for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 2812 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 | Last

Transfusion Clinique et Biologique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 30)
Transfusion Medicine Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.821, h-index: 48)
Translational Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 1.282, h-index: 23)
Translational Proteomics     Open Access  
Translational Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.443, h-index: 66)
Transplant Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.717, h-index: 48)
Transplantation Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 63)
Transplantation Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.843, h-index: 25)
Transport Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.666, h-index: 40)
Transportation Geotechnics     Full-text available via subscription  
Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.433, h-index: 65)
Transportation Research Part B: Methodological     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 3.306, h-index: 70)
Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.943, h-index: 55)
Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.255, h-index: 44)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.155, h-index: 52)
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.016, h-index: 43)
Transportation Research Procedia     Open Access  
Trastornos Adictivos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.132, h-index: 4)
Travel Behaviour and Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.554, h-index: 23)
Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 12)
Trends in Biochemical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 11.198, h-index: 210)
Trends in Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 3.859, h-index: 142)
Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, h-index: 74)
Trends in Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 10.198, h-index: 177)
Trends in Cognitive Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 93, SJR: 11.395, h-index: 179)
Trends in Ecology & Evolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 149, SJR: 10.524, h-index: 214)
Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 5.254, h-index: 108)
Trends in Environmental Analytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Trends in Food Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.189, h-index: 104)
Trends in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 9.354, h-index: 170)
Trends in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 7.5, h-index: 171)
Trends in Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 5.211, h-index: 132)
Trends in Molecular Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 5.948, h-index: 119)
Trends in Neurosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 10.184, h-index: 217)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 2.886, h-index: 104)
Trends in Pharmacological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 5.392, h-index: 162)
Trends in Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 7.209, h-index: 163)
Trials in Vaccinology     Open Access  
Tribology and Interface Engineering Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Tribology Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.512, h-index: 64)
Tribology Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Tsinghua Science & Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 18)
Tuberculosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.729, h-index: 61)
Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.687, h-index: 41)
Tzu Chi Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 7)
Ultramicroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.818, h-index: 80)
Ultrasonics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.702, h-index: 56)
Ultrasonics Sonochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.469, h-index: 68)
Ultrasound Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.189, h-index: 6)
Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.939, h-index: 91)
UMK Procedia     Open Access  
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.482, h-index: 29)
Urologic Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.85, h-index: 60)
Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Urological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.155, h-index: 2)
Urology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.299, h-index: 136)
Urology Case Reports     Open Access  
Urology Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Utilities Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.546, h-index: 25)
Vaccine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.715, h-index: 126)
Vacunas     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.144, h-index: 5)
Vacuum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 53)
Value in Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.433, h-index: 54)
Vascular Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.281, h-index: 68)
Vehicular Communications     Full-text available via subscription  
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.341, h-index: 20)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.899, h-index: 41)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.014, h-index: 43)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.804, h-index: 67)
Veterinary Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.425, h-index: 84)
Veterinary Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.229, h-index: 81)
Vibrational Spectroscopy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 47)
Video J. and Encyclopedia of GI Endoscopy     Open Access  
Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.784, h-index: 135)
Virology Reports     Open Access  
Virus Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.291, h-index: 78)
Vision Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.432, h-index: 113)
Vitamins & Hormones     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.891, h-index: 52)
Waste Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.88, h-index: 71)
Waste Management Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Water Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 3.026, h-index: 174)
Water Resources and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Water Resources and Industry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Water Resources and Rural Development     Hybrid Journal  
Water Science : The National Water Research Center J.     Open Access  
Water Science and Engineering     Open Access  
Wave Motion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.675, h-index: 38)
Wavelet Analysis and Its Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Wear     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.371, h-index: 92)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Web Semantics: Science, Services and Agents on the World Wide Web     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 2.131, h-index: 49)
Wilderness & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wine Economics and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Woman : Psychosomatic Gynaecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal  
Women and Birth     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.584, h-index: 13)
Women's Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.237, h-index: 35)
Women's Studies Intl. Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.378, h-index: 29)
World Crop Pests     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

  First | 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 | Last

Journal Cover   Diabetes & Metabolism
  [SJR: 0.971]   [H-I: 62]   [49 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1262-3636
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2812 journals]
  • Treatment maintenance duration of dual therapy with metformin and
           sitagliptin in type 2 diabetes: The ODYSSEE observational study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 May 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): P. Valensi , G. de Pouvourville , N. Benard , C. Chanut-Vogel , C. Kempf , E. Eymard , C. Moisan , J. Dallongeville
      Aim The study compared the duration of maintenance of treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) using dual therapy with either metformin and sitagliptin (M-Sita) or metformin and a sulphonylurea (M-SU). Materials and methods This observational study included adult patients with T2D who had responded inadequately to metformin monotherapy and therefore had started de-novo treatment with Met-Sita or Met-SU within the previous eight weeks. Patient follow-up and changes to treatment were performed according to their general practitioner's usual clinical practice. The primary outcome was time to change in treatment for whatever cause. HbA1c and symptomatic hypoglycaemia were also documented. Results The median treatment duration for patients in the M-Sita group (43.2 months) was significantly longer (P <0.0001) than in the M-SU group (20.2 months). This difference persisted after adjusting for baseline differences and confounders. A similar reduction in HbA1c was noted in both arms (–0.6%), and the incidence of hypoglycaemia prior to treatment modification was lower with M-Sita (9.7%) than with M-SU (21.0%). Adverse events potentially related to treatment were reported in 2.8% (n =52) and 2.7% (n =20) of patients in the M-Sita and M-SU arms, respectively. Conclusion Under everyday conditions of primary diabetes care, dual therapy with M-Sita can be maintained for longer than M-SU. In addition, while efficacy, as measured by changes in HbA1c, was similar between treatments, the incidence of hypoglycaemia was lower in patients taking M-Sita.


      PubDate: 2015-05-13T06:48:37Z
       
  • Is HbA1c a valid surrogate for macrovascular and microvascular
           complications in type 2 diabetes'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 May 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): T. Bejan-Angoulvant , C. Cornu , P. Archambault , B. Tudrej , P. Audier , Y. Brabant , F. Gueyffier , R. Boussageon
      Recent recommendations regarding type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients’ treatments have focused on personalizing glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) targets. Because the relationship between HbA1c and diabetes prognosis has been established from large prospective cohorts, it is valid to question the extrapolation from population-based risk reduction estimations to individual predictions. Our study aimed to investigate the relationship between HbA1c reductions and clinical outcomes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs), using a meta-regression approach. Included were RCTs comparing intensive vs. standard glucose-lowering regimens for cardiovascular events and microvascular complications in T2D patients. Eight studies (33,396 patients) providing data for HbA1c reductions were found. In our meta-regression, HbA1c decreases were not significantly associated with reductions in our main study outcomes: total and cardiovascular mortality. They were also not associated with any of the secondary endpoints, including myocardial infarction, stroke and severe hypoglycaemia. Sensitivity analysis showed a significant correlation only between HbA1c-lowering and severe hypoglycaemia (P =0.014). Meta-regression analysis could find no significant association between HbA1c-lowering and a decrease in clinical outcomes, thereby questioning the use of HbA1c as a surrogate outcome for T2D-related complications. Thus, RCTs vs. placebo are urgently required to evaluate the risk–benefit ratios of therapeutic strategies beyond HbA1c control in T2D patients.


      PubDate: 2015-05-09T06:44:17Z
       
  • Intracellular diglycerides in relation to glycaemic control in the
           myocardium: A pilot study in humans
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 May 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): C.A. Anastasiou , A. Stamatelopoulos , P. Dedeilias , C. Charitos , L.S. Sidossis , S.A. Kavouras
      Aim Intramyocellular diglycerides have been implicated in the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. In the myocardium, excess lipid storage may also contribute to the appearance of diabetic cardiomyopathy, while diglycerides may have certain cardio-protective functions. However, little is known on intracellular diglyceride accumulation in the human heart. We aimed to determine diglyceride accumulation in the human myocardium in relation to diabetes status. Methods Six diabetic and six non-diabetic aged human subjects undergoing by-pass surgery participated in the study. Subjects were matched for age and body mass index. Intracellular diglyceride levels were measured in heart biopsy samples. Additional samples were taken from pectoralis major muscle that served as control. Whole body glycaemic control was assessed as the percent glycated haemoglobin. Results Intracellular diglycerides were significantly higher in the myocardium compared to pectoralis major (P <0.05). Although not statistically significant, diabetic subjects tended to accumulate smaller amounts of diglycerides compared to non-diabetic subjects in the myocardium. A linear negative correlation was observed between myocardial diglycerides and glycaemic control (r =0.632, P <0.05). Conclusions Our data suggest that poor glycaemic control and diabetes may be associated with a defective accumulation of myocardial diglycerides, possibly blunting intracellular processes and contributing to the development of cardiomyopathy.


      PubDate: 2015-05-09T06:44:17Z
       
  • Oral magnesium supplementation improves glycaemic status in subjects with
           prediabetes and hypomagnesaemia: A double-blind placebo-controlled
           randomized trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): F. Guerrero-Romero , L.E. Simental-Mendía , G. Hernández-Ronquillo , M. Rodriguez-Morán
      Aim This study evaluated the efficacy of oral magnesium supplementation in the reduction of plasma glucose levels in adults with prediabetes and hypomagnesaemia. Methods A total of 116 men and non-pregnant women, aged 30 to 65years with hypomagnesaemia and newly diagnosed with prediabetes, were enrolled into a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial to receive either 30mL of MgCl2 5% solution (equivalent to 382mg of magnesium) or an inert placebo solution once daily for four months. The primary trial endpoint was the efficacy of magnesium supplementation in reducing plasma glucose levels. Results At baseline, there were no significant statistical differences in terms of anthropometric and biochemical variables between individuals in the supplement and placebo groups. At the end of follow-up, fasting (86.9±7.9 and 98.3±4.6mg/dL, respectively; P =0.004) and post-load glucose (124.7±33.4 and 136.7±23.9mg/dL, respectively; P =0.03) levels, HOMA-IR indices (2.85±1.0 and 4.1±2.7, respectively; P =0.04) and triglycerides (166.4±90.6 and 227.0±89.7, respectively; P =0.009) were significantly decreased, whereas HDL cholesterol (45.6±10.9 and 46.8±9.2mg/dL, respectively; P =0.04) and serum magnesium (1.96±0.27 and 1.60±0.26mg/dL, respectively; P =0.005) levels were significantly increased in those taking MgCl2 compared with the controls. A total of 34 (29.4%) people improved their glucose status (50.8% and 7.0% in the magnesium and placebo groups, respectively; P <0.0005). Conclusion Our results show that magnesium supplementation reduces plasma glucose levels, and improves the glycaemic status of adults with prediabetes and hypomagnesaemia.


