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Journal Cover International Journal of Project Management
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0263-7863
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2563 journals]   [SJR: 0.99]   [H-I: 58]
  • Developing a systemic lessons learned knowledge model for organisational
           learning through projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Stephen Duffield , S. Jonathan Whitty
      A significant challenge for government and business project organisations is to ensure that lessons are learned and that mistakes of the past are not repeated. Both knowledge and project management literature suggests that in practice lessons learned processes rarely happen, and when it does it is concerned with lessons identification rather than organisational learning. There are limited practical models for general management to use to conceptualise what organisational learning is and therefore how to enable it. However, aspects of health care, nuclear power, rail, and aviation organisations have successfully implemented organisational learning by way of the Swiss cheese model for safety and systemic failures. This paper proposes an adaptation of the Swiss cheese model to enable project organisations to conceptualise how they learn from past project experiences and distribute successful project know-how across an organisational network of elements such as individual learning, culture, social, technology, process and infrastructure.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2014-08-12T16:53:10Z
       
  • Identification of variables that impact project success in Brazilian
           companies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Fernando Tobal Berssaneti , Marly Monteiro Carvalho
      This research aims to analyze the relation between project management maturity and the project success. Moreover, the moderating effect of top management support and the assignment of a dedicated project manager were analyzed. The methodological research approach was a survey of 336 professionals in the field of project management conducted in Brazilian organizations. The results show that project management maturity is significantly related to all vertices of the iron triangle (time, cost and technical performance) dimensions of success. However, it is not related to the customer satisfaction dimension. The two moderate variables, top management support and dedicated project manager, have significant impact on the time success dimension but not on customer satisfaction. It suggests focus on efficiency aspects rather than effectiveness aspects.


      PubDate: 2014-08-12T16:53:10Z
       
  • Social responsibility of major infrastructure projects in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): S.X. Zeng , H.Y. Ma , H. Lin , R.C. Zeng , Vivian W.Y. Tam
      China has implemented a large number of major infrastructure projects (MIPs) over the last three decades. Social responsibility management is crucial for MIPs' sustainable development. What is social responsibility of major infrastructure (MIP-SR)? To answer this question, this article proposes the concept and key issues of major infrastructure projects' social responsibility (MIP-SR) and develops a comprehensive conceptual framework for MIP-SR, which covers three dimensions: (i) project life-cycle dynamics; (ii) stakeholder's heterogeneity and (iii) social responsibility interactivity. The three-dimensional framework provides a systematic framework for MIP-SR's academic research and practical implementation, which in turn promotes the sustainable development of MIPs.


      PubDate: 2014-08-12T16:53:10Z
       
  • Evaluation on the utility efficiency of metro infrastructure projects in
           China from sustainable development perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Liyin Shen , Liudan Jiao , Bei He , Lanchun Li
      The development of metro infrastructure projects (MIP) has been playing an important role in the economic growth in China through improving urban transportation condition. The economic benefits from MIP in China have been well appreciated. However, concerns on the utility efficiency and the impacts of MIP on social and environmental aspects have been increasingly raised. It is anticipated that a large number of metro infrastructure projects will be built in the near future in China. There is a need for a method to guide the development of MIP towards achieving better utility efficiency and collective benefits between economic, social and environmental dimensions. Previous studies have provided various methods for evaluating economic performance of MIP, but it appears that there is no existing method for studying the utility efficiency of a metro infrastructure project particularly from sustainable development perspective. This paper presents a model for evaluating the utility efficiency of MIP with reference to the Chinese context, which is called utility efficiency evaluation index (UEEI) model. Population of city (POP), length of Metro systems (LEN), annual ridership of Metro systems (RID), ticket price (FAR) and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) are selected as the variables for developing the UEEI model. The utility efficiency of the 17 MIPs is analyzed by using the data collected from 17 cities in China.


      PubDate: 2014-08-12T16:53:10Z
       
  • Learning between projects: More than sending messages in bottles
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Andreas Hartmann , André Dorée
      Although learning from projects has gained much importance in research and practice, progress in understanding and improving inter-project learning appears to be slight. We argue that the adoption of a sender/receiver approach limits the learning effectiveness in project-based organisations. Drawing upon the notion of learning as a social activity embedded in an organisational context, we develop the argument that learning from projects takes place within projects rooted in the historical, organisational and cultural context of previous and current projects. We underpin our argument with results from a multiple-case study on learning in construction organisations. We show that learning cannot be segregated from immediate practice and occurs when individuals engage in project work. Particularly the orientation towards project goals and project-overarching ambitions or trajectories can serve as contextual binder for learning in and between projects.


      PubDate: 2014-08-12T16:53:10Z
       
  • Measuring the complexity of mega construction projects in China—A
           fuzzy analytic network process analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Qinghua He , Lan Luo , Yi Hu , Albert P.C. Chan
      Mega construction projects in China are usually very complicated in nature, thus evaluating and understanding these complexities are critical to the success of these megaprojects. However, empirical studies related to the measurement of the complexity of megaprojects remain lacking. This paper aims to fill this gap by developing a complexity measurement model based on the Shanghai Expo construction project in China using fuzzy analytic network process (FANP). Firstly, a complexity measurement model consisting of 28 factors, which are grouped under six categories, namely, technological, organizational, goal, environmental, cultural and information complexities, is formulated through literature review using the content analysis technique. The model is then refined by a two-round Delphi survey conducted in the case megaproject. Finally, the refined model and suggestions for its application are provided based on the survey results. The model is believed to be beneficial for scholars and serve as reference for professionals in managing megaprojects.


