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International Journal of Project Management    [27 followers]  Follow    
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0263-7863
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2556 journals]   [SJR: 0.99]   [H-I: 58]
  • The effects of organizational culture and environmental pressures on IT
           project performan A moderation perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Vicky Ching Gu , James J. Hoffman , Qing Cao , Marc J. Schniederjans
      In this study we examine the impact of culture and environmental pressures on IT project performance. Specifically, the current study examines four dimensions of organizational culture (i.e., institutional collectivism, results orientation, positive work environment, leadership risk tolerance) and environmental pressures that are competitive and regulatory in nature. Within the context of these variables this study examines the moderating effect of environmental pressures (i.e., levels of competitive and regulatory pressure) on the relationship between organizational culture and IT project performance. The model was empirically tested with data from the United States and China. These two countries were chosen due to their very distinctive characteristics related to organizational resources and environmental factors. Results support the theory that the relationship between organizational culture and IT project performance is moderated by environmental pressures. These results should aid project managers when making decisions pertaining to the designing and carrying out of project management practices.


      PubDate: 2014-01-17T02:16:56Z
       
  • An Earned Schedule-based regression model to improve cost estimate at
           completion
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Timur Narbaev , Alberto De Marco
      Traditional Earned Value Management (EVM) index-based methods for Cost Estimate at Completion (CEAC) of an ongoing project have been known for their limitations inherent with both the assumption that past EVM data is the best available information and early-stage unreliability. In an attempt to overcome such limitations, a new CEAC methodology is proposed based on a modified index-based formula predicting expected cost for the remaining work with the Gompertz growth model via nonlinear regression curve fitting. Moreover, the proposed equation accounts for the schedule progress as a factor of cost performance. To this end, it integrates into its equation an Earned Schedule-based factor indicating expected duration at completion. The proposed model shows itself to be more accurate and precise in all early, middle, and late stage estimates than those of four compared traditional index-based formulae. The developed methodology is a practical tool for Project Managers to better incorporate the progress status into the task of computing CEAC and is a contribution to extending EVM research to better capture the inherent relation between cost and schedule factors.


      PubDate: 2014-01-08T21:14:26Z
       
  • The moderating effect of human resource management practices on the
           relationship between knowledge absorptive capacity and project performance
           in project-oriented companies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Sujinda Popaitoon , Sununta Siengthai
      In response to recent calls for research on human resource management (HRM) in project management, this research investigates the links between HRM practices, the project team's knowledge absorptive capacity (ACAP) and project performance in project-oriented companies (POCs). Based on survey data from 198 projects in multinational companies (MNCs) in the Thai automotive industry, this research finds that HRM practices moderate the effects of a project team's knowledge ACAP on project performance, in particular of potential ACAP on long-run project performance. In addition, HRM practices covary with a project team's realized ACAP, the other dimension of ACAP, to affect short-run project performance. This research sheds light on the different roles that HRM practices play in a project, finding that HRM practices not only facilitate knowledge management from the current project to future projects but also strengthen the relationship between a project team's knowledge ACAP and long-term project performance. This research contributes to the understanding of HRM in the literature of project management.


      PubDate: 2014-01-04T19:39:16Z
       
  • EDM: Earned Duration Management, a new approach to schedule performance
           management and measurement
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Homayoun Khamooshi , Hamed Golafshani
      The concept of schedule monitoring and control as one of the most important functions of project and program management has not been fully exploited. One possible explanation could be the dominance of the Earned Value Management System (EVMS, also known as EVM). EVM was originally developed as a cost management and control tool which was extended to track the schedule as well. EVM and its derivatives (e.g. Earned Schedule) use cost as a proxy to measure schedule performance to control the duration of the project. While there is a correlation between schedule, cost, quality, and scope of a project, using cost to control duration has proven to be misleading. In contrast to Earned Value and Earned Schedule, the authors have developed the Earned Duration Management (EDM) in which they have decoupled schedule and cost performance measures and developed a number of indices to measure progress and performance of schedule and cost, as well as the efficacy and efficiency of the plan at any level of the project. These new indices are easy to understand, have wider applications, and can be used by contractors, clients and the scheduling offices to assess and measure schedule performance. The newly developed duration performance measures are all schedule-based and can be used for forecasting the finish date of the project.


      PubDate: 2013-12-20T00:49:10Z
       
  • Delivering complex engineering projects: Reexamining organizational
           control theory
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 December 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Li Liu , Mark Borman , Jun Gao
      The delivery performance of complex engineering projects, such as infrastructure projects, is poor and shows no sign of significant improvement. Most of these projects have been delivered by a contractor organization for a client—usually a public or statutory agency. To ensure expected outcomes, the client typically employs “control instruments”, such as specifying outputs, directing behaviors, selecting contractors and building relationships, to influence, or control, delivery by the contractors. The dominant literature informing the choice of control instruments is derived from organizational control theory, which primarily focuses on the exercise of control within a single organization and assumes that different types of control function independently. The persistent poor delivery performance of infrastructure projects suggests a need to revisit the recommendations of organizational control theory. While a number of papers have identified the potential of combining control instruments and the need to take into account the influence of operating in a client–contractor context the mechanics and influence of specific interactions remain little understood. A case study of the delivery of the Open Pool Australian Lightwater reactor (OPAL) Nuclear Research Reactor Project in Australia, documents how the various controls employed interacted and jointly impacted on the delivery outcome. The findings start the process of further developing control theory and offer a number of practical suggestions for combining control types for practitioners. There are two main contributions to theory by this study. First, it adds support to the view that the factors influencing the principal's choice of control modes are more complex than depicted by the control theory framework. Second, it enriches the emerging balance of control literature (Cardinal et al. 2004), suggesting that it is not only the number of control modes that determines performance but also the interactions between them. Thus not only is the appropriate choice of control modes based on more than task programmability and outcome measurability, it appears that interactions between control modes also play an important role. In the case studied a combination of input, output and clan control was seen as forming an effective combination. It was also assessed to be important to avoid behavior control due to the interaction effect between behavior control and output control when employing such a grouping.


