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Journal Cover Diabetes & Metabolism
  [SJR: 1.252]   [H-I: 70]   [59 followers]  Follow
    
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   ISSN (Print) 1262-3636
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3039 journals]
  • Consensus statement on the management of dyslipidaemias in adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 September 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): S. Béliard, F. Bonnet, B. Bouhanick, E. Bruckert, B. Cariou, S. Charrière, V. Durlach, P. Moulin, R. Valéro, B. Vergès



      PubDate: 2016-09-20T21:11:11Z
       
  • Family history of diabetes and the risk of coronary heart disease in
           people with or without type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 September 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): M. Afarideh, S. Noshad, A. Ghajar, Z. Aryan, E. Khajeh, S. Hosseini Shirvani, F. Bonnet, A. Esteghamati



      PubDate: 2016-09-20T21:11:11Z
       
  • Low adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels over
           10 years of follow-up predict risk of the metabolic syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 September 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): S. Lindberg, J.S. Jensen, M. Bjerre, J. Frystyk, A. Flyvbjerg, J. Jeppesen, R. Mogelvang
      Aim Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine and may play a key role in the interplay between obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Thus, this large population-based cohort investigated whether adiponectin at baseline and/or a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up is associated prospectively with the risk of incident MetS. Methods Using a prospective study design, the development of MetS was examined in 1134 healthy participants from the community. Plasma adiponectin was measured at study entry and again after a median follow-up of 9.4 years (IQR: 9.2–9.7). During follow-up, 187 participants developed MetS, and 439 presented with at least two components of MetS. Results During follow-up, adiponectin decreased in participants who developed MetS, whereas adiponectin was increased in those who did not develop MetS (P <0.001). Those with low adiponectin levels (quartile 1) at baseline had an increased risk of developing MetS (OR: 2.92, 2.08–6.97; P <0.001) compared with those with high levels (quartile 4). After adjusting for confounding variables, low adiponectin levels at baseline remained independently associated with MetS (OR: 2.24, 1.11–4.52; P =0.017). Similarly, participants with a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up also had an increased risk of MetS (OR: 2.96, 2.09–4.18; P <0.001). This association persisted after multivariable adjustments, including for baseline adiponectin (OR: 4.37, 2.77–6.97; P <0.001). Finally, adiponectin levels at follow-up were inversely associated with an increase in the number of components of MetS (P <0.001); geometric mean adiponectin levels were 9.5mg/L (95% CI: 9.0–10.0) for participants with no components vs 7.0mg/L (95% CI: 6.3–7.9) for those with four to five components. Conclusions/interpretation Low plasma adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels during follow-up are both associated with an increased risk of MetS.


      PubDate: 2016-09-15T21:06:34Z
       
  • Impaired development and dysfunction of endothelial progenitor cells in
           type 2 diabetic mice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 September 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): S. Tsukada, H. Masuda, S.Y. Jung, J. Yun, S. Kang, D.Y. Kim, J.H. Park, S.T. Ji, S.-M. Kwon, T. Asahara
      Aim Dysfunction of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) has been shown to affect the development of microvascular diseases in diabetes patients. The aim of this study was to elucidate the development and mechanical dysfunction of EPCs in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods The colony-forming capacity of EPCs and differentiation potential of bone marrow (BM) c-Kit(+)/Sca-I(+) lineage-negative mononuclear cells (KSL) were examined in T2D mice, db/db mice and KKAy mice, using EPC colony-forming assay (EPC-CFA). Results T2D mice had fewer BM stem/progenitor cells, and proliferation of KSL was lowest in the BM of db/db mice. In T2D mice, the frequency of large colony-forming units (CFUs) derived from BM-KSL was highly reduced, indicating dysfunction of differentiation into mature EPCs. Only a small number of BM-derived progenitors [CD34(+) KSL cells], which contribute to the supply of EPCs for postnatal neovascularization, was also found. Furthermore, in terms of their plasticity to transdifferentiate into various cell types, BM-KSL exhibited a greater potential to differentiate into granulocyte macrophages (GMs) than into other cell types. Conclusion T2D affected EPC colony formation and differentiation of stem cells to mature EPCs or haematopoietic cells. These data suggest opposing regulatory mechanisms for differentiation into mature EPCs and GMs in T2D mice.


      PubDate: 2016-09-15T21:06:34Z
       
  • Effectiveness of the multidisciplinary Risk Assessment and Management
           Program for Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (RAMP-DM) for diabetic
           microvascular complications: A population-based cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): F. Jiao, C.S.C. Fung, Y.F. Wan, S.M. McGhee, C.K.H. Wong, D. Dai, R. Kwok, C.L.K. Lam
      Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary Risk Assessment and Management Program for Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (RAMP-DM) in reducing the risks of microvascular complications. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted with 29,670 propensity-score-matched RAMP-DM participants and diabetes patients under the usual primary care (14,835 in each group). Study endpoints were the first occurrence of any diabetic microvascular complications, non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy/preproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR/prePDR), sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) or blindness, nephropathy, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), neuropathy and lower-limb ulcers or amputation. Log-rank tests and multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regressions were employed to estimate between-group differences in incidences of study endpoints. Results After a median follow-up of 36 months with>41,000 person-years in each group, RAMP-DM participants had a lower incidence of microvascular complications (760 vs 935; adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66–0.81; P <0.001) and lower incidences of all specific microvascular complications except neuropathy (adjusted HR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.61–1.45; P =0.778). Adjusted HRs for the RAMP-DM vs control group for ESRD, STDR or blindness, and lower-limb ulcers or amputation were 0.40 (95% CI: 0.24–0.69; P <0.001), 0.55 (95% CI: 0.39–0.78; P =0.001) and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.30–0.80; P =0.005), respectively. Conclusion The RAMP-DM intervention was associated with lower incidences of all microvascular complications except neuropathy over a 3-year follow-up. These encouraging results constitute evidence that structured risk assessment and risk-stratified management provided by a multidisciplinary team is effective for reducing microvascular complications in diabetes patients. Clinical trial registry NCT02034695, www.ClinicalTrials.gov.