      PubDate: 2014-08-06T16:50:40Z
       
  • Organizational enablers for project governance and governmentality in
           project-based organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Ralf Müller , Sofia Pemsel , Jingting Shao
      This study identifies organizational enablers (OEs) for governance and governmentality in the realm of projects in project-based organizations (PBOs). We use a multiple case study design with six firms in Sweden and China to identify OEs. Institutional theory serves as theoretical perspective. Results show that OEs are interwoven, albeit with different strength, with the three pillars of institutional theory (regulative, normative and cultural–cognitive). OEs for project governance and governance of projects fall predominantly into the category of regulative and normative pillars, whereas OEs for governmentality belong mainly to the cultural–cognitive pillar. Collectively these OEs provide for an ambidexterity of flexibility and stability, which allows organizations to align their internal characteristics with their organizational context. Managerial and theoretical implications of the results are discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-08-06T16:50:40Z
       
  • Earned readiness management for scheduling, monitoring and evaluating the
           development of complex product systems
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Romulo Magnaye , Brian Sauser , Peerasit Patanakul , David Nowicki , Wesley Randall
      How should the development of a complex product system (CPS) be managed in a manner that focuses on process milestones, which is responsive to changes in technology and requirements; based on maturity measures; and applied in an interactive manner, in addition to facilitating timely feedback? This is considered to be an important question in project management. Project management tools and techniques have been inadequate for monitoring technology development in a CPS. If the technologies are not properly matured by a specific period of time, the progress of the project can be in detriment. To address this important gap, the objective of this study is to develop a new maturity-focused methodology for scheduling, monitoring and evaluating the development of a system. We present Earned Readiness Management (ERM) for system scheduling, monitoring and evaluation which was developed and validated using a case study. Future research on ERM is also discussed in this paper.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Concession period for PPPs: A win–win model for a fair risk sharing
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Nunzia Carbonara , Nicola Costantino , Roberta Pellegrino
      Public Private Partnership (PPP) is adopted throughout the world for delivering public infrastructure. Despite the worldwide experience has shown that PPP can provide a variety of benefits to the government, to fully gain them several critical aspects related to a PPP project need to be managed, among these the determination of the concession period. This paper provides a methodology to calculate the concession period as the best instant of time that creates a ‘win–win’ solution for both the concessionaire and the government and allows for a fair risk sharing between the two parties. In other words, the concession period is able to satisfy the private and the government by guaranteeing for both parties a minimum profit, and, at the same time, to fairly allocate risks between parties. In order to take into account the uncertainty that affects the PPP projects, the Monte Carlo simulation was used. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, a Build–Operate–Transfer (BOT) port project in Italy has been used as case study.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Project cost risk analysis: A Bayesian networks approach for modeling
           dependencies between cost items
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Vahid Khodakarami , Abdollah Abdi
      Uncertainty of cost items is an important aspect of complex projects. Cost uncertainty analysis aims to help decision makers to understand and model different factors affecting funding exposure and ultimately estimate the cost of project. The common practice in cost uncertainty analysis includes breaking the project into cost items and probabilistically capturing the uncertainty of each item. Dependencies between these items are important and if not considered properly may influence the accuracy of cost estimation. However these dependencies are seldom examined and there are theoretical and practical obstacles in modeling them. This paper proposes a quantitative assessment framework integrating the inference process of Bayesian networks (BN) to the traditional probabilistic risk analysis. BNs provide a framework for presenting causal relationships and enable probabilistic inference among a set of variables. The new approach explicitly quantifies uncertainty in project cost and also provides an appropriate method for modeling complex relationships in a project, such as common causal factors, formal use of experts' judgments, and learning from data to update previous beliefs and probabilities. The capabilities of the proposed approach are explained by a simple example.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Stakeholder dynamics and responsibilities in Public–Private
           Partnerships: A mixed experience
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Steven De Schepper , Michaël Dooms , Elvira Haezendonck
      Although stakeholder management is seen as one of the main success factors of Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs), to date, limited research has investigated actual stakeholder management in PPPs. After positioning PPP in the current stakeholder management theory, a comparative case study analysis of four PPP infrastructure projects demonstrates the relevance and importance of stakeholder inclusion in PPPs. The case study findings indicate that a PPP makes the stakeholder environment more complex to manage, due to the increasing importance of the stakeholder context and dynamics. Hence, allocating stakeholder responsibilities between the public initiator and private consortium becomes problematic as it goes hand in hand with balancing between reactive and proactive responses to stakeholder claims. In order to cope with the PPP specific stakeholder characteristics, the use of a dynamic dual stakeholder management tool is recommended as well as the identification of governance structures that allow the sharing and division of responsibilities between stakeholders.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Learning from international development projects: Blending Critical
           Project Studies and Critical Development Studies
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Lavagnon A. Ika , Damian Hodgson
      This article aims at making international development (ID) projects critical. To that end, it shows that project management (PM) in ID has evolved as an offshoot of conventional PM moving like the latter, but at varying speeds, from a traditional approach suited to blueprint projects where tools matter (1960s–1980s); towards eclectic and contingent approaches suited to process projects where people matter the most (1980s–now); and finally pointing towards the potential contribution of a critical perspective which focuses on issues of power (1980s–now). Consequently, it points to a confluence between the Critical Project Studies movement and Critical Development Studies movements. More specifically, it argues that the postdevelopment, the Habermasian, the Foucauldian and the neo-Marxist lenses may be effectively called upon in that scholarship. Thus, it suggests a framework to encourage project actors to reflect on their personal positions in light of the power relations which shape PM in ID.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Adaptive programme management through a balanced performance/strategy
           oriented focus
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Jeroen Rijke , Sebastiaan van Herk , Chris Zevenbergen , Richard Ashley , Marcel Hertogh , Ernst ten Heuvelhof
      This paper explores how programme management (as opposed to project management) can contribute to the effective design and delivery of megaprojects. Traditionally, project management is considered to be performance focused and task oriented, whilst programme management entails a more strategic focus. The programme management literature suggests that this can result in tensions between the management of the projects and the programme as a whole. This paper uses the findings of the €2.4billion Room for the River flood protection programme in the Netherlands as a case study, because indicators about its budget, time, quality and stakeholder satisfaction suggest high programme management performance upon completion of the planning and design stage of its 39 river widening projects. Based on a literature review, document analysis and 55 face-to-face interviews, we have analysed how the programme management of the programme contributed to this result. Six attributes for effective programme management that are identified from the project and programme management literature are used to structure the research data. Consecutively, the interactions between project and programme management are analysed. The analysis of Room for the River reveals a combined strategic/performance focus at the level of both programme and project management that enables a collaborative approach between programme and project management. This particularly enables effective stakeholder collaboration, coordination and adaptation of the programme to contextual changes, newly acquired insights and the changing needs of consecutive planning stages, which positively contributes to the performance of the programme as a whole.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • The effects of organizational culture and environmental pressures on IT
           project performance: A moderation perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Vicky Ching Gu , James J. Hoffman , Qing Cao , Marc J. Schniederjans
      In this study we examine the impact of culture and environmental pressures on IT project performance. Specifically, the current study examines four dimensions of organizational culture (i.e., institutional collectivism, results orientation, positive work environment, leadership risk tolerance) and environmental pressures that are competitive and regulatory in nature. Within the context of these variables this study examines the moderating effect of environmental pressures (i.e., levels of competitive and regulatory pressure) on the relationship between organizational culture and IT project performance. The model was empirically tested with data from the United States and China. These two countries were chosen due to their very distinctive characteristics related to organizational resources and environmental factors. Results support the theory that the relationship between organizational culture and IT project performance is moderated by environmental pressures. These results should aid project managers when making decisions pertaining to the designing and carrying out of project management practices.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • The ritualization of transitions in the project life cycle: A study of
           transition rituals in construction projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Leonore van den Ende , Alfons van Marrewijk
      To manage the project life cycle and facilitate transitions, Project Management (PM) research often points to temporal models and structuring devices. However, the social and symbolic facet of transitions in projects remains understudied. Therefore, this research focuses on the ritualization of transitions in projects. Specifically, the aim is to gain insight into the practice and meaning of transition rituals in the project life cycle. To do so we draw from field research in the infrastructure sector where participant-observation was carried out during eight transition rituals in four Dutch construction projects, and 58 interviews were executed with project participants. The contribution to the PM debate on temporary organizing lies in the conceptualization of transition rituals as powerful symbolic and strategic practices in the project life cycle, and in the provision of an overview showcasing how, when and why transition rituals are practiced to facilitate transitions and embed a project in its environment.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • “Drop your boat!”: The discursive co-construction of project
           renewal. The case of the Darwin mountaineering expedition in Patagonia
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Geneviève Neukirch Musca , Caroline Mellet , Gilda Simoni , Frédérique Sitri , Sarah de Vogüé
      When a project faces an unexpected, ambiguous and risky environment, “drop your tools” often comes up against the reluctance of the actors to accept and implement its renewal. Our contribution aims to explore how team members discursively co-construct the sense of their situation and accept to “drop their tools”. Drawing upon a real-time, in situ ethnographic study of a mountaineering expedition in Patagonia, we conducted a discursive analysis of a project renewal episode. Our paper first contributes to shed light on an unexplored phenomenon: the construction and acceptance of “dropping the tools”. Second, we add to the literature on project renewal. Third, we show how team members make sense in real-time of their environment by drawing on four discursive practices (re-wording, reframing, focusing attention, and reaffirming team cohesiveness) in order to construct and accept project renewal.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Stakeholder analysis and engagement in projects: From stakeholder
           relational perspective to stakeholder relational ontology
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Stephanie Missonier , Sabrina Loufrani-Fedida
      This paper investigates the stakeholder analysis and engagement in the field of project management. In response to the limits of prior studies, we propose a relevant conceptual approach by moving from a stakeholder relational perspective, anchored in recent studies on Social Network Theory, to a stakeholder relational ontology, anchored in Actor–Network Theory (ANT). We apply our approach to read and understand a longitudinal case study of an Information System (IS) project. Our most important findings suggest that this approach based on ANT improves stakeholders' analysis of and engagement in a project by shedding light on the dynamic and emergent nature of the relationships, since we demonstrate that the nature, roles, and relations between stakeholders co-evolve with the project's definition and trajectory. Consequently, we can provide project managers with a relevant approach that informs them about what to observe in stakeholder project networks, as well as how and when to observe them.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • “On time and on budget”: Harnessing creativity in large scale
           projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Esther R. Maier , Oana Branzei
      Keeping large scale projects “on time and on budget” is no trivial accomplishment, especially when they rely on creative contributions from multiple individuals and groups that cannot be precisely timed. Simultaneously delivering on all of these aspects requires a flexible and nuanced approach to controls that builds on the discipline instilled in professional practice. We substantiate this insight with 82-day ethnography of a dramatic television series production as it unfolded in real-time. Our analyses reveal three distinct practices enacted by project members to (re)balance creativity within the parameters of the project: 1) analogically linking controls with creative tasks; 2) (in)formally attuning creative tasks to controls as the project unfolds; and 3) (re)allocating scarce resources to realize creative aspirations of the project. Taken together, these practices organically but predictably (re)balance creativity and control in large scale projects.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7