      PubDate: 2013-12-20T00:49:10Z
       
  • IPMA - Call for Applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Feature based process framework to manage scope in dynamic NPD portfolios
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Rui Abrantes , José Figueiredo
      The need to develop new products in increasingly frequent cycles of innovation drives organizations to form new product development (NPD) portfolios. In such dynamic environments, organizations need to reinforce their capabilities to deal with the simultaneity of multiple NPD projects, as well as with the frequent changes of the product scope. Many organizations, that have adopted the typical NPD process enforcing a streamlined product development process, are challenged beyond strict planning and rigorous control of their NPD projects. This paper identifies the challenges to manage the scope of a complete portfolio of NPD projects within the dynamic context that organizations face today, and using existing scope management practices. This paper suggests a novel approach to structuring the scope in dynamic NPD portfolios using feature modeling, and illustrates its use in an action-research case.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • From dynamic capabilities to ERP enabled business improvements: The
           mediating effect of the implementation project
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Edward W.N. Bernroider , Christina W.Y. Wong , Kee-hung Lai
      This study explores whether an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) implementation project mediates the relationship between dynamic pre-adoption capabilities and ERP-enabled business improvements. The results from our field survey of large ERP adopters in Austria suggest that the effects of the two out of three selected dynamic capabilities are dependent on the properties of the underlying organizational transformation project. While external information acquisition and IT governance capabilities are fully mediated by the performance of the ERP implementation project, decision making only directly impacts business capabilities. These results further our understanding about the role of the implementation project for ERP value creation and the different natures of capability relationships. We call for more research on co-presence conditions related to dynamic capabilities and IT transformation project performance.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Delivery risk analysis within the context of program management using
           fuzzy logic and DEA: A China case study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Qian Shi , Yikun Zhou , Chao Xiao , Rongyi Chen , Jian Zuo
      The last decades witnessed an increasing number of large construction programs, which have presented a large number of extra risks in terms of management. This is due to the unique characteristics of programs compared to traditional projects. On the basis of definition of a construction program, a mixed approach was employed in this study to explore the management of delivery risk of a construction program. The main contents include (1) build a delivery risk structure for a construction program as the foundation of risk qualitative and quantitative analysis; (2) analyze risk magnitude and assess the efficiency of delivery methods by using fuzzy logic theory and DEA; (3) conduct a case study of the 2010 Guangzhou Asian Games as an example of construction programs to apply and verify the mixed delivery risk assessment approach developed in this study. The result shows that the separate contracting delivery method which was planned to be used for the 2010 Guangzhou Asian Games is not the best choice, which needs to be improved based on the principles of PM contracting and partner contracting. The mixed approach used in the case study can be employed by practitioners to select an optimal delivery method for other construction programs.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Project risk management methodology for small firms
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sara Marcelino-Sádaba , Amaya Pérez-Ezcurdia , Angel M. Echeverría Lazcano , Pedro Villanueva
      We present a project management methodology designed for small businesses (SMEs), who need to run projects beyond their normal operations. These projects are critical to the survival of these organisations, such as the development of new products to adapt to the market or new legislation, management system implementations, etc. Very frequently, the managers of these projects are not project management professionals, so they need guidance to have autonomy, using minimal time and documentation resources. The risk management method outlined in this paper is based on extensive research with a large number (72) of Spanish companies. This new methodology considers the factors that are usually neglected by SMEs; i.e., project alignment with the company's strategy and results management. The methodology, based on project risk management, includes simple tools, templates and risk checklists with recommended actions and indicators. For validation it was tested in five different types of real projects (innovation, management systems and ICT implementation) of industrial and service companies with different characteristics.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Construction industry productivity and the potential for collaborative
           practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Richard Fulford , Craig Standing
      The construction industry is widely recognised as a laggard in terms of productivity improvement. This research study identifies the factors inhibiting collaboration and provides a model for developing a collaborative network approach. The case studies conducted examine the factors impacting on collaboration in the project networks of three large construction organisations. It was found that excessive fragmentation in the industry together with disparate project management processes and non-standardised information is impeding efficiency gains. A panel of project experts reviewed the findings to explain the basis of the practices. This has led to four primary conclusions: (1.) the construction industry lacks the ‘strength’ of relationships necessary to create a network of organisations that trust and have shared values; (2.) design processes should include both value engineering and lifecycle costing; (3.) procedures and information need to be standardised; (4.) there should be more emphasis on value adding project management activities.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Identifying the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to TOT
           and divestiture business models in China's water market
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Won-Suk Jang , Dong-Eun Lee , Jae-ho Choi
      This study attempts to enhance the understanding of the two emerging public–private partnership (PPP) business models – Transfer-Operate-Transfer (TOT) and divestiture – in the context of Chinese water sector. Foreign investors aiming to enter or expand their share in the market need to select an optimal PPP model between competing ones through a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOTs) analysis. For the purpose, we employ the triangulation approach consisting of an opinion survey to measure the level of consensus on each of a total of eleven SWOT factors surrounding TOT and divestiture models, and in-depth case studies on the two-representative TOT and divestiture projects. Our assessments indicate the emergence of a strong consensus between interviewees regarding bid premium, financial burden, and bidding method in TOT and fixed-return provisions, operational management efficiency, majority control, and equity transfer proportion in divestiture. However, it is advised that foreign investors should be flexible in interpreting the factors and respond them at the solution level considering a project-specific environment.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Drivers and barriers to adopting relational contracting practices in
           public projects: Comparative study of Beijing and Sydney
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Florence Yean Yng Ling , Shi Ying Ong , Yongjian Ke , Shouqing Wang , Patrick Zou
      When contracting parties adopt relational contracting (RC) as opposed to formal contracting stance, the construction project may achieve good outcomes. However, public projects usually face more constraints in adopting RC, as close relationships may lead to allegations of corruption. The aim of this study is to undertake a comparative analysis of drivers and barriers to adopting RC practices in public construction projects in two different markets viz. a centrally planned economy and a free market economy by investigating practices in Beijing and Sydney. The survey research design was adopted and data of public construction projects in Beijing and Sydney were collected using a structured questionnaire. The results revealed that relationship quality and level of harmony among contracting parties are significantly good in both cities. In Sydney, the level of inter-personal relations between contractors and consultants is significantly higher than in Beijing. It was found that the same 18 factors drive contracting parties in Beijing and Sydney to adopt RC practices, and in 6 instances, these are significantly greater drivers in Sydney. The barriers to adopting RC practices are totally dissimilar in both cities. Contracting parties in Beijing could not adopt more RC practices because of a lack of training in relational arrangement and public clients lack initiative in adopting RC practices. The conservative industry culture that encourages preservation of the status quo is also prevalent in Beijing. In Sydney, the only significant barrier is public sector accountability concerns. To cultivate readiness to embrace RC practices, it is suggested that industry professionals and the government adopt recommendations highlighted in this study according to the type of market structure.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Quantitative effects of drivers and barriers on networking strategies in
           public construction projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Yan Ning