      PubDate: 2016-08-26T20:49:45Z
       
  • High-intensity interval training reduces abdominal fat mass in
           postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): F. Maillard, S. Rousset, B. Pereira, A. Traore, P. de Pradel Del Amaze, Y. Boirie, M. Duclos, N. Boisseau
      Aim This study compared the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) for 16 weeks on whole-body and abdominal fat mass (FM) in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Seventeen women (69±1 years; BMI: 31±1kg.m−2) were randomly assigned to either a HIIT [60×(8s at 77–85% HRmax, 12s of active recovery)] or MICT (40min at 55–60% of their individual HRR) cycling program for 16 weeks, 2 days/week. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure whole-body and regional FM content, including abdominal adiposity and visceral adipose tissue. Plasma cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, glucose and HbA1c levels were measured. Levels of nutritional intake and physical activity were evaluated by 7-day self-reports. Results Dietary energy (caloric) intake, physical activity level and total body mass did not vary in either group from the beginning to the end of the training intervention. Overall, total FM decreased and total fat-free mass significantly increased over time (by around 2–3%). Total FM reduction at the end of the intervention was not significantly different between groups. However, significant loss of total abdominal (−8.3±2.2%) and visceral (−24.2±7.7%) FM was observed only with HIIT. Time effects were noted for HbA1c and total cholesterol/HDL ratio. Conclusion With no concomitant caloric restriction, an HIIT program in postmenopausal women with T2D (twice a week for 16 weeks) appeared to be more effective for reducing central obesity than MICT, and could be proposed as an alternative exercise training program for this population.


      PubDate: 2016-08-26T20:49:45Z
       
  • Levels of betatrophin decrease during pregnancy despite increased insulin
           resistance, beta-cell function and triglyceride levels
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 August 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): A. Zielińska, R. Maciulewski, K. Siewko, A. Popławska-Kita, D. Lipińska, G. Kozłowska, M. Górska, M. Szelachowska
      Aim Evidence in support of an association between betatrophin and insulin resistance (IR) is mounting, with studies demonstrating that betatrophin is elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity and gestational diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of betatrophin in IR and physiological proliferation of beta cells during pregnancy in healthy women. Methods Eighty healthy pregnant women were examined at each trimester [T1 (first), T2 (second), T3 (third)], with a subgroup (n =45) that was also examined at 3 months postpartum (3MPP). The controls comprised 30 non-pregnant healthy women (HW) of reproductive age. Also measured were levels of betatrophin (ELISA), glucose (enzymatic method with hexokinase), insulin (IRMA), C-peptide (EASIA) and HbA1c (HPLC), while HOMA-IR and HOMA-β scores were calculated. Results Betatrophin concentration was highest at T1, and differed significantly from T2 and T3 (1.84 [Q1 =1.16, Q3 =2.67]ng/mL vs 1.46 [Q1 =0.96, Q3 =2.21]ng/mL; P <0.05 and 1.23 [Q1 =0.85, Q3 =2.14]ng/mL; P <0.01, respectively). The T3 median concentration of betatrophin was the lowest of all trimesters, and significantly lower than at 3MPP (1.23 [Q1 =0.85, Q3 =2.14]ng/mL vs 1.49 [Q1 =1.06, Q3 =2.60]ng/mL; P <0.01, respectively). At 3MPP, the level of betatrophin was similar to that of HW (1.47 [Q1 =0.89, Q3 =2.67]ng/mL). HOMA-IR and HOMA-%β index scores increased during gestation, peaking at T3 (2.3 [Q1 =1.66, Q3 =2.72] and 227.7 [Q1 =185.49, Q3 =326.31], respectively) and returning to levels similar to those of HW at 3MPP (1.53 [Q1 =1.12, Q3 =2.41] and 88.86 [Q1 =62.73, Q3 =130.45] vs 1.35 [Q1 =1.02, Q3 =1.62] and 92.5 [Q1 =74.20, Q3 =111.47], respectively). Conclusion Concentrations of betatrophin decrease during pregnancy, suggesting that the hormone does not play a significant role in the expansion of beta-cell mass and IR during pregnancy.


      PubDate: 2016-08-21T20:45:21Z
       
  • Welcome to the 9th Annual meeting of the Diabetes &amp; Cardiovascular
           disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 August 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): P. Valensi, A. Ceriello



      PubDate: 2016-08-21T20:45:21Z
       
  • A high titre of autoantibody at onset does not predict pancreatic
           beta-cell fate
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 August 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): H. Yanai



      PubDate: 2016-08-07T20:33:40Z
       
  • Type A personality is not associated with poor glycaemic control: Data
           from cross-sectional and longitudinal surveys of people with type 1 or
           type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 August 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): J.-C. Chauvet-Gélinier, B. Trojak, C. Lemogne, A. Louprou, B. Bouillet, I. Simoneau, K. Chahraoui, J.-M. Petit, S.M. Consoli, B. Bonin, B. Vergès



      PubDate: 2016-08-07T20:33:40Z
       
  • Adiposity induced by interleukin-17A blockade
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 July 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): T. Nakamura, Y. Iwasaki, S. Yamane, M. Ogura, A. Yasoda, K. Nagashima, N. Inagaki



      PubDate: 2016-07-29T20:25:45Z
       
  • Hypoglycaemia revealing heterozygous insulin receptor mutations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): V. Preumont, C. Feincoeur, O. Lascols, C. Courtillot, P. Touraine, D. Maiter, C. Vigouroux



      PubDate: 2016-07-29T20:25:45Z
       
  • Effect of maternal body mass index and weight gain in women with
           gestational diabetes on the incidence of large-for-gestational-age infants
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): M.J. Santos, V. Fernandes, O. Marques, M.L. Pereira



