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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 2817 journals)

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Journal Cover International Journal of Project Management
  [SJR: 1.092]   [H-I: 67]   [41 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0263-7863
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2817 journals]
  • Identifying perspectives of public project managers on project success:
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Leonie Koops, Marian Bosch-Rekveldt, Laura Coman, Marcel Hertogh, Hans Bakker
      Public and private project managers contribute to the success of Large Infrastructure Projects. Considering the public client, so far researchers have been looking at him in a passive role with respect to project success. The focus of this exploratory research is what public project managers who are actively involved in the project, consider project success. Using Q-methodology, we identify four viewpoints in the respondent group, consisting of managers from five North-Western European countries and the specific success criteria accompanying these viewpoints. Within each viewpoint, the managers have the same vision on the ranking of project success criteria. Next to the conventional project manager, we distinguish the product driven manager, the parent oriented manager and the manager with a stakeholder focus. In Large Infrastructure Projects, where public and private partners collaborate, awareness of these different perspectives will help to understand the motives of the public project manager.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-04-25T07:13:09Z
       
  • The positive effect of expressing negative emotions on knowledge creation
           capability and performance of project teams
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): John Paul Stephens, Abraham Carmeli
      Organizations are built around teams as a way to better manage complex work, such as technological projects. However, complex teamwork presents challenges that can often generate positive and negative emotions, as well as demand efforts to generate new knowledge. We examine whether and how the capacity of technological product development teams to constructively express negative emotions facilitates knowledge creation capabilities and thereby enhances project outcomes. Results indicate that with greater capacity for constructively expressing negative emotions, teams enhance their capability to access crucial knowledge and exchange and integrate that knowledge in ways that enhance both project performance outcomes and project budget adherence. In so doing, we hope to open up new avenues for research on how expressing negative emotions in project teams can help in building knowledge creation capabilities and drive multiple performance outcomes.


      PubDate: 2016-04-25T07:13:09Z
       
  • Stability & reconstruction operations as mega projects: Drivers of
           temporary network effectiveness
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Paul C. van Fenema, Sebastiaan Rietjens, Peter van Baalen
      Mega projects require a temporary network of contributors. Stability & Reconstruction Operations are examined as mega projects, characterized by high levels of ambiguity and a non-permissive environment. The objective of this paper is to introduce a developmental view on managing a temporary network of contributors, and to examine in which dimensions development needs to take place. Drawing on mega project management and network theory, development of a temporary network of contributors is conceptualized using four phases: forming, storming, norming and performing. Data collection for our qualitative case study on Afghanistan focused on international actors involved in Afghanistan. We identified development challenges across four dimensions: heterogeneous stakeholders, governance, knowledge and coordination routines, and performance management. Researchers and practitioners may use this developmental view to better understand why mega projects fail or succeed, in particular when these concern heterogeneous network partners and (potentially) adversarial relationships among stakeholders in the project's local context.


      PubDate: 2016-04-17T18:48:48Z
       
  • Skills that improve profitability: The relationship between project
           management, IT skills, and small to medium enterprise profitability
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Julien Pollack, Daniel Adler
      It is commonly assumed that using project management and IT skills are good for business performance. This research explored this assumption by testing whether the use of project management and IT skills have a positive affect on business' total sales and profitability. The research data was drawn from two longitudinal Government surveys of small to medium enterprises in Australia. Models were created to describe the relationship between project management, IT skills, profitability and total sales using multiple linear regression and binary logistic regression. The results show that when controlling for the influence of other business skills, project management and IT skills have a significant positive influence on sales and profitability.


      PubDate: 2016-04-12T18:43:46Z
       
  • Selecting risk response strategies considering project risk
           interdependence
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Yao Zhang
      In risk response analysis, risks are often assumed independently. In fact, however, risks in a project mutually affect and the independent risk seldom exists in reality. This paper provides an approach to quantitatively measure the risk interdependence. Based on the analysis of the risk interdependence, we construct an optimization model for selecting risk response strategies considering the expected risk loss, risk interdependence and its two directions. Further, the effects of the risk interdependence on risk response can be investigated. There are two major findings by the analysis of the case project. First, the expected utility would be more sensitive to the risk interdependence itself than to the directions of it. Second, the insufficient attention paid to or neglect of the risk interdependence would lower the expected utility and increase the implementation cost.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T18:35:03Z
       
  • Transformational leadership and project success: The mediating role of
           team-building
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): D.A. Aga, N. Noorderhaven, B. Vallejo
      Although the effect of transformational leadership on project success is empirically supported, less is known about the mechanisms that explain this effect. To address this issue, we propose the mediating role of team-building as a possible explanation of the relationship between transformational leadership and project success. Based on a field survey of 200 development project managers in the Ethiopian Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) sector, the results of our study indicate that team-building partially mediates the effect of transformational leadership on project success. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T18:35:03Z
       
