge sharing than external consultants, in their relation to employees. Employees tend to engage in less knowledge sharing than external consultants, in their relation to external consultants. Trust in relation to a specific category of employment was also found to be statistically related to knowledge sharing behavior toward personnel in the category.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2015-07-09T09:01:00Z
       
  • Identifying and managing coordination complexity in global product
           development project
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Qing Yang , Sonia Kherbachi , Yoo Suk Hong , Chen Shan
      The complexity of communication and coordination stemming from teams distributed across geographic locations and time zones is a fundamental feature of the global product development (GPD) project. The GPD project is also a complex web of interactions involving many overlapped activities and interdependent components. In order to manage coordination complexity, this paper presents a systematic method for identifying and measuring coordination drivers and coordination barriers in GPD projects. For characterizing coordination drivers, this paper builds quantitative models to measure dependency strengths related to product features and overlapped processes based on Multi-Domain Matrix (MDM) and Design Structure Matrix (DSM). For characterizing coordination barriers, the concepts of daily overlapping working hours ratio and relative spatial distance between GPD teams are presented for modeling dependency strengths related to temporal separation and spatial distance. Further, this paper proposes a new dependency rating scheme of organization DSM to evaluate the integrated coordinative dependency strength (ICDS). A two-stage clustering criteria minimizing the total coordination cost is used to reduce complexity of GPD organization. An industrial example is provided to illustrate the proposed models. Optimization results provide a more integrated managerial insight for evaluating ICDS and reducing total coordination cost.


      PubDate: 2015-07-09T09:01:00Z
       
  • Classification of articles and journals on project control and earned
           value management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Laura L. Willems , Mario Vanhoucke
      This paper presents an overview of the existing literature on project control and earned value management (EVM), aiming at fulfilling three ambitions. First, the journal selection procedure allows to discern between high-quality journals and more popular business magazines. Second, the collected papers on project control and EVM, published in the selected journals, are classified based on a framework consisting of six distinct classes. Third, the classification framework indicates current trends and potential areas for future research, which can be summarized as follows: (i) increased attention to the stochastic nature of projects, (ii) enhanced validation of the proposed methodology using a large historical dataset or a simulation experiment, (iii) expansion of integrated control models, focusing on time and cost as well as other factors such as quality and sustainability, and (iv) development and validation of corrective action procedures.


      PubDate: 2015-07-05T09:58:40Z
       
  • Complex project conceptualization and the linguistic turn; the case of a
           small Australian construction company
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 June 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Allen McKenna , Georges Baume
      Conceptualizing complex projects, especially in the face of powerful communities of conflicting stakeholders can be messy. Doing so requires some means of coordinating the different ideas of stakeholders. The pragmatic cultural ethics summarized in the Australian ‘mate-ship’ argues success requires opportunity be given to all. This pragmatic philosophy provides the solution by offering all stakeholders the opportunity to be heard. After briefly reviewing pragmatism, this paper draws on the work of McKenna and Metcalfe and the linguistic turn, published in an earlier version of the International Journal of Project Management. It explains how this method can be used to help project managers conceive projects made complex by powerful communities of conflicting stakeholders. It then uses an Australian based organizational change project as an example of its application. Idea mapping is used to categorize stakeholder statements, revealing underlying linguistic concepts. It is argued that this approach provides a practical, yet philosophical and scientifically sound means of conceptualizing complex projects, and one that takes genuine advantage of the experience and knowledge of a wide range of stakeholders.


      PubDate: 2015-06-30T14:37:59Z
       
  • IPMA Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Helgi Thor Ingason



      PubDate: 2015-06-30T14:37:59Z
       
  • Exploratory findings on the influence of physical distance on six
           competencies in an international project
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 June 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Olivier Mesly
      The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of physical distance between offices located in different countries working on the same international project, within an exploratory scope rather than a confirmatory perspective. Qualitative and quantitative investigations were conducted that show that physical distance impacts six competencies of the international project under investigation, including ability to instill trust and to cooperate. However, this impact can be positive or negative depending on circumstances, as physical distance acts as a moderating variable most particularly between trust and cooperation. A ratio between control and transparency, two of the six competencies, appears to be in line with past research on the importance of ensuring sound management.