      PubDate: 2016-07-24T17:39:28Z
       
  • Fasting serum C-peptide levels (>1.6ng/mL) can predict the presence of
           insulin resistance in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 July 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): H. Yanai, Y. Hirowatari



      PubDate: 2016-07-24T17:39:28Z
       
  • What is the evidence for metabolic surgery for type 2 diabetes' A
           critical perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): C. Amouyal, F. Andreelli
      Bariatric surgery has emerged as a highly effective treatment not only for obesity, but also for type 2 diabetes (T2D). A meta-analysis has reported the complete resolution of T2D in 78.1% of cases of morbidly obese patients after bariatric surgery. Such extraordinary results obtained in diabetic patients with body mass index (BMI) scores>35kg/m2 have led investigators to question whether similar results might be achieved in patients with BMIs<35kg/m2. Preliminary studies suggest that metabolic surgery is safe and effective in patients with T2D and a BMI<35kg/m2, whereas other studies report that metabolic surgery is less effective for promoting T2D remission in these patients. Thus, the results are discordant. Long-term studies would be useful for determining the safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of metabolic surgery for this population with T2D. In 2015, it is probably premature to say that metabolic surgery is an accepted treatment option for T2D patients with BMIs<35kg/m2.


      PubDate: 2016-07-11T15:14:08Z
       
  • Postpartum IGF-I and IGFBP-2 levels are prospectively associated with the
           development of type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes
           mellitus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 July 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): M. Lappas, D. Jinks, A. Shub, J.C. Willcox, H.M. Georgiou, M. Permezel
      Aims Women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In the general population, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system has been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine if circulating IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 levels 12weeks following a GDM pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Methods IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 levels were measured in 98 normal glucose tolerant women, 12weeks following an index GDM pregnancy using enzyme immunoassay. Women were assessed for up to 10years for the development of overt type 2 diabetes. Results Among the 98 women with previous GDM, 21 (21%) developed diabetes during the median follow-up period of 8.5years. After adjusting for age and BMI, IGF-I and IGFBP-2 were significantly associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. In a clinical model of prediction of type 2 diabetes that included age, BMI, pregnancy fasting glucose and postnatal fasting glucose, the addition of IGF-I and IGFBP-2 resulted in an improvement in the net reclassification index of 17.8%. Conclusions High postpartum IGF-I and low postpartum IGFBP-2 levels are a significant risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes in women with a previous history of GDM. This is the first report that identifies IGF-I and IGFBP-2 as a potential biomarker for the prediction of type 2 diabetes in women with a history of GDM.


      PubDate: 2016-07-07T13:57:40Z
       
  • Association of circulating total bilirubin with the metabolic syndrome and
           type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational
           evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 July 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): J. Nano, T. Muka, M. Cepeda, T. Voortman, K. Dhana, A. Brahimaj, A. Dehghan, O.H. Franco
      Objective Emerging evidence suggests that bilirubin levels might be associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), although the nature of the association remains unclear. Design This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the relationship between total plasma bilirubin and the risk of MetS and T2D. Data sources Relevant studies were identified using five databases (Embase, Medline [Ovid], Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Central and Google Scholar), with the last search done on 21 October 2015. Study references were checked and authors contacted to identify additional studies. Study selection Randomized controlled trials, and cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies of adults examining the association between blood bilirubin levels and MetS and T2D were included, irrespective of language and date of publication. and full-text selection was done by two independent reviewers, with a third reviewer available in case of disagreement. Data extraction Data were extracted by two independent reviewers using a predesigned data collection form. Main outcomes and measures MetS and T2D. Methods Summary estimates were obtained by random-effects meta-analysis. Results Of the 2313 searched references, 16 observational studies (11 cross-sectional, two prospective, one that was both cross-sectional and prospective, two retrospective and one national survey) met our inclusion criteria. Overall, data were available for 175,911 non-overlapping participants, including 7414 MetS cases and 9406 T2D cases. In the meta-analysis of seven cross-sectional studies, the pooled odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for MetS in a comparison of extreme tertiles of serum bilirubin levels was 0.70 (95% CI: 0.62, 0.78), whereas no significant association was found for the pooled estimated relative risk between two prospective studies (0.57, 95% CI: 0.11, 2.94). The corresponding estimate was 0.77 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.87) for T2D from four cross-sectional studies. Conclusion The available evidence, mainly from cross-sectional studies, supports an inverse association of bilirubin levels with adverse metabolic outcomes. Large-scale prospective studies are now needed to establish whether bilirubin levels may be useful in the prevention of MetS and T2D.


      PubDate: 2016-07-07T13:57:40Z
       
  • Signs of low-grade systemic inflammation in female offspring of women with
           type 1 diabetes: The EPICOM study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 July 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): A.B. Boisen, S. Knorr, T.K. Hansen, Z. Vlachova, B. Bytoft, P. Damm, H. Beck-Nielsen, D.M. Jensen, H.J. Møller, C.H. Gravholt



      PubDate: 2016-07-02T10:50:09Z
       
  • Dopaminergic Effects on Brown Adipose Tissue (DEBAT): A prospective
           physiological study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): L. Bahler, H.J. Verberne, M.R. Soeters, J. Booij, J.B. Hoekstra, F. Holleman