  • How safety leadership works among owners, contractors and subcontractors
           in construction projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Chunlin Wu, Feng Wang, Patrick X.W. Zou, Dongping Fang
      Leadership is a key factor impacting construction safety, but previous research merely investigated the single-level relationship between safety leadership and safety performance and ignored the leadership interaction between different project stakeholders. To fill this gap, this paper aims to examine the relationships between safety leaderships of project owners, contractors and subcontractors and discover leadership dimensions which significantly impact construction safety performance. An impacting mechanism involving owner safety leadership, contractor safety leadership and subcontractor safety leadership are hypothetically proposed and empirically tested. The results show that significant relationships exist between safety leaderships of the three key stakeholders. Project safety culture acts as a significant mediator in these relationships. In addition, among all leadership dimensions of owners and contractors, safety influence and role modeling has the widest range of influence on project safety culture and other stakeholders' safety leadership. As such, it is suggested that owners and contractors should cultivate charisma and the ability of being influential about ideals in project managers and require them to behave as role models for others. The results also show that the caring dimension of leadership is more required in the frontline environment. Supervisors need more attention and support from the contractor in their well-being and organizational identification for the project. In conclusion, this paper establishes clear leadership impacting paths from owners to site supervisors of subcontractors in construction projects, which provides insights into effective ways to implement managerial measures and publicize policies and values to construction sites.


      PubDate: 2016-04-02T17:00:54Z
       
  • Enhancing project benefit realization through integration of line managers
           as project benefit managers
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Dorthe Håhr Dupont, Pernille Eskerod
      Many organizations establish projects to undertake change efforts. However, the aimed-for benefits are often difficult to harvest. A viable way to move the field forward may be to address the WHO question related to project benefit realization. A case study was undertaken in the international service organization with multi-site branches. The aim of this study was to investigate the potentials of integrating line managers in a formal role as project benefit managers within a project team for enhancing realization of project benefits. Based on the findings, we claim that line managers as project benefit managers can enhance compliance in project implementation. This is not least due to their detailed knowledge about operational processes. However, the cohesiveness of a project benefit manager’s network as well as the mutual relationship between the project benefit manager and relevant peer managers has an importance for the success of the project benefit managers.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • The impact of project management (PM) and benefits management (BM)
           practices on project success: Towards developing a project benefits
           governance framework
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Amgad Badewi
      Benefits management (BM) and project management (PM) are two interrelated approaches to the success of projects. The literature, however, still lacks empirical evidence of the value of applying BM practices. Hence, it is aimed to test the impact of BM practices on the success of investments in projects, taking into consideration the impact of PM practices on that success. Since the results, based on 200 valid responses, suggest that a significant proportion of organisations adopt PM and BM concurrently, SEM was used. PM practices were not only found to influence project management success but also to affect project investment success. However, BM is found to be less significant and to have less impact on project investment success. Nevertheless, the probability of project success is enhanced significantly when PM and BM practices are combined together. Therefore, a governance based framework is developed to uncover the interweaving relationship between the two practices.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • International journal of project management special issue on
           “project benefit management”
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Ofer Zwikael



      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • Taking stock of project value creation: A structured literature review
           with future directions for research and practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Markus Laursen, Per Svejvig
      This paper aims to take stock of what we know about project value creation and to present future directions for research and practice. We performed an explorative and unstructured literature review, which was subsequently paired with a structured literature review. We join several research areas by adopting the project value creation perspective on literature relating to benefits, value, performance, and success in projects. Our review includes 111 contributions analyzed through both an inductive and deductive approach. We find that relevant literature dates back to the early 1980s, and the still developing value-centric view has been the subject of many publications in recent years. We contribute to research on project value creation through four directions for future research: rejuvenating value management through combining value, benefits, and costs; supplementing value creation with value capture; applying a holistic approach to project, portfolio, and strategic management; and theorizing by applying independent models and frameworks.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • Benefits of information system projects: The tale of two countries
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Carl Marnewick
      International results emphasise that information systems (IS) projects fail at an alarming rate and do not contribute to the strategy of the organisation. The results also indicate that there is a shift in how IS project success is measured, i.e. towards benefits realisation. This raises the concern whether organisations understand the notion of benefits management. Secondly, does benefits management have an impact on the success rates of IS projects and ultimately the success of the organisation itself? Organisations within the Netherlands and South Africa were targeted to benchmark the benefits management process employed by the organisations against best practices. Semi-structured interviews were conducted within 33 organisations and the interviewees expressed their views on the adoption of the benefits management process. The results indicate that although organisations are aware of and are implementing benefits management best practices, there is still a notion not to relate the delivered benefits back to the promised benefits within the business case. Benefits management also plays a role within individual projects and not just within programme management. Organisations can reap more benefits from IS projects when benefits are stipulated up front and are managed throughout the project/programme life cycle. Enhancing benefits realisation implies that the return on investment improves and that organisations ultimately are successful and sustainable.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • Managing program impacts in new product development: An exploratory case
           study on overcoming uncertainties
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Teemu Laine, Tuomas Korhonen, Miia Martinsuo
      New product development (NPD) programs are designed to implement innovation strategies in a coordinated way. Managing program impacts in a multi-project setting is insufficiently covered in research and increasingly challenging in practice. This paper explores program impact management practice. The paper focuses on NPD program impact management as a joint effort where program stakeholders collectively identify, make sense of and overcome uncertainties and ambiguities to create and enhance the program impact. The qualitative study relies on in-depth access to a large-scale NPD program in the machine manufacturing industry. The results show that program impact includes several financial and non-financial aspects and is made jointly and separately by the program organization, thus involving different uncertainties and ambiguities. Through collective sensemaking, knowledge about the program impacts may be strengthened, and the impacts may be extended beyond immediate benefits.