      Past studies have found that network strategies can contribute to better company and project performance. The adoption of network strategies is motivated by a set of factors (i.e., drivers), but also faces numerous challenges (i.e., barriers). The appreciation of the factors motivating and deterring networking strategies is beneficial to the successful implementation of network strategies. In the context of public construction projects, this study aims to examine the quantitative effect of drivers and barriers on three network strategies (i.e., trust, information sharing and joint problem solving). The results of a questionnaire-survey of 104 public projects show that the adoption of network strategies in public construction is mainly cost-driven. The results indicate that four barriers impede network strategies in public projects: (i) a lack of continuity and (ii) ethos of public services are harmful to trust; (iii) institutional constraints hinder information sharing; and (iv) a lack of capability is a hurdle to information sharing and trust. It is also found that one barrier (i.e., ethos of public services) has a positive influence on trust between clients and consultants. Recommendations on enhancing network strategies through the appreciation of drivers and barriers are provided.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Identifying the critical success factors for relationship management in
           PPP projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Weiwu Zou , Mohan Kumaraswamy , Jacky Chung , James Wong
      The longer the contract period, the higher the chance that major changes will arise. Thus a greater reliance on the established relationships is needed to maintain the contractual bond in PPP project. Relationship management (RM) can therefore be expected to be even more valuable in the PPP context. This paper aims to investigate current perceptions and experiences of RM in PPP projects and more importantly, to identify the CSFs for RM in PPP projects. By means of an empirical questionnaire survey geared towards PPP practitioners with direct hands-on experience, the opinions were solicited, analyzed and compared in relation to potential PPP RM success factors. The survey findings indicate that industry practitioners currently lack a general understanding of concepts and applications of RM, given that it is relatively new in PPP. However, they do think that RM is very important to improve the present performance of PPPs. Future PPP business opportunities can also be increased by effective RM. The top four CSFs for RM are found to be commitment of senior executives, defining the objectives, integration of the different divisions and a multidisciplinary team. However, the relative importance presently assigned for each of the above factors is insufficient, and commitment from senior management is perceived as the most difficult factor to improve.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • What can we learn from the Hoover Dam project that influenced modern
           project management?
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Young Hoon Kwak , John Walewski , Dana Sleeper , Hessam Sadatsafavi
      The Hoover Dam was completed two years ahead of schedule and under budget despite political, economical, technical, and organizational obstacles. Previous literature regarding the Hoover Dam project focused primarily on the aspects of design, engineering, and construction, with minimal analysis or discussions on project and program management techniques unique to this undertaking. This paper examines project and program management practices applied to the building of the Hoover Dam, and discusses how these factors contributed to the establishment and evolution of modern project management principles, tools, and techniques. A historical review of the Hoover Dam project reveals that the project team implemented a number of innovative strategies and practices that are comparable to critical success factors for today's megaprojects to overcome monumental project challenges and obstacles. This paper conveys the organizational and managerial best practices and presents lessons learned associated with the planning and construction of the Hoover Dam project.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • A performance-based approach to project assignment and performance
           evaluation
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Yan Xu , Chung-Hsing Yeh
      Project assignment and performance evaluation have been addressed as two important and separate research issues in project management. This paper develops a new performance-based approach for integrating the project assignment and the performance evaluation processes in a project-based organization. An objective-oriented preference-based assignment process is developed to assign a project to a project manager. An optimal project assignment model is developed to maximize the total weighted contribution value of all new projects to the organizational objectives. An efficiency-based evaluation process is developed using data envelopment analysis to measure the relative performance efficiency of the completed projects and of the project managers. The approach provides a proactive mechanism for facilitating objective-focused management of projects. The outcomes of an empirical study conducted provide managerial insights in assigning projects to project managers and in evaluating the performance efficiency of both projects and project managers.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Managing complex project process models with a process architecture
           framework
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Tyson R. Browning
      Especially in large, complex projects, various aspects of process (activity network) information reside in separate models and diagrams that can become unsynchronized over time. Prior research has introduced the concept of a process architecture framework (PAF), which provides a solution by tying all the models and diagrams together in a single, rich process model with many views, where each view presents a subset of model information. This paper advances that work by (1) proposing an expandable PAF structure that organizes 27+ new and existing views, (2) suggesting examples of three new views that align well with specific concerns of users, and (3) presenting insights to guide the development of new views. Thus, this paper takes further steps towards the development of a PAF that provides at once both simplicity and completeness for project managers and other users of process models and project management information systems.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Florence Duomo project (1420–1436): Learning best project management
           practice from history
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Mark Kozak-Holland , Chris Procter
      This paper narrates the project management of the construction of the Florence Duomo by Filippo Brunelleschi in the fifteenth century. This was the most significant dome project in Europe in 1300years, and possibly the most significant, innovative and complex project of the Renaissance era (Colombo and Lanzavecchia, 1997). It still stands as the largest brick dome ever built. In order to achieve what seemed technically impossible at the time, Brunelleschi researched and adapted the construction and project management of the Pantheon in Rome in the second century. The paper allows us in turn to learn both product and process innovation from this case study, both of which are essential to contemporary project management practice. The case is valuable in understanding key drivers of project management success, and illustrates the substantial potential for learning, and therefore knowledge transfer, from previous historical projects and experiences.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Different stakeholder groups and their perceptions of project success
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Kate Davis
      This is a theoretical paper using the Web of Science search engine and Bibexcel analysis functions to determine key literature related to ‘project success’. The paper firstly provides background to the development of project success since the 1970s. Then, an inductive thematic analysis investigates which factors stakeholders, involved in projects, perceived as key to project success. It provides a better understanding of project success and identifies perceptions by senior management, project core team and project recipient stakeholder groups. The main issue highlighted by the research was that, for some groups, there were no common success factors. This suggests a lack of agreement in perceptions of project success factors between these three groups, highlighting discontinuity between them and provides a case for empirical research into multiple stakeholder groups' perceptions of project success. The approach selected employed a combination of a systematic integrative literature review, coding framework and thematic analysis.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Exploring the value of project management: Linking Project Management
           Performance and Project Success
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 2
      Author(s): Farzana Asad Mir , Ashly H. Pinnington
      The literature on Project Management (PM) shows that, in spite of advancement in PM processes, tools and systems, project success has not significantly improved. This problem raises questions about the value and effectiveness of PM and PM systems. This paper reports a research study which tests the relationship between PM performance and project success drawing from empirical data on PM professionals working in UAE project-based organisations. Multi-dimensional frameworks are validated and used in this study to measure PM performance and project success. A total of 154 completed questionnaires were analysed. Bi-variate correlation and multiple regression tests found a positive influence of PM performance and its contributing variables on project success. Additionally, new variable relationships that have not previously been identified are explored between individual variables of PM performance and project success.