      PubDate: 2015-06-30T14:37:59Z
       
  • Benefits management: Lost or found in translation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 June 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Richard Breese , Stephen Jenner , Carlos Eduardo Martins Serra , John Thorp
      It is now about 25years since the emergence of benefits management (BM), but hitherto it has had limited impact on project management and even less on general management practices. This is despite evidence that a focus on benefits improves the success rate of projects and programmes. One of the areas for research to explain the limited uptake concerns the spread of knowledge on BM and its adoption by organisations. The theoretical lens of translation is used to examine this issue, which focuses on the processes through which management ideas spread and influence management practice. The global development of BM is traced to identify the changes in translation processes over time and the current geographical patterns of usage. This analysis is used in conjunction with the limited evidence available on translation processes at the level of the organisation to identify key factors for the impact of BM in the future.


      PubDate: 2015-06-30T14:37:59Z
       
  • Evaluation of the excess revenue sharing ratio in PPP projects using
           principal–agent models
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Yinglin Wang , Jicai Liu
      In PPP projects, a reasonable risk-sharing system determines whether project financing will be successful. It is often necessary for the host government to provide investors with certain guarantees that relieve some of the risk shouldered by the private parties in order to attract investment. For instance, a minimum revenue guarantee (MRG) supplied by the government reduces the market risk taken by the investor. Based on the principle that the benefits one receives should be fairly equal to the risks taken, governments have the right to share any excess revenue the investors gain equal to the difference between the actual revenue gained by the investors and the cap of the expected earnings. As a result, an excess revenue sharing ratio has to be determined. This paper integrates the fairness preference theory with the traditional principal–agent model in order to calculate optimal incentives when principals (governments) employ agents (investors) who have fairness preferences. This study shows that sharing ratio of the excess revenue is related to the fairness preferences and the effort cost coefficient of the investors. Furthermore, governments can obtain more expected revenue when hiring investors with higher fairness preferences.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Intuition in project management and missing links: Analyzing the
           predicating effects of environment and the mediating role of reflexivity
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Said Elbanna
      The role of an intuitive cognitive style in project planning may be more complex than prior studies have allowed for. Therefore, we used a model of the role of environment in intuition and the relationships between intuition, reflexivity, and project outcomes (measured as project success and speed of completion) in order to examine how environment influences intuition; and whether reflexivity mediates the link between intuition and project outcomes. Our field study incorporates responses from 450 managers representing 410 projects from firms located in the United Arab Emirates. The regression analysis suggests that competition uncertainty and environmental complexity are determinants of intuition; intuition promotes team reflexivity and this in turn enhances project outcomes. These results show that the intuitive approach in planning projects and team reflexivity are complementary foundations for improving different aspects of project performance and, therefore, that models of intuition in project management should incorporate the effects of reflexivity.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Call for papers: International Journal of Project Management Special issue
           “Managing Disaster Recovery Projects”
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Yan Chang-Richards (Alice) , Randy Rapp , Suzanne Wilkinson , Jason von Meding , Richard Haigh