      PubDate: 2016-03-13T06:21:53Z
       
  • Identifying critical factors affecting the effectiveness and efficiency of
           tendering processes in Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs): A
           comparative analysis of Australia and China
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Tingting Liu, Yan Wang, Suzanne Wilkinson
      The success of Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) largely depends on the performance of tendering processes. This research aims to conduct a comparative analysis of critical factors affecting the effectiveness and efficiency of PPP tendering in Australia and China. A triangulation of literature review, semi-structured interviews and questionnaire survey was used. The research identified 14 critical factors underpinning the implementation of PPP tendering, under 7 dimensions: (1) Robustness of business case development; (2) Quality of project brief; (3) Public sector capacity; (4) Governance structures; (5) Effectiveness of communication; (6) Balance between streamlining and competition; and (7) Level of transparency of tendering processes. The following analysis suggested that there are statistically significant differences in eight factors between the two countries. By adopting the recommended strategies, both public and private entities engaging in PPP projects will be at a better position to structure and manage the tendering processes.


      PubDate: 2016-03-13T06:21:53Z
       
  • Critical success factors for community-driven development projects: A Sri
           Lankan community perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Sugath Yalegama, Nicholas Chileshe, Tony Ma
      Despite significant investments, community-driven development (CDD) projects have yielded mixed successes in different countries and localities, underscoring the need to improve the project model. Recognising the importance of critical success factors (CSFs) in this exercise from different stakeholders’ perspectives and at a project-level ‘micro’ view, this study identifies the CSFs of the Gemidiriya CDD project of Sri Lanka from a community perspective. Questionnaires were administered to beneficiary community members and community project managers at villages to assess the importance of various project model features and linkages with overall project success. Factor analysis identified three critical success factors: enabling community environment, measurable project management outcomes by village organization and community project management engagement. Project managers should view CSFs from an impact-on-ground-orientation rather than a task-orientation. Furthermore, the beneficiaries who were also involved in the project execution may have a greater tendency to assign a high weight on the impact.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • The relationship between project governance and project success
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Robert Joslin, Ralf Müller
      This study looks at the relationship between project governance and project success from an agency theory and stewardship theory perspective. For that project governance was operationalized respectively as a) the extent of shareholder versus stakeholder orientation and b) the extent of behavior versus outcome control, both exercised by the parent organization over its project. A cross-sectional, worldwide online survey yielded 254 usable responses. Factor and regression analyses indicate that project success correlates with increasing stakeholder orientation of the parent organization, while the types of control mechanisms do not correlate with project success. Results support the importance of stewardship approaches in the context of successful projects.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Integrated PPM Process: Scale Development and Validation
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Marisa Padovani, Marly M. Carvalho
      This study aims to propose and validate a structural model on project portfolio management, identifying the core processes. Moreover, this study aims to investigate the relation between project portfolio management and performance. The model is proposed and validated through a survey-based research, applying structural equation modeling. The total sample size comprises 103 valid questionnaires. The project portfolio management measurement model validated is composed by a set of 11 processes as follows: knowledge of the organizational context; opportunity identification; decision criteria; classification; selection, prioritization, optimization and sequencing; balancing; approval; resource allocation; formation of portfolio; and project portfolio management infrastructure. The findings indicate that there is a strong relationship between project portfolio management and performance.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Impromptu teams in a temporary organization: On their nature and role
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Mattias Jacobsson, Markus Hällgren
      The abundance and importance of temporary project teams in society introduces the need of understanding their nature. The purpose of this article thus is to highlight the existence of an only accidentally investigated type of team that we identify as Impromptu teams, and analyze their role in a temporary organization. Based on a detailed retrospective account of the infamous disaster on Mount Everest in 1996, we identify three examples of Impromptu teams. The three examples indicate that the teams are characterized by being triggered by an unexpected event, and formed through a bottom-up process, where joining the team is voluntary and the activities are based on a logic of appropriateness, rather than rule following. The identification and nature of Impromptu teams have implications far beyond Mount Everest, since most organizations at some point need to use teams similar to the identified examples.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Critical review on PPP Research – A search from the Chinese and
           International Journals
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Shang Zhang, Albert P.C. Chan, Yingbin Feng, Hongxia Duan, Yongjian Ke
      A significant number of literatures have concentrated on diverse issues related to Public–Private Partnership (PPP) both in China and abroad. However, there is no systematic analysis on the PPP research progress and status in Chinese journals, which is worth investigating because China is one of the largest PPP markets globally. In addition, there are many PPP publications in international journals based on the context of China. A comparative study is still missing between the PPP publications in Chinese journals and international journals. This paper hence aims to conduct a critical review of PPP publications from selected first tier Chinese journals and international journals. Based on a three-stage literature review research framework, 615 and 70 high quality research papers on PPP topics were selected from Chinese and international journals in the last decade between 2005 and 2014, respectively. Main research methods, research topics and research findings were then identified through content analysis and statistical analysis methods. It is found that in these two journals the frequently adopted research methods are case study, literature review, modeling, questionnaire survey and comparison; and the popular research topics include PPP models and their application, risk management, financing and economic issues, legal and procurement issues, government regulation and guarantee. Comparison analysis results show that in terms of order of popularity, there are more similarities in the research topics than research methods in Chinese and international journals. The outcomes of this paper contribute to the PPP body of knowledge through summarizing PPP research in Chinese journals and international journals in the context of China. In addition, the findings are valuable for Chinese researchers to embark future research on PPP. This paper also breaks the language barrier and enriches western researchers a better understanding of the research status of PPP in the context of China.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • The impact of product superiority on customer satisfaction in project
           management
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Matti J. Haverila, Kacy Fehr
      This paper investigates direct and moderating role of product superiority between project management and customer satisfaction. The data comes from customer satisfaction surveys conducted for a Fortune 500 company in building control systems industry. Data was aggregated over 18 consecutive months with 3129 surveys completed. Results showed that product superiority in project management has a significant direct impact on perceived customer satisfaction throughout the project. Furthermore product superiority somewhat strengthens the relationship between the project management stages and customer satisfaction. Due to this dual impact of the product superiority on the project management and customer satisfaction relationship, product superiority is a quasi-moderating variable in statistical terms. The results also suggest that product superiority, being a precursor for customer satisfaction, has lower impact on customer satisfaction than the actual project management aspect. This may be an indication of the higher service rather than product oriented nature of the system delivery projects.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Development paths of project managers: What and how do project managers
           learn from their experiences?
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Chantal M.J.H. Savelsbergh, Liselore A. Havermans, Peter Storm