      PubDate: 2016-07-02T10:50:09Z
       
  • Sex hormone levels are not associated with progression of renal disease in
           male patients with T2DM
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): E. Feigerlová, P.-J. Saulnier, P. Gourdy, R. Roussel, J.-M. Halimi, E. Gand, D. Dardari, B. Guerci, P. Sosner, M. Marre, P. Zaoui, S. Ragot, S. Hadjadj
      Background Greater renal function decline (RFD) in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has been suggested in men compared with women, and imbalances in estrogen/androgen levels have been associated with cardiovascular disease mortality in elderly men, but it remains unclear whether sex hormone disequilibrium is related to diabetic nephropathy (DN) in men with T2DM. Objective This study examined the relationship between sex steroid concentrations and renal outcomes in male T2DM patients. Population and methods Total testosterone (T), total estradiol (E2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and total and calculated free (cf) E2/T ratios were compared in 735 male T2DM patients with (n =513) and without (n =222) DN, using a cross-sectional approach. Also, in a pilot complementary prospective nested case-control cohort, total E2/total T and cfE2/cfT were evaluated according to a hard renal outcome (HRO): end-stage renal disease/doubling of baseline serum creatinine (36 HRO cases, 72 HRO controls) and rate of eGFR decline (68 rapid vs 68 slow RFD). Result With the cross-sectional approach, E2 and cfE2 were higher in DN cases vs DN controls (95.5 vs 86.8pmol/L [P =0.0246] and 2.59 vs 2.36pmol/L [P =0.005], respectively). The difference in E2 persisted on multivariate analysis. In the prospective approach, E2 and T concentrations, and total E2/total T and cfE2/cfT2 ratios did not differ in HRO cases vs controls or in patients with rapid vs slow RFD. Conclusion Although positively related to DN in the cross-sectional analysis, progression of renal disease in male patients with T2DM was not related to either sex hormone levels or aromatase index as reflected by E2/T ratio.


      PubDate: 2016-06-28T06:28:16Z
       
  • Serum leptin level is associated with glycaemic control in newly diagnosed
           type 2 diabetes patients: A 1-year cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): L. Zhou, X. Cai, Y. Zhu, W. Liu, S. Gong, S. Zhang, Y. Ma, B. Zhang, Y. Liu, M. Li, X. Zhou, Y. Luo, L. Gao, X. Zhang, J. Chen, J. Wu, L. Chen, R. Zhang, Q. Ren, F. Zhang, W. Yang, X. Han, L. Ji



      PubDate: 2016-06-28T06:28:16Z
       
  • Relationship between achieved personalized glycaemic targets and
           monitoring of clinical events in elderly diabetic patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): S. Bucher, H. Panjo, A. Al-Salameh, B. Bauduceau, L. Benattar-Zibi, P. Bertin, G. Berrut, E. Corruble, N. Danchin, G. Derumeaux, J. Doucet, B. Falissard, F. Forette, O. Hanon, R. Ourabah, F. Pasquier, C. Piedvache, M. Pinget, L. Becquemont, V. Ringa
      Aim Recent guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the elderly recommend adjusting the therapeutic target (HbA1c) according to the patient's health. Our study aimed to explore the association between achieving the recommended personalized HbA1c target and the occurrence of major clinical events under real-life conditions. Methods The T2DM S.AGES cohort was a prospective multicentre study into which 213 general practitioners recruited 983 non-institutionalized T2DM patients aged>65 years. The recommended personalized HbA1c targets were<7%, <8% and <9% for healthy, ill and very ill patients, respectively. Major clinical events (death from any cause, major vascular events and/or hospitalization) were recorded during the 3-year follow-up. Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used for the analyses. Results Of the 747 patients analyzed at baseline, 551 (76.8%) were at their recommended personalized HbA1c target. During follow-up, 391 patients (52.3%) experienced a major clinical event. Of the patients who did not achieve their personalized HbA1c target (compared with those who did), the risk (OR) of a major clinical event was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.69–1.31; P =0.76). The risk of death, major vascular event and hospitalization were 0.88 (95% CI: 0.40–1.94; P =0.75), 1.14 (95% CI: 0.7–1.83; P =0.59) and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.60–1.18; P =0.32), respectively. Conclusion Over a 3-year follow-up period, our results showed no difference in risk of a major clinical event among patients, regardless of whether or not they achieved their personalized recommended HbA1c target. These results need to be confirmed before implementing a more permissive strategy for treating T2DM in elderly patients.


      PubDate: 2016-06-18T18:37:05Z
       
  • Low-dose erythropoietin promotes wound-healing of ulcers in diabetics:
           Evidence from a phase-IIa clinical study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): C. Chatzikyrkou, F.H. Bahlmann, N. Sushakova, F.G. Scurt, J. Menne, P. Nawroth, P.R. Mertens, H. Haller



      PubDate: 2016-06-18T18:37:05Z
       
  • Adverse effects of weight loss: Are persistent organic pollutants a
           potential culprit'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): M. Cheikh Rouhou, A.D. Karelis, D.H. St-Pierre, L. Lamontagne
      Health professionals commonly recommend weight loss to individuals with obesity. However, unexpected adverse health effects after a weight-loss program have been reported in several studies. The factors that could explain this phenomenon are currently poorly understood. However, one potential factor that has emerged is persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Due to their lipophilic nature, POPs are known to accumulate in the adipose tissue and their concentrations are found to be higher in obese individuals than lean subjects. There is evidence to suggest that weight loss induces a significant increase in POPs levels in the bloodstream. Furthermore, the increases in plasma POPs levels after weight loss are even greater with an intensive weight loss. Thus, a critical question that remains unresolved is whether POPs released from the adipose tissue to the bloodstream during intensive weight loss could increase the risk of cardiometabolic disturbances. In turn, the accumulation of POPs released in response to an intensive weight loss may impair energy metabolism and stimulate a subsequent weight regain. Thus, the purpose of this review is to provide insights about the role of POPs on cardiometabolic risk factors during weight loss and weight regain that could potentially explain, at least in part, the adverse effects observed in certain weight-loss studies. We will also discuss the potential synergistic or antagonistic POPs-dependent risks following weight-loss programs. Ultimately, this may lead in establishing new therapeutic boundaries to minimize potential health hazards related to weight loss.