      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • The project manager cannot be a hero anymore! Understanding critical
           competencies in project-based organizations from a multilevel approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sabrina Loufrani-Fedida , Stéphanie Missonier
      This paper focuses on improving the understanding of critical competencies in project-based organizations (PBOs) from a multilevel approach. To do so, we detail the types of “PBO competencies” (functional and integrative), and identify their links with the three levels of competencies in PBOs (individual, collective, and organizational). We perform case studies of four PBOs (IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Arkopharma, and Temex) operating in different sectors and reveal the relations that unite the three levels of critical competencies. The multilevel approach also highlights a new reading of the collective competence of a project team. Our study recommends that both practitioners and current academic researchers stop looking for the perfect, “ideal” project manager who would possess all of the necessary critical competencies for projects. Managers should consider sharing responsibility between the individual and organizational competencies and should not expect a project manager to possess all the required competencies.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Developing a framework for statistical process control approaches in
           project management
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Jeroen Colin , Mario Vanhoucke
      Different statistical process control (SPC) approaches were proposed over the years for project management using earned value management/earned schedule. A detailed examination of these approaches has led us to express a need for a unified framework in which to test and compare them. The main drivers for this need were the lack of a formal definition for a state of control, the unavailability of a benchmark dataset, the absence of measures to quantify the SPC performance and the lack of consensus on how to overcome and test the normality assumption. In this paper, we present such a framework that combines a classification from empirical data, a known project dataset, a sound simulation model and two quantitative measures for project control efficiency. Four SPC approaches from prior literature have been implemented and an exhaustive experiment was set up to compare and to discuss their value for the project management practice.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Key antecedents and practices for Supply Chain Management adoption in
           project contexts
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Davide Aloini , Riccardo Dulmin , Valeria Mininno , Simone Ponticelli
      An adequate identification of antecedents is recognized as fundamental in order to set the basis for connecting the inter-organizational networks in a SCM perspective. This work aims to identify key antecedents of SCM in a project-based environment by using Interpretive Structural Modelling (ISM). This is firstly useful in order to highlight the relationships among the antecedents and to deduce priority for their achievement. The findings provide a hierarchical perspective of the 16 identified antecedents. In particular, three macro-classes of prerequisites were defined: cross-organizational cooperation, rules and procedures — accessibility, and super-ordinate goals. Moreover, results from a longitudinal and illustrative case study are also presented in order to compare the out-coming ISM model with evidence from a success case in the Yacht-building context so offering interesting insights about the implementation process. From a managerial perspective, the proposed model offers a conceptual path for SCM adoption, emphasizing most critical issues that have to be considered and organized in this complex and unpredictable setting.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Resource management process framework for dynamic NPD portfolios
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Rui Abrantes , José Figueiredo
      This paper presents empirical results from a research on how companies developing products reconfigure their resources (we refer to human resources) as changes continuously occur to their new product development (NPD) portfolios. Although resource scheduling and allocation methods have received a wide attention in academic literature, the systematic and holistic resource management processes that support the whole organization's portfolio are still not understood. We have adopted an action research approach and worked together with different project teams of a multi-national company. This research approach has allowed us to get close contact with the difficulties faced by its managers, imposed by the need to quickly respond to the frequent changes in a coordinated manner. This research contributes to an improved understanding of the context in which resource management decisions are made. For practitioners, this proposes a process framework for organizations to effectively manage their resources in the context of dynamic NPD portfolios.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Diagnosing organizational risks in software projects: Stakeholder
           resistance
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Simon L.R. Vrhovec , Tomaž Hovelja , Damjan Vavpotič , Marjan Krisper
      Critical success and failure factors of software projects were extensively studied. However, software project risk management has rarely researched organizational risks even though most problems occur when the social aspects are not addressed. By employing the resistance to change theory, our paper develops an organizational risk diagnosing (ORD) framework in order to show how can organizational risks be better understood and managed. Organizational risk factors may have non-trivial underlying root causes. A failure to diagnose them may result in ineffective risk responses that address the symptoms. A case study of a loan application software project has been conducted in one of the biggest banks in South-Eastern Europe. An analysis of the risk management process in the studied case allows a better understanding of organizational risk management.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Persuasion and management support for IT projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Gloria H.W. Liu , Eric T.G. Wang , Cecil E.H. Chua
