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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 2969 journals)

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Journal Cover International Journal of Project Management
  [SJR: 1.092]   [H-I: 67]   [46 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0263-7863
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2969 journals]
  • Six decades of project management research: Thematic trends and future
           opportunities
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Milind Padalkar, Saji Gopinath
      Project management as a discipline possesses a rich body of literature characterized by early determinism and later expansion to broader contexts aided by paradigmatic, thematic, and methodological diversity. The dynamic nature of research entails many parallel streams of enquiry under differing perspectives without convergence to parsimonious theories. We argue that an integrated view of project management research in terms of its thematic evolution and trends is necessary for an understanding of future directions. Our study fills this gap by tracing the evolution of themes in project management research, trends, and future opportunities through a systematic review of literature. We find the research to be dominated by empirical and deterministic perspectives while non-deterministic research enquiry remains weak and sporadic. We contend that stronger focus on non-deterministic perspective and a methodological convergence is necessary for the research to meaningfully advance towards theory building, and discuss potential avenues for further research.


      PubDate: 2016-08-13T21:25:51Z
       
  • Influence of personality and risk propensity on risk perception of Chinese
           construction project managers
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Chun Mei Wang, Bing Bing Xu, Su Juan Zhang, Yong Qiang Chen
      Construction project managers (CPMs) with different types of personalities make various assessments in risky situations and draw up different risk management strategies. This research presents the findings of an empirical study in China that investigated whether and how CPMs with different personality traits differed in the way they perceived project risk. A conceptual model was developed and four hypotheses were proposed concerning the relationships among personality traits, risk propensity, and risk perception using the Big Five personality model. The Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling analyses of a sample of 152 imply that 1) Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness significantly influence risk propensity; 2) risk propensity negatively affects risk perception; 3) Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness have significant effects on risk perception; and 4) risk propensity fully mediates the relationship between personality traits and risk perception. The results were complemented by qualitative evidence from 5 semi-structured interviews with project managers. This research contributes to a better understanding of how CPMs perceive risk.


      PubDate: 2016-08-09T01:00:05Z
       
  • Community and post-disaster Program Management Methodology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Paul Steinfort
      The challenge for personnel in disaster situations is that there has been very limited effective Program or Project Management (PPM) methodology, education or training provided to plan and implement Programs of Projects that will deliver sustainable value for stakeholders following a disaster. Based on extensive program management research and practice, this paper addresses a context driven, flexible but robustly practical approach to Program and Project Management methodology and education. Current Program Management training is a one size fits all approach based on Project practices and methodologies which do not integrate effectively with Project Management or cater for the largely unpredictable or high risk situation, such as a disaster. This paper reviews • A practical process for assessing, planning and delivering best value outcomes for Programs and Projects. • The PSA Project process which can be integrated into any Project methodology through the working Scope within an effective Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) process by engaging key stakeholder values to enable sustainable Program results..


      PubDate: 2016-08-09T01:00:05Z
       
  • Managing legitimacy: The Christchurch post-disaster reconstruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Bernard Walker, Huibert P. de Vries, Venkataraman Nilakant
      Large-scale, post-disaster infrastructure reconstruction projects confront multiple challenges. These include working in a demanding, resource-constrained environment; working to compressed timeframes; addressing community expectations; and protecting the local economy affected by the disaster. Following a series of major earthquakes in Canterbury New Zealand, an innovative organisational arrangement was developed in order to manage the extensive infrastructure reconstruction. This research investigated how SCIRT, the project-based alliance organisation that was created for the disaster recovery, addressed these challenges in handling the vast programme of projects. A key finding was that establishing the internal and external legitimacy of this organisation was a critical element that determined the effectiveness of the recovery work. Managing legitimacy perceptions among the multiple stakeholders is identified as a core task, and a little-recognised critical success factor, in the use of alliances for large-scale disaster-recovery projects.


      PubDate: 2016-08-09T01:00:05Z
       
  • The making and impacts of a classic text in megaproject management: The
           case of cost overrun research
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Matti Siemiatycki
      This paper presents a case study of the making and impacts of a classic text in the field of megaproject management. It focuses on Bent Flyvbjerg, Mette Skamris Holm and Søren Buhl's article Cost Underestimation in Public Works Projects: Error or Lie?, which was published in the Journal of the American Planning Association in 2002. The paper shows that classic texts can have a significant impact on megaproject planning theory and practice. Within the academy, classic texts are those that are widely cited and come to define the theoretical terrain, types of research questions that are asked and methods used in subsequent research. They also directly contribute to new megaproject planning methods and shape the public discourse on megaproject delivery. The paper concludes by identifying the key ingredients that make a classic text.