      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Extending project management research: Insights from social theories
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Serghei Floricel , Claudine Bonneau , Monique Aubry , Viviane Sergi
      Our article answers the call for renewing the theoretical bases of project management in order to overcome the problems that stem from the application of methods based on decision-rationality norms, which bracket the complexity of action and interactions in projects. By grounding our reflection in the practice perspective and by adopting Nicolini's (2013) toolkit approach, we suggest ways that could help practitioners and theorists make better sense of aspects that are highly relevant for project management but are usually overlooked. The paper discusses Nicolini's five dimensions of practice and three social theories (activity theory, actor–network theory and structuration theory) to highlight the combinations that are most appropriate and fruitful for addressing various theoretical and practical issues requiring the attention of project management researchers.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Explaining over-requirement in software development projects: An
           experimental investigation of behavioral effects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Ofira Shmueli , Nava Pliskin , Lior Fink
      One of the major risks associated with software development is related to the phenomenon of over-requirement. Also known as over-specification and gold-plating, over-requirement is manifested when a product or a service is specified beyond the actual needs of the customer or the market. In the software development context, we argue in this work that over-requirement is due partially to the emotional involvement of developers with the software features they specify. Similar involvement has been demonstrated for physical items as a result of the endowment, IKEA, and I-designed-it-myself behavioral effects, when people come to overvalue items they possess or self-create. To explore these behavioral effects and the interactions among them in the context of software development, we conducted an experiment in which over 200 participants were asked to specify a nice-to-have software feature. Our results confirm the existence of these behavioral effects in software development and their influence on over-requirement. The findings contribute to theory by explaining the over-requirement phenomenon and by providing insights into behavioral effects in the context of software development. Also practically relevant, the findings can alert managers of software projects to the over-requirement risk evoked by the behavioral effects explored in this study.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • The Last Planner System in China's construction industry — A SWOT
           analysis on implementation
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Shang Gao , Sui Pheng Low
      The Last Planner System™ (LPS) is well-documented in the literature, and has sometimes been used to represent lean construction or lean project management. LPS aims to achieve reliable workflow by encouraging foremen to have a sense of ownership of the project programme and to build-in their commitment into it. This study reports on the perceptions of Chinese building professionals of the application of LPS in Chinese construction projects. It reveals that several components of LPS have already taken place in large Chinese construction firms. Further, this study employs a SWOT analysis to examine the possible strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat factors that might have an impact on implementation of LPS in construction projects in China.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Occupational stress and job demand, control and support factors among
           construction project consultants
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 7
      Author(s): Paul Bowen , Peter Edwards , Helen Lingard , Keith Cattell
      Occupational stress affects the health and wellbeing of people who work, and the construction industry is recognized as a high-stress working environment. The relationship between job demands, job control, workplace support, and experiences of stress in the South African construction context is investigated, using hierarchical regression, factor analysis and structural equation modeling to explore the strength of thirteen factor relationships with perceived stress. Data were gathered from an on-line questionnaire survey response sample of 676 architects, civil engineers, quantity surveyors, and project and construction managers. Predictors displaying a significant relationship with occupational stress are the presence of work–life imbalance, the need to ‘prove’ oneself, hours worked per week, working to tight deadlines, and support from line managers in difficult situations at work. Existing theories of occupational stress are confirmed but not completely supported. The construction industry should give attention to how the need to work long hours is justified. Organizations should look to improving managerial and collegial support for construction professionals, but be careful in engaging in socializing and project team-building activities. Further research will need to focus more deeply on construction-specific job demand factors; explore why women professionals appear to experience more stress than men; and aim to develop reliable early-warning detection techniques for construction professionals.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T16:49:35Z
       
  • Precursors to engaged leaders in virtual project teams
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 July 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Josh Iorio , John E. Taylor
      Virtual project teams are becoming common organizational structures because firms seek to leverage geographically distributed, specialized knowledge to execute work. Performance in virtual teams can be increased through effective leadership. Although a growing body of research exists that identifies how effective leaders engage in interactions with their teams, we know less about how to strategically identify candidates for leadership positions who have high potential to become engaged leaders. Our research fills this gap by exploring how prior experiences can be used to predict engagement in interactions associated with effective leadership. Our research is based on analysis of 20 graduate students in four simulated virtual project teams executing a construction design and planning task. Results suggest that in virtual teams, engagement is conditioned by the technological context in which the work is executed. Our findings have implications for existing leadership training programs and contribute to theories about the appropriateness of shared leadership models for virtual project teams.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T16:48:34Z
       