      PubDate: 2016-06-18T18:37:05Z
       
  • Functional gastrointestinal disorders and incidence of type 2 diabetes:
           Evidence from the E3N–EPIC cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): G. Fagherazzi, G. Gusto, B. Balkau, M.-C. Boutron-Ruault, F. Clavel-Chapelon, F. Bonnet
      Objective Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) such as diarrhoea and constipation can reflect intestinal dysfunction, especially with regard to intestinal microbiota, which, in turn, have been associated with chronic conditions, including obesity and insulin resistance. However, little is known of the association between FGID and type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Design and methods This analysis aimed to determine the influence of diarrhoea, constipation and alternating bouts of diarrhoea/constipation on T2D risk in 62,683 women from the prospective E3N–EPIC cohort. Results A total of 1795 T2D cases were recorded during follow-up. Compared with women who had normal gastrointestinal transits, women with chronic diarrhoea or alternating diarrhoea/constipation were at increased risk of T2D (HR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.00–1.65 vs. HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.15–1.52, respectively), whereas women with constipation had a decreased risk (HR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.57–0.78). There was no interaction between FGID and body mass index for risk of T2D. Also, these associations were independent of dietary habits such as coffee, fruit and vegetable consumption, and even of the use of laxatives and psychotropic drugs. Conclusion The present analysis showed, for the first time, a limited association between FGID and T2D risk in a large prospective cohort, and supports the hypothesis of a relationship between gastrointestinal function and diabetes. The presence of gastrointestinal transit disorders may assist in screening for subjects at higher risk of diabetes beyond the conventional risk factors.


      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Family history of diabetes and the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): G.-M. Park, Y.-R. Cho, S.-W. Lee, S.-C. Yun, E.H. Gil, D.W. Kim, T.-S. Kim, C.J. Kim, J.S. Cho, M.-W. Park, S.H. Her, Y.-H. Kim, D.H. Yang, J.-W. Kang, T.-H. Lim, C.H. Jung, E.H. Koh, W.J. Lee, M.-S. Kim, K.-U. Lee, H.-K. Kim, J. Choe, J.-Y. Park
      Aim This study investigated the influence of a family history of diabetes on the risk of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis according to coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in asymptomatic individuals. Methods A total of 6434 consecutive asymptomatic individuals with no prior history of coronary artery disease voluntarily underwent CCTA evaluation as part of a general health examination. Coronary atherosclerotic plaque and significant coronary artery stenosis (degree of stenosis ≥50%) on CCTA were assessed. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between a family history of diabetes and atherosclerotic plaque or significant coronary artery stenosis according to the degree of diabetes (normal, prediabetic and diabetic). Results Mean age of study participants was 53.7±7.6 years, and 4694 (73.0%) were male. A total of 1593 (24.8%) participants had a family history of diabetes in a first-degree relative. Among the study participants, 1115 (17.3%), 3122 (48.5%) and 2197 (34.1%) were categorized as diabetic, prediabetic and normal, respectively. In diabetic participants, after stepwise adjustments for clinical and laboratory variables, a family history of diabetes was significantly associated with non-calcified plaque (P <0.05 for all), but did not appear to be associated with either calcified or mixed plaques or with significant coronary artery stenosis (P >0.05 for all). In prediabetic and normal participants, a family history of diabetes was not associated with either atherosclerotic plaque or significant coronary artery stenosis (P >0.05 for all). Conclusion In asymptomatic diabetic individuals, a family history of diabetes is consistently associated with non-calcified coronary plaque after adjusting for risk factors.


      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Parathyroid hormone is associated with incident diabetes in white, but not
           black adults: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): J.P. Reis, E. Selvin, J.S. Pankow, E.D. Michos, C.M. Rebholz, P.L. Lutsey
      Objective Accumulating evidence has linked elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) with insulin resistance, beta cell dysfunction and dysglycaemia, however, its role in the development of diabetes is largely unclear, particularly among non-whites. We sought to examine the association of PTH with the incidence of diabetes. Methods We studied 8066 white and 2034 black adults aged 46–70 years at baseline (1990–92) from the ARIC Study with follow-up for incident diabetes ascertained during study visits conducted in 1993–95 and 1996–98. Hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% CIs for diabetes adjusted for demographics, lifestyle, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were estimated according to PTH measured at baseline. Results PTH was higher among blacks than whites (median [IQR], 43.8 [35.0–55.8] vs. 37.9 [30.4–47.3] pg/mL; P <0.001). During a median follow-up of 6 years, 498 white and 167 black participants developed diabetes. The association of PTH with diabetes varied significantly by race (P-interaction 0.02). PTH was not associated with risk for diabetes among black adults. Among whites, HRs according to quintiles of PTH were 1 (referent), 0.95 (0.71, 1.29), 0.95 (0.70, 1.28), 1.12 (0.84, 1.51), and 1.31 (0.98, 1.76) (P-trend 0.03). When a clinical cut-point for PTH was applied (≥65pg/mL; 5.7% of whites), the HR for diabetes among whites was 1.38 (1.01, 1.88). Results were similar when restricted to participants with normal baseline kidney function. Conclusion In this large, population-based study, elevated PTH was independently associated with risk for diabetes among white, but not black adults. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms that may underlie this differential association of PTH with diabetes across race groups.


      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Editorial board
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Resting beta-cells – A functional reserve'
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): M. Hara, J.L. Fowler, G.I. Bell, L.H. Philipson
      Pancreatic beta-cells play a pivotal role to synthesize and secrete insulin, as the solo source of the body. Physical as well as functional loss of beta-cells over a certain threshold result in diabetes. While the mechanisms underlying beta-cell loss in various types of diabetes have been extensively studied, less is known about residual beta-cells, found even in autoimmune type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes with a substantial amount. Why have these beta-cells been spared' Some patients with neonatal diabetes have demonstrated the life-changing restoration of functional beta-cells that were inactive for decades but awakened in several weeks following specific treatment. The recent striking outcomes of bariatric surgery in many obese diabetic patients indicate that their beta-cells are likely “preserved” rather than irreversibly lost even in the multifactorial polygenic state that is type 2 diabetes. Collectively, the preservation of residual beta-cells in various diabetic conditions challenges us regarding our understanding of beta-cell death and survival, where their sustenance may stem from the existence of resting beta-cells under physiological conditions. We posit that beta-cells rest and that studies of this normal feature of beta-cells could lead to new approaches for potentially reactivating and preserving beta-cell mass in order to treat diabetes.


