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Journal Cover International Journal of Project Management
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0263-7863
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2970 journals]
  • How do contract types and incentives matter to project performance?
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Mohammad Suprapto, Hans L.M. Bakker, Herman G. Mooi, Marcel J.C.M Hertogh
      How collaborative contracts and contractual incentives might influence project performance remains equivocal. We hypothesized that their effects on project performance are mediated by owner–contractor collaboration, measured in terms of relational attitudes (relational norms and senior management commitment) and teamworking quality (inter-team collaborative processes). Using PLS-SEM, we analyzed a sample of 113 capital projects. The results suggest that through better relational attitudes and teamworking quality, projects with a partnering/alliance contract are likely to perform better than those with lump-sum and reimbursable contracts. Likewise, the projects with incentive contracts are likely to perform better than those without incentives through better relational attitudes and teamworking quality. There were no differences in project performance directly associated with different contract types and contractual incentives. Taken together, a partnering/alliance contract and incentive contracts do not necessarily result directly into better project performance but through relational attitudes and how they play out into actual teamworking behavior.


      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • Mapping the multi-faceted: Determinants of uncertainty in safety-critical
           projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Fiona C. Saunders, Andrew W. Gale, Andrew H. Sherry
      Project managers tasked with delivering safety-critical projects must demonstrate care, competence and confidence right from the earliest stages of project inception, when levels of uncertainty can be very high. Based on interviews with 30 project management practitioners in civil nuclear and aerospace sectors, this paper builds on work by Saunders et al. (2015), who posited the Uncertainty Kaleidoscope as a framework for identifying uncertainties. Our findings are that the six determinants of project uncertainty are similar across both civil nuclear and aerospace projects. The most commonly mentioned determinant of project uncertainty was the Environment, followed by Complexity, Capability and Information. The impact of Time on project uncertainty and Individual perceptions of uncertainty were mentioned less frequently by respondents. Our key contribution is to validate the Uncertainty Kaleidoscope over a larger data set, thereby enriching our understanding of the sources of project uncertainty in these two important and highly-consequential project environments.


      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • In project management, uncertainty is a great opportunity
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Martina Huemann, Miia Martinsuo



      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • Antecedents of project managers' voice behavior: The moderating effect of
           organization-based self-esteem and affective organizational commitment
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Bastian Ekrot, Johannes Rank, Hans Georg Gemünden
      Theory and research stress that employee voice behavior (VB; discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions, or concerns with the intent to improve organizational functioning) positively influences decision making, improvement, and innovation. However, the VB construct has rarely been studied in the specific context of project management. Using a sample of 618 project managers and 154 project portfolio coordinators nested in 154 firms, the main purpose of this study was to analyze a moderated model, in which specific contextual factors interact with individual-level variables to predict project managers' VB. Consistent with our hypotheses derived from self-consistency theory, moderated hierarchical regression analysis revealed that idea encouragement, career perspectives, qualification opportunities, and peer collaboration related more positively to VB for project managers with a high level of organization-based self-esteem. For project managers high in affective organizational commitment, we found stronger positive relationships of peer collaboration and idea encouragement with project managers' VB.