      The development paths of project managers are paved with formal and informal learning experiences. Knowledge of the learning experiences that project managers indicate as important for their development as professionals is limited in both the academic and the practitioner world. In the current study we explore what and how project managers learn from experiences, and what is perceived as supporting this learning. We used a multi-method approach, consisting of in-depth interviews and a short follow-up survey among 31 project managers. Results show that most learning experiences occur more or less accidentally on the job and support for learning from these experiences is limited. This suggests potential to improve the quality and pace of the development paths of project managers. Limitations of the current study, and implications of these findings for theory and practice are discussed opening up avenues for future research.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • The agility construct on project management theory
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Edivandro Carlos Conforto, Daniel Capaldo Amaral, Sergio Luis da Silva, Ariani Di Felippo, Dayse Simon L. Kamikawachi
      Definitions of agility found in the project management (PM) and agile project management (APM) disciplines are inconsistent, incomplete and lack clarity. This paper presents a complete definition of the agility construct, built from a combination of systematic literature review and frame semantics methodology. A survey with 171 projects with different innovation levels and industry sectors combined with factor analysis was used to first validate the construct. The results show that the agility construct is cohesive and useful in different PM contexts. The implications for advancing the PM theory and practice are threefold: i) agility should be considered a team's performance, rather than a mere adjective for practices and methods; ii) agility, as a performance, might be dependent upon a combination of organization, team and project factors; and iii) the agility performance level can be measured within two main factors: rapid project planning change and active customer involvement.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Projects with internal vs. external customers: An empirical investigation
           of variation in practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Brian Hobbs, Claude Besner
      The purpose of this paper and the research programme of which it is part is to empirically investigate variations in project management practice. The research is based on the analysis of an extensive dataset containing information on the extent of use of a large number of practices and contextual variables related to organisational contexts and project characteristics. The paper focusses on the effects of the difference between projects with internal and external customers, which have been shown to be an important characteristic of the project context. A distinction is made between the extent of use of project management practices and the effect of variation in the extent of use on project performance, which are shown to be very different both conceptually and empirically.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Are complexity and uncertainty distinct concepts in project
           management? A taxonomical examination from literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Milind Padalkar, Saji Gopinath
      Project management research is characterized by dominance of determinism, decision-theoretic approaches, and weak theories. The growth of research interest in non-deterministic paradigms through the lenses of complexity and uncertainty is recent, and could provide stronger theoretic explanations. However, analysis of select project management literature reveals that the constructs of complexity and uncertainty are yet to be grounded in terms of definitions and constituent variables. We argue that definitional clarity is necessary for the non-deterministic research to move forward. In this paper, we propose taxonomy of constituent terms of complexity and uncertainty based on semantic analysis of select literature and show that the two constructs are broadly confounded in their constituent terms. While our finding may appear to align with complexity theoretic concept of strong interrelationship between complexity and uncertainty, we argue that such confounding represents intermingling of varying ontological and epistemological preferences within the community of project management scholars rather than a broad adherence to the complexity theory. The paper contributes to project management literature by facilitating further research toward stronger construct definitions and theory-building efforts. The paper also contributes to research methods by offering a novel methodology to elicit taxonomy of terms and to illuminate the confounding and separating terms across multiple constructs.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Identifying and contextualising the motivations for BIM implementation in
           construction projects: An empirical study in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Dongping Cao, Heng Li, Guangbin Wang, Ting Huang
      Grounded in institutional theory and the innovation diffusion literature, this paper identifies the motivations of designers and general contractors to implement BIM in construction projects, and investigates how different motivations are impacted by organisational BIM capability and other contextual factors. Results of factor analysis with survey data collected from China provide support for the theoretically developed motivation model which classifies BIM implementation motivations into four categories: image motives, reactive motives, project-based economic motives, cross-project economic motives. Hierarchical regression results suggest that although project participants will have stronger economic motivations to improve project performances as their BIM capability matures, this increase in economic motivations does not necessarily require a parallel decrease of desires to improve social image. Regression results also suggest that BIM implementation motivations relate to organisational ownership type and project characteristics. The findings contribute to a broadened understanding of the multi-dimensionality and dynamics of construction organisations' innovation implementation motivations.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Analysis of interacting uncertainties in on-site and off-site activities:
           Implications for hybrid construction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Mehrdad Arashpour, Ron Wakefield, E.W.M. Lee, Ricky Chan, M. Reza Hosseini
      Interaction and integration of uncertainties in on-site and off-site project activities often result in the risk of delays and schedule overruns in hybrid construction projects. To address this problem, a holistic risk analysis approach that assesses the integrating impact of uncertainties on completion times is proposed. The results of the analysis show that growth in project size and work quantities intensifies pair and group interconnection of tasks within and between groups of on-site and off-site activities, resulting in lengthened completion times and deviations from project plans. Unavailability of resources, risk seeking attitudes, and workflow variability are other major contributors to the risk of late completion in hybrid construction. While project managers often analyze on-site and off-site uncertainties separately, practical implications of the research results suggest adoption of a holistic approach in which risk management practices in the two environments are integrated. This approach significantly improves tangible performance measures in projects.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Mapping the multi-faceted: Determinants of uncertainty in safety-critical
           projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Fiona C. Saunders, Andrew W. Gale, Andrew H. Sherry
      Project managers tasked with delivering safety-critical projects must demonstrate care, competence and confidence right from the earliest stages of project inception, when levels of uncertainty can be very high. Based on interviews with 30 project management practitioners in civil nuclear and aerospace sectors, this paper builds on work by Saunders et al. (2015), who posited the Uncertainty Kaleidoscope as a framework for identifying uncertainties. Our findings are that the six determinants of project uncertainty are similar across both civil nuclear and aerospace projects. The most commonly mentioned determinant of project uncertainty was the Environment, followed by Complexity, Capability and Information. The impact of Time on project uncertainty and Individual perceptions of uncertainty were mentioned less frequently by respondents. Our key contribution is to validate the Uncertainty Kaleidoscope over a larger data set, thereby enriching our understanding of the sources of project uncertainty in these two important and highly-consequential project environments.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
  • Exploring program management competences for various program types
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Maxim Miterev, Mats Engwall, Anna Jerbrant
      This paper challenges the implicit ‘one-size-fits-all’ assumption that dominates mainstream program management competence literature. Findings from case studies of 10 programs executed in a large pharmaceutical company suggest that different programs require different competences of program managers. Based on the Pellegrinelli's (1997) program typology we put forward a framework, linking specific management competences to program types. By establishing the link between the program typologies literature and program management competence literature, the paper shows that programs should not be treated as a generic and homogenous category in discussions on program management competences. In addition, the findings highlight program content as a significant contingency variable for understanding program management dynamics. The paper suggests a conceptual framework that combines program types with program management competence profiles that could be applied to appointment decisions, staff assessments and organizational development.