      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Autoimmune diabetes superimposed on type 2 diabetes in a patient initiated
           on immunotherapy for lung cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): M. Alhusseini, J. Samantray



      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Skin and subcutaneous tissue thickness at insulin injection sites in
           Chinese diabetes patients: Clinical implications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): W. Wang, X. Guo, G. Shen, G. Bai, Z. Wei, J. Liu, L. Hirsch, K. Strauss



      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • T-cadherin gene variants are associated with type 2 diabetes and the Fatty
           Liver Index in the French population
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): A. Nicolas, R. Aubert, N. Bellili-Muñoz, B. Balkau, F. Bonnet, J. Tichet, G. Velho, M. Marre, R. Roussel, F. Fumeron
      Aim Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted protein associated with insulin sensitivity. T-cadherin is a receptor for high and medium molecular weight adiponectin. In GWAS, T-cadherin gene (CDH13) polymorphisms are associated with circulating adiponectin levels. This study investigated the associations between genetic variants of CDH13 and type 2 diabetes (T2D), and its related parameters, in a Caucasian population. Methods Two polymorphisms of CDH13 (rs11646213 and rs3865188) were genotyped in two French cohorts, a general population from the D.E.S.I.R. study (n =5212) and people with T2D in the DIABHYCAR study (n =3123). Baseline adiponectin levels were measured in D.E.S.I.R. participants who were normoglycaemic at baseline, but hyperglycaemic after 3 years (n =230), and in controls who remained normoglycaemic (n =226) throughout. Results In a cross-sectional analysis, CDH13 genotype distributions differed between those with and without T2D, with T2D odds ratios (OR) of 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04–1.18; P =0.001) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.87–0.98; P =0.01) for rs11646213 and rs3865188, respectively. The rs11646213 variant, associated with a higher OR for T2D, was also associated with higher BMI (P =0.03) and HbA1c (P =0.006), and lower plasma adiponectin levels (P =0.03) in the D.E.S.I.R. participants. Conversely, the rs3865188 variant, associated with a lower OR for T2D, was also associated with lower BMI (P =0.03), HbA1c (P =0.02) and Fatty Liver Index (FLI; P ≤0.01), and higher plasma adiponectin levels (P =0.002). Associations with HbA1c, FLI and adiponectin levels persisted after adjusting for BMI. Conclusion CDH13 polymorphisms are associated with prevalent T2D in this French population study. The association may be mediated through effects on BMI and/or plasma adiponectin.


      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Reappraisal of the diuretic effect of empagliflozin in the EMPA-REG
           OUTCOME trial: Comparison with classic diuretics
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): A.J. Scheen
      Aims Empagliflozin, a sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, has been associated with a remarkable reduction in cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and antecedents of cardiovascular disease. This effect was attributed to a diuretic (haemodynamic) rather than metabolic (antiatherogenic) effect. The aim of this review is to offer arguments that either support or challenge this ‘diuretic hypothesis’. Methods The literature was scrutinized to: (1) examine the diuretic effects of SGLT2 inhibitors vs. hydrochlorothiazide as the reference diuretic; (2) analyze the effects of classic diuretics on cardiovascular outcomes and mortality in diabetic patients; and (3) reconsider some of the specific analyses of the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial possibly related to a diuretic effect. Results The diuretic effect of empagliflozin has so far been poorly investigated, although SGLT2 inhibitors have actions distinct from those of classic diuretics. The effects of thiazide-like diuretics on cardiovascular and overall mortality have been limited in diabetic patients with hypertension, whereas the effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in subgroups of diabetic patients with heart failure were more impressive, but still largely inferior to those reported in EMPA-REG, where relative reductions in mortality with empagliflozin were observed in diabetic patients with or without heart failure, arterial hypertension, renal impairment or diuretic background therapy. Conclusion Although the diuretic hypothesis was put forward to explain the remarkable reduction in mortality with empagliflozin in EMPA-REG, the available results do not support a major contribution of this mechanism, unless the specific diuretic effect of SGLT2 inhibitors turns out to be markedly different from those of classic diuretics.


      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • History of diabetes and risk of suicide and accidental death in Japan: The
           Japan Public Health Centre-based Prospective Study, 1990–2012
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): T. Yamauchi, M. Inagaki, N. Yonemoto, M. Iwasaki, T. Akechi, N. Sawada, H. Iso, M. Noda, S. Tsugane
      Aim This study looked at whether a history of diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a higher risk of externally caused death (by suicide and accident), using data for a large population-based prospective cohort from an Asian population. Methods Data collected between 1990 and 2012 from the Japan Public Health Centre-based Prospective Study were analyzed, and Poisson regression models were used to calculate adjusted risk ratios (RR) for external causes of death. Results The population-based cohort comprised 105,408 Japanese residents (49,484 men and 55,924 women; mean age: 51.2 [SD 7.9] years). At baseline, 3250 (6.6%) men and 1648 (3.0%) women had a history of DM. During the follow-up period, 113 external deaths (41 suicides and 72 accidents) were noted among those with a history of DM, with 1304 external deaths (577 suicides and 727 accidents) among those without such a history. A higher risk of external death (men, RR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.2–1.8; women, RR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.01–2.4) was observed in those with a history of DM. Also, among those aged 40–49 years (RR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3–2.7) and 50–59 years (RR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.05–1.9) at baseline, the risk of external death was significantly higher in those with a history of DM. Conclusion Compared with people with no history of DM, those with such a history had a significantly greater risk of externally caused death (particularly accidental deaths) in both genders and in those aged≤59 years at baseline.