      PubDate: 2016-07-29T04:00:05Z
       
  • Genesis of the special issue
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Christophe N. Bredillet, Stéphane Tywoniak



      PubDate: 2016-07-23T19:00:06Z
       
  • The modern project: Mindsets, toolsets, and theoretical frameworks
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management




      PubDate: 2016-07-23T19:00:06Z
       
  • Understanding effects of BIM on collaborative design and construction: An
           empirical study in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Yan Liu, Sander van Nederveen, Marcel Hertogh
      In construction projects, Building Information Modeling (BIM) influences on the common way of collaboration, including the roles of different participants. The goal of this research is to explore current practices and identify the critical effects of BIM on collaborative design and construction. Through a focus group discussion and interviews with BIM related participants, we explored project professions' understandings of BIM implementation on collaborative design and construction and adopted the grounded theory to analyze the qualitative data. Eight concepts influencing the development of BIM collaboration are identified and classified: (1) IT capacity, (2) technology management, (3) attitude and behavior, (4) role-taking, (5) trust, (6) communication, (7) leadership, (8) learning and experience. We discussed the taxonomy of BIM effects into three dimensions: technology, people and process. Our findings provide empirical insights into the collaborative nature of BIM construction projects and highlight the importance of collaboration within project teams in BIM project delivery.


      PubDate: 2016-07-23T19:00:06Z
       
  • Application of the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge model for
           Organisational Learning through Projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Stephen M. Duffield, S. Jonathan Whitty
      This study is an application of the Systemic Lessons Learned Knowledge (Syllk) model that enables management to conceptualise how organisational know-how for projects is wired (distributed) across various elements of an organisation. The research method consisted of action research cycles within a large divisional branch of a government organisation. Knowledge management interventions and initiatives were implemented with three action research cycles completed. Actions and changes were observed, monitored, evaluated, and reflected on using an after action review process. This study has established that the alignment of the people and system elements (learning, culture, social, technology, process and infrastructure) can positively influence an organisation’s capability for organisation learning. This study shows how the Syllk model enables management to conceptualise (and illustrate) how organisational know-how is wired (distributed) across various people and system elements of an organisation.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-07-23T19:00:06Z
       
  • Improving IS development teams' performance during requirement analysis in
           project—The perspectives from shared mental model and emotional
           intelligence
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Chunjie Xiang, Zhonghua Yang, Ling Zhang
      Numerous studies have investigated factors affecting the project requirement analysis of information system development (ISD) teams from the view of technology, but our research focused on how developers' behaviors affected project team members' requirements analysis work from the emotional intelligence (EI) and shared mental model (SMM) perspectives. Specifically, we separated SMM into task-related SMM and member-related SMM to examine their impacts on ISD teams' performances during requirement analysis phase. Then we chose four scales of EI to research the relationships between them and SMMs. Using the approach of structural equation model, the results indicated that two aspects of SMM both have significant and positive impact on team performance, and EI could be the antecedents of SMM. The results indicate that SMM could enhance the influences of EI on project team performance, so the choice of individual team members and the team building are both significant to ISD teams for better performance in project requirement analysis.


      PubDate: 2016-07-15T16:39:54Z
       
  • Responding to project uncertainty: Evidence for high reliability practices
           in large-scale safety–critical projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Fiona C. Saunders, Andrew W. Gale, Andrew H. Sherry
      In large-scale safety–critical projects unforeseen events and uncertainties must be carefully managed to safeguard the integrity of the end product and deliver projects to time and cost. Based on 47 ‘vignettes’ of uncertainty across projects in two safety–critical sectors, this study provides an empirical examination of whether practices consistent with theories of high reliability organising are adopted by project managers as a response to project uncertainty. Our findings are that confronting uncertainties in safety–critical projects do involve many high reliability practices. Respondents expressed a sense of balancing competing demands, and provided evidence of learning, acting mindfully, avoiding over-rigid processes, and of upholding constructive tensions, conceptual slack and close interdisciplinary working. However these practices are often fragile in nature and dependent on key individuals. There are also differences between the two sectors studied, with more widespread evidence of high reliability project organising in civil nuclear than in aerospace projects.


      PubDate: 2016-07-15T16:39:54Z
       
  • Spatio-temporal dynamics of public private partnership projects in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Zhe Cheng, Yongjian Ke, Jing Lin, Zhenshan Yang, Jianming Cai
      Public Private Partnership (PPP) has been widely applied in developing infrastructures around the world. In this research, a large database of PPP projects in China was firstly built to explore the spatio-temporal evolution in terms of regional differentiation, sectors, investors and contract types. It was found that China's PPP projects have undergone four stages with the characteristics of fluctuations along with time series, spatial differentiation and paradox of application. The mechanism behind these changes mainly include the momentum of economic development and impact of national policies, local settings, especially the local governments' motivation, preference, competency and reliability, as well as the feasibility and management of PPP projects. This paper tries to make its contribution in providing Chinese cases for international comparison, while helping Chinese national and local governments make customized policies, as well as laying foundation for further in-depth empirical and theoretical PPP research.