      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • A framework for governance of projects: Governmentality, governance
           structure and projectification
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Ralf Müller, Li Zhai, Anyu Wang, Jingting Shao
      This paper develops a general-purpose framework for the governance of projects. The framework is structured by the concepts of governmentality and governance of projects, in the context of different levels of projectification in organizations. It visualizes the organization-specific profiles for these concepts. The dimensions and scales underlying the three concepts derived mainly from the literature on governance, general management, and project management. Eight case studies in four industries in Scandinavia and China validated the dimensions and scales and identified a new dimension for the concept of governmentality. This dimension, called precept, addresses the predominant theme in governmentality as being either organizational values, process compliance, or project well-being. Theoretical implications are in the integration of so far separate concepts plus a new governmentality dimension into one overall framework and visualization of it. Practical implications are in the identification of organization specific profiles, which can be used to develop generic profiles for industries, geographies, or otherwise different governance regimes.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • Identifying interesting project phenomena using philosophical and
           methodological triangulation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Robert Joslin, Ralf Müller
      The scarcity of accepted research designs within each research philosophy paradigm limits the variance of research approaches, which reduces the chances to identify real new phenomena. We propose that researchers use triangulation of alternative research philosophies to identify interesting new phenomena, provide alternative perspectives to complex problems, and gain a richer and more holistic understanding of complex project management problems. Philosophical triangulation extends methodological triangulation into the realm of ontology and epistemology and provides for more comprehensive understanding, as it resembles a more realistic view towards social science phenomena, which, by their nature, appear differently to people, and thus are seen from different ontological perspectives simultaneously. Three related studies are used to exemplify the approach, where the results of two sets of empirical data (qualitative and quantitative) are discussed in different philosophical contexts. Implications for scholars include more practice-oriented research perspectives in line with the projects-as-practice stream by extending existing benefits from methodological triangulation into philosophical triangulation in order to identify and understand complex phenomena.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • The “economic–finance interface” for eco-innovation
           projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sabina Scarpellini, Jesús Valero-Gil, Pilar Portillo-Tarragona
      It is widely accepted that eco-innovation is a feasible direction if we want to progress towards sustainable development. However, in many European countries, eco-innovation projects are currently not common because of the significant barriers to and the negligible culture of including eco-innovation in an organisation's strategy. In this scenario, the analysis of eco-innovation project determinants offers a new strategic approach for industries to manage sustainable innovation initiatives. A specific methodology has been developed for this purpose to analyse the main characteristics of 44 applied eco-innovation projects. The purpose of the methodology described in this paper is to define the “economic–finance interface” between these projects and the main characteristics of firms in which such eco-innovation has been applied and to provide guidance in the implementation of eco-innovation to align project management with business strategy.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • A conceptualisation of relationship quality in construction procurement
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Mostafa Babaeian Jelodar, Tak Wing Yiu, Suzanne Wilkinson
      Relational contracting is often regarded as means to improve performance and profit margins in managing projects. A continuum of contracts in construction projects attempts to provide fit for purpose relationships to different working conditions; hosting levels of relationship quality. This study aims to explore contracting methodologies within construction procurement in search of practical and manageable relationship quality attributes. Initially relational attributes such as teamwork, commitment and trust along with seven main strategies for achieving these attributes are extracted from relevant studies. In the second stage construction expert interviews suggest that performance satisfaction is also a practical attribute and necessity of relationship quality. The study proposes a framework of actions and seven strategies which can facilitate the attributes associated with relationship quality. Finally based on the framework and three case studies five levels of transaction, action, strategy, attribute and relationship are demonstrated for relationship quality evaluation in construction project's procurement practices.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • Balancing contradictory temporality during the unfold of innovation
           streams
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Fanny Simon, Albéric Tellier
      This article focuses on individuals working on innovation developments during the unfolding of innovation streams. Innovation streams include both exploitation- and exploration-oriented projects. Those projects imply different temporalities and can be conducted at different paces. This research examines how different temporalities within a single innovation stream are managed first at the level of projects and then among projects. We collected data on an innovation stream in the semiconductor industry. We explain how teams and organization develop processes and tools to address different temporalities. The results show that the process of learning occurs first within projects and then among projects. Our research offers new understandings of the transition of organizations towards a project-based structure by demonstrating that changes in practices can occur first as a reaction to external events, then as the results of new arrangements triggered by management and finally as the consequences of the team’s proactive actions.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • Projectyness: A spectrum of greater or lesser capability
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Bronte van der Hoorn, Stephen J. Whitty
      Grounding in continental philosophical perspectives, and in alignment with the calls to rethink project management, this article reconceptualises what is a project. This conceptual paper uses the theoretical concepts of Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Dawkins as an interpretative lens to consider project work. The findings are that no activity is innately a project. A project is an experience that arises when there is a lack of inherent capability to undertake the activity. It is associated with a projecty experience: spikiness, roughness, and emotional ups and downs. Furthermore, it is found that there is no point of clear distinction between operational and project work: there is a projectyness spectrum. Based on these findings, we identify that project managing is about managing a lack of inherent capability and managing multiple people's experience (not a single detached activity). Furthermore, the point at which to adopt project management techniques is not definitive.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • A framework for examining the dimensions and characteristics of complexity
           inherent within rail megaprojects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Robert J. Chapman
      This paper presents a framework for examining the dimensions and characteristics of project complexity, with an emphasis on rail megaprojects. UK government departments have recorded that project complexity has increased significantly over the last decade and highlight that the subject has received inadequate attention, with a detrimental effect on project performance. However departments have not examined the characteristics of complexity or made a distinction between complexity emanating from the decisions made by the project itself and the complexity emanating from its context, as they warrant different treatment. By way of response, post examination and comparison of existing frameworks, a new framework is proposed based on a literature review. A case study is examined to illustrate how the framework may be applied.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • Key factors of sustainability in project management context: A survey
           exploring the project managers' perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Mauro L. Martens, Marly M. Carvalho
      Topics of project management and sustainability have been addressed by countless studies, but research focusing on the intersection of these topics are needed. This research looks at sustainability through the triple-bottom line perspective: economic, social, and environmental. It aims to identify key aspects of sustainability in project management context and to understand its importance based on project managers' lens. A systematic literature review merging bibliometric and content analysis was applied toward an understanding of the key topics. Further, a survey of project managers was performed and analyzed through exploratory factor analysis. The results show that four factors stood out: Sustainable Innovation Business Model, Stakeholders Management, Economic and Competitive Advantage, and Environmental Policies and Resources Saving.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • Enhancing the supplier's non-contractual project relationships with
           designers
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Rami Sariola, Miia Martinsuo
      Project delivery involves networks of customers, contractors, sub-contractors, suppliers, and designers. Strong interorganizational relationships are considered relevant to project performance. Previous research has focused on contractual relationships in direct supply chains, with little attention to suppliers and their non-contractual relationships. This study develops and tests a framework of relationship strength and its antecedents in the non-contractual relationship between suppliers and designers as third parties in construction projects. The intent is to identify the key factors relevant to enhancing the supplier's non-contractual relationships with designers. The results reveal the supplier's activeness and technical capability as antecedents to trust, and supplier's technical capability and supplier–designer cooperation beyond project boundaries as antecedents to commitment. The different antecedents of trust and commitment imply alternative pathways for strengthening non-contractual relationships in construction projects, thereby deviating from activities in contractual relationships. Further research is proposed on other types of third parties and other antecedents of commitment.