      PubDate: 2013-12-15T19:11:11Z
       
  • Call for papers — Special Issue on uncertainty, risk &
           opportunity, resilience & anti-fragility
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Christophe Bredillet , Stephane Tywoniak



      PubDate: 2013-12-11T18:24:47Z
       
  • Three domains of project organising
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Graham M. Winch
      It has become axiomatic in research on project organising that projects are temporary organisations. Yet there are a number of challenges to this axiom: research on matrix organisation, the embeddedness of projects in project ecologies, and projectification all emphasise the relationship of the project to permanent organisations. Similarly, research on project-based firms and owner organisations which are relatively permanent challenges this axiom. This paper develops a conceptual framework which defines three domains of project organising: project-based firms; projects and programmes; and owners and operators as its principal theoretical contribution. This conceptual framework draws our attention to two important new areas for future research in project organising. The first is at the interfaces between the three domains of project organising: commercial, resourcing, and governance. The second is on project organising as temporary configurations of permanent organisations in coalitions to deliver particular outputs.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2013-12-11T18:24:47Z
       
  • The impact of uncertainty and ambiguity related to iteration and
           overlapping on schedule of product development projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 December 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Qing Yang , Ting Lu , Tao Yao , Bo Zhang
      Overlapping and iteration stemming from concurrent engineering are fundamental features of product development (PD) projects. They may not only reduce project duration but also create process uncertainty and ambiguity. We propose that the iteration and overlapping are the main causes of uncertainty and ambiguity in the PD process. Based on discrete-event simulation modeling and analysis with Arena software, our empirical research provides a quantitative method to reveal how uncertainty related to iteration and ambiguity related to overlapping impact on project schedule. In the simulation model, we use four variables to characterize uncertainty: iteration probability, iteration length, number of iterations and activity's learning curve effect. And different sequential and overlapped process structures are used to describe the variable of ambiguity in the model. Propositions regarding the reduction of uncertainty and ambiguity by controlling iteration and overlapping are derived. Simulation experiment results yield and reinforce several managerial insights, including: the relationship between uncertainty or ambiguity reduction and the complexity of iteration or levels of overlapping; and how to control project schedule and hedge the risk resulting from overlapping and iteration.


      PubDate: 2013-12-03T15:21:58Z
       
  • Corrigendum to “Research updating the APM Body of Knowledge 4th
           edition” [Int. J. Proj. Manag. 24 (2006) 461–473]
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Peter W.G. Morris , Ashley Jamieson , Miles M. Shepherd



      PubDate: 2013-11-29T14:39:01Z
       
  • Value creation using the mission breakdown structure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Erling S. Andersen
      The modern concept of project success includes the project contributing to the value creation of its base organization. We need tools to discuss what the project itself and the base organization should do to enhance this value creation. The Mission Breakdown Structure tool helps a company set up a project with a clearly defined mission and secures an effective interplay between the base organization and its project. This article presents the tool in principle and use an illustrative real-life case. The case looks like an IT project at the outset, but when using the Mission Breakdown Structure tool, we recognise that it is much more than that and that different stakeholders need to be involved to secure a successful project. Advice on how to use the Mission Breakdown Structure tool is also provided.