      This study assesses the effectiveness of an IT project team's direct persuasion behaviors in obtaining management support. The literature typically suggests that obtaining management support is critical for IT project success. The literature also generally prescribes cognition-based approaches to obtaining such support, ignoring the potential effect of emotion on influencing management. We employ organizational influence theory to identify direct persuasion strategies and posit that both cognitive involvement and emotional involvement mediate the effectiveness of influence strategies on management support. Our argument was tested on a survey of non-MIS managers who recently undertook large IT projects. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of two persuasion behaviors applied by the project team to obtain management support. Both persuasion behaviors encourage management support by increasing management's cognitive and emotional involvement in the project. We find that emotional involvement has a stronger effect than cognitive involvement on management support. Important implications for theory and practice are discussed.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Signs to dogma: A Heideggerian view of how artefacts distort the project
           world
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Bronte van der Hoorn , Stephen J. Whitty
      There are a variety of artefacts that are commonly associated with projects and their management. This article uses the Heideggerian concept of signs to disclose the elements of the “lived experience” of project work that are veiled or distorted by these artefacts. The exploration also identifies the elements of the dominant thinking of project management (dogma) that are referred to by these artefacts. The reason for this veiling and distortion is discussed with reference to the linguistics concept of veiled intention. A key implication of these findings is that effort is being expended on these artefacts which reinforce thinking that is not aligned with the “lived experience” of projects. It also indicates the relationship of the dominant project management dogma to the discipline’s artefacts.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Evaluating the level of stakeholder involvement during the project
           planning processes of building projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 5
      Author(s): Amirhossein Heravi , Vaughan Coffey , Bambang Trigunarsyah
      The purpose of this study is to examine the current level of stakeholder involvement during the project's planning process. Stakeholders often provide the needed resources and have the ability to control the interaction and resource flows in the network. They also ultimately have strong impact on an organisation's survival, and therefore appropriate management and involvement of key stakeholders should be an important part of any project management plan. A series of literature reviews was conducted to identify and categorise significant phases involved in the planning. For data collection, a questionnaire survey was designed and distributed amongst nearly 200 companies who were involved in the residential building sector in Australia. Results of the analysis demonstrate the engagement levels of the four stakeholder groups involved in the planning process and establish a basis for further stakeholder involvement improvement.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • The effects of project characteristics on adopting relational transaction
           strategies
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 5
      Author(s): Yan Ning , Florence Yean Yng Ling
      The objective of this study is to investigate whether project complicatedness and the chances of recurring exchanges influence the adoption of relational transactions in public construction projects. A structured questionnaire was administrated in Singapore. The Partial Least Square-Structural Equation Modelling was used to analyze the data. The statistical results show that: (1) the level of project complicatedness has a positive correlation with the preservation of relationships, cooperation between contracting parties and procedural flexibility; and (2) the chances of recurring exchanges are positively correlated with harmonization between contracting parties, cooperation between contracting parties and procedural flexibility. The quantitative results were complemented by qualitative evidence from eight in-depth interviews, which validated that both the level of project complicatedness and the chances of recurring exchanges have influence on the adoption of relational transaction practices. This study contributes to knowledge by presenting empirically that project characteristics influence the adoption of relational transactions.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Playing projects: Identifying flow in the ‘lived experience’
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 5
      Author(s): Bronte van der Hoorn
      The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the ‘lived experience’ of projects discourse. The research study uses an arts-based research method (musical improvisation on a xylophone and/or glockenspiel) to access the participant's perception of their experience of managing a project. Participants are then asked to explain their improvisation and therefore their experience. Key findings were that participants described their ‘lived experience’ of project managing as having ‘ups and downs’, including challenges and issues, and as experiencing variations in emotions over the project lifecycle. Csikszentmihalyi's flow theory is used to show that these ‘lived experience’ findings support a Heideggerian paradigm and personal perspective of what a project is. Projectness is not a characteristic of the activity itself. A project is a personal phenomenon defined in terms of the relationship between the individual or organisation and activity. It is dependent on capability versus the challenge presented by the activity.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Bridging BIM and building: From a literature review to an integrated
           conceptual framework
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Ke Chen , Weisheng Lu , Yi Peng , Steve Rowlinson , George Q. Huang
      A Building Information Model (BIM) is at risk of being ‘blind and deaf’ if its contained information cannot be synchronized with ongoing building processes in a real-time manner. Previous studies have attempted to explore solutions to the problem, with a view to making BIM a more useful decision-support system. However, an integrated conceptual framework summarizing these studies and structuring future development in the area is missing. Based on an ex post facto critical review of 75 papers of this kind published over the past decade, this paper proposes a conceptual framework for bridging BIM and building (BBB), which highlights the importance of synchronizing information between BIM and real-life building processes. The framework is further illustrated through a case study of prefabricated housing construction in Hong Kong. With this integrated conceptual framework, future research on BBB can proceed on a more solid footing.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 5