      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • An analysis of risk sharing in strategic R&D and new product
           development projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Terry R. Adler, Thomas G. Pittz, Jack Meredith
      While prior research regarding strategic projects recognizes the tension inherent in interfirm relationships, less is understood of the impact of risk sharing in the design of the contracts guiding those relationships. This investigation illuminates important performance elements of projects as they differ in the amount of contractual risk that is shared among firms. Through a multivariate analysis of 240 United States defense department R&D and new product development contracts, we found that defense contracts with partner risk sharing built in involve more change and growth than their concentrated risk counterparts. Our results suggest that projects, when managed through interfirm contracts, are more likely to involve strategic change when risk is shared than when either the buyer or seller assumes full design, technical, and/or financial risk. The results further suggest that projects containing shared buyer and seller risk enhance the prospects of joint gain through the generation of opportunities for learning.


      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • Exploring the management style of Brazilians project managers
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Pamela Ramos, Caroline Mota, Luciana Corrêa
      This research aims to identify the management style adopted by project managers. We conducted factor analysis to refine the data and to identify the management style most commonly used by project managers. Lastly, we ran Levene's test, one-way ANOVA analysis, and Kruskal–Wallis test to make assumptions considering gender and organizational sector in a sample of 129 project management practitioners. We notice that most project managers state a reactive and determined management style and give importance to interaction between parties. Brazilians project managers may desire to minimize their loss in the time of financial instability. The results present that there is no significant change for gender and organizational sector. This finding proves that regardless of gender or organizational sector, they have similar judgment about how they manage people and projects. The relevance of studies regarding management style remains, particularly for the Brazilian scenario where the literature on this subject is embryonic, and where the current economic situation is passing through. The results of this study produce insights for project managers interested in developing management abilities.


      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • Researching complex projects: Using causal mapping to take a systems
           perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Fran Ackermann, James Alexander
      Extant literature has called for researchers to be more pluralistic in their approaches to researching projects. Responding to this call, this paper offers an exposition of a causal mapping technique. In the project management literature, there already exists a small number of articles reporting effective use of causal mapping. However, these are not dedicated to detailed explanation of the technique itself and so lack consideration of its features beyond those relevant to a particular application. Consequently, an exposition of the technique is needed to enable comprehensive understanding of causal mapping to be gained and its suitability for research designs assessed. Specifically, this paper examines causal mapping's theoretical grounding, explores its strengths and weakness, presents example applications, compares alternative causal mapping approaches, and overall, explains how causal mapping can support a systemic perspective on projects. These issues will be of interest to researchers who wish to incorporate causal mapping into their project management research designs.


      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5




      PubDate: 2016-05-06T03:04:14Z
       
  • Identifying perspectives of public project managers on project success:
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Leonie Koops, Marian Bosch-Rekveldt, Laura Coman, Marcel Hertogh, Hans Bakker
      Public and private project managers contribute to the success of Large Infrastructure Projects. Considering the public client, so far researchers have been looking at him in a passive role with respect to project success. The focus of this exploratory research is what public project managers who are actively involved in the project, consider project success. Using Q-methodology, we identify four viewpoints in the respondent group, consisting of managers from five North-Western European countries and the specific success criteria accompanying these viewpoints. Within each viewpoint, the managers have the same vision on the ranking of project success criteria. Next to the conventional project manager, we distinguish the product driven manager, the parent oriented manager and the manager with a stakeholder focus. In Large Infrastructure Projects, where public and private partners collaborate, awareness of these different perspectives will help to understand the motives of the public project manager.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-04-25T07:13:09Z
       