      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • A pilot study of gestational diabetes mellitus not controlled by diet
           alone: First-line medical treatment with myoinositol may limit the need
           for insulin
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): V. Lubin, R. Shojai, P. Darmon, E. Cosson
      Aim This study assessed whether myoinositol might be a first-line medical treatment for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods For 12 months, women with GDM not controlled by diet (n =32) were prospectively treated with myoinositol 1200mg and folic acid 400μg/day, while consecutive women (n =28) with insulin-requiring GDM treated during the previous year at our centre constituted the control group. Baseline characteristics and care were similar in both groups. Results Insulin was required in eight women (25%) in the myoinositol group who, compared with the 24 who did not need insulin, were older (37±5 vs. 32±5 years, respectively; P =0.018) and had a larger percentage of high self-monitored glucose values (45±8% vs. 32±14%; P <0.0001) during the week prior to the introduction of myoinositol treatment. All of the women had similar pregnancy outcomes regardless of their GDM management, although less labour induction was required in the myoinositol group (OR: 0.22 [0.07–0.65]), which had no side effects. Conclusion This pilot study suggests that myoinositol may be a safe first-line medical treatment for uncontrolled GDM.


      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Effects of ethinylestradiol–cyproterone acetate vs.
           pioglitazone–flutamide–metformin on plasma FGF21 levels in adolescent
           girls with androgen excess
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): M. Díaz, J.M. Gallego-Escuredo, F. de Zegher, F. Villarroya, L. Ibáñez



      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Carotid extra-medial thickness does not predict adverse cardiovascular
           outcomes in high-risk adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): T.Y. Cai, C. Magnussen, B. Haluska, D.W. Johnson, P.M. Mottram, N. Isbel, D.S. Celermajer, T.H. Marwick, M.R. Skilton



      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Metabolic features associated with positivity to ZnT8 autoantibody in
           sub-Saharan African young-onset diabetes patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): A. Mbanya, A. Ngandeu, V. Kamwa, O.T. Donfack, É. Lontchi, R. Leke, J.-C. Mbanya, E. Sobngwi



      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • Difficulties describing feelings to others still predicts glycaemic
           control up to 24 months later in children with type 1 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): M. Housiaux, O. Luminet, H. Dorchy



      PubDate: 2016-06-14T08:02:58Z
       
  • A common rs7903146 variant of the transcription factor 7-like 2 gene is
           associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and fasting glucose in a
           Taiwanese population
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): T.-J. Hsiao, E. Lin



      PubDate: 2016-06-08T07:52:27Z
       
  • Elevated parathyroid hormone predicts high asymmetric dimethylarginine
           (ADMA) concentrations in obese diabetic patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): A.T. Amarasekera, A.L. Sverdlov, J.D. Horowitz, D.T. Ngo



      PubDate: 2016-06-08T07:52:27Z
       
  • Visceral adipose tissue dysfunction and mortality among a population-based
           sample of males and females
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): J.C. Brown, M.O. Harhay, M.N. Harhay



      PubDate: 2016-06-08T07:52:27Z
       
  • Family history of diabetes predisposes to cardiovascular disease among
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): F. Bonnet, B. Balkau, A. Natali



      PubDate: 2016-06-03T07:48:54Z
       
  • Relationship between HHV8 infection markers and insulin sensitivity in
           ketosis-prone diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): J.-L. Nguewa, E. Lontchi-Yimagou, F. Agbelika, M. AitDjoudi, P. Boudou, S. Choukem, E. Sobngwi, J.-F. Gautier
      Background and objectives Peripheral tissue resistance to insulin action is a characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It has also been reported that some chronic viral infections can contribute to insulin resistance. Human herpesvirus (HHV)-8 infection has been detected in T2DM patients in previous studies. Our study investigated whether the presence of the virus is associated with insulin resistance in patients with ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (KPD), as reported with other viruses. Research design and methods A total of 11 insulin-free KPD patients positive (+) and seven patients who were negative (−) for HHV-8 infection were recruited; the latter had KPD that was well controlled (HbA1c =6.2±0.7%). A two-step euglycaemic–hyperinsulinaemic clamp test coupled with deuterated [6,6-2H2]glucose was used to assess insulin sensitivity, non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) suppression and endogenous glucose production. Results In KPD patients, whether HHV-8+ or HHV-8−, there were no differences in NEFA release, endogenous glucose production or insulin sensitivity (M value). Conclusion Asymptomatic HHV-8 infection does not appear to be associated with decreased insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients. These results should now be confirmed in a larger sample population.


      PubDate: 2016-06-03T07:48:54Z
       
  • The vitamin D metabolites 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D are not related to either
           glucose metabolism or insulin action in obese women
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 June 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): K.W. ter Horst, R.I. Versteeg, P.W. Gilijamse, M.T. Ackermans, A.C. Heijboer, J.A. Romijn, S.E. la Fleur, R. Trinko, R.J. DiLeone, M.J. Serlie
      Aim Vitamin D deficiency has been proposed to be involved in obesity-induced metabolic disease. However, data on the relationship between 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D) and insulin resistance have been inconsistent, and few studies have investigated the active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D). This study aimed to determine the relationship between circulating levels of both 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D and direct measures of glucose metabolism and insulin action in obese women. Methods Serum levels of 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D, and glucose metabolism and tissue-specific insulin action, as assessed in the basal state and during a two-step euglycaemic–hyperinsulinaemic clamp study with [6,6-2H2]glucose infusion, were measured in 37 morbidly obese women (age: 43±10 years; body mass index: 44±6kg/m2). Results Sixteen subjects had circulating 25(OH)D levels<50nmol/L, consistent with vitamin D deficiency, and 21 had normal 25(OH)D levels. There were no differences in either baseline characteristics or parameters of glucose metabolism and insulin action between the groups. Serum 25(OH)D, but not 1,25(OH)2D, was negatively correlated with both body mass index (r =−0.42, P =0.01) and total body fat (r =−0.46, P <0.01). Neither 25(OH)D nor 1,25(OH)2D levels were related to any measured metabolic parameters, including fasting glucose, fasting insulin, basal endogenous glucose production, and hepatic, adipose-tissue and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Obesity was associated with lower levels of circulating 25(OH)D, but not with the hormonally active metabolite 1,25(OH)2D. Neither 25(OH)D nor 1,25(OH)2D were related to glucose metabolism and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity in obese women, suggesting that vitamin D does not play a major role in obesity-related insulin resistance.