      PubDate: 2013-11-29T14:39:01Z
       
  • Quality vs risk: An investigation of their relationship in software
           development projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Lazaros Sarigiannidis , Prodromos D. Chatzoglou
      Quality, risk and successful software development projects are three concepts which appear to be indisputably intertwined with one another. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between people quality, process quality and risk in the context of software development projects of Greek companies. Project team members with different characteristics were used as key respondents. The final sample consisted of 112 projects from 63 companies. Empirical data were analysed using the structural equation modelling technique. The main results indicate a negative effect of people quality on project risk level. On the contrary, process quality appears to have a slightly limited effect, defining only the risk level associated with the project team. The results contribute in the existing literature underlining the importance of quality on the reduction of the project risk level, thus, creating the necessary background for new similar research attempts in the future.


      PubDate: 2013-11-29T14:39:01Z
       
  • Rating defence major project success: The role of personal attributes and
           stakeholder relationships
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 November 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Alicia Mazura , Anne Pisarskia , Artemis Chang , Neal M. Ashkanasy
      In this paper we develop and test a model of the associations between major project managers' personal attributes and project success in the context of the Australian Defence industry. In our model, emotional intelligence, cognitive flexibility and systemic thinking were hypothesised to relate to project success, mediated by internal and external stakeholder relationships. The model was tested in an online survey with 373 major project managers. Emotional intelligence and cognitive flexibility were found to be related to the development, quality and effectiveness of major project managers' relationships with both internal and external stakeholders; and these in turn were associated with their ratings of project success. Systemic thinking, however, had no relationship with either stakeholder relationships or project success. Additional research is needed to examine the contribution of a wider range of personal attributes to stakeholder relationships and project success, and to assess whether this model is applicable in other industries and types of projects.


      PubDate: 2013-11-25T12:52:04Z
       
  • Competencies required of project managers at the design phase of mass
           house building projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): D.K. Ahadzie , D.G. Proverbs , Isaac Sarkodie-Poku
      Contemporary management researchers argue that competency-based measures are the only viable means for refocusing project managers (PMs) on what it takes to achieve managerial excellence towards engendering their professional development in a modern competitive work environment. Subsequently, a study has identified the need to establish and match the competency profiles of PMs to the project lifecycle in Mass House Building projects (MHBPs), to help improve managerial performance on these projects from inception to completion. Drawing on the well acclaimed task-contextual organizational theory of job performance, 110 structured questionnaires containing design related behavioural competencies were delivered to Property Developers in Ghana to establish their consensus on what they consider to be the core competencies that PMs must possess at the design phase of MHBPs. The data was then subjected to multiple regression analysis (stepwise method) towards isolating the relevant competencies. The findings suggest that from the perspective of senior managers (specifically managing directors of housing development companies in Ghana), they expect PMs to possess the following competencies towards ensuring effective design management at the design phase of the lifecycle of MHBPs: job-knowledge of mass contract packaging; job knowledge of performance characteristics of materials for design of MHBPs; technical quality of strategies for managing the design process; job knowledge of thermal comfort assessment and provisions in the design of MHBPs and then job knowledge of relevant design codes, legislation and regulation for MHBPs. The paper provides an important empirical impetus to a foundation paper which has already established competencies for the construction phase of the lifecycle of MHBPs. It is therefore important that PMs focus their attention on these findings towards improving their managerial and professional development for effective design management of MHBPs.


      PubDate: 2013-11-21T23:37:59Z
       
  • Exploring the interactive effects of safety investments, safety culture
           and project hazard on safety performan An empirical analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Yingbin Feng , Evelyn Ai Lin Teo , Florence Yean Yng Ling , Sui Pheng Low
      This study aims to explore the interactive effects of safety investments, safety culture and project hazard on construction safety performance. Data were collected using multiple techniques from 47 completed building projects in Singapore. Data were analyzed using correlation analysis, regression analysis, moderation analysis and mediation analysis. The results show that: (1) safety performance improves when there is a higher level of safety investments, a higher level of safety culture or a lower level of project hazard; (2) the effect of any individual factor on safety performance varies with the changes in other factors; (3) the effect of voluntary safety investments on safety performance is mediated by safety culture; and (4) the relationship between accident frequency rate and accident severity rate is moderated by project hazard level. The study suggests that safety performance of building projects is determined by the synergy effect of safety investments, safety culture and project hazard.


      PubDate: 2013-11-21T23:37:59Z
       
  • Overlapping design and construction activities and an optimization
           approach to minimize rework
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): M.A. Hossain , D.K.H. Chua
      Construction industry often faces challenge to complete project in minimum possible time. Overlapping design and construction activities with early information from the precedent activities shortens project completion with the expense of rework in downstream design and construction activities. However, the expected amount of rework must be properly quantified to decide on the overlapping strategy. This study presents an integrated framework to overlap design and construction activities using the concepts of upstream evaluation and downstream sensitivity characteristics and develops a simulation model in order to ascertain project performance in terms of total project duration and expected amount of rework. The results indicate that reduction in project duration and expected rework amount vary based on the accuracy of upstream early information and sensitivity of downstream activities. Moreover, unplanned overlapping may not necessarily reduce project duration but may result in excessive design and construction rework which can be very costly. This study also describes a decision-making framework to optimize project schedule with minimal rework. The search for an optimal overlapping strategy is carried out using an Overlapping Strategy Matrix (OSM) with the genetic algorithm (GA) to eliminate unnecessary rework. The proposed optimization method minimizes the expected amount of rework while maintaining the project completion contract date and provides an effective means to decide on the overlapping strategy.