  • Identifying organizational variables affecting project management office
           characteristics and analyzing their correlations in the Iranian
           project-oriented organizations of the construction industry
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): M. Parchami Jalal , S. Matin Koosha
      Today, applying project management knowledge by project oriented organizations for optimal use of resource and increasing productivity is inevitable. An organizational entity generally called “Project Management Office” can be responsible for project management knowledge and systematic developer of it which can centralize and coordinate management of those projects under its domain. Since organizations have different contextual and structural dimensions, we expect different project management offices in terms of their structural and functional characteristics. This article is searching for variables in the context of organizations in construction industry which have significant relationships with project management offices' characteristics. So that by analyzing these relations we can design and implement more efficient project management offices. Finally, from 29 organizational context variables which had been thought to have decisive impact on project management offices' characteristics only 9 variables had significant impact on them in which this paper focuses on.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2014-07-29T16:48:34Z
       
  • A three-step design science approach to develop a novel human
           resource-planning framework in projects: the cases of construction
           projects in USA, Europe, and Iran
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Mehrdokht Pournader , Amin Akhavan Tabassi , Peter Baloh
      Developing a comprehensive human resource (HR)-planning framework that corresponds to the variety of HR-related issues has seldom been observed in existing project management literature. The present study applies a three-step design science approach to introduce a holistic HR-planning framework. The rigor and relevance cycles in this approach address the HR-related issues in projects and the shortcomings of the literature associated with developing a thorough HR-planning framework. Subsequently, the proposed framework is being validated by an exploratory study undertaken at Parsons Brinckerhoff (USA) and BISOL Group (EU). Next, in line with the guidelines of the design cycle for justifying the use of the framework, a survey is conducted on the collected data from 110 Iranian experts in the construction industry. Using Partial Least Squares for analyzing the data, the outcomes indicate that ‘Empowerment/Training’ could significantly improve the performance of HRs in projects. The results also confirm the substantial impact of ‘Quality Assessment’ on the constructs included the HR-planning framework. Furthermore, ‘Networking Management’, ‘Delegating’, and ‘Reward/Compensation’ are prioritized as the subsequent influential constructs for effective HR management practices.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T16:48:34Z
       
  • Developing a city-level multi-project management information system for
           Chinese urbanization
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Yongkui Li , Yujie Lu , Young Hoon Kwak , Shuang Dong
      The unprecedented Chinese urbanization leads to massive government-funded construction projects. In most cities, a special project management mode called “Agent Construction Model (ACM)” has been adopted to manage and govern these projects under the same umbrella of administrative standards. The ACM integrates all available government resources to complete the urbanization projects but meanwhile it faces great challenges from overwhelming complex information and information processing. This study presents the development of a city-level multi-project management information system to decompose the information processing complexity in the context of ACM management mode. The complex adaptive system and two specific development techniques—adaptive project framework and modularized functional design method—are introduced for the system development. The system was validated at a typical urbanization city in Changchun, China. This research complements the existing project information system by adopting complexity design principles and it also provides practical value for managing large-scale urbanization projects.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T16:48:34Z
       
  • Multi-level project governance: Trends and opportunities
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 July 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Christopher Biesenthal , Ralf Wilden
      Project governance is important in ensuring successful project delivery. In this article we conduct a systematic investigation of previous research to provide a content-driven review of the literature, and to provide future research direction. We use the textual data mining software Leximancer to identify dominant concepts and themes underlying project governance research. Our findings indicate that agency and stakeholder theories have been adapted to the project governance context to a greater extent than other theories. Furthermore, we find differences in project governance research, published in project management journals compared to general management, IT and engineering journals. We conclude the paper by presenting a framework that links governance theories to the multiple organizational levels relevant to project governance.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T16:48:34Z
       
  • PPP application in infrastructure development in China: Institutional
           analysis and implications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Shuibo Zhang , Ying Gao , Zhuo Feng , Weizhuo Sun
      Public–private partnership (PPP) has been applied more and more widely for the past two decades. Questions still remain as to how to cultivate a facilitating institutional environment for developing PPP projects success. This paper examines such a question, focusing on the institutional analysis of the Chinese context. A theoretical framework of PPP governance is first developed, identifying the logics and interactions of the differentiating levels in the PPP system. Then, the institutional framework of China is presented with regard to its cultural, legal, and administrative characteristics, as the embeddedness of PPP development. Thereafter, the evolution of Chinese institutions with particular regard to PPP is analyzed. Findings show that changes in the institutional arrangements have to go in tandem with introduction of PPP, and performance of PPP is closely related with its institutional environment. Suggestions are put forward to enhance China’s institutional arrangements for healthy PPP promotion, and the implications for governments and investors in other countries are described.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2014-07-29T16:48:34Z
       
  • Project-based and temporary organizing: Reconnecting and rediscovering
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 July 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Jonas Söderlund , Brian Hobbs , Tuomas Ahola
      In recent years, the linkages between project management and organization theory have become stronger. In an attempt to address this development, this paper analyzes the research on temporary and project-based organizing. It especially discusses the development associated with the EGOS sub-themes on project organizing and the potential avenues for future research. The paper also summarizes the key findings from the included papers in the special issue on project-based and temporary organizing, which is based on papers from the EGOS conference in 2013. One key argument is that project organizing needs to develop along three lines: new empirical contexts, new theoretical/conceptual issues, and new research methodologies.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T16:48:34Z
       