      PubDate: 2016-02-26T19:19:06Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2016-02-26T19:19:06Z
       
  • A model for determining the optimal project life span and concession
           period of BOT projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Xiaoling Zhang, Haijun Bao, Hongdi Wang, Martin Skitmore
      The concession agreement is the core feature of BOT projects, with the concession period being the most essential feature in determining the time span of the various rights, obligations and responsibilities of the government and concessionaire. Concession period design is therefore crucial for financial viability and determining the benefit/cost allocation between the host government and the concessionaire. However, while the concession period and project life span are essentially interdependent, most methods to date consider their determination as contiguous events that are determined exogenously. Moreover, these methods seldom consider the, often uncertain, social benefits and costs involved that are critical in defining, pricing and distributing benefits and costs between the various parties and evaluating potentially distributable cash flows. In this paper, we present the results of the first stage of a research project aimed at determining the optimal build-operate-transfer (BOT) project life span and concession period endogenously and interdependently by maximizing the combined benefits of stakeholders. Based on the estimation of the economic and social development involved, a negotiation space of the concession period interval is obtained, with its lower boundary creating the desired financial return for the private investors and its upper boundary ensuring the economic feasibility of the host government as well as the maximized welfare within the project life. The outcome of the new quantitative model is considered as a suitable basis for future field trials prior to implementation. The structure and details of the model are provided in the paper with Hong Kong tunnel project as a case study to demonstrate its detailed application. The basic contributions of the paper to the theory of construction procurement are that the project life span and concession period are determined jointly and the social benefits taken into account in the examination of project financial benefits. In practical terms, the model goes beyond the current practice of linear-process thinking and should enable engineering consultants to provide project information more rationally and accurately to BOT project bidders and increase the government's prospects of successfully entering into a contract with a concessionaire. This is expected to generate more negotiation space for the government and concessionaire in determining the major socioeconomic features of individual BOT contracts when negotiating the concession period. As a result, the use of the model should increase the total benefit to both parties.