      PubDate: 2016-07-10T06:18:26Z
       
  • Exploring performance of the integrated project delivery process on
           complex building projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Harrison A. Mesa, Keith R. Molenaar, Luis F. Alarcón
      Many building projects do not meet owners' performance expectations. Integrated project delivery (IPD) has emerged as a new delivery system with the potential to provide better performance through more supply chain integration. However, there is a knowledge gap surrounding how project delivery systems, IPD in particular, affect supply chain relationships and potential project performance. To fill this gap, we applied a simulation method, General Performance Model (GPM), to assess the interactions between numerous project delivery variables and compare potential performance between delivery systems. This study presents a GPM analysis of a complex hospital project and based upon cross-impact assessments by owners, architects, constructors, and specialty contractors from the building industry. The results found the most influential drivers of project delivery performance to be communication, alignment of interest and objectives, team working, trust, and gain/pain sharing. The performance of the supply chain was found to drive the project delivery performance.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • Measuring project management inputs throughout capital project delivery
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Sungmin Yun, Jiyong Choi, Daniel P. Oliveira, Stephen P. Mulva, Youngcheol Kang
      Despite continuous efforts into benchmarking over the last decades, few have focused on management efforts of project organizations who are involved in managing the capital project. This study presents a phase-based framework and 10 input measures for measuring project management efforts in a capital project. The measures are planning, organizing, leading, controlling, design efficiency, human resources, quality, sustainability, supply chain, and safety. This study quantifies and assesses the inputs and further sorts the results by industry sectors and project phases. The analyses show that traditional functions tend to have more consistent implementation than construction-specific functions. The results indicate that infrastructure sector tends to exert fewer and less consistent efforts than building and industrial sectors. This study contributes a new benchmarking framework and is the first to quantify project management inputs of a capital project systematically. Additionally, phase-focused and phase-wide benchmarking applications of the input measures are also discussed and provided.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • Managing inter-organizational networks for value creation in the front-end
           of projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Juri Matinheikki, Karlos Artto, Antti Peltokorpi, Risto Rajala
      Projects involve inter-organizational networks that are central to collaborative project-based value creation. Interest in value creation in the project lifecycle is mounting, and the front-end stage of projects is gaining increasing attention in the research literature. However, little is known about how network management activities facilitate value creation in the front-end and how such activities push a project toward higher end-states of value. The purpose of this research is to identify activities that facilitate the development of inter-organizational networks and augment value creation among multiple organizations in the front-end of projects. To this end, we conduct a qualitative empirical case study of the front-end of a health care campus development project. We identify four activities and five network attributes that explain how inter-organizational network can be managed for value creation in the front-end of the project. These findings contribute to research on management of the front-end of projects and management of inter-organizational networks in projects.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • A comprehensive model of project team technical performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Wen-Hsing Liu, Jennifer A. Cross
      Project teams are commonly used within organizations and have been widely studied. Yet, there is still no consensus on how to define project team success and which factors contribute most strongly to success. This study sought to develop an initial, comprehensive model of project team technical performance, using a diverse sample of 133 teams, and employing regression analysis and structural equation modeling. Effectiveness, efficiency, and innovation were found to be the primary dimensions of technical performance. Each was predicted by a different set of factors, with few factors predicting multiple dimensions. Management support, cooperation, and communication were positively related to effectiveness; efficiency was positively related to goal clarity, cooperation, and team harmony, but negatively related to team diversity; and, innovation was positively associated with knowledge/skill and cohesion, but negatively associated with team harmony. Future research should identify additional influential factors and further explore the relationships found in this study.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • Review of the application of social network analysis (SNA) in construction
           project management research
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Xian Zheng, Yun Le, Albert P.C. Chan, Yi Hu, Yongkui Li
      Over the past two decades, social network analysis (SNA) has elicited increasing attention in construction project management (CPM) research as a response to the emerging perspective of viewing projects as network-based organizational organizations. However, a thorough review of SNA application in CPM research is unavailable. This study aims to address this gap by reviewing 63 SNA papers published in eight peer-reviewed journals from 1997 to 2015 to ascertain the status of this research area and identify future research directions. The papers are analyzed in terms of institutional and individual contribution, citations, topic coverage and research design and methodologies. Three research directions, namely, internal stakeholder networks for outcome-related values, external stakeholder networks for process-related values, and external stakeholder networks for outcome-related values, are identified. The findings of this study are believed to provide useful references for the future application of SNA in CPM research.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • Clarifying the project complexity construct: Past, present and future
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Javad Bakhshi, Vernon Ireland, Alex Gorod