      PubDate: 2013-11-21T23:37:59Z
       
  • Barriers towards integrated product development — Challenges from a
           holistic project management perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2013
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Anita Friis Sommer , Iskra Dukovska-Popovska , Kenn Steger-Jensen
      The basis for product development in many large industrial companies is a traditional project management method positing non-overlapping phases, independent activities, and a dedicated project team. Research findings indicate that the use of integrated product development methods increases performance compared to traditional methods in contexts of complex problem solving, which are disruptive and non-linear. Even though integrated product development has been the focus of a large number of research studies, these studies mostly focus on identifying success criteria and improving performance, while the requirements for implementing integrated product development remain under-researched. This study takes a more holistic project management perspective and identifies both the challenges and the requirements of successful implementation through an in-depth case study. It was found in a chosen case company that successful implementation requires awareness and skills of integrated product development in senior management, as well as a set of cross-organizational project governance structures.


      PubDate: 2013-11-21T23:37:59Z
       
  • Risk management in small construction projects in Singapore: Status,
           barriers and impact
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Bon-Gang Hwang , Xianbo Zhao , Li Ping Toh
      Risk management (RM) should be implemented in construction projects to assure the achievement of project objectives, regardless of project size. This study aims to investigate RM in small projects in Singapore in terms of status, barriers and impact of RM on project performance. To achieve the objectives, a questionnaire survey was conducted and data were collected from 668 projects submitted by 34 companies. The analysis results indicated a relatively low level of RM implementation in small projects, and that “lack of time”, “lack of budget”, “low profit margin”, and “not economical” were prominent barriers. Also, the results reported the positive correlation between RM implementation and improvement in quality, cost and schedule performance of small projects, respectively. The findings of this study can provide an in-depth understanding of RM in small projects in Singapore and make benefits of RM convincing to the participants of small projects.
      Highlights ► To investigate the status quo of risk management (RM) in small projects. ► To identify the barriers to RM implementation in small projects. ► To capture the importance of RM in improving performance of small projects. ► To explore the perceived impact of RM on performance of small projects.

      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Knowledge leadership to improve project and organizational performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Li-Ren Yang , Chung-Fah Huang , Ting-Jui Hsu
      Conceptualizing knowledge leadership and customer knowledge management (CKM) in the project context is still rudimentary. Thus, the first objective of this study is to assess the associations among knowledge leadership, customer knowledge management, the performance of a precision instrument sales (PIS) project, and organizational performance. The second objective is to determine whether project performance may mediate the effect of customer knowledge management on organizational performance. The third objective is to examine the moderating role of data complexity in the relationship between customer knowledge management and project performance. This study empirically investigated a sample of precision instrument sales projects in Taiwanese high-tech industry. The findings indicate that adoption of knowledge leadership is associated with customer knowledge management. In addition, these analyses suggest that implementation of customer knowledge management influences organizational performance via project performance. The results also show that the positive relationship between customer knowledge management and project performance depends on data complexity.
      Highlights ► This study evaluates the effect of knowledge leadership on performance outcomes. ► Adoption of knowledge leadership is associated with customer knowledge management. ► Project performance fully mediates the effect of CKM on organizational performance. ► Data complexity moderates the relationship between CKM and project performance.

      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • The case for good reviewing
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jonas Söderlund , Rene M. Bakker



      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Boundary object efficacy: The mediating role of boundary objects on task
           conflict in global virtual project networks
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Josh Iorio , John E. Taylor
      As project-based industries such as Architecture, Engineering and Construction globalize, workers require strategies for managing conflict in virtual project networks. Our aim in this paper is to explore the efficacy of boundary objects as tools to mediate conflict in culturally-diverse, distributed networks. Based on annotated recordings for eight networks of graduate student engineers, we demonstrate that different interactional patterns between distributed engineers and boundary objects can lead to a reduction in conflict duration. We did not observe higher levels of conflict for global compared to domestic networks, but did discover that, regardless of network diversity, networks that interacted with the boundary objects in certain ways were able to identify and resolve conflicts more quickly. Our findings have important implications for theories of conflict management and boundary object efficacy in addition to practical applications to support conflict management in global virtual project networks.


      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Dealing with legitimacy: A key challenge for Project Portfolio Management
           decision makers
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Ernesto Gutiérrez , Mats Magnusson
      Previous research has considered combining different decision-making approaches to be critical to achieve flexibility in Project Portfolio Management (PPM). Lacking flexibility, i.e., making decisions only by rational and formal approaches, might lead to a deficient balance between different types of ideas and projects, and this may lead to innovation opportunities being missed. However, the challenges that decision makers might face in achieving that flexibility have not been investigated thoroughly. In an interview study of three industrial companies, we explored how different decision-making approaches are combined in PPM. We found that rational and formal decision-making processes are experienced as more legitimate than informal and non-rational ones. Decision makers deal with legitimacy by certain mechanisms that allow them to bypass high accepted approaches and legitimizing decisions made by low accepted ones. We discuss how these mechanisms, while contributing to achieving flexibility, might also cause a bias in decisions and destabilization in resource allocation.
      Highlights ► How Project Portfolio Management decision makers face different decision situations. ► Explorative study with qualitative interviews in three industrial companies. ► Some decision-making approaches are experienced as more legitimate than others. ► Decision makers must deal with legitimacy for approaching decisions appropriately. ► Flexibility in decision making might cause bias and destabilize resource allocation.