  • The positive effect of expressing negative emotions on knowledge creation
           capability and performance of project teams
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): John Paul Stephens, Abraham Carmeli
      Organizations are built around teams as a way to better manage complex work, such as technological projects. However, complex teamwork presents challenges that can often generate positive and negative emotions, as well as demand efforts to generate new knowledge. We examine whether and how the capacity of technological product development teams to constructively express negative emotions facilitates knowledge creation capabilities and thereby enhances project outcomes. Results indicate that with greater capacity for constructively expressing negative emotions, teams enhance their capability to access crucial knowledge and exchange and integrate that knowledge in ways that enhance both project performance outcomes and project budget adherence. In so doing, we hope to open up new avenues for research on how expressing negative emotions in project teams can help in building knowledge creation capabilities and drive multiple performance outcomes.


      PubDate: 2016-04-25T07:13:09Z
       
  • Stability & reconstruction operations as mega projects: Drivers of
           temporary network effectiveness
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Paul C. van Fenema, Sebastiaan Rietjens, Peter van Baalen
      Mega projects require a temporary network of contributors. Stability & Reconstruction Operations are examined as mega projects, characterized by high levels of ambiguity and a non-permissive environment. The objective of this paper is to introduce a developmental view on managing a temporary network of contributors, and to examine in which dimensions development needs to take place. Drawing on mega project management and network theory, development of a temporary network of contributors is conceptualized using four phases: forming, storming, norming and performing. Data collection for our qualitative case study on Afghanistan focused on international actors involved in Afghanistan. We identified development challenges across four dimensions: heterogeneous stakeholders, governance, knowledge and coordination routines, and performance management. Researchers and practitioners may use this developmental view to better understand why mega projects fail or succeed, in particular when these concern heterogeneous network partners and (potentially) adversarial relationships among stakeholders in the project's local context.


      PubDate: 2016-04-17T18:48:48Z
       
  • Skills that improve profitability: The relationship between project
           management, IT skills, and small to medium enterprise profitability
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Julien Pollack, Daniel Adler
      It is commonly assumed that using project management and IT skills are good for business performance. This research explored this assumption by testing whether the use of project management and IT skills have a positive affect on business' total sales and profitability. The research data was drawn from two longitudinal Government surveys of small to medium enterprises in Australia. Models were created to describe the relationship between project management, IT skills, profitability and total sales using multiple linear regression and binary logistic regression. The results show that when controlling for the influence of other business skills, project management and IT skills have a significant positive influence on sales and profitability.


      PubDate: 2016-04-12T18:43:46Z
       
  • Selecting risk response strategies considering project risk
           interdependence
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Yao Zhang
      In risk response analysis, risks are often assumed independently. In fact, however, risks in a project mutually affect and the independent risk seldom exists in reality. This paper provides an approach to quantitatively measure the risk interdependence. Based on the analysis of the risk interdependence, we construct an optimization model for selecting risk response strategies considering the expected risk loss, risk interdependence and its two directions. Further, the effects of the risk interdependence on risk response can be investigated. There are two major findings by the analysis of the case project. First, the expected utility would be more sensitive to the risk interdependence itself than to the directions of it. Second, the insufficient attention paid to or neglect of the risk interdependence would lower the expected utility and increase the implementation cost.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T18:35:03Z
       
  • Transformational leadership and project success: The mediating role of
           team-building
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): D.A. Aga, N. Noorderhaven, B. Vallejo
      Although the effect of transformational leadership on project success is empirically supported, less is known about the mechanisms that explain this effect. To address this issue, we propose the mediating role of team-building as a possible explanation of the relationship between transformational leadership and project success. Based on a field survey of 200 development project managers in the Ethiopian Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) sector, the results of our study indicate that team-building partially mediates the effect of transformational leadership on project success. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T18:35:03Z
       
  • How safety leadership works among owners, contractors and subcontractors
           in construction projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Chunlin Wu, Feng Wang, Patrick X.W. Zou, Dongping Fang
      Leadership is a key factor impacting construction safety, but previous research merely investigated the single-level relationship between safety leadership and safety performance and ignored the leadership interaction between different project stakeholders. To fill this gap, this paper aims to examine the relationships between safety leaderships of project owners, contractors and subcontractors and discover leadership dimensions which significantly impact construction safety performance. An impacting mechanism involving owner safety leadership, contractor safety leadership and subcontractor safety leadership are hypothetically proposed and empirically tested. The results show that significant relationships exist between safety leaderships of the three key stakeholders. Project safety culture acts as a significant mediator in these relationships. In addition, among all leadership dimensions of owners and contractors, safety influence and role modeling has the widest range of influence on project safety culture and other stakeholders' safety leadership. As such, it is suggested that owners and contractors should cultivate charisma and the ability of being influential about ideals in project managers and require them to behave as role models for others. The results also show that the caring dimension of leadership is more required in the frontline environment. Supervisors need more attention and support from the contractor in their well-being and organizational identification for the project. In conclusion, this paper establishes clear leadership impacting paths from owners to site supervisors of subcontractors in construction projects, which provides insights into effective ways to implement managerial measures and publicize policies and values to construction sites.