  • When planned IS/IT project benefits are not realized: a study of
           inhibitors and facilitators to benefits realization
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 July 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Crispin R. Coombs
      IS/IT evaluations reveal that many organizations fail to realize planned benefits from their IS/IT projects. Benefits management researchers argue that organizational change is necessary for the delivery of IS/IT project benefits. However, existing IS/IT evaluation methods adopt a narrow quantitative focus on costs and benefits and fail to consider the organizational dimension. This study brings together the concepts of benefits management and IS/IT evaluation using the Cranfield Benefits Dependency Network (BDN) as a diagnostic tool to examine an underperforming IS/IT project. The analysis revealed that planned benefits had not been realized because of a lack of attention to technical and organizational facilitators and inhibitors associated with IT-enabled organizational change.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T16:48:34Z
       
  • The transformative effect of top management governance choices on project
           team identity and relationship with the organization — An agency and
           stewardship approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 July 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Aurélie Toivonen , Petri U. Toivonen
      This study focuses on the relationship and identity changes within and between a project team and its organization following top management intervention in the context of a large international construction project. The study follows the project-as-practice orientation, examining the actions and behaviors of the project team through participant ethnography in the “praxis” of the project site over its entire duration. The longitudinal case allows the examination of the way the transition process established a new governance culture undermining the initial trust-based one and changed it from a virtual absence of mechanisms toward far more potent mechanisms of control, monitoring, and punishment. Simultaneously, the initial stewardship relationships and collectivist identity of the project team shifted toward agency relationships and individualistic identity. The triggers for the transformation process were identified as CEO succession, project failure, top management intervention driven changes in governance mechanisms, and perception of organizational betrayal of the project team.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T16:48:34Z
       
  • Multiproject lineage management: Bridging project management and
           design-based innovation strategy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Rémi Maniak , Christophe Midler
      Innovation-based strategies are widely recognized as key drivers to maintain competitive advantage. The design and strategic literature underline the possibility of triggering a multiproduct value-expansion dynamic based on the creation of new concepts dynamically twinned with corporate strategy. However, the multiproject-management literature—portfolio, program, and platform—lags behind and remains focused on ex ante coordination, resource allocation and selectionism. Thus, there are still few indications of the processes that stimulate and orient continuous, profitable multiproject creative expansion. Bridging the multiproject-management literature and design theory, we propose a model of multiproject lineage management (MPLM), which focuses on the key processes that drive exploration efforts and shape innovation trajectory. We conduct a multiple longitudinal case analysis in the automobile sector. Based on this analysis, we expose the principles of MPLM, mapping the roles of corporate, program and project management within a global expansion project. Finally, we highlight our contributions to managerial practices and the related literature.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Corrigendum to “Research updating the APM Body of Knowledge 4th
           edition” [Int. J. Proj. Manag. 24 (2006) 461–473]
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Peter W.G. Morris , Ashley Jamieson , Miles M. Shepherd