      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Large-scale public venue development and the application of
           Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs)
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tingting Liu , Suzanne Wilkinson
      Large-scale venues for exhibitions and events are important public infrastructure. Developing venues have captured much of governments' attention due to the potential benefits the industry would bring to the community. However, venue development requires considerable capital and operating costs, unique standards of design and complicated operational issues. Public–Private Partnerships were introduced by governments as innovative delivery models to bring forward venue projects. This paper presents comparative case studies of two PPP venue projects in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and New Zealand aiming to investigate key challenges for using PPPs in venue development and propose strategies to address the problems and assist future planning and organization for venue PPPs. The research shows that for a successful venue PPP, the following are critical features: (1) sound business case development; (2) streamlined financial arrangements; (3) robust tendering; (4) effective governance structure and partnership-based consortium; and (5) realistic risk allocation.
      Highlights ► We conduct two case studies in the venue sector where PPPs have been used. ► A successful venue PPP requires a sound business case development. ► Streamlined financial arrangements and robust tendering are critical for venue PPPs. ► Venue PPPs need an effective governance structure and partnership-based consortium. ► Achieving realistic risk allocation is essential for venue PPPs.

      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Towards a better modelling and assessment of construction risk: Insights
           from a literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Abdulmaten Taroun
      This paper reviews the literature of construction risk modelling and assessment. It also reviews the real practice of risk assessment. The review resulted in significant results, summarised as follows. There has been a major shift in risk perception from an estimation variance into a project attribute. Although the Probability–Impact risk model is prevailing, substantial efforts are being put to improving it reflecting the increasing complexity of construction projects. The literature lacks a comprehensive assessment approach capable of capturing risk impact on different project objectives. Obtaining a realistic project risk level demands an effective mechanism for aggregating individual risk assessments. The various assessment tools suffer from low take-up; professionals typically rely on their experience. It is concluded that a simple analytical tool that uses risk cost as a common scale and utilises professional experience could be a viable option to facilitate closing the gap between theory and practice of risk assessment.


      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Comparative performance of healthcare and transport PFI projects:
           Empirical study on the influence of key factors
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Christian Henjewele , Ming Sun , Peter Fewings
      Private Finance Initiative (PFI) has been used on many projects in the UK in the delivery of public services. Cost, time and risk performance in public projects was anticipated to be improved by the superior skills of the private sector. So far, there are limited empirical studies on the life cycle performance of PFI projects, especially performance comparison between different sectors. This study investigated and compared variations in costs, time, and client requirements tracking it through the strategic business case stage to the operational phase in healthcare and transport sectors. It explored the influence of sector-specific factors, project size and maturity of the PFI on these variations. It used documentary analysis of full business cases of five PFI projects and a questionnaire survey of 44 PFI projects in the UK. The findings reveal that there are still considerable cost and time overruns and requirement changes in PFI projects in both sectors over the development of the project and its early use. The health sector was better than the transport sector for time overruns but was worse on costs. Smaller-value projects outperformed larger projects on cost variations but underperformed on time.
      Highlights ► The study compared performance by project size, sector specifics and PFI maturity. ► The health sector was better than the transport sector on time but worse on cost. ► The relationship between variations and project size or sector specifics is trivial. ► But PFI maturity has a significant impact on performance. ► The findings cast light on the fundamentals of the PPP procurement dynamics.

      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • A prototype system dynamic model for assessing the sustainability of
           construction projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Xiaoling Zhang , Yuzhe Wu , Liyin Shen , Martin Skitmore
      There is a worldwide demand for an increasingly sustainable built environment. This has resulted in the need for a more accurate evaluation of the level of sustainability of construction projects. To do this it involves the development of better measurement and benchmarking methods. One approach is to use a theoretical model to assess construction projects in terms of their sustainable development value (SDV) and sustainable development ability (SDA) for implementation in the project life cycle, where SDA measures the contribution of a project to development sustainability and as a major criterion for assessing its feasibility. This paper develops an improved SDA prototype model that incorporates the effects of dynamical factors on project sustainability. This involves the introduction of two major factors concerning technological advancement and changes in people's perceptions. A case study is used to demonstrate the procedures involved in simulation and modeling, one outcome of which is to demonstrate the greater influence of technological advancement on project sustainability than changes in perception.
      Highlights ► We develop an improved SDA prototype model to measure project sustainability. ► Technological advancement and change of people's perception are added in the model. ► Influence of technological advancement on project sustainability plays the key role. ► When technological becomes mature, the people's perception begins to play a role.

      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • A parallel multiple mediator model of knowledge sharing in architectural
           design project teams
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Zhikun Ding , Fungfai Ng , Jingru Li
      The demystification of the underlying mechanism for architects' knowledge sharing behavior in a project team context is of importance to better appreciate the behavior in a theoretical sense and for effective managerial intervention in a practical sense. However, most studies of knowledge sharing mechanism in current literature focus on the simple mediation. The likelihood of multiple mediators for knowledge sharing is yet to be investigated. To bridge this gap, structural equation modeling is applied to test the parallel mediation of team-based self-esteem and team identification between two types of trust and knowledge sharing with survey data. It is found that the relation between affect-based trust and knowledge sharing is completely mediated by team-based self-esteem and team identification. The model implies that project managers should pay attention to the cultivation of members' team-based self-esteem and team identification. Special measures should also be taken to build and strengthen the affect-based trust.


      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • An integrated approach to implement Project Management Information Systems
           within the Extended Enterprise
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): M. Braglia , M. Frosolini
      Project Management Information Systems (PMIS) are software applications that help managers track projects from their conception to their execution. They provide them with pertinent information and collaborative tools. Currently, most businesses use disconnected instruments which are not designed for managing complex projects. Increases in complexity, both due to the extent of scope and the fact that the users who contribute to the decision making process are physically separated, have led to initiatives that deal with cooperation, teamwork and continuous improvement. This work presents an integrated approach to improve PMIS applicability within the Extended Enterprise. The study regards the definition and the building of a management framework where planning, scheduling, and communicating are made immediate and effective by the adoption of common standards, shared communication and appropriate software tools for the management of whole Supply Chains. The proposed approach has been successfully applied within the shipbuilding industry.
      Highlights ► PMIS are described and their strengths and weaknesses are discussed. ► The Extended Enterprise and the SCEM tools that help optimizing it are discussed. ► A new approach that uses web-based collaborative technologies is proposed. ► The approach enhances the understanding of processes and helps detecting issues. ► An event driven Control Tower manages the alerts ensuring they are not ignored.