      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Choosing your words carefully: Leaders' narratives of complex emergent
           problem resolution
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 5
      Author(s): Liselore A. Havermans , Anne Keegan , Deanne N. Den Hartog
      As leaders, project and program managers use language as a vital tool in shaping their projects and programs. The ways in which leaders frame issues through their use of language impacts on how these issues are approached and resolved by members of the project team. In this study we explore the narratives of project and program managers in complex emergent problem resolution. We analyze interview data to show the storylines leaders construct regarding which groups are more or less important and the tensions between these groups, whether they frame the impact of outsiders as positive or negative, and how they portray the role of conflicting perspectives in problem resolution. We discuss the practical implications arising from our analysis of leadership narratives in the management of projects, the limitations of the current study and opportunities for future research.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Performance measurement and the prediction of capital project failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Hong Long Chen
      This paper examines how changes in project-management performance in the execution phase affect project outcomes at completion. While identifying the key determinants of project-management performance is critical, few studies examine the discriminatory power of performance variables for predicting capital project failure at completion. Using 130 capital projects and a longitudinal design, this study develops a performance-measurement model based on changes in project-management performance during the execution phase. Subsequent hierarchical logistic-regression analysis reveals a good explanation of the variation in the failure of capital projects and high classification accuracy. Validating out-of-sample data demonstrates that the optimal model provides a reasonably good overall classification rate of 81.54%. Ultimately, our findings suggest that performance changes in the execution phase explain an important part of project outcomes and, more importantly, are useful predictors for project failure.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Relationships between a project management methodology and project success
           in different project governance contexts
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Robert Joslin , Ralf Müller
      This study looks at the relationship between the use of a project management methodology (PMM) and project success, and the impact of project governance context on this relationship. A cross-sectional, world-wide, online survey yielded 254 responses. Analysis was done through factor analysis and moderated hierarchical regression analysis. The results of the study show that the application of a PMM account for 22.3% of the variation in project success, and PMMs that are considered sufficiently comprehensive to manage the project lead to higher levels of project success than PMMs that need to be supplemented for use by the project manager. Project governance acts as a quasi-moderator in this relationship. The findings should benefit project management practitioners by providing insights into the choice of PMM in different governance contexts. Academics should benefit from insights into PMMs' role as a success factors in projects.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Quantifying the complexity of transportation projects using the fuzzy
           analytic hierarchy process
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): An T. Nguyen , Long D. Nguyen , Long Le-Hoai , Chau N. Dang
      Transportation projects are increasingly complex. A systematic approach for measuring and evaluating complexity in transportation projects is imperative. Thirty six project complexity factors were identified specifically for transportation construction. Using factor analysis, this study deduced the six components of project complexity, namely sociopolitical, environmental, organizational, infrastructural, technological, and scope complexity. The Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (Fuzzy AHP) method was employed to determine the weights of the components and parameters of project complexity. Sociopolitical complexity was the most defining component of complexity in transportation construction. A complexity level (CL) was proposed to measure the overall project complexity. The application of the proposed approach was demonstrated in a case study of three transportation projects performed by a heavy construction company. As a quantitative measure CL enables managers to better anticipate potential difficulties in complex transportation projects. As a result, scarce resources will be allocated efficiently among transportation projects in a company’s portfolio.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Review of studies on the Critical Success Factors for Public–Private
           Partnership (PPP) projects from 1990 to 2013