      The research explores the historical development of project complexity. Projects are becoming more complex due to unexpected emergent behaviour and characteristics. Complexity has become an inseparable aspect of systems and also one of the important factors in the failure of projects. While much has been written about project complexity, there is still a lack of understanding of what constitutes project complexity. This research includes a systematic literature review to demonstrate the current understanding of commonalities and differences in the existing research. This was achieved by examining more than 420 published research papers, drawn from an original group of approximately 10,000, based on citations during the period of 1990–2015. As a result of this exploration, an integrative systemic framework is presented to demonstrate understanding of project complexity. It was found that there are three primary and distinctive models of project complexity, the Project Management Institute view, the System of Systems view and the view developed from the analysis of citations of research papers, which is called the Complexity Theories view. Further testing is required on a range of complex projects in order to attempt to reconcile these views.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • Project Complexity and Risk Management (ProCRiM): Towards modelling
           project complexity driven risk paths in construction projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Abroon Qazi, John Quigley, Alex Dickson, Konstantinos Kirytopoulos
      Project complexity has been extensively explored in the literature because of its contribution towards the failure of major projects in terms of cost and time overruns. Focusing on the interface of Project Complexity and Interdependency Modelling of Project Risks, we propose a new process that aids capturing interdependency between project complexity, complexity induced risks and project objectives. The proposed modelling approach is grounded in the theoretical framework of Expected Utility Theory and Bayesian Belief Networks. We consider the decision problem of identifying critical risks and selecting optimal risk mitigation strategies at the commencement stage of a project, taking into account the utility function of the decision maker with regard to the importance of project objectives and holistic interaction between project complexity and risk. The proposed process is supported by empirical research that was conducted in the construction industry and its application is illustrated through a simulation study.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • How to reduce the negative impacts of knowledge heterogeneity in
           engineering design team: Exploring the role of knowledge reuse
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Lianying Zhang, Xiaonan Li
      Typical characteristics of construction projects are uniqueness and complexities, which lead to lack of reuse of previous knowledge in engineering design team (EDT). Furthermore, with the development of construction industry, knowledge heterogeneity continues to strengthen and increases the difficulties of knowledge reuse in EDT. The aim of this paper is to explore how to reduce the negative impacts of knowledge heterogeneity by reusing knowledge effectively in EDT. The study demonstrates that knowledge heterogeneity impact EDT performance negatively in some cases, and effective knowledge reuse and good team atmosphere help alleviate the negative effects to a certain extent. Hence EDT should encourage employees' knowledge reuse behaviors or activities and create harmonious team atmosphere so as to reduce the negative effects of knowledge heterogeneity that will in turn lead to benefits for the organization as a whole.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • Building absorptive capacity in an alliance: Process improvement through
           lessons learned
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Peter E.D. Love, Pauline Teo, Murray Davidson, Shaun Cumming, John Morrison
      Lessons learned provide the greatest value when they form part of a continuous learning process and should be: documented, communicated, archived, throughout all stages of a project. This can enable a project to maximize its ‘absorptive capacity’ (i.e. its ability to value, assimilate and apply new knowledge). With this in mind, the development and implementation of continuous ‘lessons learned’ process adopted by a program alliance that was able to improve its safety and quality performance is presented. The alliance was able to shift its mindset from single to double loop learning fuelling its absorptive capacity. The paper examines ‘how’ the lessons learned process was implemented and presents examples of learning that were implemented. The alliance's experiences in enabling the acquisition and transfer of knowledge through their ‘lessons learned’ initiative provides a learning opportunity for organizations seeking to ameliorate the performance of the projects that they are charged with delivering.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • Manager emotional intelligence and project success: The mediating role of
           job satisfaction and trust
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Azadeh Rezvani, Artemis Chang, Anna Wiewiora, Neal M. Ashkanasy, Peter J. Jordan, Roxanne Zolin
      The number of complex projects is increasing across many sectors and the associated challenges are substantial. Using a field study we aim to understand how project managers' emotional intelligence (EI) contributes to project success. We propose and test a model linking EI to project success and examine the mediating effects of project managers' job satisfaction and trust on this relationship. Based on data collected from 373 project managers in the Australian defence industry, our results indicate that EI has a positive impact on project success, job satisfaction, and trust. Moreover, we found evidence that job satisfaction and trust mediate the relationship between EI and project success. Our findings suggest that top management should be aware of the importance of project managers' job satisfaction and trust, which can both serve to boost project success in complex project situations.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • Incentive mechanism for inhibiting investors' opportunistic behavior in
           PPP projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 7
      Author(s): Jicai Liu, Ruolan Gao, Charles Y.J. Cheah, Jian Luo
      In public-private partnership (PPP) projects, private investors may engage in opportunistic behavior to pursue self-interest. In this paper, based on the contractual relationship between the government and private investors in PPP projects, principal-agent models in the presence of opportunistic tendencies in private investors were constructed to analyze the incentive mechanism for inhibiting investors' opportunistic tendencies in PPP projects. The results show that investors with opportunistic tendencies would be more inclined to invest an optimal level of productive efforts after acquiring a higher proportion of benefits allocation in the project output. Likewise, an increase in incentive intensity would help to lower the level of opportunistic behavior adopted by investors. For investors who are armed with opportunistic tendencies, there exists an optimal level of opportunistic behavior in order to maximize their benefits, and contrary to intuition it is not always the case that a higher level would be better for them. The findings contribute new insights into the development of incentives mechanism between the government and the private investors to collectively work toward creating a “win-win” contract and curbing potential opportunistic behavior.