      PubDate: 2016-06-03T07:48:54Z
       
  • The autoimmune hypothesis for acute bilateral cataract in type 1
           diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): D.T. Papadimitriou, C. Bothou, F. Skarmoutsos, T.K. Alexandrides, V. Papaevangelou, A. Papadimitriou



      PubDate: 2016-05-19T05:28:26Z
       
  • Impaired RBC deformability is associated with diabetic retinopathy in
           patients with type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): J.S. Moon, J.H. Kim, J.H. Kim, I.R. Park, J.H. Lee, H.J. Kim, J. Lee, Y.K. Kim, J.S. Yoon, K.C. Won, H.W. Lee
      Aim Red blood cell (RBC) deformability, the ability of RBCs to change shape under stress, is known to be decreased in type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, as yet little is known of the association between RBC deformability and diabetic complications in T2D. For this reason, this study has investigated the association between RBC deformability and diabetic complications. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 452 T2D patients were initially enrolled. RBC deformability was measured using a microfluidic ektacytometer and expressed as an elongation index at 3Pa (EI@3Pa, %). Results A final total of 373 patients (mean age: 60.04±11.93 years; males: 201) were included in the study. When categorized into quartiles of RBC deformability, the lower EI@3Pa groups had higher glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), triglycerides and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy compared with the higher quartiles (P <0.05 for trend). In particular, the EI@3Pa was significantly lower in patients with retinopathy than in those without retinopathy (30.53±1.95 vs 31.20±1.53, P =0.001). Between the lowest EI@3Pa quartile (Q1) to the highest (Q4, reference), the odds ratio (OR) for Q1 was 2.81 (95% CI: 1.21–6.49, P =0.004 for trend), after adjusting for age, gender, presence of hypertension and smoking, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, glomerular filtration rate and triglycerides. Conclusion In terms of diabetic complications, the lowest EI@3Pa group was closely associated with only the risk of diabetic retinopathy in our study. These results suggest that RBC deformability might be contributory to the development of the microvascular complication.


      PubDate: 2016-05-19T05:28:26Z
       
  • Effects of probiotic supplementation on glycaemic control and lipid
           profiles in gestational diabetes: A randomized, double-blind,
           placebo-controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): M. Karamali, F. Dadkhah, M. Sadrkhanlou, M. Jamilian, S. Ahmadi, M. Tajabadi-Ebrahimi, P. Jafari, Z. Asemi
      Background To our knowledge, data on the effects of probiotic supplementation on glycaemic control and lipid concentrations in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are scarce. Aim The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of probiotic supplementation on glycaemic control and lipid profiles in GDM patients. Methods Sixty pregnant women with GDM, primigravida and aged 18–40years, were divided into two groups to receive either probiotic capsules (n =30) or a matching placebo (n =30) in this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The patients in the probiotic group took a daily capsule that contained three viable freeze-dried strains: Lactobacillus acidophilus (2×109 CFU/g), L. casei (2×109 CFU/g) and Bifidobacterium bifidum (2×109 CFU/g) for 6weeks. The placebo group took capsules filled with cellulose for the same time period. Fasting blood samples were taken at the beginning and end of the study to quantify the relevant markers. Results After 6weeks of intervention, probiotic supplementation vs a placebo resulted in significant decreases in fasting plasma glucose (−9.2±9.2mg/dL vs +1.1±12.2mg/dL, P <0.001), serum insulin levels (−0.8±3.1μIU/mL vs +4.5±10.6μIU/mL, P =0.01), homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA) for insulin resistance (−0.4±0.9 vs +1.1±2.5, P =0.003) and HOMA for β-cell function (+1.1±9.8 vs +18.0±42.5, P =0.03), and a significant increase in the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.007±0.01 vs −0.01±0.02, P =0.007). In addition, significant decreases in serum triglycerides (−1.6±59.4mg/dL vs +27.1±37.9mg/dL, P =0.03) and VLDL cholesterol concentrations (−0.3±11.9mg/dL vs +5.4±7.6mg/dL, P =0.03) were seen following supplementation with the probiotics compared with the placebo. However, no significant changes in other lipid profiles were seen with the intervention. Conclusion Overall, the results of our study have demonstrated that taking probiotic supplements for 6weeks in patients with GDM had beneficial effects on glycaemic control, triglycerides and VLDL cholesterol concentrations, although there was no effect on other lipid profiles.


      PubDate: 2016-05-19T05:28:26Z
       
  • Tailoring nutrient sequence and content to improve glucose tolerance: Why
           and how to do it
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 May 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): L. Monnier, F. Bonnet, C. Colette



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T04:05:31Z
       
  • Risk of type 2 diabetes in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver
           disease: Causal association or epiphenomenon'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 April 2016
      Source:Diabetes & Metabolism
      Author(s): G. Targher, G. Marchesini, C.D. Byrne
      Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, causing considerable liver-related mortality and morbidity. Over the last 10years, it has also become increasingly evident that NAFLD is a multisystem disease, affecting many extra-hepatic organ systems and interacting with the regulation of multiple metabolic pathways. NAFLD is potentially involved in the aetiology and pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes via its direct contribution to hepatic/peripheral insulin resistance and the systemic release of multiple hepatokines that may adversely affect glucose metabolism and insulin action. In this updated review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of clinical and epidemiological evidence that supports a strong link between NAFLD and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We also briefly examine the conventional and the more innovative pharmacological approaches for the treatment of NAFLD that may influence the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.


      PubDate: 2016-05-05T00:06:42Z
       
 
 
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