      PubDate: 2015-05-01T06:34:35Z
       
  • Different associations of body mass index and visceral fat area with
           metabolic parameters and adipokines in Japanese patients with type 2
           diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): H. Yanai , Y. Hirowatari



      PubDate: 2015-04-27T06:17:29Z
       
  • A novel heterozygous mutation in the glucokinase gene is responsible for
           an early-onset mild form of maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 2
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): D.T. Papadimitriou , P.J. Willems , C. Bothou , T. Karpathios , A. Papadimitriou



      PubDate: 2015-04-27T06:17:29Z
       
  • MicroRNAs and the functional β cell mass: For better or worse
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): C. Guay , R. Regazzi
      Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells plays a central role in the control of blood glucose levels. The amount of insulin released by β cells is precisely adjusted to match organism requirements. A number of conditions that arise during life, including pregnancy and obesity, can result in a decreased sensitivity of insulin target tissues and a consequent rise in insulin needs. To preserve glucose homoeostasis, the augmented insulin demand requires a compensatory expansion of the pancreatic β cell mass and an increase in its secretory activity. This compensatory process is accompanied by modifications in β cell gene expression, although the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon are still poorly understood. Emerging evidence indicates that at least part of these compensatory events may be orchestrated by changes in the level of a novel class of gene regulators, the microRNAs. Indeed, several of these small, non-coding RNAs have either positive or negative impacts on β cell proliferation and survival. The studies reviewed here suggest that the balance between the actions of these two groups of microRNAs, which have opposing functional effects, can determine whether β cells expand sufficiently to maintain blood glucose levels in the normal range or fail to meet insulin demand and thus lead, as a consequence, towards diabetes manifestation. A better understanding of the mechanisms governing changes in the microRNA profile will open the way for the development of new strategies to prevent and/or treat both type 2 and gestational diabetes.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T06:13:35Z
       
  • Lower serum zinc levels are associated with unhealthy metabolic status in
           normal-weight adults: The 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition
           Examination Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): H.K. Yang , S.H. Lee , K. Han , B. Kang , S.Y. Lee , K.H. Yoon , H.S. Kwon , Y.M. Park
      Aim This study investigated whether serum zinc concentration is associated with glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and metabolic health status in Korean adults. Methods Subjects with available serum zinc levels were recruited from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANESV) cohort. Those in the highest quartile on homoeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and with a body mass index (BMI) of 18.5–25kg/m2 were classified as metabolically obese and normal weight (MONW). Results A total of 1813 subjects with a mean age of 45.2±0.5 years and a mean BMI of 24.01±0.11kg/m2 were enrolled. Those in the lower serum zinc quartiles exhibited higher levels of fasting blood glucose and insulin resistance indices compared with those in the higher quartiles. However, these associations were positive only in normal-weight subjects. Those categorized as MONW exhibited significantly lower serum zinc levels than the metabolically healthy and normal weight (MHNW) subjects (131.6±3.0μg/dL vs 141.7±2.8μg/dL, respectively; P =0.0026), whereas serum zinc levels did not differ according to metabolic health in obese subjects. The odds ratio for being categorized as MONW was 4.12 (95% CI: 1.75, 9.72) among those in the lowest serum zinc quartile compared with those in the highest quartile even after adjusting for possible confounding factors. Conclusion Lower serum zinc levels were associated with unhealthy metabolic status in normal-weight adults. Further prospective studies are required to define the role of zinc in metabolic health.


      PubDate: 2015-04-23T06:13:35Z
       
  • Using the respective contributions of postprandial and basal glucose for
           tailoring treatments in type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): L. Monnier , C. Colette



      PubDate: 2015-04-18T05:29:25Z
       
  • Individualizing treatment of type 2 diabetes by targeting postprandial or
           fasting hyperglycaemia: Response to a basal vs a premixed insulin regimen
           by HbA1c quartiles and ethnicity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): A.J. Scheen , H. Schmitt , H.H. Jiang , T. Ivanyi
      Aim This study evaluated the proportions of prandial (PHG) vs fasting hyperglycaemia (FHG) over 24h in a group of patients with type 2 diabetes (overall and for Caucasian vs Asian patients), and tested the hypothesis that an insulin regimen with a prandial component allows a greater response than basal insulin at low glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels with a higher proportion of PHG than FHG. Methods Relative contributions of PHG and FHG to overall hyperglycaemia were analyzed by baseline HbA1c quartiles and by ethnicity at baseline and after 24-week treatment with either insulin glargine or insulin lispro mix 25 in the DURABLE study. Results With increasing baseline HbA1c, the mean relative contribution of PHG to the total area under the curve decreased (from 41% to 27%) while FHG was increased (from 59% to 73%). Both insulins decreased FHG, but only insulin lispro mix 25 decreased PHG. More patients with baseline HbA1c <9%, where PHG was more relevant, achieved the target HbA1c of<7% at endpoint with insulin lispro mix 25 compared with glargine. On average, Asians had a 10% larger contribution of PHG at all HbA1c quartiles, and a lower proportion of Asians reached the HbA1c target of<7% with either insulin treatment compared with Caucasians. Conclusion At baseline, the contribution of FHG to overall hyperglycaemia predominated at all HbA1c quartiles, whereas PHG was more clinically relevant at lower HbA1c levels and with a greater response to insulin lispro mix 25. Asians had a greater proportion of PHG and a lesser response to either insulins compared with Caucasians. Thus, responses to diabetes drugs by baseline HbA1c and ethnicity are worth investigating to better target and individualize treatment.


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T05:29:25Z
       
  • Are third-trimester adipokines associated with higher metabolic risk among
           women with gestational diabetes'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): D. Honnorat , E. Disse , L. Millot , E. Mathiotte , M. Claret , A. Charrie , J. Drai , L. Garnier , C. Maurice , E. Durand , C. Simon , O. Dupuis , C. Thivolet
      Aim This study aimed to determine whether third-trimester adipokines during gestational diabetes (GDM) are associated with higher metabolic risk. Methods A total of 221 women with GDM (according to IADPSG criteria) were enrolled between 2011/11 and 2013/6 into a prospective observational study (IMAGE), and categorized as having elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG, n =36) if levels were≥92mg/dL during a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, n =116) if FBG was<92mg/dL but with elevated 1-h or 2-h OGTT values, or impaired fasting and stimulated blood glucose (IFSG, n =69) if both FBG was≥92mg/dL and 1-h or 2-h OGTT values were elevated. Results Pre-gestational body mass index (BMI) was higher in women with IFG or IFSG compared with IGT (P <0.001), as were leptin levels in women with IFG vs IGT [34.7 (10.5–119.7) vs 26.6 (3.56–79.4) ng/L; P =0.008]. HOMA2-IR scores were higher in women with IFG or IFSG vs IGT (1.87±1.2 or 1.72±0.9 vs 1.18±0.8, respectively; P <0.001). Also, those with IFSG vs those with IGT had significantly lower HOMA2-B scores (111.4±41.3 vs 127.1±61.6, respectively; P <0.05) and adiponectin levels [5.00 (1.11–11.3) vs 6.19 (2.11–17.7) μg/mL; P <0.001], and higher levels of IL-6 [1.14 (0.33–20.0) vs 0.90 (0.31–19.0); P =0.012] and TNF-α [0.99 (0.50–10.5) vs 0.84 (0.45–11.5) pg/mL; P =0.003]. After adjusting for age, parity, and pre-gestational and gestational BMI, the difference in adiponectin levels remained significant. Conclusion Diagnosing GDM by IADSPG criteria results in a wide range of heterogeneity. Our study has indicated that adipokine levels in addition to FBG may help to select women at high metabolic risk for appropriate monitoring and post-delivery interventions (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCP02133729).


      PubDate: 2015-04-18T05:29:25Z
       
  • Active and passive exposure to tobacco smoke in relation to insulin
           sensitivity and pancreatic β-cell function in Japanese subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): S. Oba , E. Suzuki , M. Yamamoto , Y. Horikawa , C. Nagata , J. Takeda
      Aim Several studies have suggested that cigarette-smoking affects insulin sensitivity in Western populations. The present study evaluated glucose tolerance, pancreatic β-cell function and insulin sensitivity in relation to active and passive smoking among the Japanese. Methods A total of 411 men and 586 women were recruited into a community-based cross-sectional study in Gifu, Japan. Diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were screened for by a 75g oral glucose tolerance test. HOMA and insulinogenic (ΔI0−30/ΔG0−30) indexes were used to estimate insulin secretion and sensitivity. To assess the possible association of self-reported smoking status and parameters of glucose metabolism, logistic regression was applied after adjusting for potential confounders. Results Currently smoking women were more likely to have diabetes, IGT or IFG compared with never-smoking women (OR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.05–4.84). Heavy-smoking men (≥25 cigarettes/day) were likely to be in the lowest tertile group of ΔI0–30/ΔG0–30 compared with never-smoking men (OR: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.05–6.68, P trend =0.04). The number of cigarettes/day was borderline significantly associated with diabetes in men. Also with borderline significance, never-smoking women with smoking husbands were more likely to have diabetes, IGT or IFG (OR: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.00–2.62) and significantly more likely to have lower HOMA-β (OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.36–3.48) than those without smoking husbands. Conclusion The greater the number of cigarettes smoked per day appears to be associated with diabetes among men whereas, among women, both active and passive smoking appear to be associated with diabetic states, including IGT and IFG. An association between smoking status and insulin secretion is also suggested, whereas no significant association was observed with HOMA-IR in this Japanese subjects, suggesting that the influence of smoking on glucose metabolism may differ among races.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Effects of alcohol consumption and the metabolic syndrome on 10-year
           incidence of diabetes: The ATTICA study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): E. Koloverou , D.B. Panagiotakos , C. Pitsavos , C. Chrysohoou , E.N. Georgousopoulou , V. Metaxa , C. Stefanadis
      Aim The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate the effect of alcohol consumption on the 10-year diabetes incidence. Methods In 2001–2002, a random sample of 1514 men (18–89 years old) and 1528 women (18–87 years old) was selected to participate in the ATTICA study (Athens metropolitan area, Greece). Among various other characteristics, average daily alcohol intakes (abstention, low, moderate, high) and type of alcoholic drink were evaluated. Diabetes was defined according to American Diabetes Association criteria. During 2011–2012, the 10-year follow-up was performed. Results The 10-year incidence of diabetes was 13.4% in men and 12.4% in women. After making various adjustments, those who consumed up to 1 glass/day of alcohol had a 53% lower diabetes risk (RR=0.47; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.83) compared with abstainers, while trend analysis revealed a significant U-shaped relationship between quantity of alcohol drunk and diabetes incidence (P <0.001 for trend). Specific types of drinks were not associated with diabetes incidence; however, a one-unit increase in ratio of wine/beer/vodka vs. other spirits was associated with an 89% lower risk of diabetes (RR=0.11; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.67). The protective effect of low alcohol consumption on diabetes incidence was more prominent among individuals with stricter adherence to the Mediterranean diet (RR=0.08; 95% CI: 0.011, 0.70) and without the metabolic syndrome (RR=0.34; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.70). Conclusion This work revealed the protective effect of modest alcohol consumption of particularly wine and beer against the long-term incidence of diabetes, possibly due to their pleiotropic health effects.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Adverse drug reaction: A possible case of glimepiride-induced syndrome of
           inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): H. Adachi , H. Yanai