      PubDate: 2016-07-05T18:47:07Z
       
  • How do contract types and incentives matter to project performance?
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Mohammad Suprapto, Hans L.M. Bakker, Herman G. Mooi, Marcel J.C.M Hertogh
      How collaborative contracts and contractual incentives might influence project performance remains equivocal. We hypothesized that their effects on project performance are mediated by owner–contractor collaboration, measured in terms of relational attitudes (relational norms and senior management commitment) and teamworking quality (inter-team collaborative processes). Using PLS-SEM, we analyzed a sample of 113 capital projects. The results suggest that through better relational attitudes and teamworking quality, projects with a partnering/alliance contract are likely to perform better than those with lump-sum and reimbursable contracts. Likewise, the projects with incentive contracts are likely to perform better than those without incentives through better relational attitudes and teamworking quality. There were no differences in project performance directly associated with different contract types and contractual incentives. Taken together, a partnering/alliance contract and incentive contracts do not necessarily result directly into better project performance but through relational attitudes and how they play out into actual teamworking behavior.


      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • Mapping the multi-faceted: Determinants of uncertainty in safety-critical
           projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Fiona C. Saunders, Andrew W. Gale, Andrew H. Sherry
      Project managers tasked with delivering safety-critical projects must demonstrate care, competence and confidence right from the earliest stages of project inception, when levels of uncertainty can be very high. Based on interviews with 30 project management practitioners in civil nuclear and aerospace sectors, this paper builds on work by Saunders et al. (2015), who posited the Uncertainty Kaleidoscope as a framework for identifying uncertainties. Our findings are that the six determinants of project uncertainty are similar across both civil nuclear and aerospace projects. The most commonly mentioned determinant of project uncertainty was the Environment, followed by Complexity, Capability and Information. The impact of Time on project uncertainty and Individual perceptions of uncertainty were mentioned less frequently by respondents. Our key contribution is to validate the Uncertainty Kaleidoscope over a larger data set, thereby enriching our understanding of the sources of project uncertainty in these two important and highly-consequential project environments.


      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • In project management, uncertainty is a great opportunity
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Martina Huemann, Miia Martinsuo



      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • Antecedents of project managers' voice behavior: The moderating effect of
           organization-based self-esteem and affective organizational commitment
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Bastian Ekrot, Johannes Rank, Hans Georg Gemünden
      Theory and research stress that employee voice behavior (VB; discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions, or concerns with the intent to improve organizational functioning) positively influences decision making, improvement, and innovation. However, the VB construct has rarely been studied in the specific context of project management. Using a sample of 618 project managers and 154 project portfolio coordinators nested in 154 firms, the main purpose of this study was to analyze a moderated model, in which specific contextual factors interact with individual-level variables to predict project managers' VB. Consistent with our hypotheses derived from self-consistency theory, moderated hierarchical regression analysis revealed that idea encouragement, career perspectives, qualification opportunities, and peer collaboration related more positively to VB for project managers with a high level of organization-based self-esteem. For project managers high in affective organizational commitment, we found stronger positive relationships of peer collaboration and idea encouragement with project managers' VB.