      PubDate: 2016-02-26T19:19:06Z
       
  • Cultural practices of governance in the Panama Canal Expansion Megaproject
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Alfons van Marrewijk, Karen Smits
      The academic debate on governance in project management is dominated by research that looks at the structure of governance regimes, but there is very little research on the micro-practices of governance as it actually takes place. This paper fills this gap by focusing on the governance practices of project employees and looking at megaprojects as cultural phenomena. Therefore, a one-year ethnographic field study of the Panama Canal Expansion Megaproject was conducted to examine the cultural practices of governing. In the study, five cultural practices were found to influence the governance of this megaproject: (1) ritualizing the bid-winning ceremony, (2) changing teams, (3) struggling over governance structure, and labeling according to (4) national and (5) organizational cultures. This paper makes a contribution to the current debate by offering a cultural approach of megaprojects and by including a case that shows how ex post micro-processes of governing can start escalation in megaprojects.


      PubDate: 2016-02-26T19:19:06Z
       
  • Announcement of the IPMA Research Awards 2015
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Helgi Thor Ingason



      PubDate: 2016-02-15T13:04:41Z
       
  • Stakeholder engagement in large-scale energy infrastructure projects:
           Revealing perspectives using Q methodology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Eefje Cuppen, Marian G.C. Bosch-Rekveldt, Ewout Pikaar, Donna C. Mehos
      Public opposition is one of the main political, and less predictable, risks of large-scale energy infrastructure projects. External stakeholder management has become indispensable to the governance of risk in such projects. We integrate insights on public engagement from policy and planning studies with the field of project management to contribute to the governance of risk. We present Q methodology as a congruent method for stakeholder analysis that allows for anticipation of unforeseen stakeholder issues or concerns and to kick-off a participatory procedure with external stakeholders. We present an illustration of Q methodology results of a Dutch shale gas exploration project. If used in the stakeholder management process, this method can help reveal perspectives beneficial for both the governance of risks and the identification of opportunities to create socially valued, successful projects.


      PubDate: 2016-02-10T12:52:32Z
       
  • Relationship between the interactive use of control systems and the
           project performance: The moderating effect of uncertainty and equivocality
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ouafa Sakka, Henri Barki, Louise Côté
      Information system development (ISD) projects are knowledge-intensive settings that involve varying levels of uncertainty and equivocality. The objective of the present paper is to better understand how project managers can enhance ISD project performance by adapting their level of interactive use of a project's control system (PCS) to the project's uncertainty and equivocality. While interactive use of PCS can enable project managers to personally engage themselves in the project team members' work by regularly discussing project feedback information in face-to-face meetings, it can also be costly in terms of the time and attention it requires from project participants. These relationships were examined via PLS and Fisher test analyses of survey data collected on 93 ISD projects. The results indicated that PCS interactive use enhanced performance when project uncertainty and equivocality were high, but deteriorated it when they were low.


      PubDate: 2016-01-31T12:59:52Z
       
  • Selection and use of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) in construction
           projects — Past and future research
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Chia Kuang Lee, Tak Wing Yiu, Sai On Cheung
      Research on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) selection and use has been gaining prevalent interest from project practitioners and researchers. This study presents a systematic review of the factors influencing ADR selection and use in construction projects for the last 32years. A total of 446 articles from 21 construction project-related journals were identified and reviewed. Among these, only 13 articles focused on the factors influencing ADR selection and use. These 13 articles were then analysed, synthesized, and summarized in terms of the research methods used, distribution across countries and citation influences. The studies on the selection and use of ADR were mainly based on utility. Utility factors offer less conceptual basis to explain decision making. To address this deficiency, this study reclassified ADR selection and use with reference to Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) based framework. The potential development and research avenues of using the TPB framework were also discussed.


      PubDate: 2016-01-16T00:08:11Z
       
  • A method to measure success dimensions relating to individual stakeholder
           groups
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Kate Davis
      A new method to measure and identify project success dimensions meriting further investigation is detailed. It considers the conceptualization, diagnosis and understanding of these dimensions to judge the success or failure of a project. The method used an inductive thematic analysis to reveal two major themes: one related to the multiple stakeholders involved in a project and the other to project structure. Further analysis showed three new success dimensions linked directly to the perception of project success: benefit to the stakeholder group, client/customer specific issues and time/cost/quality. Inclusion of these dimensions to measure project success has the potential to allow all stakeholder groups to share the same perception of project success.