      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • More effective glycaemic control by metformin in African Americans than in
           Whites in the prediabetic population
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): C. Zhang , R. Zhang
      Aim Metformin, a first-line diabetes drug, delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in the prediabetic population; however, in prediabetic patients, differences in glycaemic response to metformin among racial groups are unknown. We aimed to compare glucose-lowering effects of metformin between Whites and African Americans (AAs). Methods We performed a secondary analysis using data from the diabetes prevention program, a multi-center randomized clinical trial, in which all participants were prediabetic. The metformin group (582 Whites and 210 AAs) received 850mg of metformin twice daily, and was followed for 3years. Results We found that after 6months on metformin, Whites had a drop of 3.89±0.39 (mg/dL, mean±SEM) in the fasting plasma glucose level, significantly less than that in African Americans (6.04±0.72, P =0.006); at years 1 and 2, the differences were also significant. Consistently, the linear mixed model showed that, within 1year of metformin treatment, the rate in reduction of glucose levels was more pronounced in AAs than in Whites (P =0.025 following adjustment for age and sex). Conclusions Therefore, AAs have a better glycaemic response to metformin treatment than Whites in the prediabetic population.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Neuregulin 1 affects leptin levels, food intake and weight gain in
           normal-weight, but not obese, db/db mice
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): G. Ennequin , N. Boisseau , K. Caillaud , V. Chavanelle , M. Etienne , X. Li , C. Montaurier , P. Sirvent
      Aim Studies in vitro have highlighted the potential involvement of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) in the regulation of energy metabolism. This effect has also been suggested in vivo, as intracerebroventricular injection of NRG1 reduces food intakes and weight gain in rodents. Thus, it was hypothesised that NRG1 might affect serum leptin levels in mice. Methods Weight, food intakes, energy expenditure, spontaneous physical activity and serum leptin levels were evaluated in normal-weight C57BL/6JRJ mice following intraperitoneal administration of NRG1 (50μg/kg, three times/week) or saline for 8 weeks. Based on the results of this first experiment, leptin-resistant obese db/db mice were then given NRG1 for 8 weeks. Results Leptin serum concentrations were six times higher in C57BL/6JRJ mice treated with NRG1 than in the animals given saline. NRG1 treatment also reduced weight gain by 10% and food intakes by 15% compared with saline treatment, while energy expenditure remained unchanged. In db/db mice, serum leptin concentrations, weight gain, food intakes, energy expenditure and spontaneous physical activity were not altered by NRG1 treatment. Conclusion The decrease in food intakes and weight gain associated with NRG1 treatment in C57BL/6JRJ mice may be partly explained by increased leptin levels, whereas db/db mice were not affected by the treatment, suggesting resistance to NRG1 in this pathological state.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Impact of socioeconomic status and gender on glycaemic control,
           cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes complications in type 1 and 2
           diabetes: A population based analysis from a Scottish region
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): A. Collier , S. Ghosh , M. Hair , N. Waugh
      Aims In this cross-sectional study, the aims were to investigate the association of the socioeconomic status and gender on the prevalence of type 1 and 2 diabetes, glycaemic control, cardiovascular risk factors plus the complications of diabetes in a population-based analysis in the county of Ayrshire and Arran, Scotland. Methods Quality Outcome Framework data was obtained from General Practices in Ayrshire and Arran, Scotland (n =15,351 patients). Results In type 1 diabetes, there was an increasing linear trend in HbA1c across deprivation levels (P <0.01). In type 1 diabetes, obesity in women (P <0.01) and increased non-fasting triglyceride levels in both men and women were associated with deprivation (P <0.05). In type 2 diabetes, there was a significant prevalence trend with deprivation for women (P <0.01) but not with glycaemic control (P =0.12). Smoking, ischaemic heart disease and neuropathy (P <0.01) were all associated with increasing deprivation with gender differences. In type 2 diabetes, reduced HDL cholesterol (P <0.01 both genders), and percentage of people on lipid lowering therapy (men P <0.05; women P <0.01) were associated with deprivation. Smoking, ischaemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease and neuropathy plus foot ulcers (P <0.05) were all associated with increasing deprivation with gender differences. Conclusions Socioeconomic status and gender are associated with changes in glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors plus complication development in both type 1 and 2 diabetes. The mechanisms are unclear but follow-up of these patients should allow greater understanding.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Anthropometric markers for detection of the metabolic syndrome in
           adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): K. Benmohammed , P. Valensi , M. Benlatreche , M.T. Nguyen , F. Benmohammed , J. Pariès , S. Khensal , C. Benlatreche , A. Lezzar
      Objectives This study aimed to estimate, in a large group of Algerian adolescents, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), using four definitions (by Cook, De Ferranti, Viner and the IDF), and to test the validity of unique thresholds of waist circumference, waist/height ratio and BMI in screening for the MetS regardless of the definition used. Subjects and methods A total of 1100 adolescent students, aged 12–18 y, were randomly selected from schools and classrooms in the city of Constantine; all had anthropometric measurements taken and 989 had blood tests. Results Prevalences of the MetS were: 2.6% for boys and 0.6% for girls by the Cook definition; 4.0% for boys and 2.0% for girls by the De Ferranti definition; 0.7% for boys and 0% for girls by the Viner definition; and 1.3% for boys and 0.5% for girls by the 2007 IDF definition. Prevalences ranged from 3.7% to 13.0% in obese adolescents. Unique thresholds, independent of gender, age and height, of 80cm for waist circumference, 0.50 for waist/height ratio and 25kg/m2 for BMI had sensitivities of 72–100%, 67–100% and 72–100%, respectively, and specificities of 74–78%, 74–86% and 74–78%, respectively, depending on the MetS definition used. Conclusion The MetS is present in Algerian adolescents and the prevalence is especially high in obese young people. Our thresholds for waist circumference, waist/height ratio and BMI for screening for the MetS should now be tested in other adolescent populations.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • The dawn phenomenon in type 2 diabetes: How to assess it in clinical
           practice'
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): L. Monnier , C. Colette , S. Dejager , D. Owens
      Aim The study was aimed at determining whether the dawn phenomenon in type 2 diabetes (T2D) can be predicted and quantified using simple and easily accessible glucose determinations. Methods A total of 210 non-insulin-treated persons with T2D underwent continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). The dawn phenomenon was quantified as the absolute increment from the nocturnal glucose nadir to the pre-breakfast value (Δdawn, mg/dL). Pre-lunch (preL) and pre-dinner (preD) glucose, and their averaged values (preLD), were compared with the nocturnal nadir. These pre-meal values were subtracted from the pre-breakfast values. The differences obtained (Δpre-mealL, Δpre-meal D and Δpre-meal LD) were correlated with Δdawn values. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to select the optimal Δpre-meal value that best predicted a dawn phenomenon, set at a threshold of 20mg/dL. Results All pre-meal glucose levels and differences from pre-breakfast values (Δpre-meal) significantly correlated (P <0.0001) with the nocturnal nadir and Δdawn values, respectively. The strongest correlations were observed for the parameters averaged at preL and preD time points: r =0.83 for preLD and r =0.58 for Δpre-meal LD. ROC curve analysis indicated that the dawn phenomenon at a threshold of 20mg/dL can be significantly predicted by a Δpre-meal LD cut off value of 10mg/dL. The relationship between Δdawn (Y, mg/dL) and Δpre-meal LD (X, mg/dL) was Y=0.49 X+15. Conclusion The self-monitoring of preprandial glucose values at the three main mealtimes can predict the presence/absence of the dawn phenomenon, and permits reliable assessment of its magnitude without requiring continuous overnight glucose monitoring.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Hypoglycaemia requiring medical assistance in patients with diabetes: A
           prospective multicentre survey in tertiary hospitals
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): S. Liatis , M. Mylona , S. Kalopita , A. Papazafiropoulou , S. Karamagkiolis , A. Melidonis , A. Xilomenos , I. Ioannidis , G. Kaltsas , L. Lanaras , S. Papas , C. Basagiannis , A. Kokkinos
      Aim Hypoglycaemia is considered a factor contributing to morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. The aim of the present study was to examine the frequency, clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcomes of iatrogenic hypoglycaemia requiring medical assistance. Methods Eight hospitals participated in this prospective survey of documented iatrogenic hypoglycaemia at their emergency departments. Cases with type 2 diabetes (T2D) were compared with a control group, consisting of patients visiting the outpatients’ diabetes clinics of the same hospitals during the same time period. Results Median survey duration was 16.5 months, and 295 episodes of iatrogenic hypoglycaemia were recorded. Frequency varied across centres from 0.25 to 0.78 cases per 100 presenting patients. Most cases (90.8%) were observed in patients with T2D (mean age: 76.7±10.1 years), while 8.1% of events were recorded in patients with type 1 diabetes (mean age: 42.7±18.3 years). Total in-hospital mortality was 3.4%, and all involved patients with T2D. In T2D patients, advanced age (OR: 1.3 [1.20–1.45] for 5-year increase), use of sulphonylureas (OR: 4.0 [2.5–6.36]), use of insulin (OR: 2.35 [1.42–3.95]), lower estimated GFR (OR: 1.15 [1.07–1.23] at 10mL/min) and number of comorbidities (OR: 1.74 [1.34–2.27]) were each independently associated with hypoglycaemia requiring medical assistance. Conclusion Hypoglycaemia requiring medical assistance in patients with diabetes is a moderately common condition seen in emergency departments and has a mortality rate of 3.4%. The majority of cases involve elderly individuals with T2D who are suffering from serious comorbidities and treated with insulin and/or sulphonylureas.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Frequency and predictors of confirmed hypoglycaemia in type 1 and
           insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a real-life setting:
           Results from the DIALOG study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): B. Cariou , P. Fontaine , E. Eschwege , M. Lièvre , D. Gouet , D. Huet , S. Madani , S. Lavigne , B. Charbonnel
      Aim DIALOG assessed the prevalence and predictors of hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 (T1DM) or insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a real-life setting. Methods In this observational study, insulin-treated patients (n =3048) completed prospective daily questionnaires reporting the frequency and consequences of severe/confirmed non-severe hypoglycaemia over 30 days. Patients (n =3743) also retrospectively reported severe hypoglycaemia over the preceding year. Results In this prospective survey, 85.3% and 43.6% of patients with T1DM and T2DM, respectively, reported experiencing at least one confirmed hypoglycaemic event over 30 days, while 13.4% and 6.4%, respectively, reported at least one severe event. Hypoglycaemia frequency increased with longer duration of diabetes and insulin therapy. Strongly predictive factors for hypoglycaemia were previous hypoglycaemia, >2 injections/day, BMI<30kg/m2 and duration of insulin therapy>10 years. HbA1c level was not predictive of hypoglycaemia in either T1DM or T2DM. The confirmed hypoglycaemia rate was increased in the lowest compared with the highest tertile of HbA1c in T1DM, but not T2DM. At the time of enrolment, physicians reported severe hypoglycaemia in 23.6% and 11.9% of T1DM and T2DM patients, respectively, during the preceding year; the retrospective survey yielded frequencies of 31.5% and 21.7%, respectively. Also, severe hypoglycaemia led to medical complications in 10.7% and 7.8% of events in T1DM and T2DM patients, respectively, over 30 days. Conclusion Using a unique combined prospective and retrospective approach, the DIALOG study found a relatively high frequency of hypoglycaemia among insulin-treated patients. These findings emphasize the importance of a patient-centred approach for managing diabetes in which hypoglycaemia risk evaluation is critical. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01628341.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Editorial board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Endocrine disruptors: New players in the pathophysiology of type 2
           diabetes'
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): N. Chevalier , P. Fénichel
      The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has dramatically increased worldwide during the last few decades. While lifestyle factors, such as decreased physical activity and energy-dense diets, together with genetic predisposition, are well-known actors in the pathophysiology of T2D, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that the increased presence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the environment, such as bisphenol A, phthalates and persistent organic pollutants, may also explain an important part in the incidence of metabolic diseases (the metabolic syndrome, obesity and T2D). EDCs are found in everyday products (including plastic bottles, metal cans, toys, cosmetics and pesticides) and used in the manufacture of food. They interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, activity and elimination of natural hormones. Such interferences can block or mimic hormone actions and thus induce a wide range of adverse effects (developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune). In this review, both in vivo and in vitro experimental data and epidemiological evidence to support an association between EDC exposure and the induction of insulin resistance and/or disruption of pancreatic β-cell function are summarized, while the epidemiological links with disorders of glucose homoeostasis are also discussed.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • Long-term impact of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes on social life,
           quality of life and sexuality
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): H. Mellerio , S. Guilmin-Crépon , P. Jacquin , M. Labéguerie , C. Lévy-Marchal , C. Alberti
      Aim This study describes the socio-professional outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and sexuality of adults with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods The study participants (n =388), recruited from a nationwide registry (age: 28.5±3.1 years; T1D duration: 17.0±2.7 years), completed a questionnaire (198 items); the results were compared with the French general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and Z scores matched for age, gender and period with/without education levels and patterns of family life. Linear regression models also investigated correlates of SF-36 Physical (PCS) and Mental Composite Scores (MCS). Results Compared with the French general population, education levels of people with T1D were similar, with 68.6% having at least a high-school diploma or higher (SIR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.93; 1.20), as were also their patterns of family life. Unemployment was higher in T1D women (15.3%, SIR: 1.50, 1.00; 2.05), but not in T1D men (8.6%, SIR: 0.96, 0.51; 1.57). Social discrimination was more common (SIR: 5.64, 4.64; 6.62), and frequency of daily alcohol consumption was higher (SIR: men, 3.34, 2.38; 4.54; women, 6.53, 4.57; 12.99). PCS and MCS were decreased moderately (mean±SD: 52.0±7.5; mean Z score: −0.2, 95% CI: −0.3; −0.1) and substantially (mean±SD: 42.1±12.4; mean Z score: −0.7, −0.8; −0.6), respectively. Fatigue and abandoning sports were predictive of a lower HRQOL. Both men and women were more frequently dissatisfied with their sex life. Prevalence of sexual problems was higher in women (SIR for: dysorgasmia, 1.91, 1.21–2.88; decreased/loss of desire: 2.11, 1.35–3.08), but similar in men. Participants with T1D-related complications had preserved social outcomes, but altered HRQOL. Conclusion Young adults with T1D have satisfactory social participation. However, their higher alcohol consumption, lower MCS and frequent dissatisfaction with sexuality suggest a heavy impact of the disease on morale, especially in women. Improving the everyday well-being of these young adults represents a key challenge for diabetes healthcare.