      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Managing quality in projects: An empirical study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Ron Basu
      The purpose of this paper is to establish the key role of quality in the ‘iron triangle of cost, time and quality’ and highlight the importance of implementing the people related ‘organisation quality’ amongst key stakeholders to deliver the success criteria of a project. The field research design comprised three stages. Stage 1: Semi-structured interviews Stage 2: Questionnaire surveys followed by a conceptual research model. The research model was validated by Partial Least Squares (PLS) modelling Stage 3: Case studies of two comparable large projects based organisations (Heathrow Terminal 5 and High Speed 1). As a substantive contribution to knowledge the research defined project quality with three dimensions (viz. Design Quality, Process Quality and Organisation Quality) and identified the lack of attention to details to Organisation Quality. A mixed methodology of Partial Least Squares (PLS) and case studies was applied. The findings also helped to develop a simple but effective tool APEX (Assessing Process Excellence) to assess the key constructs of project quality and excellence. The paper also provides a summary of the best practices for managing quality.


      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Knowledge sharing in information systems development projects: Explicating
           the role of dependence and trust
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jun-Gi Park , Jungwoo Lee
      This study provides empirical evidence for the role of dependence and trust in knowledge sharing in information systems projects. As critical antecedents of dependence and trust among team members, four constructs are included in the study—environmental complexity, domain expertise, similarity of project value, and communication frequency. Partial least square analyses are conducted, using data collected from 135 project teams in two large IT firms. The results confirm that dependence and trust maintain a strong impact on knowledge sharing, leading to good team project performance. This study uses a cross-sectional survey as a research method. Longer term exploration seems necessary to further explore how trust and dependence are actually formed among team members. Findings indicate that team members share their knowledge when they trust their partners and when they feel dependent. Feelings of dependence and trust are influenced by the communication frequency, perceived similarity of the project's value, and the perceived expertise. Project managers need to pay attention to these variables in order to increase the level of knowledge sharing among team members especially in information systems development projects where primary tasks are critically knowledge-intensive.


      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Critical chain and evidence reasoning applied to multi-project resource
           schedule in automobile R&D process
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Shanlin Yang , Lei Fu
      To solve the multi-project resource schedule problem in automobile Research and Development (R&D) process, this paper proposes a multi-project schedule method on the basis of task priority, evidence reasoning (ER) and critical chain (CC) approach. The method is composed of a decision model, an organization model and two axioms. The author applied this method to a simple case of the R&D process of a Chinese automobile enterprise and compared the results of the proposed method with the critical chain project management (CCPM) based on project priority. As a result, the new method based on task priority, CCPM and ER is proven to be good at solving resource conflict problem in a real multi-project environment and performs better than the CCPM based on project priority.
      Highlights ► Set a decision model on the basis of Evidence Reasoning and Critical Chain. ► Arrange bottleneck according to task priority instead of project priority. ► Set two axioms when applying this new model in automobile R&D process. ► Set an organization responsibility assigning model with information interaction. ► Set up the performance evaluation index system of project & task based on CCPM.

      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Risk management in software projects through Knowledge Management
           techniques: Cases in Brazilian Incubated Technology-Based Firms
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Sandra Miranda Neves , Carlos Eduardo Sanches da Silva , Valério Antonio Pamplona Salomon , Aneirson Francisco da Silva , Bárbara Elizabeth Pereira Sotomonte
      In businesses such as the software industry, which uses knowledge as a resource, activities are knowledge intensive, requiring constant adoption of new technologies and practices. Another feature of this environment is that the industry is particularly susceptible to failure; with this in mind, the objective of this research is to analyze the integration of Knowledge Management techniques into the activity of risk management as it applies to software development projects of micro and small Brazilian incubated technology-based firms. Research methods chosen were the Multiple Case Study. The main risk factor for managers and developers is that scope or goals are often unclear or misinterpreted. For risk management, firms have found that Knowledge Management techniques of conversion “combination” would be the most applicable for use; however, those most commonly used refer to the conversion mode as “internalization.”


      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
  • Resources contributing to gaining competitive advantage for open source
           software projects: An application of resource-based theory
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 32, Issue 1
      Author(s): Amir Hossein Ghapanchi , Claes Wohlin , Aybüke Aurum
      Open Source Software (OSS) is an important asset in today's software-intensive society. The success of OSS projects is highly dependent on a number of factors. These factors must be understood and managed as an OSS project progresses. Thus, project management of an OSS project has a decisive role in ensuring the success of its software. The objective of the research is to increase the understanding of the resources affecting the competitiveness of OSS projects. Herewith, the responsiveness of OSS projects to users' needs is assessed via an investigation of the defect-fixing process. A Resource-Based View of the firm (RBV) is used to build theoretical justifications for a set of hypotheses proposed in this study. Data gathered from 427 OSS projects confirmed that developers' interest in and users' contribution to the project as well as frequently updating and releasing the software affect the project's ability to gain competitive advantage through effective defect-fixing. It is also shown that OSS projects that are more popular and have a higher level of organizational communication than others are more likely to gain competitive advantage through effective defect-fixing. Finally, implications of the results for practitioners and the research community are presented.


      PubDate: 2013-11-09T08:37:36Z
       
 
 
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