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Robert Osei-Kyei , Albert P.C. Chan
      The Critical Success Factors for Public–Private Partnership is a major research interest worldwide therefore this paper aims to methodically review studies on the CSFs for implementing PPP from some selected top tier academic journals from 1990 to 2013 (years inclusive). The search results indicated an increased research interest in the exploration of PPP CSFs since 1990. The mostly identified CSFs are risk allocation and sharing, strong private consortium, political support, community/public support and transparent procurement. It was further noticed that Australia, the U.K., China and Hong Kong have been the countries of focus for most research studies on PPP CSFs. Finally the research approaches adopted are case study, questionnaire survey and mixed methods. The findings revealed provide an overview of CSFs for PPPs in order to enhance future implementations. Moreover a checklist of CSFs for PPPs has been developed, which could be adopted for further empirical studies.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Relational factors in owner–contractor collaboration: The mediating
           role of teamworking
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): Mohammad Suprapto , Hans L.M. Bakker , Herman G. Mooi
      We hypothesized that teamworking quality, defined as an inter-team collaborative process, is the mediator that links the efficacy of three antecedents—relational attitudes (relational norms and senior management commitment), collaborative practices (team integration and joint working procedures), and teams' joint capability (the project team's overall competence and experience)—in improving project performance (efficiency, effectiveness, perceived satisfaction, perceived success). Using a sample of 113 capital projects, we applied partial least squares structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. The results confirm that the three antecedents indirectly influence project performance through teamworking quality. There is no empirical evidence that these antecedents directly influence project performance: relational attitudes, teams' joint capability, and collaboration practices do not automatically lead to a successful collaboration without day-to-day managerial intervention in teamworking processes. We also found that the parties' expectations regarding continuing relationships, as a consequence of good project performance, are directly affected by relational attitudes.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Implementing systems thinking to manage risk in public private partnership
           projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 33, Issue 6
      Author(s): M. Loosemore , E. Cheung
      The complexity of public private partnership (PPP) projects ensures that risks can arise and spread in unpredictable and sometimes catastrophic ways. Systems thinking is often proposed as a potential solution to this problem but has not been widely adopted in practice. To explore the reasons for this, interviews were conducted with sixteen senior construction professionals with experience of PPPs. The results show that the main barriers to the adoption of systems thinking are: conflicts of interest within PPP projects; confrontational contracts; resistance to change; lack of time and resources; perceptions of complexity; unknown legal implications of sharing risk; and external validation of existing risk management practices. It is concluded that in moving to a systems thinking approach, deeply imbedded ontologies, path dependencies, confrontational practices, and traditional linear and reductionist risk management practices will need to be challenged. Five key questions are also proposed for future research in this area.


      PubDate: 2015-06-25T10:43:11Z
       
  • Risk-bearing capacity as a new dimension to the analysis of project
           governance
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 February 2015
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Chen-Yu Chang
      Project governance has been recognized as a critical factor to the success of project delivery in practice. Accordingly, this research aims to demonstrate that the notion of risk-bearing capacity (RBC) can be drawn upon as a new dimension to the analysis and design of project governance. An effort is made to link this concept with the definitions of governance employed within the literature of transaction cost economics and corporate governance. The RBC approach distinguishes itself from extant views of project governance through its ability to quantitatively integrate organizational (e.g., delivery system), contractual (e.g., risk-sharing ratio) and financial (e.g., insurance cover) measures. This novel approach provides an avenue for incorporating the project's historical construction and operating data into the design of project governance; an advantage with the potential to exponentially increase as a torrent of digital data is made available through the deployment of emergent information technologies (e.g. building information modelling).


      PubDate: 2015-05-13T19:26:25Z
       
 
 
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