      PubDate: 2015-04-14T04:12:24Z
       
  • O14 Rôle de miR-148b et miR-21 dans les mécanismes associés
           aux effets de l’activité physique
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): C. Gastebois , A. Bergouignan , S. Blanc , S. Rome , E. Lefai , C. Simon
      Objectif Les changements actuels de mode de vie, notamment la sédentarité, sont associés aux maladies chroniques, alors qu’une activité régulière améliore les fonctions métaboliques. Les mécanismes moléculaires des effets de l’activité physique sont incomplètement élucidés. Nous proposons d’étudier le rôle de certains microARNs, d’importants régulateurs de gènes récemment identifiés, comme régulateurs physiologiques de ces effets. Matériels et méthodes Une étude exhaustive des microARNs sériques de sujets actifs et sédentaires, en basal et après modulation de leur activité (désentrainement et entraînement ; étude LIPOX), a permis d’identifier différents microARNs d’intérêt. L’expression musculaire de ces microARNs a été mesurée afin de préciser les relations entre niveaux d’expression sérique et tissulaire. Les microARNs ont été surexprimés ou inhibés in vitro dans des modèles cellulaires (cellules L6 et HuH7) afin d’identifier leur rôle dans les processus biologiques associés à l’activité physique. Résultats L’entraînement physique induit une augmentation du niveau d’expression sérique des 2 microARNs sélectionnés, miR148-b et miR-21 (+56 % et +132 % ; p <0,05) mais ne modifie pas leur niveau d’expression musculaire. À l’inverse le désentrainement ne modifie pas leur niveau d’expression sérique mais induit une diminution de leur niveau d’expression musculaire (–31 % et –21 % ; p <0,05). Les variations de la dépense énergétique liée à l’activité physique (DEAP) sont corrélées positivement aux variations sériques de miR-148b (R²=0,64 ; p <0,001) et miR-21 (R²=0,29 ; p <0,05) ; celles de VO2max aux variations sériques de miR-21 (R²=0,37 ; p <0,05). L’ensemble de ces résultats est associé aux variations d’expression de gènes cibles des 2 microARNs. Conclusion Ces résultats suggèrent le rôle des microARNs dans le dialogue inter-organe comme régulateurs des effets de l’activité physique. Les processus biologiques sous-jacents, comme la voie de l’insuline ou le métabolisme des lipides, font actuellement l’objet d’études de surexpression et d’inhibition in vitro. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O13 Potentialisation par l’acide α-lipoique des effets
           géniques « exercice-mimétiques » de la voie
           PPARβδ
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): A.-S. Rousseau , B. Sibille , J. Murdaca , I. Satney , J. Neels , P. Grimaldi
      Introduction La qualité de l’ajustement métabolique et de la réponse adaptative à l’exercice physique, qui dépend du statut « redox », détermine la susceptibilité liée à l’âge de développer un diabète de type 2. Celle-ci implique la voie PPARβ/δ qui contrôle la transcription de gènes du métabolisme des acides gras, de la différenciation cellulaire et de l’inflammation. Le but de cette étude est de caractériser, dans le muscle squelettique, les effets de l’acide α-lipoïque (α-LA), un puissant antioxydant, sur la voie PPARβ/δ. Matériels et méthodes Nous avons maintenu des myotubes C2C12 et C2C12 surexprimant PPARβ/δ ou PPARβ/δ-DN dans des conditions standards ou « stressantes ». Ces cellules ont été traitées avec de l’α-LA et/ou du GW0742 (agoniste de PPARβ/δ) et/ou par des inhibiteurs des voies du stress. Des études in vivo ont été réalisées chez des souris C57Bl6: 1) jeunes et âgées, 2) soumises ou non un entrainement volontaire sur roue d’activité (7 semau), 3) soumises ou non à un exercice « stressant » sur tapis roulant. Résultats L’α-LA ne présente pas d’activité agoniste de PPARβ/δ mais le traitement par l’α-LA affecte significativement l’expression de PPARβ/δ (× 2) et de certains de ses gènes cibles, et potentialise les effets géniques du GW0742 des C2C12. L’inhibition de la voie c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) conduit au même profil de réponse (ARNm et protéine PPARβ/δ et gènes cibles), que le traitement à l’α-LA. L’α-LA diminue la forme phosphorylée de JNK et de c-Jun. Dans le vastus lateralis de souris, l’entrainement augmente l’expression de PPARβ/δ de deux fois alors que le vieillissement et l’exercice forcé (situations physiologiques stressantes) conduisent à sa diminution. Conclusion Lorsque la voie JNK est anormalement activée, l’α-LA pourrait être envisagé comme un traitement préventif des conséquences métaboliques de la sédentarité en particulier lorsque l’activité physique est impossible. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O12 Évaluation de l’efficacité du pancréas artificiel
           pour réduire les hypoglycémies nocturnes dans un camp de
           vacances pour enfants présentant un diabète de type 1
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): A. Haidar , L. Matteau-Pelletier , V. Messier , M. Dallaire , L. Legault , R. Rabasa-Lhoret
      Rationnel Malgré le développement des pompes à insuline et des lecteurs de glycémie en continu, les enfants atteints du diabète de type 1 (DbT1) continuent de présenter des hypoglycémies nocturnes (HN) fréquentes. Il a été montré que le pancréas artificiel (PA) permet de réduire les NH. Afin de réduire encore plus le risque d’HN, du glucagon peut être ajouté au PA, on parle alors d’un PA à double hormone (PADH). Nous avons réalisé un essai randomisé dans un camp de vacances pour enfants DbT1 pour comparer trois stratégies: le PA à simple hormone (PASH), le PADH et le traitement conventionnel (TC) avec la pompe à insuline. Patients et méthodes Chaque patient réalisait trois nuits consécutives avec chaque stratégie. La glycémie était mesurée avec le lecteur sous-cutané Dexcom G4 Platinum (Dexcom). Pour les interventions avec le PA, la pompe Accu-Chek Combo (Roche) était utilisée. Pour les interventions avec le TC, les patients conservaient leur pompe habituelle. Le critère d’évaluation principal est le temps passé en hypoglycémie (< 4,0mmol/L) de 23 heures à 7 heures. Résultats Trente-trois patients ont complété l’étude. Le PADH a diminué le temps passé en hypoglycémie comparativement au PASH et au TC (2,1 %, 4,7 % et 6,7 % respectivement ; p = NS pour PASH vs TC, sinon p <0,05). Le PADH et PASH augmentent le temps passé dans les cibles glycémiques (entre 4,0 et 8,0mmol/L) comparativement au TC (63,2 %, 53,6 % et 32,7 % respectivement ; p < 0,05). Des HN (< 3,1mmol/L) sont survenues chez 11 participants avec le TC, 4 avec le PASH et aucune avec le PADH. Conclusion Chez des enfants DbT1 étudiés la nuit dans un camp de vacances les deux versions du PA améliorent le temps passé dans les cibles glycémiques comparativement au TC. Toutefois, le PADH réduit de façon plus importante le risque d’hypoglycémie comparativement au PASH. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O03 Le FGF21 améliore le profil métabolique des souris
           lipodystrophiques Bscl2-/-
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): L. Dollet , T. Coskun , Q. Venara , C. Le May , A. Adams , R. Gimeno , J. Magré , B. Cariou , X. Prieur
      Introduction Ces dix dernières années, le fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) est devenu une cible pharmacologique des complications métaboliques associées à l’obésité. Dans des modèles murins d’obésité, un traitement par des doses pharmacologiques de FGF21 permet une nette amélioration des paramètres métaboliques. Chez l’homme, un analogue de FGF21 a été testé chez des diabétiques de type 2 et a induit une augmentation des niveaux circulant d’adiponectine. Des travaux récents montrent que les effets insulinosensibilisateurs de FGF21 sont liés à son action sur le tissu adipeux via une production accrue d’adiponectine. Les souris lipodystrophiques Bscl2-/- sont caractérisées par une faible masse de tissu adipeux dysfonctionnel et des niveaux très bas d’adiponectine. Nous avons utilisé FGF21 dans le but d’améliorer les propriétés du tissu adipeux des souris Bscl2-/- et leur statut métabolique. Matériels et méthodes Des souris Bscl2-/- de 6 semaines ont été traitées par un analogue du FGF21 humain, LY 2405319 (Eli-lilly), à une dose de 1mg/kg, pendant 28 jours. Résultats Le traitement avec FGF21 améliore la glycémie à l’état nourri (256 ± 49 vs 147 ± 28mg/dL Bscl2-/- contrôles vs traitées), la sensibilté à l’insuline et augmente la concentration plasmatique d’adiponectine (0,64 ± 0,12 vs 1,53 ± 0,47 µg/ml). Ces effets bénéfiques sont associés à une augmentation de l’expression de PPARã et de l’adiponectine dans le tissu adipeux blanc des souris Bscl2-/-. De plus, les gènes de la thermogénèse sont induits dans ce même tissu, ce qui suggère qu’une partie des effets de FGF21 passent par la « beigisation » du tissu adipeux blanc. Le traitement n’a aucun effet sur la masse ou le profil d’expression génique du tissu adipeux brun. Discussion Nos résultats montrent que FGF21 améliore en partie les complications métaboliques associées à la lipodystrophie. Ces effets bénéfiques semblent principalement dus à l’amélioration par FGF21 du profil d’expression et sécrétoire du tissu adipeux blanc résiduel des souris lipodystrophiques. Ces résultats ouvrent la possibilité que le FGF21 soit une piste thérapeutique intéressante pour les patients lipodystrophiques. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent avoir un intérêt avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté. Mise à disposition de l’analogue de FGF21 par les laboratoires Eli Lilly.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O11 Insulinothérapie en boucle fermée à domicile en
           période vespérale et nocturne durant 2 mois: données
           préliminaires françaises de l’essai randomisé
           contrôlé HYBRI
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): E. Renard , J. Place , O. Diouri , A. Farret , C. Ap At Home
      Objectif Nous avons évalué l’efficacité d’une insulinothérapie en boucle fermée (BF) à domicile du dîner au réveil durant 2 mois chez des patients diabétiques type 1 (DT1). Patients et méthodes Douze patients DT1 depuis 23 à 48 ans, 6M/6F, âgés de 37 à 66 ans, sous pompe à insuline depuis 3 à 32 ans, avec HbA1c de 7,9 ± 0,4 %, ont utilisé en ambulatoire une pompe Accu-Chek Combo (Roche) couplée à une mgC (G4 Platinum, Dexcom) durant 2 semaines (run-in). De façon randomisée, la pompe a été ensuite asservie ou non à un algorithme MPC géré par smart-phone de 19-8 heures à domicile durant 2 mois. L’efficacité sur la glycémie est jugée sur le % temps passé de 70-180, < 70 et > 180mg/dl et sur la glycémie moyenne, de 19-8 heures, de 22-8 heures et sur 24 heures. Résultats Sur 2 mois, le pourcentage de temps moyen [70-180mg/dl] était de 68 vs 62 de 19-8 heures, soit +10 % en B F, 68 vs 63 de 22-8 heures, soit +7 % en B F, et 64 vs 58, soit +9,4 % sur 24 heures avec BF de 19-8 heures. Le % temps moyen < 70mg/dl était inférieur de 58 % en BF de 19-8 heures (2,5 vs 6), de 67 % en BF de 22-8 heures (1,8 vs 5,5) et de 64 % sur 24 heures avec BF de 19-8 heures (2,9 vs 6,3). Le % temps moyen > 180mg/dl et la glycémie moyenne étaient similaires avec/sans B F, de 19-8 heures, 22-8 heures et sur 24 heures. Un patient dans chaque groupe est sorti d’étude pour inconfort nocturne. Conclusion Ces données préliminaires indiquent la réduction de moitié du temps passé en hypoglycémie et l’augmentation de 10 % du temps passé dans l’intervalle-cible lors d’une insulinothérapie en BF 19-8 heures à domicile sur 2 mois. Les bénéfices sont retrouvés sur 24 heures. Une extension de l’étude va évaluer le gain avec la BF 24 heures/24 durant 1 mois. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent avoir un intérêt avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté. Consultant scientifique pour Roche Diagnostics. Soutien pour la recherche de Roche Diagnostics et de Dexcom.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O10 Une nouvelle loi de commande vers le pancréas artificiel: SP-MPC
           (Saddle Point Model Predictive Control), première étude clinique
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): A. Paillard , P. Maxime , M. Penet , M.-A. Lefebvre , M. Carpentier , A. Esvant , A.-M. Leguerrier , I. Guilhem , J.-Y. Poirier
      Introduction Notre algorithme SP-MPC est supposé contrôler de manière robuste la glycémie malgré les incertitudes du modèle (par exemple: la sensibilité à l’insuline). Cette étude a évalué la capacité de SP-MPC à maintenir la normoglycémie sur la période nocturne et à éviter les hypoglycémies. Matériels et méthodes Dix patients diabétiques de type 1 traités par pompe à insuline ont été inclus dans cette étude randomisée en cross-over, boucle ouverte (BO) vs boucle fermée (BF). En BO, ils géraient leur traitement en s’aidant de la mesure continue du glucose en temps réel (MCG-RT). En B F, les doses d’insuline étaient calculées par l’algorithme SP-MPC toutes les 15 minutes. À 19 heures, les patients consommaient un repas précédé de leur bolus habituel. La glycémie plasmatique était mesurée toutes les 30 minutes. Le critère de jugement principal était les pourcentages de temps passé entre 70-145mg/dl et en dessous de 70mg/dl de 23 heures à 8 heures. Résultats Le temps passé dans les objectifs ne différait pas significativement entre BO et B F. Les hypoglycémies (< 70mg/dl) étaient moins nombreuses en BF qu’en B0 (14 vs 27, p =0,02). Le taux moyen de glucose interstitiel était inférieur en BF (128mg/dl ; IC 95 %: 112-145) par rapport à la BO (134mg/dl ; IC 95 %: 118-151), (p <0,01). L’aire sous la courbe pour les valeurs de glucose dépassant 145mg/dl était inférieure pendant la BF (p =0,03) ainsi que l’indice HBGI (p =0,02). La dose totale d’insuline ne différait pas entre les deux boucles. Conclusion Cette étude n’a pas montré de différence concernant le temps passé dans les objectifs en comparant notre algorithme au traitement par pompe couplée à la MCG-RT. Cependant, l’utilisation de SP-MPC était associée à une diminution du nombre d’hypoglycémies et du taux moyen de glucose. Les performances de SP-MPC seront à confirmer dans une étude incluant un plus grand nombre de patients. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O09 Résultats métaboliques et fonctionnels à 5 ans de la