      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Quality vs risk: An investigation of their relationship in software
           development projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Lazaros Sarigiannidis , Prodromos D. Chatzoglou
      Quality, risk and successful software development projects are three concepts which appear to be indisputably intertwined with one another. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between people quality, process quality and risk in the context of software development projects of Greek companies. Project team members with different characteristics were used as key respondents. The final sample consisted of 112 projects from 63 companies. Empirical data were analysed using the structural equation modelling technique. The main results indicate a negative effect of people quality on project risk level. On the contrary, process quality appears to have a slightly limited effect, defining only the risk level associated with the project team. The results contribute in the existing literature underlining the importance of quality on the reduction of the project risk level, thus, creating the necessary background for new similar research attempts in the future.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • An economic–probabilistic model for project selection and
           prioritization
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Camila Costa Dutra , José Luis Duarte Ribeiro , Marly Monteiro de Carvalho
      This paper presents an economic–probabilistic model for project selection and prioritization that enables necessary investments and potential benefits and their inherent variability to be quantified, thus providing a stochastic analysis of expected returns for projects. The model was developed in three steps: definition of criteria; definition of the most appropriate method to be used; and model building. A practical test to evaluate the applicability and usefulness of the model comprising a portfolio of investment projects at a power distribution company was conducted. The results show three major contributions of the proposed model: i) a set of sufficiently complete criteria, ii) the combined use of economic and probabilistic approaches which qualifies the information available to decision makers, and iii) the use of financial language, which is more easily understood and has a concrete meaning for both management and technical staff.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Separating project risk from the time value of money: A step toward
           integration of risk management and valuation of infrastructure investments
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): R. David Espinoza
      The rationale for using heuristics to establish a risk premium that is added to the risk-free rate to obtain the value of an investment is questioned and an alternative method, termed decoupled net present value (DNPV), is proposed. Rather than using utility theory concepts to decrease the value of uncertain cash flows, the risks associated with project cash flows are discretely quantified using insurance and contingent claim valuation concepts. Synthetic insurance premiums are designed to “protect” the value of expected cash flows which are treated as additional project costs. Because identified project risks are quantified in financial terms and treated as a real cost to the project, DNPV allows business executives to evaluate the effect on the value of the project of different risks and select management techniques that are deemed more effective. Hence, DNPV is both a valuation methodology and a risk management tool.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • EDM: Earned Duration Management, a new approach to schedule performance
           management and measurement
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Homayoun Khamooshi , Hamed Golafshani
      The concept of schedule monitoring and control as one of the most important functions of project and program management has not been fully exploited. One possible explanation could be the dominance of the Earned Value Management System (EVMS, also known as EVM). EVM was originally developed as a cost management and control tool which was extended to track the schedule as well. EVM and its derivatives (e.g. Earned Schedule) use cost as a proxy to measure schedule performance to control the duration of the project. While there is a correlation between schedule, cost, quality, and scope of a project, using cost to control duration has proven to be misleading. In contrast to Earned Value and Earned Schedule, the authors have developed the Earned Duration Management (EDM) in which they have decoupled schedule and cost performance measures and developed a number of indices to measure progress and performance of schedule and cost, as well as the efficacy and efficiency of the plan at any level of the project. These new indices are easy to understand, have wider applications, and can be used by contractors, clients and the scheduling offices to assess and measure schedule performance. The newly developed duration performance measures are all schedule-based and can be used for forecasting the finish date of the project.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • An Earned Schedule-based regression model to improve cost estimate at
           completion
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Timur Narbaev , Alberto De Marco
      Traditional Earned Value Management (EVM) index-based methods for Cost Estimate at Completion (CEAC) of an ongoing project have been known for their limitations inherent with both the assumption that past EVM data is the best available information and early-stage unreliability. In an attempt to overcome such limitations, a new CEAC methodology is proposed based on a modified index-based formula predicting expected cost for the remaining work with the Gompertz growth model via nonlinear regression curve fitting. Moreover, the proposed equation accounts for the schedule progress as a factor of cost performance. To this end, it integrates into its equation an Earned Schedule-based factor indicating expected duration at completion. The proposed model shows itself to be more accurate and precise in all early, middle, and late stage estimates than those of four compared traditional index-based formulae. The developed methodology is a practical tool for Project Managers to better incorporate the progress status into the task of computing CEAC and is a contribution to extending EVM research to better capture the inherent relation between cost and schedule factors.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Overlapping design and construction activities and an optimization
           approach to minimize rework
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): M.A. Hossain , D.K.H. Chua
      Construction industry often faces challenge to complete project in minimum possible time. Overlapping design and construction activities with early information from the precedent activities shortens project completion with the expense of rework in downstream design and construction activities. However, the expected amount of rework must be properly quantified to decide on the overlapping strategy. This study presents an integrated framework to overlap design and construction activities using the concepts of upstream evaluation and downstream sensitivity characteristics and develops a simulation model in order to ascertain project performance in terms of total project duration and expected amount of rework. The results indicate that reduction in project duration and expected rework amount vary based on the accuracy of upstream early information and sensitivity of downstream activities. Moreover, unplanned overlapping may not necessarily reduce project duration but may result in excessive design and construction rework which can be very costly. This study also describes a decision-making framework to optimize project schedule with minimal rework. The search for an optimal overlapping strategy is carried out using an Overlapping Strategy Matrix (OSM) with the genetic algorithm (GA) to eliminate unnecessary rework. The proposed optimization method minimizes the expected amount of rework while maintaining the project completion contract date and provides an effective means to decide on the overlapping strategy.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Subcontracting in project-based firms: Do you follow the same pattern
           across your different projects'
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Jorge Tarziján , Francisco Brahm