      PubDate: 2016-01-16T00:08:11Z
       
  • The impact of organizational project benefits management governance on ERP
           project success: Neo-institutional theory perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Amgad Badewi, Essam Shehab
      The success of ERP has been discussed extensively throughout the last decade. However, this research offers a new lens for understanding this success through combining project management theory with institutional theory. Based on neo-institutional theory, it is proposed that the more the Project Management (PM) and Benefits Management (BM) are used as practice and governance frameworks in an organization, the more it is able to use them in ERP projects since they become part of its institutional logic in managing its projects. Therefore, ERP investment success is hypothesized to be associated with the organization's project and benefits management institutional logics. After analyzing 130 questionnaires using Structural Equation Modeling, it is found that these hypotheses are supported. Furthermore, the organizations that have both logics outperform others which have not. This research implies that project management is not responsible for the project investment success. This is the responsibility of business change management.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • “Evaluating performance of public sector projects in Russia: The
           choice of a social discount rate”
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Tatiana Kossova, Maria Sheluntcova
      Public sector project management in Russia is inefficiently carried out. One reason for this is an absence of generally accepted procedures for evaluating the performance of projects. In the framework of evaluating performance, there is the issue of evaluating the rate for discounting the anticipated benefits and costs of public projects to the present moment. This paper contains a methodology for estimating the social discount rate for cost–benefit analysis in various economic industries in Russia. We apply two approaches – social rate of time preferences and social opportunity cost of capital – and propose a methodology for projects related to any industry. We present examples of estimating the social discount rate for healthcare, education, social services, and infrastructure projects. Our results are useful when both the government and private firms are able to solve the same social problems. The findings are applicable for any country with unequal development of various economic industries.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • Barriers to the use of an IT Project Management Methodology in a large
           financial institution
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Marco Alexandre Terlizzi, Fernando de Souza Meirelles, Heverton Roberto Oliveira Cesar de Moraes
      The global financial crisis of 2008 demanded greater control mechanisms from the financial service industry. The IT Project Management Methodology (PMM) is considered an important control mechanism for IT governance to support managers in achieving more predictable rates of project management success (PMS). The aim of this study is to further investigate how an implemented IT PMM that contributes to PMS is used in a large Brazilian financial institution. A case study was conducted on one of the largest financial institutions in the world that is located in Brazil by means of interviews, analysis of a database of 3047 IT projects and a survey of 347 IT professionals. The study showed that, despite the belief of 90% of the IT professionals that the use of an IT PMM improves PMS rates, there are five main barriers that prevent its proper use: very tight project deadlines; working as both a developer and a project manager; working simultaneously on several projects; difficulty using the project management software; and a lack of knowledge of the PMM. Finally, an action plan to solve these issues is presented.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • What impacts the performance of large-scale government projects?
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Peerasit Patanakul, Young Hoon Kwak, Ofer Zwikael, Min Liu
      Government projects and programs contribute to national growth at a great magnitude. However, records show that they are not well managed, even when project teams follow established project management principles. As a result, this study aimed at identifying key characteristics of government projects and programs, and recommending how they can be used to improve performance. This paper analyzed 39 public projects undertaken in the U.S., UK, and Australia and reviewed officially by the national audit offices and government agencies, including the Los Angeles Metro, London Heathrow's Terminal 5, and the fatal Australia's Homeowner Insulation Program. Based on this analysis the paper suggests six key characteristics, 17 practical recommendations, and six research propositions. These findings can support government project managers to utilize project management approaches according to project characteristics. This paper can support policy makers and government officials in improving the approaches for the management of government projects and programs


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • Unpacking the impact of attachment to project teams on boundary-spanning
           behaviors
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sujin Lee, Sukanlaya Sawang
      As business environments become even more competitive, project teams are required to make an effort to operate external linkages from within an organization or across organizational boundaries. Nevertheless, some members boundary-span less extensively, isolating themselves and their project teams from external environments. Our study examines why some members boundary-span more or less through the framework of group attachment theory. Data from 521 project team members in construction and engineering industries revealed that the more individuals worry about their project team's acceptance (group attachment anxiety), the more likely they are to perceive intergroup competition, and thus put more efforts into operating external linkages and resources to help their own teams outperform competitors. In contrast, a tendency to distrust their project teams (group attachment avoidance) generates members' negative construal of their team's external image, and thus fewer efforts are made at operating external linkages. Thus, project leaders and members with high group attachment anxiety may be best qualified for external tasks.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • How to apply the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge model to wire an
           organisation for the capability of storytelling
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Stephen Duffield, Stephen J. Whitty
      This study is an application of the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge (Syllk) model that enables management to conceptualise how organisational know-how for storytelling is wired (distributed) across various elements of an organisation. The research method consisted of action research cycles within a large division of a government organisation. Storytelling interventions and initiatives were implemented with two action research cycles completed. Actions and changes were observed, monitored, evaluated, and reflected on using an after action review process. This study has established that the alignment of the people and system elements (learning, culture, social, technology, process and infrastructure) can positively influence an organisation's capability for storytelling, and therefore learn lessons from stories of past project experiences.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • Development of performance metrics for phase-based capital project
           benchmarking
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sungmin Yun, Jiyong Choi, Daniel P. de Oliveira, Stephen P. Mulva
      Despite various research efforts focusing on the development of an effective measurement system, most project performance metrics were designed for post evaluation of processes and practices after project completion. This paper presents performance metrics tailored to phase-based benchmarking, which can be utilized as both leading and lagging indicators. Built upon industry experts' input and an extensive review of existing metrics, a framework for performance metrics was developed to evaluate performance outcomes for five major phases; front end planning/programming, design/engineering, procurement, construction, and startup/commissioning. Within this framework, phase-wise and phase-specific metrics were created under the categories of cost, schedule, efficiency, staffing, procurement, and safety performance. The results show that the framework and metrics are effective for the evaluation of project performance throughout capital project delivery. By employing the benchmarking process during the course of the project, industry practitioners can improve project performance and develop proactive strategies for subsequent phases.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • When traditional information technology project managers encounter the
           cloud: Opportunities and dilemmas in the transition to cloud services
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 3
      Author(s): Chen Wang, Lincoln C. Wood, Hamzah Abdul-Rahman, Yit Teng Lee
      Cloud computing has rapidly changed the conventional way information technology (IT) products and services are delivered. This study aims to identify the opportunities and dilemmas IT project managers are encountering in managing cloud projects, and to develop a system dynamics model to capture the complexity of cloud adoption. A questionnaire survey was conducted among IT project managers and data were analyzed via T-Tests, ANOVA, and principal component analysis. The identified opportunities and dilemmas in adopting cloud services formed the elements in the system dynamics model. Findings revealed incorporating cloud services in IT projects could shorten project timeline, optimize project scope, and reduce project cost. However, project managers also expressed concern about data privacy, security, IT governance, and local regulation when moving services to the cloud. Incorporation of proper change management plan and detailed risk management plan are required to identify the privacy and regulatory concerns.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T13:45:06Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-01-06T08:55:49Z
       