      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2016-06-25T21:24:52Z
       
  • A framework for governance of projects: Governmentality, governance
           structure and projectification
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Ralf Müller, Li Zhai, Anyu Wang, Jingting Shao
      This paper develops a general-purpose framework for the governance of projects. The framework is structured by the concepts of governmentality and governance of projects, in the context of different levels of projectification in organizations. It visualizes the organization-specific profiles for these concepts. The dimensions and scales underlying the three concepts derived mainly from the literature on governance, general management, and project management. Eight case studies in four industries in Scandinavia and China validated the dimensions and scales and identified a new dimension for the concept of governmentality. This dimension, called precept, addresses the predominant theme in governmentality as being either organizational values, process compliance, or project well-being. Theoretical implications are in the integration of so far separate concepts plus a new governmentality dimension into one overall framework and visualization of it. Practical implications are in the identification of organization specific profiles, which can be used to develop generic profiles for industries, geographies, or otherwise different governance regimes.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • Identifying interesting project phenomena using philosophical and
           methodological triangulation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Robert Joslin, Ralf Müller
      The scarcity of accepted research designs within each research philosophy paradigm limits the variance of research approaches, which reduces the chances to identify real new phenomena. We propose that researchers use triangulation of alternative research philosophies to identify interesting new phenomena, provide alternative perspectives to complex problems, and gain a richer and more holistic understanding of complex project management problems. Philosophical triangulation extends methodological triangulation into the realm of ontology and epistemology and provides for more comprehensive understanding, as it resembles a more realistic view towards social science phenomena, which, by their nature, appear differently to people, and thus are seen from different ontological perspectives simultaneously. Three related studies are used to exemplify the approach, where the results of two sets of empirical data (qualitative and quantitative) are discussed in different philosophical contexts. Implications for scholars include more practice-oriented research perspectives in line with the projects-as-practice stream by extending existing benefits from methodological triangulation into philosophical triangulation in order to identify and understand complex phenomena.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • The “economic–finance interface” for eco-innovation
           projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sabina Scarpellini, Jesús Valero-Gil, Pilar Portillo-Tarragona
      It is widely accepted that eco-innovation is a feasible direction if we want to progress towards sustainable development. However, in many European countries, eco-innovation projects are currently not common because of the significant barriers to and the negligible culture of including eco-innovation in an organisation's strategy. In this scenario, the analysis of eco-innovation project determinants offers a new strategic approach for industries to manage sustainable innovation initiatives. A specific methodology has been developed for this purpose to analyse the main characteristics of 44 applied eco-innovation projects. The purpose of the methodology described in this paper is to define the “economic–finance interface” between these projects and the main characteristics of firms in which such eco-innovation has been applied and to provide guidance in the implementation of eco-innovation to align project management with business strategy.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • A conceptualisation of relationship quality in construction procurement
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Mostafa Babaeian Jelodar, Tak Wing Yiu, Suzanne Wilkinson
      Relational contracting is often regarded as means to improve performance and profit margins in managing projects. A continuum of contracts in construction projects attempts to provide fit for purpose relationships to different working conditions; hosting levels of relationship quality. This study aims to explore contracting methodologies within construction procurement in search of practical and manageable relationship quality attributes. Initially relational attributes such as teamwork, commitment and trust along with seven main strategies for achieving these attributes are extracted from relevant studies. In the second stage construction expert interviews suggest that performance satisfaction is also a practical attribute and necessity of relationship quality. The study proposes a framework of actions and seven strategies which can facilitate the attributes associated with relationship quality. Finally based on the framework and three case studies five levels of transaction, action, strategy, attribute and relationship are demonstrated for relationship quality evaluation in construction project's procurement practices.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • Balancing contradictory temporality during the unfold of innovation
           streams
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Fanny Simon, Albéric Tellier
      This article focuses on individuals working on innovation developments during the unfolding of innovation streams. Innovation streams include both exploitation- and exploration-oriented projects. Those projects imply different temporalities and can be conducted at different paces. This research examines how different temporalities within a single innovation stream are managed first at the level of projects and then among projects. We collected data on an innovation stream in the semiconductor industry. We explain how teams and organization develop processes and tools to address different temporalities. The results show that the process of learning occurs first within projects and then among projects. Our research offers new understandings of the transition of organizations towards a project-based structure by demonstrating that changes in practices can occur first as a reaction to external events, then as the results of new arrangements triggered by management and finally as the consequences of the team’s proactive actions.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • Projectyness: A spectrum of greater or lesser capability
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Bronte van der Hoorn, Stephen J. Whitty
      Grounding in continental philosophical perspectives, and in alignment with the calls to rethink project management, this article reconceptualises what is a project. This conceptual paper uses the theoretical concepts of Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Dawkins as an interpretative lens to consider project work. The findings are that no activity is innately a project. A project is an experience that arises when there is a lack of inherent capability to undertake the activity. It is associated with a projecty experience: spikiness, roughness, and emotional ups and downs. Furthermore, it is found that there is no point of clear distinction between operational and project work: there is a projectyness spectrum. Based on these findings, we identify that project managing is about managing a lack of inherent capability and managing multiple people's experience (not a single detached activity). Furthermore, the point at which to adopt project management techniques is not definitive.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • A framework for examining the dimensions and characteristics of complexity
           inherent within rail megaprojects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Robert J. Chapman
      This paper presents a framework for examining the dimensions and characteristics of project complexity, with an emphasis on rail megaprojects. UK government departments have recorded that project complexity has increased significantly over the last decade and highlight that the subject has received inadequate attention, with a detrimental effect on project performance. However departments have not examined the characteristics of complexity or made a distinction between complexity emanating from the decisions made by the project itself and the complexity emanating from its context, as they warrant different treatment. By way of response, post examination and comparison of existing frameworks, a new framework is proposed based on a literature review. A case study is examined to illustrate how the framework may be applied.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T01:04:42Z
       
  • Key factors of sustainability in project management context: A survey
           exploring the project managers' perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management
      Author(s): Mauro L. Martens, Marly M. Carvalho
      Topics of project management and sustainability have been addressed by countless studies, but research focusing on the intersection of these topics are needed. This research looks at sustainability through the triple-bottom line perspective: economic, social, and environmental. It aims to identify key aspects of sustainability in project management context and to understand its importance based on project managers' lens. A systematic literature review merging bibliometric and content analysis was applied toward an understanding of the key topics. Further, a survey of project managers was performed and analyzed through exploratory factor analysis. The results show that four factors stood out: Sustainable Innovation Business Model, Stakeholders Management, Economic and Competitive Advantage, and Environmental Policies and Resources Saving.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • Enhancing the supplier's non-contractual project relationships with
           designers
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Rami Sariola, Miia Martinsuo
      Project delivery involves networks of customers, contractors, sub-contractors, suppliers, and designers. Strong interorganizational relationships are considered relevant to project performance. Previous research has focused on contractual relationships in direct supply chains, with little attention to suppliers and their non-contractual relationships. This study develops and tests a framework of relationship strength and its antecedents in the non-contractual relationship between suppliers and designers as third parties in construction projects. The intent is to identify the key factors relevant to enhancing the supplier's non-contractual relationships with designers. The results reveal the supplier's activeness and technical capability as antecedents to trust, and supplier's technical capability and supplier–designer cooperation beyond project boundaries as antecedents to commitment. The different antecedents of trust and commitment imply alternative pathways for strengthening non-contractual relationships in construction projects, thereby deviating from activities in contractual relationships. Further research is proposed on other types of third parties and other antecedents of commitment.