      PubDate: 2016-04-02T17:00:54Z
       
  • Enhancing project benefit realization through integration of line managers
           as project benefit managers
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Dorthe Håhr Dupont, Pernille Eskerod
      Many organizations establish projects to undertake change efforts. However, the aimed-for benefits are often difficult to harvest. A viable way to move the field forward may be to address the WHO question related to project benefit realization. A case study was undertaken in the international service organization with multi-site branches. The aim of this study was to investigate the potentials of integrating line managers in a formal role as project benefit managers within a project team for enhancing realization of project benefits. Based on the findings, we claim that line managers as project benefit managers can enhance compliance in project implementation. This is not least due to their detailed knowledge about operational processes. However, the cohesiveness of a project benefit manager’s network as well as the mutual relationship between the project benefit manager and relevant peer managers has an importance for the success of the project benefit managers.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • The impact of project management (PM) and benefits management (BM)
           practices on project success: Towards developing a project benefits
           governance framework
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Amgad Badewi
      Benefits management (BM) and project management (PM) are two interrelated approaches to the success of projects. The literature, however, still lacks empirical evidence of the value of applying BM practices. Hence, it is aimed to test the impact of BM practices on the success of investments in projects, taking into consideration the impact of PM practices on that success. Since the results, based on 200 valid responses, suggest that a significant proportion of organisations adopt PM and BM concurrently, SEM was used. PM practices were not only found to influence project management success but also to affect project investment success. However, BM is found to be less significant and to have less impact on project investment success. Nevertheless, the probability of project success is enhanced significantly when PM and BM practices are combined together. Therefore, a governance based framework is developed to uncover the interweaving relationship between the two practices.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • International journal of project management special issue on
           “project benefit management”
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Ofer Zwikael



      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • Taking stock of project value creation: A structured literature review
           with future directions for research and practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Markus Laursen, Per Svejvig
      This paper aims to take stock of what we know about project value creation and to present future directions for research and practice. We performed an explorative and unstructured literature review, which was subsequently paired with a structured literature review. We join several research areas by adopting the project value creation perspective on literature relating to benefits, value, performance, and success in projects. Our review includes 111 contributions analyzed through both an inductive and deductive approach. We find that relevant literature dates back to the early 1980s, and the still developing value-centric view has been the subject of many publications in recent years. We contribute to research on project value creation through four directions for future research: rejuvenating value management through combining value, benefits, and costs; supplementing value creation with value capture; applying a holistic approach to project, portfolio, and strategic management; and theorizing by applying independent models and frameworks.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • Benefits of information system projects: The tale of two countries
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Carl Marnewick
      International results emphasise that information systems (IS) projects fail at an alarming rate and do not contribute to the strategy of the organisation. The results also indicate that there is a shift in how IS project success is measured, i.e. towards benefits realisation. This raises the concern whether organisations understand the notion of benefits management. Secondly, does benefits management have an impact on the success rates of IS projects and ultimately the success of the organisation itself? Organisations within the Netherlands and South Africa were targeted to benchmark the benefits management process employed by the organisations against best practices. Semi-structured interviews were conducted within 33 organisations and the interviewees expressed their views on the adoption of the benefits management process. The results indicate that although organisations are aware of and are implementing benefits management best practices, there is still a notion not to relate the delivered benefits back to the promised benefits within the business case. Benefits management also plays a role within individual projects and not just within programme management. Organisations can reap more benefits from IS projects when benefits are stipulated up front and are managed throughout the project/programme life cycle. Enhancing benefits realisation implies that the return on investment improves and that organisations ultimately are successful and sustainable.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • Managing program impacts in new product development: An exploratory case
           study on overcoming uncertainties
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Teemu Laine, Tuomas Korhonen, Miia Martinsuo
      New product development (NPD) programs are designed to implement innovation strategies in a coordinated way. Managing program impacts in a multi-project setting is insufficiently covered in research and increasingly challenging in practice. This paper explores program impact management practice. The paper focuses on NPD program impact management as a joint effort where program stakeholders collectively identify, make sense of and overcome uncertainties and ambiguities to create and enhance the program impact. The qualitative study relies on in-depth access to a large-scale NPD program in the machine manufacturing industry. The results show that program impact includes several financial and non-financial aspects and is made jointly and separately by the program organization, thus involving different uncertainties and ambiguities. Through collective sensemaking, knowledge about the program impacts may be strengthened, and the impacts may be extended beyond immediate benefits.