           transplantation d’îlots de Langerhans au sein du réseau
           GRAGIL
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): S. Lablanche , S. Borot , O. Thaunat , F. Bayle , L. Badet , C. Thivolet , A. Wojtusciszyn , L. Frimat , L. Kessler , A. Penfornis , C. Brault , C. Colin , D. Bosco , T. Berney , P.-Y. Benhamou
      Objectif La transplantation d’îlots de Langerhans est une technique innovante de thérapie cellulaire s’adressant aux patients diabétiques de type 1 porteur d’un diabète instable ou ayant bénéficié d’une greffe de rein. Évaluer l’efficacité et la sécurité à 5 ans de la transplantation d’îlots de Langerhans au sein du réseau GRAGIL. Patients et méthodes Étude rétrospective analysant l’efficacité métabolique (HbA1c, correction des hypoglycémies, insulino-indépendance, dose d’insuline), la survie du greffon et la sécurité à 5 ans de la transplantation d’îlots de Langerhans au sein de la cohorte de patients diabétiques de type 1 transplantés dans le cadre du réseau GRAGIL entre 2003-2010. Résultats Quarante-quatre patients ont bénéficié d’une transplantation d’îlots entre septembre 2003 et avril 2010. 24 patients (54,5 %) ont reçu une transplantation d’îlots seule (ITA) et 20 patients (45,5 %) ont reçu une transplantation d’îlots après une greffe de rein (IAK). L’âge moyen des receveurs est de 46 ans (42-55) et l’ancienneté de diabète de 33 ans (26-27). Le nombre moyen d’injection d’îlots est de 1,9 par patient. La quantité moyenne d’îlots administrée est de 340 200 (279 000-427 000) IEQ/infusion, l’index de stimulation est mesuré à 1,9 (1,2-2,3) et la viabilité des îlots de 92 % (81-91). Un an et 5 ans après la transplantation d’îlots, 80 % et 65 % des receveurs atteignent une HbA1c < 7 % ou une baisse d’HbA1C > 2 % vs seulement 9 % avant la transplantation (p < 0,05). 41/43 patients (95 %) et 19/21 patients (90,4 %) des patients ne décrivent plus d’hypoglycémies sévères 1 an et 5 ans après la transplantation vs 18/44 (40,9 %) avant la transplantation (p < 0,05). 35/43 (81,4 %) et 13/21 (62 %) patients ont un greffon d’îlots fonctionnel 1 an et 5 ans après la transplantation. Les doses d’insuline utilisées par les receveurs sont de 0,15 (0-0,21) UI/kg et 0,19 (0-26) UI/kg 1 an et 5 ans après la transplantation vs 0,5 (0,42-0,58) UI/kg avant la transplantation d’îlots (p < 0,05). 23/44 patients (52 %) connaissent une période d’insulino-indépendance avec une durée médiane d’insulino-indépendance de 18 mois (2-60). Un décès de cause cardiovasculaire est à déplorer pendant la période d’analyse. 29/44 (65 %) patients décrivent la survenue d’au moins un événement indésirable pendant les 5 ans de suivi. 18/55 (32 %) des événements indésirables sont possiblement imputables au traitement immunosuppresseur, 11,9 % des EIG sont reliés à l’injection d’îlots. Concernant la sévérité des événements indésirables, 14 % sont mineurs, 9 % modérés, 67 % sévères et 9 % menaçant le pronostic vital. Conclusion La transplantation d’îlots est une technique efficace offrant aux receveurs une amélioration notable et durable de l’équilibre métabolique en termes de réduction de l’HbA1c et de réduction des hypoglycémies sévères à long terme. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, indu...
      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O08 HbA1c, schémas thérapeutiques, connaissances et qualité
           de vie chez les enfants et les adolescents ayant un diabète de type 1
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): J.-J. Robert , M. Keller , R. Attia , J. Djadi-Prat , M. Cahané , C. Choleau
      Objectif Étudier l’évolution des schémas de traitement par l’insuline chez les enfants et les adolescents ayant un diabète de type 1, et leurs liaisons avec l’HbA1c. Patients et méthodes L’étude a inclus 4 293 enfants et adolescents (âge: 12,9 ± 2,6 ans, plus d’un an de diabète), ayant participé aux séjours d’été de l’Aide aux Jeunes Diabétiques (AJD) de 2009 à 2014. La distribution des différents schémas de traitement, et les liaisons entre Hb1Ac, schémas thérapeutiques, connaissance du diabète (questionnaire AJD) et qualité de vie (Ingersoll et Marrero, version courte du Hvidoere Study Group) ont été évaluées en fonction des années. Résultats Le pourcentage de jeunes traités par la pompe a augmenté jusqu’à environ 45 %, celui des schémas basal bolus s’est maintenu au-dessus de 40 %, alors que les autres schémas ont diminué de façon très marquée. L’HbA1c a diminué de 0,014 % par an et le pourcentage d’HbA1c ≤ 7,5 % n’a pas augmenté, sauf avec la pompe ; celui d’HbA1c > 9 % et > 10 % a diminué de plus de moitié et de façon plus marquée avec la pompe. L’HbA1c est significative-ment plus basse avec la pompe (8,12 ± 1,09 %) et 2-3 injections (8,18 ± 1,28 %) qu’avec le basal bolus (8,32 ± 1,33 %). L’HbA1c est corrélée au niveau de connaissance du diabète chez les jeunes de plus de 14 ans, et fortement corrélée aux scores de qualité de vie indépendamment de l’âge. Conclusion Le pourcentage des jeunes qui atteint l’objectif de 7,5 % d’HbA1c progresse peu, alors que le pourcentage de ceux qui sont les plus à risque de complications est en nette diminution. La distribution des HbA1cs évalue mieux l’équilibre glycémique d’une population que la moyenne ou le pourcentage de patients ayant atteint l’objectif. L’HbA1c est plus fortement liée à la qualité de vie qu’aux schémas thérapeutiques et à la connaissance du diabète. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O18 La réponse hémodynamique du cortex préfrontal à
           l’exercice incrémental maximal est altérée chez les
           patients diabétiques de type 1 mal équilibrés
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): S. Tagougui , E. Heyman , P. Fontaine , A. Vambergue , E. Leclair , G. Baquet , P. Mucci , K. Oussaidene , A. Descatoire , F. Prieur , J. Aucouturier , R. Matran
      Introduction Grâce à des méthodes pharmacologiques induisant une hypercapnie, une altération de la vasoréactivité cérébrale altérée a été mise en évidence chez des patients diabétiques de type 1 (DT1) mal équilibrés et indemnes de complications microvasculaires. Notre hypothèse est que la vasoréactivité cérébrale pourrait être également compromise en réponse à des situations physiologiques stimulatrices de la perfusion régionale cérébrale, tel que l’exercice exhaustif. Matériels et méthodes Des adultes DT1, indemnes de complications, divisés en deux groupes (HbA1c<7 %, n =8 et HbA1c > 8 %, n =10), appariés à des témoins sains, ont réalisé un exercice progressif exhaustif avec mesure des variations d’oxyhémoglobine, de désoxyhémoglobine et d’hémoglobine totale, au niveau du cortex préfrontal gauche, par spectroscopie du proche infrarouge. Des prélèvements veineux et capillaires artérialisés au repos et à l’exercice maximal ont été réalisés afin de mesurer les variables qui sont connues par leurs actions sur l’hémodynamique cérébrale et qui peuvent être modifiées par le diabète et/ou l’exercice physique (PaCO2, pH et insuline libre). Résultats L’augmentation de l’hémoglobine totale (effets groupe p <0,001 et interaction p <0,05), reflétant la perfusion locale, ainsi que l’augmentation de HHb (effet interaction p <0,05), reflétant l’extraction neuronale d’O2, sont significativement atténuées à l’exercice chez les patients mal équilibrés. Les variables capables d’influencer l’hémodynamique cérébrale étaient comparables entre les patients et leurs sujets contrôles. Conclusion L’exercice physique maximal permet de mettre en exergue des altérations fonctionnelles de la microcirculation, au niveau du cortex préfrontal, avant même l’apparition de complications microvasculaires détectables par les tests cliniques habituels. Ces altérations fonctionnelles sont probablement la conséquence de l’effet délétère de l’hyperglycémie chronique sur la fonction endothéliale. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O17 Impact du diabète de type 1 et de niveaux élevés
           d’hémoglobine glyquée sur l’apport et
           l’utilisation de l’oxygène au muscle squelettique: depuis
           la diffusion alvéolo-capillaire jusqu’à la respiration
           mitochondriale
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): E. Heyman , S. Tagougui , F. Daussin , V. Wieczorek , R. Caiazzo , R. Matran , A. Descatoire , E. Leclair , G. Marais , A. Combes , G. Baquet , P. Fontaine
      Introduction La consommation maximale d’oxygène (VO2max) est altérée chez les patients présentant un diabète de type 1 (DT1) mal équilibré. Notre objectif est d’étudier l’impact du DT1 et des niveaux d’hémoglobine glyquée (HbA1c) sur la cascade de l’O2, depuis sa diffusion alvéolo-capillaire, son transport artériel et sa libération au niveau musculaire, jusqu’à son utilisation mitochondriale. Patients et méthodes Des adultes DT1, indemnes de complications, divisés en deux groupes (HbA1c<7 %, n =11 et HbA1c > 8 %, n =12), appariés à des témoins sains, ont effectué 1/ une double diffusion DLCO/DLNO (volume capillaire pulmonaire, conductance de la membrane alvéolo-capillaire) 2/ une épreuve d’effort progressive exhaustive incluant des mesures d’oxygénation et d’hémodynamique au niveau du vastus lateralis (spectroscopie du proche infrarouge), du contenu artériel en O2 et des variables influençant l’hémodynamique et/ou la dissociation de l’oxyhémoglobine (pH ; PaCO2 ; 2,3-DPG ; insuline ; glucose sur prélèvements veineux et capillaires artérialisés au repos et l’effort maximum). 3/ la respiration mitochondriale était mesurée (biopsie du vastus lateralis) chez 16 DT1 et leurs témoins. Résultats La VO2max est altérée chez les patients mal équilibrés (34,6 ± 7,2 vs 41,2 ± 7,2 ml.min-1.kg-1). La diffusion alvéolo-capillaire et le transport artériel de l’O2 ne diffèrent pas entre les groupes. Néanmoins, l’augmentation de l’hémodynamique locale (effet groupe, p <0,01) et de l’extraction musculaire d’O2 (effet groupe, p <0,0001 ; interaction, p <0,01), induite par l’exercice, est atténuée chez les patients mal équilibrés. L’activité du complexe IV de la chaîne respiratoire tend à diminuer en cas d’HbA1c élevée (r =0,47 ; p =0,06 chez les 16 patients). Conclusion Un niveau élevé d’HbA1c dans le DT1 pourrait modifier l’activité du complexe IV de la chaîne respiratoire et altérer l’extraction musculaire de l’O2 probablement en raison de l’affinité accrue de HbA1c pour O2. Une moindre perfusion musculaire à l’exercice chez les patients mal équilibrés peut être dépistée par spectroscopie du proche infrarouge et suggère l’existence d’altérations fonctionnelles de la microcirculation avant même l’apparition clinique de microangiopathie. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O16 Activité physique juste après un repas: vaut-il mieux
           réduire le débit de base ou le bolus pour limiter le risque
           hypoglycémique, en cas de traitement par pompe '
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): S. Franc , M.-H. Petit , A. Daoudi , C. Peschard , C. Petit , M. El Makni , A. Pochat , F. Koukoui , E. Pussard , M. Duclos , C. Simon , G. Charpentier
      Introduction Dans le diabète de type 1 traité par pompe, il n’existe pas de recommandations précises sur l’ajustement des doses d’insuline en cas d’activité physique (AP) lorsque celle-ci a lieu après un repas: vautil mieux réduire le débit de base (DB) ou le bolus ' Patients et méthodes Vingt patients DT1 sous pompe (HbA1c < 9 %, pratiquant l’IF et une AP de loisirs), après détermination de V02max, ont fait 2 sessions d’AP à 50 % V02max (30 min/vélo ergométrique), 90 minutes après le déjeuner, comparant réduction du bolus (-30/-50 %) vs réduction DB (-50/-80 % pendant AP + 2 heures) (ordre randomisé). Glycémie/insulinémie étaient mesurées pendant l’AP + 2 heures. Le critère principal était le nombre d’hypoglycémies sur courbe CGM (iPro2). Résultats Trente-sept sessions d’AP ont été collectées, avec la survenue d’une seule hypoglycémie. La comparaison réduction Bolus vs DB a montré les résultats suivants: l’après-midi, l’incidence des hypoglycémies tendait à être moindre (p =0,0689), différence non retrouvée la nuit. Le niveau glycémique, comparable avant le déjeuner était plus élevé juste avant l’AP avec la réduction du bolus [p =0,033]. À la fin de l’activité, la chute glycémique était comparable (bolus: 71mg/dL/DB: 77mg/dL, p =0,19). Les courbes CGM sont restées stables l’après-midi mais avec un niveau glycémique plus élevé avec la réduction du bolus (168 ± 46 vs 129 ± 47mg/dL, p =0,054). Le temps passé dans l’objectif [70 ; 180mg/dL] était comparable, celui à < 80mg/dL était moindre (6,3 % vs 20 %, p =0,04), celui passé > 180mg/dl, plus conséquent (42 % vs 16 %, p =0,057). Les niveaux glycémiques au dîner ainsi qu’au coucher étaient comparables ; les courbes CGM sont restées plates la nuit. Conclusion En cas d’AP après un repas, la réduction du bolus du repas précédent, s’accompagne d’une tendance à une moindre incidence des hypoglycémies par rapport à la réduction du DB au prix d’un niveau glycémique plus élevé l’après-midi. Lorsque l’AP peut être anticipée, la réduction du bolus paraît donc être l’option la plus sûre. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O15 Développement pathologique accéléré par un
           régime de type « cafétéria » dans un modèle
           murin de néphropathie
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): M. Gjorgjieva , J. Clar , M. Raffin , A. Duchampt , G. Mithieux , F. Rajas