      This article analyzes an important dimension in which the organization of the projects performed by the same firm can differ: the insourcing or outsourcing of an activity that needs to be undertaken in each of the different projects. Analyzing the variability of a firm's insourcing or outsourcing decision across its projects gives us a better understanding of the firm's decision-making process in terms of the stability of its choices across projects and the main determinants of that variability. This analysis is valuable because a firm that manages multiple projects can benefit from the careful analysis and consideration of the interactions among and the specificities of its projects. Using a comprehensive database of construction firms and projects, we conclude that firms demonstrate variability in their insource or outsource choices across projects and that this variability is explained by factors such as the number of projects simultaneously undertaken, the variability in a project's complexity, and their market power in local markets. These results suggest that the theories explaining firm boundaries in project-based firms should be expanded to include interrelationships between projects and the individual project characteristics that drive differences in insource or outsource choices.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Barriers towards integrated product development — Challenges from a
           holistic project management perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Anita Friis Sommer , Iskra Dukovska-Popovska , Kenn Steger-Jensen
      The basis for product development in many large industrial companies is a traditional project management method positing non-overlapping phases, independent activities, and a dedicated project team. Research findings indicate that the use of integrated product development methods increases performance compared to traditional methods in contexts of complex problem solving, which are disruptive and non-linear. Even though integrated product development has been the focus of a large number of research studies, these studies mostly focus on identifying success criteria and improving performance, while the requirements for implementing integrated product development remain under-researched. This study takes a more holistic project management perspective and identifies both the challenges and the requirements of successful implementation through an in-depth case study. It was found in a chosen case company that successful implementation requires awareness and skills of integrated product development in senior management, as well as a set of cross-organizational project governance structures.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Competencies required of project managers at the design phase of mass
           house building projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): D.K. Ahadzie , D.G. Proverbs , Isaac Sarkodie-Poku
      Contemporary management researchers argue that competency-based measures are the only viable means for refocusing project managers (PMs) on what it takes to achieve managerial excellence towards engendering their professional development in a modern competitive work environment. Subsequently, a study has identified the need to establish and match the competency profiles of PMs to the project lifecycle in Mass House Building projects (MHBPs), to help improve managerial performance on these projects from inception to completion. Drawing on the well acclaimed task-contextual organizational theory of job performance, 110 structured questionnaires containing design related behavioural competencies were delivered to Property Developers in Ghana to establish their consensus on what they consider to be the core competencies that PMs must possess at the design phase of MHBPs. The data was then subjected to multiple regression analysis (stepwise method) towards isolating the relevant competencies. The findings suggest that from the perspective of senior managers (specifically managing directors of housing development companies in Ghana), they expect PMs to possess the following competencies towards ensuring effective design management at the design phase of the lifecycle of MHBPs: job-knowledge of mass contract packaging; job knowledge of performance characteristics of materials for design of MHBPs; technical quality of strategies for managing the design process; job knowledge of thermal comfort assessment and provisions in the design of MHBPs and then job knowledge of relevant design codes, legislation and regulation for MHBPs. The paper provides an important empirical impetus to a foundation paper which has already established competencies for the construction phase of the lifecycle of MHBPs. It is therefore important that PMs focus their attention on these findings towards improving their managerial and professional development for effective design management of MHBPs.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Exploring the interactive effects of safety investments, safety culture
           and project hazard on safety performan An empirical analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Yingbin Feng , Evelyn Ai Lin Teo , Florence Yean Yng Ling , Sui Pheng Low
      This study aims to explore the interactive effects of safety investments, safety culture and project hazard on construction safety performance. Data were collected using multiple techniques from 47 completed building projects in Singapore. Data were analyzed using correlation analysis, regression analysis, moderation analysis and mediation analysis. The results show that: (1) safety performance improves when there is a higher level of safety investments, a higher level of safety culture or a lower level of project hazard; (2) the effect of any individual factor on safety performance varies with the changes in other factors; (3) the effect of voluntary safety investments on safety performance is mediated by safety culture; and (4) the relationship between accident frequency rate and accident severity rate is moderated by project hazard level. The study suggests that safety performance of building projects is determined by the synergy effect of safety investments, safety culture and project hazard.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Rating defence major project success: The role of personal attributes and
           stakeholder relationships
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Alicia Mazur , Anne Pisarski , Artemis Chang , Neal M. Ashkanasy
      In this paper we develop and test a model of the associations between major project managers' personal attributes and project success in the context of the Australian Defence industry. In our model, emotional intelligence, cognitive flexibility and systemic thinking were hypothesised to relate to project success, mediated by internal and external stakeholder relationships. The model was tested in an online survey with 373 major project managers. Emotional intelligence and cognitive flexibility were found to be related to the development, quality and effectiveness of major project managers' relationships with both internal and external stakeholders; and these in turn were associated with their ratings of project success. Systemic thinking, however, had no relationship with either stakeholder relationships or project success. Additional research is needed to examine the contribution of a wider range of personal attributes to stakeholder relationships and project success, and to assess whether this model is applicable in other industries and types of projects.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Toward a genealogy of project management: Sidewinder and the management of
           exploratory projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sylvain Lenfle
      This paper deals with the management of exploratory projects, i.e. projects where neither the goals nor the means to attain them can be defined at the beginning. It relies on the historical case study of the Sidewinder Air-to-Air missile, designed by the US Navy between 1947 and 1957. The case is interesting because it violated all the best practices of PM, yet involved a short and cheap development process that resulted in a best-seller in missile history. This case thus helps to analyze the inner working of an understudied skunkworks (project-level) and to discuss the governance of exploratory projects (firm-level), more specifically the limits of Stage-Gate processes for radical innovations.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • Theme: INBAM 2013: The fourth annual conference of the International
           Network of Business and Management Journals
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Rodney Turner