      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • An analysis of risk sharing in strategic R&D and new product
           development projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Terry R. Adler, Thomas G. Pittz, Jack Meredith
      While prior research regarding strategic projects recognizes the tension inherent in interfirm relationships, less is understood of the impact of risk sharing in the design of the contracts guiding those relationships. This investigation illuminates important performance elements of projects as they differ in the amount of contractual risk that is shared among firms. Through a multivariate analysis of 240 United States defense department R&D and new product development contracts, we found that defense contracts with partner risk sharing built in involve more change and growth than their concentrated risk counterparts. Our results suggest that projects, when managed through interfirm contracts, are more likely to involve strategic change when risk is shared than when either the buyer or seller assumes full design, technical, and/or financial risk. The results further suggest that projects containing shared buyer and seller risk enhance the prospects of joint gain through the generation of opportunities for learning.


      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • Exploring the management style of Brazilians project managers
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Pamela Ramos, Caroline Mota, Luciana Corrêa
      This research aims to identify the management style adopted by project managers. We conducted factor analysis to refine the data and to identify the management style most commonly used by project managers. Lastly, we ran Levene's test, one-way ANOVA analysis, and Kruskal–Wallis test to make assumptions considering gender and organizational sector in a sample of 129 project management practitioners. We notice that most project managers state a reactive and determined management style and give importance to interaction between parties. Brazilians project managers may desire to minimize their loss in the time of financial instability. The results present that there is no significant change for gender and organizational sector. This finding proves that regardless of gender or organizational sector, they have similar judgment about how they manage people and projects. The relevance of studies regarding management style remains, particularly for the Brazilian scenario where the literature on this subject is embryonic, and where the current economic situation is passing through. The results of this study produce insights for project managers interested in developing management abilities.


      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • Researching complex projects: Using causal mapping to take a systems
           perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 6
      Author(s): Fran Ackermann, James Alexander
      Extant literature has called for researchers to be more pluralistic in their approaches to researching projects. Responding to this call, this paper offers an exposition of a causal mapping technique. In the project management literature, there already exists a small number of articles reporting effective use of causal mapping. However, these are not dedicated to detailed explanation of the technique itself and so lack consideration of its features beyond those relevant to a particular application. Consequently, an exposition of the technique is needed to enable comprehensive understanding of causal mapping to be gained and its suitability for research designs assessed. Specifically, this paper examines causal mapping's theoretical grounding, explores its strengths and weakness, presents example applications, compares alternative causal mapping approaches, and overall, explains how causal mapping can support a systemic perspective on projects. These issues will be of interest to researchers who wish to incorporate causal mapping into their project management research designs.


      PubDate: 2016-05-17T13:45:20Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5




      PubDate: 2016-05-06T03:04:14Z
       
  • Identifying perspectives of public project managers on project success:
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Leonie Koops, Marian Bosch-Rekveldt, Laura Coman, Marcel Hertogh, Hans Bakker
      Public and private project managers contribute to the success of Large Infrastructure Projects. Considering the public client, so far researchers have been looking at him in a passive role with respect to project success. The focus of this exploratory research is what public project managers who are actively involved in the project, consider project success. Using Q-methodology, we identify four viewpoints in the respondent group, consisting of managers from five North-Western European countries and the specific success criteria accompanying these viewpoints. Within each viewpoint, the managers have the same vision on the ranking of project success criteria. Next to the conventional project manager, we distinguish the product driven manager, the parent oriented manager and the manager with a stakeholder focus. In Large Infrastructure Projects, where public and private partners collaborate, awareness of these different perspectives will help to understand the motives of the public project manager.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-04-25T07:13:09Z
       
  • The positive effect of expressing negative emotions on knowledge creation
           capability and performance of project teams
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): John Paul Stephens, Abraham Carmeli
      Organizations are built around teams as a way to better manage complex work, such as technological projects. However, complex teamwork presents challenges that can often generate positive and negative emotions, as well as demand efforts to generate new knowledge. We examine whether and how the capacity of technological product development teams to constructively express negative emotions facilitates knowledge creation capabilities and thereby enhances project outcomes. Results indicate that with greater capacity for constructively expressing negative emotions, teams enhance their capability to access crucial knowledge and exchange and integrate that knowledge in ways that enhance both project performance outcomes and project budget adherence. In so doing, we hope to open up new avenues for research on how expressing negative emotions in project teams can help in building knowledge creation capabilities and drive multiple performance outcomes.