      Introduction La néphropathie des patients atteints de glycogénose de type 1 [maladie rare due à une déficience de la glucose-6 phosphatase (G6Pase)] est[CHECKPAGE]] très similaire à celle observée chez les diabétiques de type 1 ou de type 2. Au niveau moléculaire, elle se caractérise par une accumulation de glucose-6 phosphate, l’activation de la lipogenèse de novo et du système rénine-angiotensine, qui mènent au développement d’une fibrose. Disposant d’un modèle murin d’invalidation spécifique de la G6Pase au niveau rénal (souris K.G6pc-/-) reproduisant la pathologie rénale chronique, nous avons analysé l’effet d’un régime de type « cafétéria » sur la progression de la néphropathie. Matériels et méthodes Des souris K.G6pc-/- ont été soumises à un régime standard hyperglucidique, ou un régime enrichi en graisses et en saccharose (HF/ HS) pendant 9 mois. La pathologie rénale a été évaluée par la mesure des para-mètres plasmatiques et urinaires et l’analyse histologique et moléculaire des reins. Résultats Après 9 mois de régime, l’accumulation de triglycérides dans le cortex rénal est plus importante sous régime HF/HS, alors que l’accumulation de glycogène est légèrement plus faible en comparaison au régime standard. Les observations en microscope électronique de transmission ont montré une destruction glomérulaire plus importante chez les souris K.G6pc-/- sous régime HF/HS. Cette altération de la barrière de filtration se traduit par une micro-albuminurie plus importante sous régime HF/HS (114 ± 33 µg albumine/ 24 heures) par rapport au régime standard (64 ± 4 µg albumine/24 heures), l’apparition d’une protéinurie et l’accumulation d’urée dans le plasma. De plus, les souris K.G6pc-/- présentent une fibrose rénale après 9 mois de régime HF/ HS, mais pas sous régime standard. Conclusion Nos résultats mettent en évidence un rôle délétère des régimes « type cafétéria » sur le développement d’une néphropathie proche de celle des diabétiques. La prise en charge nutritionnelle des patients diabétiques est donc cruciale pour ralentir le développement de la maladie rénale. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O07 Gestion et évaluation clinique du diabète de type 1 (DT1)
           chez des enfants, adolescents et jeunes adultes européens:
           l’étude TEENs
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): E. Renard , M. Phillip , L. Laffel , C. Domenger , V. Pilorget , C. Candelas , T. Danne , C. Mazza , B. Anderson , R. Hanas , S. Waldron , R. Beck , C. Mathieu
      Objectif TEENs est la plus grande étude contemporaine, internationale, transversale, visant à identifier des approches d’optimisation du contrôle glycémique des jeunes patients DT1 (20 pays, n =5 960). Nous rapportons ici les données de la cohorte européenne (n=2 943, 111 centres dans 11 pays, France comprise). Patients et méthodes Les données ont été recueillies lors des entretiens avec les patients, d’examens des dossiers médicaux et d’enquêtes patient/parents. Les patients ont été stratifiés en trois groupes d’âge: enfants (8-12 ans, n =887), adolescents (13-18 ans, n =1 451) et jeunes adultes (19-25 ans, n =605). L’HbA1c a été mesurée avec l’A1CNow™ (Bayer ; plage de référence 4-6 %). Valeurs cibles d’HbA1c < 7,5 % pour les patients ≤ 18 ans (ISPAD) et < 7 % pour les patients de 19-25 ans (ADA). Les patients âgés de ≥ 13 ans ont rempli le questionnaire PAID (Problem Areas In Diabetes) et leurs parents ont rempli la version révisée du PAID (scores de 0 à 100, 100=maximum de sévérité). Résultats La durée médiane du DT1 était de 6,5 ans (intervalle interquartile de 3,7 à 9,9). Le taux d’HbA1c (± écart-type) était de 8,1 ± 1,6 %, dont 35 % des patients atteignant les valeurs cible d’HbA1c. Ces derniers (surtout les patients âgés de 8-18 ans) avaient tendance à recevoir un traitement plus intensif que ceux n’ayant pas atteint les valeurs cibles d’HbA1c (pompe à insuline 34-35 % vs 29-27 % des patients, autosurveillance glycémique 6,2-5,1 vs 5,5-4,4 fois/j). Les parents/tuteurs ont déclaré un fardeau de soins plus lourd que les adolescents (scores=47,1 ± 20,5 vs 23,6 ± 18,0 respectivement). Conclusion Environ 1/3 des patients DT1 européens de 8-25 ans atteignent les valeurs cibles d’HbA1c. Ces patients ont tendance à bénéficier d’un traitement et d’une surveillance plus intensifs. Ainsi, il est nécessaire d’identifier des approches visant à intensifier le traitement, et à améliorer le contrôle glycémique chez les plus jeunes et réduire le fardeau du DT1 chez les jeunes patients européens. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent avoir un intérêt avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté. Consultant scientifique Sanofi.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O06 Le mutant perte de fonction p.R46L de PCSK9 n’est pas
           associé à un risque accru de diabète chez l’homme
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): B. Cariou , L. Yengo , C. Le May , M. Marre , B. Balkau , S. Franc , P. Froguel , A. Bonnefond
      Rationnel PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9) est un inhibiteur endogène du récepteur au LDL-cholestérol (LDL-C). Les inhibiteurs de PCSK9 sont actuellement testés dans des essais cliniques de phase 3 chez des patients hypercholestérolémiques. Les données précliniques sont contradictoires concernant le lien potentiel entre la déficience en PCSK9 et le risque de diabète. Notre objectif est d’étudier le lien entre la variante perte de fonction de PCSK9 p.R46L et le risque de diabète de type 2 (DT2) chez l’homme. Patients et méthodes Le variant p.R46L a été génotypé dans deux cohortes Françaises: D.E.S.I.R. (4 618 participants dont 299 DT2) et Corbeil (1 342 DT2). L’effet du variant p.R46L sur le risque de DT2 a été analysé dans une étude cas contrôle incluant les cas de DT2 dans les études D.E.S.I.R. et Corbeil et les participants non diabétiques de D.E.S.I.R. L’association entre le variant p.R46L et l’incidence du DT2 a été analysée sur les 9 ans de suivi de la cohorte D.E.S.I.R. Résultats La fréquence allélique du variant p.R46L dans D.E.S.I.R. est de 0,08 %. Comme décrit précédemment, une association a été retrouvée entre p.R46L et des concentrations significativement abaissées de cholestérol total (β [95 % IC]=− 0,394 [−0,537 ; −0,251]), LDL-C (β=−0,393 [−0,525 ; −0,261]) et d’apolipoprotéine B (β=–9,85 × 10–2 [–0,136 ; –0,061]). Le variant p.R46L ne contribue pas au risque de DT2 dans l’étude cas contrôle p =0,261. À l’inverse, il existe une tendance en faveur d’une diminution du risque de nouveaux cas de DT2 dans la cohorte D.E.S.I.R. (HR [95 % IC]=0,34 [0,11 ; 1,07] ; p =0,0650). Conclusion Les individus porteurs du variant perte de fonction PCSK9 p.R46L n’ont pas de risque accru de DT2. Ces données sont rassurantes vis-à-vis du développement des inhibiteurs de PCSK9. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O05 Absence d’association entre PCSK9 et LDL-cholestérol chez
           les diabétiques de type 1
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): S. Laugier-Robiolle , M. Le Bras , E. Gand , P.-J. Saulnier , L. Arnaud , R. Maréchaud , R. Maréchaud , M. Pichelin , S. Hadjadj , B. Cariou
      Introduction PCSK9 (Pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) est un inhibiteur endogène du récepteur au LDL-cholestérol (LDL-C). Les concentrations de PCSK9 sont positivement corrélées au LDL-C, mais aussi à d’autres paramètres métaboliques comme les triglycérides (TG) ou l’insulinorésistance. Des données sur une population de petite taille suggèrent l’absence de corrélation entre PCSK9 et LDL-C chez les sujets diabétiques. L’objectif de ce travail est de déterminer la relation entre PCSK9 et les paramètres métaboliques chez des patients diabétiques de type 1 (DT1). Matériels et méthodes Les concentrations plasmatiques de PCSK9 ont été analysées chez 111 patients DT1 indemnes de tout traitement hypolipémiant, suivis au CHU de Poitiers, issus d’une collection d’échantillons biologiques. Les paramètres métaboliques suivants ont été évalués: cholestérol total, triglycérides, LDL-C, HbA1C. La concentration plasmatique de PCSK9 a été mesurée à jeun par un test ELISA (CycLex, Co). Résultats L’âge moyen des patients est de 40 ans et la durée moyenne du diabète de 16 ans. L’HbA1C moyenne est de 8,2 ± 1,6 %. Les concentrations plasmatiques de PCSK9 varient de 105 à 868ng/ml (moyenne 317 ng/ml). Les concentrations de PCSK9 ne sont pas corrélées au LDL-C (p =0,15, R=0,136) ni à l’HbA1C (p =0,39) ; mais sont positivement associées à l’âge (p = 0,0031), à la durée du diabète (p =0,028), au cholestérol total (p =0,042) et aux triglycérides plasmatiques (p =0,002). Après ajustement sur l’HbA1C et la durée de diabète, il n’y a pas de corrélation entre PCSK9 et le LDL-C (p =0,23). Conclusion La corrélation positive établie en population générale entre les taux plasmatiques de PCSK9 et de LDL-C est abolie chez le DT1 non traité par hypolipémiant. À l’inverse, PCSK9 demeure associé aux triglycérides, renforçant son rôle dans le métabolisme des lipoprotéines au-delà du LDL-C. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O04 Relation entre le métabolisme de l’apoA-II et celui des
           sous-fractions des VLDL: étude cinétique multicentrique chez 62
           patients obèses avec syndrome métabolique
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): B. Vergès , M. Adiels , J. Boren , P.H. Barrett , G. Watts , D. Chan , L. Duvillard , S. Söderlund , N. Matikainen , J. Kahri , M.-R. Taskinen
      Introduction La diminution du HDL-cholestérol est une anomalie majeure du syndrome métabolique. Cependant, le métabolisme de l’apoA-II, deuxième apolipoprotéine des HDL demeure mal connu au cours du syndrome métabolique. En particulier la connexion entre le métabolisme de l’apoA-II et celui des sous-fractions des VLDL (VLDL1, VLDL2) est inconnue. Patients et méthodes Nous avons réalisé une étude cinétique in vivo, multicen-trique, chez 62 sujets obèses avec syndrome métabolique au moyen de leucine deutérée et glycérol deutéré pour marquer respectivement l’apoB et les triglycé-rides. Les VLDL1, VLDL2, IDL, LDL et HDL ont été séparées par ultra-centrifugation. Une mesure de la graisse sous-cutanée et abdominale par IRM ainsi que du contenu hépatique en graisse par spectro-IRM a été réalisée. Résultats En analyse univariée, le catabolisme de l’apoA-II était corrélé positivement et très significativement au catabolisme de l’apoA-I (r =0,672, p <0,0001) et à un moindre niveau (p < 0,005) à l’IMC, à la graisse sous-cutanée, à la graisse hépatique, au pool d’apoA-II, à la production des VLDL1-TG et des VLDL2-TG, au catabo-lisme des VLDL2-TG et VLDL2-apoB. Après ajustement sur le catabolisme de l’apoA-I, le catabolisme de l’apoA-II était corrélé positivement au pool d’apoA-II (r =0,513, p <0,001), au catabolisme indirect des VLDL1-TG (r =0,521, p < 0,001), au catabolisme des VLDL2-TG (r =0,501, p < 0,001) et négativement à la concentration de TG dans les VLDL1 (r =– 0,272, p =0,0046). En analyse multivariée, le catabolisme de l’apoA-II était significativement associé positivement au catabolisme de l’apoA-I (p <0,0001) et au catabolisme indirect des VLDL1-TG (p <0,0001). Ces deux facteurs expliquaient 60 % de la variance du catabolisme de l’apoA-II. Conclusion Le catabolisme de l’apoA-II est associé positivement non seulement au catabolisme de la principale apolipoporotéine des HDL, l’apoA-I, mais aussi au catabolisme des VLDL1. Ceci suggère une liaison préférentielle de l’apoA-II aux VLDL1 avec « rétention » de celle-ci dans les VLDL1 en cas de catabolisme ralenti (syndrome métabolique, diabète de type 2) dont les conséquences restent à préciser. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O02 Régulation de la lipolyse et du métabolisme oxydatif
           musculaire par la périlipine 5
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): C. Laurens , P.-M. Badin , K. Louche , D.R. Joanisse , D. Langin , V. Bourlier , C. Moro
      Introduction Les triglycérides intramusculares constituent une source d’énergie importante pour le muscle squelettique, notamment au cours d’un exercice physique. Des travaux précédents chez le rongeur indiquent que la périlipine 5 (PLIN5), protéine localisée à la surface de gouttelettes lipidiques de triglycérides, pourrait jouer un rôle dans le métabolisme lipidique musculaire. L’objec-tif de ce travail était de caractériser et d’étudier le rôle de PLIN5 dans la régulation de la lipolyse et du métabolisme oxydatif musculaire. Matériels et méthodes Nous avons caractérisé l’expression protéique de PLIN5 dans différents muscles de souris et chez des individus de poids normal sédentaires, entraînés en endurance, et obèses intolérants au glucose (IGT). Nous avons également surexprimé PLIN5 par une approche adénovirale dans des cultures primaires de cellules musculaires squelettiques humaines pour étudier son rôle fonctionnel dans la régulation du métabolisme énergétique. Résultats Nos résultats montrent que PLIN5 est fortement exprimé dans les muscles oxydatifs par rapport aux muscles glycolytiques. Nous montrons également une forte corrélation positive de PLIN5 avec la sensibilité à l’insuline (r2 = 0,42, p < 0,0001), ainsi qu’une augmentation de son expression chez des individus entraînés et une diminution chez des obèses IGT. Une surexpression de PLIN5 dans des cellules musculaires humaines freine la déplétion en triglycérides (− 53 %, p = 0,0025), ainsi que la mobilisation et l’utilisation des acides gras issus de la lipolyse des triglycérides (− 46 %, p = 0,0035). Ceci s’accompagne d’une augmentation de l’oxydation du glucose et de la synthèse de glycogène, concomitante avec une diminution de l’expression génique de PDK4 (Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4). Conclusion Ces résultats indiquent que PLIN5 joue un rôle important dans la régulation de la lipolyse et du métabolisme oxydatif musculaire. PLIN5 pour-rait en partie déterminer la sensibilité à l’insuline en modulant le flux d’acides gras dans le muscle squelettique. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • Evaluation of the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and
           periaortic fat thickness in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): N. Akyürek , M.E. Atabek , B.S. Eklioglu , H. Alp