      PubDate: 2016-03-13T06:21:53Z
       
  • Identifying critical factors affecting the effectiveness and efficiency of
           tendering processes in Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs): A
           comparative analysis of Australia and China
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Tingting Liu, Yan Wang, Suzanne Wilkinson
      The success of Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) largely depends on the performance of tendering processes. This research aims to conduct a comparative analysis of critical factors affecting the effectiveness and efficiency of PPP tendering in Australia and China. A triangulation of literature review, semi-structured interviews and questionnaire survey was used. The research identified 14 critical factors underpinning the implementation of PPP tendering, under 7 dimensions: (1) Robustness of business case development; (2) Quality of project brief; (3) Public sector capacity; (4) Governance structures; (5) Effectiveness of communication; (6) Balance between streamlining and competition; and (7) Level of transparency of tendering processes. The following analysis suggested that there are statistically significant differences in eight factors between the two countries. By adopting the recommended strategies, both public and private entities engaging in PPP projects will be at a better position to structure and manage the tendering processes.


      PubDate: 2016-03-13T06:21:53Z
       
  • Critical success factors for community-driven development projects: A Sri
           Lankan community perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Sugath Yalegama, Nicholas Chileshe, Tony Ma
      Despite significant investments, community-driven development (CDD) projects have yielded mixed successes in different countries and localities, underscoring the need to improve the project model. Recognising the importance of critical success factors (CSFs) in this exercise from different stakeholders’ perspectives and at a project-level ‘micro’ view, this study identifies the CSFs of the Gemidiriya CDD project of Sri Lanka from a community perspective. Questionnaires were administered to beneficiary community members and community project managers at villages to assess the importance of various project model features and linkages with overall project success. Factor analysis identified three critical success factors: enabling community environment, measurable project management outcomes by village organization and community project management engagement. Project managers should view CSFs from an impact-on-ground-orientation rather than a task-orientation. Furthermore, the beneficiaries who were also involved in the project execution may have a greater tendency to assign a high weight on the impact.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • The relationship between project governance and project success
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Robert Joslin, Ralf Müller
      This study looks at the relationship between project governance and project success from an agency theory and stewardship theory perspective. For that project governance was operationalized respectively as a) the extent of shareholder versus stakeholder orientation and b) the extent of behavior versus outcome control, both exercised by the parent organization over its project. A cross-sectional, worldwide online survey yielded 254 usable responses. Factor and regression analyses indicate that project success correlates with increasing stakeholder orientation of the parent organization, while the types of control mechanisms do not correlate with project success. Results support the importance of stewardship approaches in the context of successful projects.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Integrated PPM Process: Scale Development and Validation
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Marisa Padovani, Marly M. Carvalho
      This study aims to propose and validate a structural model on project portfolio management, identifying the core processes. Moreover, this study aims to investigate the relation between project portfolio management and performance. The model is proposed and validated through a survey-based research, applying structural equation modeling. The total sample size comprises 103 valid questionnaires. The project portfolio management measurement model validated is composed by a set of 11 processes as follows: knowledge of the organizational context; opportunity identification; decision criteria; classification; selection, prioritization, optimization and sequencing; balancing; approval; resource allocation; formation of portfolio; and project portfolio management infrastructure. The findings indicate that there is a strong relationship between project portfolio management and performance.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Impromptu teams in a temporary organization: On their nature and role
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Mattias Jacobsson, Markus Hällgren
      The abundance and importance of temporary project teams in society introduces the need of understanding their nature. The purpose of this article thus is to highlight the existence of an only accidentally investigated type of team that we identify as Impromptu teams, and analyze their role in a temporary organization. Based on a detailed retrospective account of the infamous disaster on Mount Everest in 1996, we identify three examples of Impromptu teams. The three examples indicate that the teams are characterized by being triggered by an unexpected event, and formed through a bottom-up process, where joining the team is voluntary and the activities are based on a logic of appropriateness, rather than rule following. The identification and nature of Impromptu teams have implications far beyond Mount Everest, since most organizations at some point need to use teams similar to the identified examples.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Critical review on PPP Research – A search from the Chinese and
           International Journals
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Shang Zhang, Albert P.C. Chan, Yingbin Feng, Hongxia Duan, Yongjian Ke
      A significant number of literatures have concentrated on diverse issues related to Public–Private Partnership (PPP) both in China and abroad. However, there is no systematic analysis on the PPP research progress and status in Chinese journals, which is worth investigating because China is one of the largest PPP markets globally. In addition, there are many PPP publications in international journals based on the context of China. A comparative study is still missing between the PPP publications in Chinese journals and international journals. This paper hence aims to conduct a critical review of PPP publications from selected first tier Chinese journals and international journals. Based on a three-stage literature review research framework, 615 and 70 high quality research papers on PPP topics were selected from Chinese and international journals in the last decade between 2005 and 2014, respectively. Main research methods, research topics and research findings were then identified through content analysis and statistical analysis methods. It is found that in these two journals the frequently adopted research methods are case study, literature review, modeling, questionnaire survey and comparison; and the popular research topics include PPP models and their application, risk management, financing and economic issues, legal and procurement issues, government regulation and guarantee. Comparison analysis results show that in terms of order of popularity, there are more similarities in the research topics than research methods in Chinese and international journals. The outcomes of this paper contribute to the PPP body of knowledge through summarizing PPP research in Chinese journals and international journals in the context of China. In addition, the findings are valuable for Chinese researchers to embark future research on PPP. This paper also breaks the language barrier and enriches western researchers a better understanding of the research status of PPP in the context of China.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • The impact of product superiority on customer satisfaction in project