  • The Project-space Model: Visualising the enablers and constraints for a
           given project
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 2
      Author(s): Bronte van der Hoorn
      This paper proposes a tool that can be used by practitioners to identify and represent the enablers to, and constraints on, the progress of a specific project: the Project-space Model. The diagrammatic tool is a response to the limitations of universal “critical success factors” for projects, and the calls for a more tailored and contextualised approach to managing projects. The Project-space Model prototype presented in the article embeds concepts from Heideggerian thinking, complexity science, Gestalt theory, and Lewin's Force Field analysis and life-space model. The tool has a ‘current-space’ and a ‘forecast-space’ and information regarding the enabling and constraining factors is shown through colour, scale and placement of icons within the ‘spaces’. The model is currently being tested through an action research case study. It is anticipated that the model will enable stakeholders to identify where their attention and action is most required in a given project.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2015-12-13T20:43:58Z
       
  • Improving the estimation of probability of bidder participation in
           procurement auctions
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 2
      Author(s): Pablo Ballesteros-Pérez, Martin Skitmore, Eugenio Pellicer, Jimmy H. Gutiérrez-Bahamondes
      Anticipating the number and identity of bidders has significant influence in many theoretical results of the auction itself and bidders' bidding behaviour. This is because when a bidder knows in advance which specific bidders are likely competitors, this knowledge gives a company a head start when setting the bid price. However, despite these competitive implications, most previous studies have focused almost entirely on forecasting the number of bidders and only a few authors have dealt with the identity dimension qualitatively. Using a case study with immediate real-life applications, this paper develops a method for estimating every potential bidder's probability of participating in a future auction as a function of the tender economic size removing the bias caused by the contract size opportunities distribution. This way, a bidder or auctioner will be able to estimate the likelihood of a specific group of key, previously identified bidders in a future tender.


      PubDate: 2015-11-29T14:59:00Z
       
  • Social procurement in UK construction projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 2
      Author(s): Martin Loosemore
      Recent developments in the field of social procurement mean that in the future, firms tendering for major construction and infrastructure projects will need to demonstrate that they are not just efficient in project delivery, but also contribute positively to the communities in which they build. The emerging social enterprise sector represents a potentially innovative and sustainable opportunity to meet this new challenge but is poorly understood and grossly under-represented in the construction industry. Through interviews with twelve leaders of successful social enterprises operating in the construction industry, it is concluded that many changes are needed to traditional procurement practices to grasp this opportunity. These include unbundling work packages, reducing tender compliance burdens, changing traditional perceptions of ‘value’ which revolve around lowest price, incorporating social value requirements into existing subcontracts and challenging the dominant role of supply chain incumbents and ingrained negative stereotypes of the disadvantaged groups which social enterprises employ.


      PubDate: 2015-11-29T14:59:00Z
       
  • Retaining project management competence — Antecedents and
           consequences
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 2
      Author(s): Bastian Ekrot, Alexander Kock, Hans Georg Gemünden
      Using a sample of 177 firms with matched dyads of middle managers and senior managers, we developed a model on the antecedents and consequences of project management competence retention (PMCR). Our results reveal that providing project managers formal developmental perspectives in project management, such as a career path or qualification opportunities, as well as establishing a formal lesson learned system both positively relate to PMCR. Moreover, our results show that PMCR is positively associated with average project success of the organization. Finally, our results confirm the substantial importance of average project success for overall business success in project-oriented organizations.


      PubDate: 2015-11-29T14:59:00Z
       
 
 
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