      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • O01 Obtention d’adipocytes beiges humains fonctionnels in vitro et
           in vivo à partir de cellules souches à pluripotence induite
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 41, Supplement 1
      Author(s): A.-C. Guénantin , N. Briand , E. Capel , F. Stillitano , D. Jeziorowska , R. Morichon , J.-P. Siffroi , B. Fève , J. Capeau , J.-S. Hulot , C. Vigouroux
      Rationnel La mise en évidence de tissu adipeux brun puis beige chez l’homme adulte a ouvert de nouvelles perspectives thérapeutiques dans l’obésité et le diabète de type 2. En effet, les adipocytes de ces tissus peuvent, après activation, dissiper l’énergie grâce au découplage mitochondrial médié par UCP1. Les cellules souches humaines à pluripotence induite (hiPSC), issues de la reprogrammation de cellules somatiques, peuvent s’autorenouveler et se différencier dans les trois feuillets embryonnaires, générant une source illimitée de cellules in vitro. Le développement de modèles d’adipocytes beiges en culture à partir de ces cellules constituerait un prérequis permettant d’étudier le développement et la physiologie des adipocytes humains thermogéniques. Matériels et méthodes Nous avons soumis trois lignées d’hiPSC témoins, issues de fibroblastes cutanés, à plusieurs milieux de culture successifs afin d’obtenir des adipocytes beiges sans avoir recours à une surexpression génique ectopique. Résultats Notre méthode de différenciation a permis d’obtenir des précurseurs adipocytaires qui expriment séquentiellement les facteurs adipogéniques C/EBPβ, C/EBPδ, C/EBPα et PPARγ. Après 20 jours de différenciation, les adipocytes expriment la périlipine et Glut-4, stockent des lipides et répondent à l’insuline par une phosphorylation de son récepteur et d’AKT. Leur phénotype beige est attesté par le marquage CITED1, et par l’induction d’UCP1 et de la mitochondriogenèse (induction de PGC1α et DIO2, augmentation du nombre de mitochondries) en réponse aux analogues de l’AMPc. Après injection in vivo chez la souris immunodéficiente, ces précurseurs adipocytaires humains forment un pannicule adipeux. Conclusion Notre méthode originale d’obtention d’adipocytes beiges humains à partir d’hiPSC (demande de brevet FR n º1457357) est simple, rapide et effi-cace. Elle permet d’explorer la physiologie et la physiopathologie de la différenciation adipocytaire beige in vitro. Ces adipocytes pourraient être utilisés pour cribler des molécules thérapeutiques activant la dissipation d’énergie, et ouvrent de nouvelles perspectives en thérapie cellulaire. Déclaration d’intérêt Les auteurs déclarent ne pas avoir d’intérêt direct ou indirect (financier ou en nature) avec un organisme privé, industriel ou commercial en relation avec le sujet présenté.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • Predicting factors of hypoglycaemia in elderly type 2 diabetes patients:
           Contributions of the GERODIAB study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 April 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): L. Bordier , M. Buysschaert , B. Bauduceau , J. Doucet , C. Verny , V. Lassmann Vague , J.P. Le Floch
      The burden of hypoglycaemia is important, particularly in elderly type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Unfortunately, however, few studies are available concerning this population. GERODIAB is a prospective, multicentre, observational study that aims to describe the 5-year morbidity and mortality of 987 T2D patients aged 70years and older. After analyzing the frequency of and factors associated with hypoglycaemia in the 6months prior to study inclusion, it was found that hypoglycaemia was associated with retinopathy, lower levels of LDL cholesterol and altered mini-Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) scores.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • Severe hypoglycaemia the “tip of the iceberg”: An
           underestimated risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): S. Halimi