           management
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Matti J. Haverila, Kacy Fehr
      This paper investigates direct and moderating role of product superiority between project management and customer satisfaction. The data comes from customer satisfaction surveys conducted for a Fortune 500 company in building control systems industry. Data was aggregated over 18 consecutive months with 3129 surveys completed. Results showed that product superiority in project management has a significant direct impact on perceived customer satisfaction throughout the project. Furthermore product superiority somewhat strengthens the relationship between the project management stages and customer satisfaction. Due to this dual impact of the product superiority on the project management and customer satisfaction relationship, product superiority is a quasi-moderating variable in statistical terms. The results also suggest that product superiority, being a precursor for customer satisfaction, has lower impact on customer satisfaction than the actual project management aspect. This may be an indication of the higher service rather than product oriented nature of the system delivery projects.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Development paths of project managers: What and how do project managers
           learn from their experiences?
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Chantal M.J.H. Savelsbergh, Liselore A. Havermans, Peter Storm
      The development paths of project managers are paved with formal and informal learning experiences. Knowledge of the learning experiences that project managers indicate as important for their development as professionals is limited in both the academic and the practitioner world. In the current study we explore what and how project managers learn from experiences, and what is perceived as supporting this learning. We used a multi-method approach, consisting of in-depth interviews and a short follow-up survey among 31 project managers. Results show that most learning experiences occur more or less accidentally on the job and support for learning from these experiences is limited. This suggests potential to improve the quality and pace of the development paths of project managers. Limitations of the current study, and implications of these findings for theory and practice are discussed opening up avenues for future research.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • The agility construct on project management theory
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Edivandro Carlos Conforto, Daniel Capaldo Amaral, Sergio Luis da Silva, Ariani Di Felippo, Dayse Simon L. Kamikawachi
      Definitions of agility found in the project management (PM) and agile project management (APM) disciplines are inconsistent, incomplete and lack clarity. This paper presents a complete definition of the agility construct, built from a combination of systematic literature review and frame semantics methodology. A survey with 171 projects with different innovation levels and industry sectors combined with factor analysis was used to first validate the construct. The results show that the agility construct is cohesive and useful in different PM contexts. The implications for advancing the PM theory and practice are threefold: i) agility should be considered a team's performance, rather than a mere adjective for practices and methods; ii) agility, as a performance, might be dependent upon a combination of organization, team and project factors; and iii) the agility performance level can be measured within two main factors: rapid project planning change and active customer involvement.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Projects with internal vs. external customers: An empirical investigation
           of variation in practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Brian Hobbs, Claude Besner
      The purpose of this paper and the research programme of which it is part is to empirically investigate variations in project management practice. The research is based on the analysis of an extensive dataset containing information on the extent of use of a large number of practices and contextual variables related to organisational contexts and project characteristics. The paper focusses on the effects of the difference between projects with internal and external customers, which have been shown to be an important characteristic of the project context. A distinction is made between the extent of use of project management practices and the effect of variation in the extent of use on project performance, which are shown to be very different both conceptually and empirically.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Are complexity and uncertainty distinct concepts in project
           management? A taxonomical examination from literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Milind Padalkar, Saji Gopinath
      Project management research is characterized by dominance of determinism, decision-theoretic approaches, and weak theories. The growth of research interest in non-deterministic paradigms through the lenses of complexity and uncertainty is recent, and could provide stronger theoretic explanations. However, analysis of select project management literature reveals that the constructs of complexity and uncertainty are yet to be grounded in terms of definitions and constituent variables. We argue that definitional clarity is necessary for the non-deterministic research to move forward. In this paper, we propose taxonomy of constituent terms of complexity and uncertainty based on semantic analysis of select literature and show that the two constructs are broadly confounded in their constituent terms. While our finding may appear to align with complexity theoretic concept of strong interrelationship between complexity and uncertainty, we argue that such confounding represents intermingling of varying ontological and epistemological preferences within the community of project management scholars rather than a broad adherence to the complexity theory. The paper contributes to project management literature by facilitating further research toward stronger construct definitions and theory-building efforts. The paper also contributes to research methods by offering a novel methodology to elicit taxonomy of terms and to illuminate the confounding and separating terms across multiple constructs.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2016-02-26T19:19:06Z
       