      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • From potential absorptive capacity to innovation outcomes in project
           teams: The conditional mediating role of the realized absorptive capacity
           in a relational learning context
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Antonio L. Leal-Rodríguez , José L. Roldán , José A. Ariza-Montes , Antonio Leal-Millán
      Starting from the construct absorptive capacity, this study separately treats its two dimensions – potential absorptive capacity (PACAP) and realized absorptive capacity (RACAP) – and analyzes their influence on innovation outcomes (IO) in project teams. We also examine potential absorptive capacity as an antecedent of realized absorptive capacity. In addition, we propose that relational learning (RL) will play a moderator role reinforcing the PACAP and RACAP link. Consequently, this paper builds and tests a conditional process model. Data was collected from a sample of 110 project managers of firms belonging to the Spanish automotive components manufacturing sector. Results from variance-based structural equation modeling and PROCESS tool show that RACAP fully mediates the influence of the PACAP on IO, and this indirect effect is positively conditioned by RL. This paper provides evidence that when RL achieves a low value, this indirect influence is not different from zero.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
  • The moderating effect of human resource management practices on the
           relationship between knowledge absorptive capacity and project performance
           in project-oriented companies
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sujinda Popaitoon , Sununta Siengthai
      In response to recent calls for research on human resource management (HRM) in project management, this research investigates the links between HRM practices, the project team's knowledge absorptive capacity (ACAP) and project performance in project-oriented companies (POCs). Based on survey data from 198 projects in multinational companies (MNCs) in the Thai automotive industry, this research finds that HRM practices moderate the effects of a project team's knowledge ACAP on project performance, in particular of potential ACAP on long-run project performance. In addition, HRM practices covary with a project team's realized ACAP, the other dimension of ACAP, to affect short-run project performance. This research sheds light on the different roles that HRM practices play in a project, finding that HRM practices not only facilitate knowledge management from the current project to future projects but also strengthen the relationship between a project team's knowledge ACAP and long-term project performance. This research contributes to the understanding of HRM in the literature of project management.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:27:12Z
       
 
 
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