      PubDate: 2016-04-25T07:13:09Z
       
  • Stability & reconstruction operations as mega projects: Drivers of
           temporary network effectiveness
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Paul C. van Fenema, Sebastiaan Rietjens, Peter van Baalen
      Mega projects require a temporary network of contributors. Stability & Reconstruction Operations are examined as mega projects, characterized by high levels of ambiguity and a non-permissive environment. The objective of this paper is to introduce a developmental view on managing a temporary network of contributors, and to examine in which dimensions development needs to take place. Drawing on mega project management and network theory, development of a temporary network of contributors is conceptualized using four phases: forming, storming, norming and performing. Data collection for our qualitative case study on Afghanistan focused on international actors involved in Afghanistan. We identified development challenges across four dimensions: heterogeneous stakeholders, governance, knowledge and coordination routines, and performance management. Researchers and practitioners may use this developmental view to better understand why mega projects fail or succeed, in particular when these concern heterogeneous network partners and (potentially) adversarial relationships among stakeholders in the project's local context.


      PubDate: 2016-04-17T18:48:48Z
       
  • Skills that improve profitability: The relationship between project
           management, IT skills, and small to medium enterprise profitability
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Julien Pollack, Daniel Adler
      It is commonly assumed that using project management and IT skills are good for business performance. This research explored this assumption by testing whether the use of project management and IT skills have a positive affect on business' total sales and profitability. The research data was drawn from two longitudinal Government surveys of small to medium enterprises in Australia. Models were created to describe the relationship between project management, IT skills, profitability and total sales using multiple linear regression and binary logistic regression. The results show that when controlling for the influence of other business skills, project management and IT skills have a significant positive influence on sales and profitability.


      PubDate: 2016-04-12T18:43:46Z
       
  • Selecting risk response strategies considering project risk
           interdependence
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Yao Zhang
      In risk response analysis, risks are often assumed independently. In fact, however, risks in a project mutually affect and the independent risk seldom exists in reality. This paper provides an approach to quantitatively measure the risk interdependence. Based on the analysis of the risk interdependence, we construct an optimization model for selecting risk response strategies considering the expected risk loss, risk interdependence and its two directions. Further, the effects of the risk interdependence on risk response can be investigated. There are two major findings by the analysis of the case project. First, the expected utility would be more sensitive to the risk interdependence itself than to the directions of it. Second, the insufficient attention paid to or neglect of the risk interdependence would lower the expected utility and increase the implementation cost.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T18:35:03Z
       
  • Transformational leadership and project success: The mediating role of
           team-building
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): D.A. Aga, N. Noorderhaven, B. Vallejo
      Although the effect of transformational leadership on project success is empirically supported, less is known about the mechanisms that explain this effect. To address this issue, we propose the mediating role of team-building as a possible explanation of the relationship between transformational leadership and project success. Based on a field survey of 200 development project managers in the Ethiopian Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) sector, the results of our study indicate that team-building partially mediates the effect of transformational leadership on project success. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T18:35:03Z
       
  • How safety leadership works among owners, contractors and subcontractors
           in construction projects
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 5
      Author(s): Chunlin Wu, Feng Wang, Patrick X.W. Zou, Dongping Fang
      Leadership is a key factor impacting construction safety, but previous research merely investigated the single-level relationship between safety leadership and safety performance and ignored the leadership interaction between different project stakeholders. To fill this gap, this paper aims to examine the relationships between safety leaderships of project owners, contractors and subcontractors and discover leadership dimensions which significantly impact construction safety performance. An impacting mechanism involving owner safety leadership, contractor safety leadership and subcontractor safety leadership are hypothetically proposed and empirically tested. The results show that significant relationships exist between safety leaderships of the three key stakeholders. Project safety culture acts as a significant mediator in these relationships. In addition, among all leadership dimensions of owners and contractors, safety influence and role modeling has the widest range of influence on project safety culture and other stakeholders' safety leadership. As such, it is suggested that owners and contractors should cultivate charisma and the ability of being influential about ideals in project managers and require them to behave as role models for others. The results also show that the caring dimension of leadership is more required in the frontline environment. Supervisors need more attention and support from the contractor in their well-being and organizational identification for the project. In conclusion, this paper establishes clear leadership impacting paths from owners to site supervisors of subcontractors in construction projects, which provides insights into effective ways to implement managerial measures and publicize policies and values to construction sites.


      PubDate: 2016-04-02T17:00:54Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2016-03-23T13:06:12Z
       
  • Development paths of project managers: What and how do project managers
           learn from their experiences?
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:International Journal of Project Management, Volume 34, Issue 4
      Author(s): Chantal M.J.H. Savelsbergh, Liselore A. Havermans, Peter Storm
      The development paths of project managers are paved with formal and informal learning experiences. Knowledge of the learning experiences that project managers indicate as important for their development as professionals is limited in both the academic and the practitioner world. In the current study we explore what and how project managers learn from experiences, and what is perceived as supporting this learning. We used a multi-method approach, consisting of in-depth interviews and a short follow-up survey among 31 project managers. Results show that most learning experiences occur more or less accidentally on the job and support for learning from these experiences is limited. This suggests potential to improve the quality and pace of the development paths of project managers. Limitations of the current study, and implications of these findings for theory and practice are discussed opening up avenues for future research.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T07:29:27Z
       
 
 
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