  • Announcement of the IPMA Research Awards 2015
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Helgi Thor Ingason



      PubDate: 2016-02-15T13:04:41Z
       
  • The impact of organizational project benefits management governance on ERP
           project success: Neo-institutional theory perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Amgad Badewi, Essam Shehab
      The success of ERP has been discussed extensively throughout the last decade. However, this research offers a new lens for understanding this success through combining project management theory with institutional theory. Based on neo-institutional theory, it is proposed that the more the Project Management (PM) and Benefits Management (BM) are used as practice and governance frameworks in an organization, the more it is able to use them in ERP projects since they become part of its institutional logic in managing its projects. Therefore, ERP investment success is hypothesized to be associated with the organization's project and benefits management institutional logics. After analyzing 130 questionnaires using Structural Equation Modeling, it is found that these hypotheses are supported. Furthermore, the organizations that have both logics outperform others which have not. This research implies that project management is not responsible for the project investment success. This is the responsibility of business change management.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • “Evaluating performance of public sector projects in Russia: The
           choice of a social discount rate”
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Tatiana Kossova, Maria Sheluntcova
      Public sector project management in Russia is inefficiently carried out. One reason for this is an absence of generally accepted procedures for evaluating the performance of projects. In the framework of evaluating performance, there is the issue of evaluating the rate for discounting the anticipated benefits and costs of public projects to the present moment. This paper contains a methodology for estimating the social discount rate for cost–benefit analysis in various economic industries in Russia. We apply two approaches – social rate of time preferences and social opportunity cost of capital – and propose a methodology for projects related to any industry. We present examples of estimating the social discount rate for healthcare, education, social services, and infrastructure projects. Our results are useful when both the government and private firms are able to solve the same social problems. The findings are applicable for any country with unequal development of various economic industries.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • How to apply the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge model to wire an
           organisation for the capability of storytelling
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Stephen Duffield, Stephen J. Whitty
      This study is an application of the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge (Syllk) model that enables management to conceptualise how organisational know-how for storytelling is wired (distributed) across various elements of an organisation. The research method consisted of action research cycles within a large division of a government organisation. Storytelling interventions and initiatives were implemented with two action research cycles completed. Actions and changes were observed, monitored, evaluated, and reflected on using an after action review process. This study has established that the alignment of the people and system elements (learning, culture, social, technology, process and infrastructure) can positively influence an organisation's capability for storytelling, and therefore learn lessons from stories of past project experiences.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • Development of performance metrics for phase-based capital project
           benchmarking
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sungmin Yun, Jiyong Choi, Daniel P. de Oliveira, Stephen P. Mulva
      Despite various research efforts focusing on the development of an effective measurement system, most project performance metrics were designed for post evaluation of processes and practices after project completion. This paper presents performance metrics tailored to phase-based benchmarking, which can be utilized as both leading and lagging indicators. Built upon industry experts' input and an extensive review of existing metrics, a framework for performance metrics was developed to evaluate performance outcomes for five major phases; front end planning/programming, design/engineering, procurement, construction, and startup/commissioning. Within this framework, phase-wise and phase-specific metrics were created under the categories of cost, schedule, efficiency, staffing, procurement, and safety performance. The results show that the framework and metrics are effective for the evaluation of project performance throughout capital project delivery. By employing the benchmarking process during the course of the project, industry practitioners can improve project performance and develop proactive strategies for subsequent phases.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • When traditional information technology project managers encounter the
           cloud: Opportunities and dilemmas in the transition to cloud services
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Chen Wang, Lincoln C. Wood, Hamzah Abdul-Rahman, Yit Teng Lee
      Cloud computing has rapidly changed the conventional way information technology (IT) products and services are delivered. This study aims to identify the opportunities and dilemmas IT project managers are encountering in managing cloud projects, and to develop a system dynamics model to capture the complexity of cloud adoption. A questionnaire survey was conducted among IT project managers and data were analyzed via T-Tests, ANOVA, and principal component analysis. The identified opportunities and dilemmas in adopting cloud services formed the elements in the system dynamics model. Findings revealed incorporating cloud services in IT projects could shorten project timeline, optimize project scope, and reduce project cost. However, project managers also expressed concern about data privacy, security, IT governance, and local regulation when moving services to the cloud. Incorporation of proper change management plan and detailed risk management plan are required to identify the privacy and regulatory concerns.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
 
 
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