      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:52:16Z
       
  • Low early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1) activity in human subcutaneous adipose
           tissue is linked to a pernicious metabolic profile
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): P. Petrus , N. Mejhert , H. Gao , J. Bäckdahl , E. Arner , P. Arner , M. Rydén
      Aim Recently, in both human and murine white adipose tissue (WAT), transcription factor early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1) has been shown to regulate adipocyte differentiation, adipose morphology and triglyceride hydrolysis (lipolysis). This study investigated whether EBF1 expression and biological activity in WAT is related to different metabolic parameters. Methods In this cross-sectional study of abdominal subcutaneous WAT, EBF1 protein levels were examined in 18 non-obese subjects, while biological activity was determined in 56 obese and non-obese subjects. Results were assessed by anthropometric measures and blood pressure as well as by plasma lipid levels and insulin sensitivity. Results EBF1 protein levels were negatively associated with waist circumference (r =−0.56; P =0.015), but not with body mass index (BMI) or body fat (P =0.10–0.29). Biological activity of EBF1 correlated negatively with plasma triglycerides (r =−0.46; P =0.0005) and plasma insulin (r =−0.39; P =0.0027), but positively with plasma HDL cholesterol (r =0.48; P =0.0002) and insulin sensitivity, as assessed by intravenous insulin tolerance test (r =0.64; P <0.0001). These relationships, except for plasma insulin, remained statistically significant after adjusting for BMI and adipose morphology. EBF1 activity was not associated with age, systolic/diastolic blood pressure or total plasma cholesterol (P =0.17–0.48). In contrast to EBF1 activity, after adjusting for BMI, EBF1 mRNA levels displayed only an association with plasma triglycerides. Conclusion Low EBF1 protein expression and activity in abdominal subcutaneous WAT is a BMI-independent marker for several traits associated with the metabolic syndrome. However, whether EBF1 constitutes a novel treatment target remains to be demonstrated.


      PubDate: 2015-03-20T03:19:37Z
       
  • Antidiabetic agents: Potential anti-inflammatory activity beyond glucose
           control
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): A.J. Scheen , N. Esser , N. Paquot
      A growing body of evidence is emerging to show that abdominal obesity, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and microvascular diabetic complications are intimately related to chronic inflammation. These observations pave the way to the development of new pharmacological strategies that aim to reduce silent inflammation. However, besides specific anti-inflammatory agents, glucose-lowering medications may also exert anti-inflammatory effects that could contribute to improved outcomes in diabetic patients. Most studies have used metformin, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, and thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which act as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonists. Both pharmacological classes (considered insulin-sparing agents or insulin sensitizers) appear to have greater anti-inflammatory activity than insulin-secreting agents such as sulphonylureas or glinides. In particular, TZDs have shown the widest range of evidence of lowered tissue (visceral fat and liver) and serum inflammation. In contrast, despite reducing postprandial hyperglycaemia, the effect of α-glucosidase inhibitors on inflammatory markers appears rather modest, whereas dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists appear more promising in this respect. These incretin-based therapies exert pleiotropic effects, including reports of anti-inflammatory activity. No human data are available so far regarding sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Although they may have indirect effects due to reduced glucotoxicity, their specific mode of action in the kidneys does not suggest systemic anti-inflammatory activity. Also, in spite of the complex relationship between insulin and atherosclerosis, exogenous insulin may also exert anti-inflammatory effects. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and potential anti-inflammatory effects related to intrinsic actions of the pharmacological class. Finally, it would also be of major clinical interest to define what role the anti-inflammatory effects of these glucose-lowering agents may play in the prevention of macrovascular and microvascular diabetic complications.


      PubDate: 2015-03-20T03:19:37Z
       
  • Contribution of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction in
           insulin resistance: Distinct or interrelated roles'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): J. Rieusset
      Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulate numerous cellular processes, and are critical contributors to cellular and whole-body homoeostasis. More important, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress are both closely associated with hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance, thereby playing crucial roles in altered glucose homoeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The accumulated evidence also suggests a potential interrelationship between alterations in both types of organelles, as mitochondrial dysfunction could participate in activation of the unfolded protein response, whereas ER stress could influence mitochondrial function. The fact that mitochondria and the ER are physically and functionally interconnected via mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) supports their interrelated roles in the pathophysiology of T2DM. However, the mechanisms that coordinate the interplay between mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress, and its relevance to the control of glucose homoeostasis, are still unknown. This review evaluates the involvement of mitochondria and ER independently in the development of peripheral insulin resistance, as well as their potential roles in the disruption of organelle crosstalk at MAM interfaces in the alteration of insulin signalling.


      PubDate: 2015-03-20T03:19:37Z
       
  • Metabolic roles of PGC-1α and its implications for type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): A. Besseiche , J.-P. Riveline , J.-F. Gautier , B. Bréant , B. Blondeau
      PGC-1α is a transcriptional coactivator expressed in brown adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, kidney, skeletal and cardiac muscles, and the brain. This review presents data illustrating how PGC-1α regulates metabolic adaptations and participates in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Studies in mice have shown that increased PGC-1α expression may be beneficial or deleterious, depending on the tissue: in adipose tissue, it promotes thermogenesis and thus protects against energy overload, such as seen in diabetes and obesity; in muscle, PGC-1α induces a change of phenotype towards oxidative metabolism. In contrast, its role is clearly deleterious in the liver and pancreas, where it induces hepatic glucose production and inhibits insulin secretion, changes that promote diabetes. Previous studies by our group have also demonstrated the role of PGC-1α in the fetal origins of T2D. Overexpression of PGC-1α in β cells during fetal life in mice is sufficient to induce β-cell dysfunction in adults, leading to glucose intolerance. PGC-1α also is associated with glucocorticoid receptors in repressing expression of Pdx1, a key β-cell transcription factor. In conclusion, PGC-1α participates in the onset of diabetes through regulation of major metabolic tissues. Yet, it may not represent a useful target for therapeutic strategies against diabetes as it exerts both beneficial and deleterious actions on glucose homoeostasis, and because PGC-1α modulation is involved in neurodegenerative diseases. However, its role in cellular adaptation shows that greater comprehension of PGC-1α actions is needed.


      PubDate: 2015-03-16T01:41:42Z
       
  • High-sensitivity C-reactive protein does not improve the differential
           diagnosis of HNF1A–MODY and familial young-onset type 2 diabetes: A
           grey zone analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2015
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): C. Bellanné-Chantelot , J. Coste , C. Ciangura , M. Fonfrède , C. Saint-Martin , C. Bouché , E. Sonnet , R. Valéro , D.-J. Lévy , D. Dubois-Laforgue , J. Timsit
      Aim Low plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) have been suggested to differentiate hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha–maturity-onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A–MODY) from type 2 diabetes (T2D). Yet, differential diagnosis of HNF1A–MODY and familial young-onset type 2 diabetes (F-YT2D) remains a difficult challenge. Thus, this study assessed the added value of hs-CRP to distinguish between the two conditions. Methods This prospective multicentre study included 143 HNF1A–MODY patients, 310 patients with a clinical history suggestive of HNF1A–MODY, but not confirmed genetically (F-YT2D), and 215 patients with T2D. The ability of models, including clinical characteristics and hs-CRP to predict HNF1A–MODY was analyzed, using the area of the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve, and a grey zone approach was used to evaluate these models in clinical practice. Results Median hs-CRP values were lower in HNF1A–MODY (0.25mg/L) than in F-YT2D (1.14mg/L) and T2D (1.70mg/L) patients. Clinical parameters were sufficient to differentiate HNF1A–MODY from classical T2D (AUROC: 0.99). AUROC analyses to distinguish HNF1A–MODY from F-YT2D were 0.82 for clinical features and 0.87 after including hs-CRP. For the grey zone analysis, the lower boundary was set to miss<1.5% of true positives in non-tested subjects, while the upper boundary was set to perform 50% of genetic tests in individuals with no HNF1A mutation. On comparing HNF1A–MODY with F-YT2D, 65% of patients were classified in between these categories – in the zone of diagnostic uncertainty – even after adding hs-CRP to clinical parameters. Conclusion hs-CRP does not improve the differential diagnosis of HNF1A–MODY and F-YT2D.


      PubDate: 2015-03-16T01:41:42Z
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2015